Hot Best Seller

Enter Night: A Biography of Metallica

Availability: Ready to download

Their roots lie in the heavy rock of 70s groups like Deep Purple. The music they played--heavy metal mixed with punk attitude--became its own genre: thrash. Their bassist died and they survived to became the biggest-selling band in the world. As grunge threatened to overtake them, they reinvented themselves. Then their singer went into rehab and they almost fell apart. The Their roots lie in the heavy rock of 70s groups like Deep Purple. The music they played--heavy metal mixed with punk attitude--became its own genre: thrash. Their bassist died and they survived to became the biggest-selling band in the world. As grunge threatened to overtake them, they reinvented themselves. Then their singer went into rehab and they almost fell apart. They are Metallica, the most influential heavy metal band of the last thirty years. As Led Zeppelin was for hard rock and the Sex Pistols were for punk, Metallica became the band that defined the look and sound of 1980s heavy metal. Inventors of thrash metal--Slayer, Anthrax and Megadeth followed--it was always Metallica who led the way, who pushed to another level, who became the last of the superstar rockers. Metallica is the fifth-largest selling artist of all time, with 100 million records sold worldwide. Their music has extended its reach beyond rock and metal, and into the pop mainstream, as they went from speed metal to MTV with their hit single "Enter Sandman." Until now there hasn't been a critical, authoritative, in-depth portrait of the band. Mick Wall's thoroughly researched, insightful work is enriched by his interviews with band members, record company execs, roadies, and fellow musicians. He tells the story of how a tennis-playing, music-loving Danish immigrant named Lars Ulrich created a band with singer James Hetfield and made his dreams a reality. "Enter Night" follows the band through tragedy and triumph, from the bus crash that killed their bassist Cliff Burton in 1986 to the 2004 documentary "Some Kind of Monster," and on to their current status as the leaders of the Big Four festival that played to a million fans in Britain and Europe and continues in the U.S. in 2011. "Enter Night" delves into the various incarnations of the band, and the personalities of all key members, past and present--especially Ulrich and Hetfield--to produce the definitive word on the biggest metal band on the planet.


Compare

Their roots lie in the heavy rock of 70s groups like Deep Purple. The music they played--heavy metal mixed with punk attitude--became its own genre: thrash. Their bassist died and they survived to became the biggest-selling band in the world. As grunge threatened to overtake them, they reinvented themselves. Then their singer went into rehab and they almost fell apart. The Their roots lie in the heavy rock of 70s groups like Deep Purple. The music they played--heavy metal mixed with punk attitude--became its own genre: thrash. Their bassist died and they survived to became the biggest-selling band in the world. As grunge threatened to overtake them, they reinvented themselves. Then their singer went into rehab and they almost fell apart. They are Metallica, the most influential heavy metal band of the last thirty years. As Led Zeppelin was for hard rock and the Sex Pistols were for punk, Metallica became the band that defined the look and sound of 1980s heavy metal. Inventors of thrash metal--Slayer, Anthrax and Megadeth followed--it was always Metallica who led the way, who pushed to another level, who became the last of the superstar rockers. Metallica is the fifth-largest selling artist of all time, with 100 million records sold worldwide. Their music has extended its reach beyond rock and metal, and into the pop mainstream, as they went from speed metal to MTV with their hit single "Enter Sandman." Until now there hasn't been a critical, authoritative, in-depth portrait of the band. Mick Wall's thoroughly researched, insightful work is enriched by his interviews with band members, record company execs, roadies, and fellow musicians. He tells the story of how a tennis-playing, music-loving Danish immigrant named Lars Ulrich created a band with singer James Hetfield and made his dreams a reality. "Enter Night" follows the band through tragedy and triumph, from the bus crash that killed their bassist Cliff Burton in 1986 to the 2004 documentary "Some Kind of Monster," and on to their current status as the leaders of the Big Four festival that played to a million fans in Britain and Europe and continues in the U.S. in 2011. "Enter Night" delves into the various incarnations of the band, and the personalities of all key members, past and present--especially Ulrich and Hetfield--to produce the definitive word on the biggest metal band on the planet.

30 review for Enter Night: A Biography of Metallica

  1. 5 out of 5

    Brandon

    “No party music, no girl magnet ballads. Just brutal, attack-oriented, audio death”. ..and with that quote, it becomes impossible to really sum up Metallica better. I’ve been a big fan of these guys since I was 15 years old and finally welcomed the chance to read an official biography on the band. Although, while it’s true I did have preconceived notions that I knew as much about the band as I was ever going to learn, that quickly went out the window in the first few chapters. As it turns out, I h “No party music, no girl magnet ballads. Just brutal, attack-oriented, audio death”. ..and with that quote, it becomes impossible to really sum up Metallica better. I’ve been a big fan of these guys since I was 15 years old and finally welcomed the chance to read an official biography on the band. Although, while it’s true I did have preconceived notions that I knew as much about the band as I was ever going to learn, that quickly went out the window in the first few chapters. As it turns out, I had known next to nothing. I especially didn’t realize that even as late as 1986 and following the release of their critically acclaimed album, Master of Puppets, the guys were still looking for a lead singer. It was revealed that Mr. Hetfield wasn’t all that comfortable being the front man and the face of the band. This totally blew my mind! James has since grown into a force of nature on stage and I can’t imagine anyone else bringing that kind of a presence to a live show. The stories of the band’s origin were interesting. Everything from the selection of the name, to the troubles with future Megadeth front man Dave Mustaine to the lasting effect their original bassist Cliff Burton had on the group. In-fighting, stories of alcohol and drug-fueled debauchery as well as the madness that the band’s second bassist, Jason Newsted, had been subjected to were surprising and endlessly ridiculous. While I did like this biography, it did take me quite a while to finish it. At times, it felt pretty anti-climatic especially since I had just watched “Some Kind of Monster” (the 2003 documentary chronicling the band) a few weeks prior. If this book assured me of anything, it’s that Dave Mustaine is a bitter jerk. Cross Posted @ Every Read Thing

  2. 5 out of 5

    britt_brooke

    Metallica was formed the year I was born (1981) so I couldn’t recall their New Wave British Metal influence or anything about the birth of Thrash in the US. I later became a fan by default since my older brother obsessively blared them from his bedroom. He and I saw them live recently and, in a burst of nostalgia, I picked up this biography. Central to their story is bassist Cliff Burton’s wholly devastating death in 1986; something they never really recovered from even with their massive succes Metallica was formed the year I was born (1981) so I couldn’t recall their New Wave British Metal influence or anything about the birth of Thrash in the US. I later became a fan by default since my older brother obsessively blared them from his bedroom. He and I saw them live recently and, in a burst of nostalgia, I picked up this biography. Central to their story is bassist Cliff Burton’s wholly devastating death in 1986; something they never really recovered from even with their massive success. Mick Wall gets bogged down in the minutiae, but it’s a fascinating history. And they put on one hell of a show now in their late 50s!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Natalie

    I learned a lot about the history of Metallica but the author could have cut this book by a third. It was very wordy, particularly in the first section, and didn't have as much information from the band as I would have liked. The author is a music writer by trade so he goes into extreme detail about the background "inspirations" for each band member as well as every friend he introduced in the book. He repeats band names hundreds of times. (I get it. They were inspired by Diamond Head.) That bein I learned a lot about the history of Metallica but the author could have cut this book by a third. It was very wordy, particularly in the first section, and didn't have as much information from the band as I would have liked. The author is a music writer by trade so he goes into extreme detail about the background "inspirations" for each band member as well as every friend he introduced in the book. He repeats band names hundreds of times. (I get it. They were inspired by Diamond Head.) That being said, I love Metallica. Their story is one of flawed people finding success with each other. I look forward to reading more on the subject.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Poppy

    For a band that has just celebrated their 30th anniversary, the book seems to skip over a lot that has happened since 1986. Almost half of the book covers these first five years, and the rest of the book seems rushed to cram in the subsequent albums. The worst point to me was the amount of personal opinion was included. I got the impression that Mick Wall is on of those "fans" that only likes the first three albums, hence why he focuses so much on writing about those and then criticising the res For a band that has just celebrated their 30th anniversary, the book seems to skip over a lot that has happened since 1986. Almost half of the book covers these first five years, and the rest of the book seems rushed to cram in the subsequent albums. The worst point to me was the amount of personal opinion was included. I got the impression that Mick Wall is on of those "fans" that only likes the first three albums, hence why he focuses so much on writing about those and then criticising the rest of their releases. Personally this is an attitude I find hypocritical since it is suggested he sees them as "sellouts" yet is quite happy to use their name and success to make himself money. Overall, I bought this book as a fan, not someone who only listens to pre-1986 Metallica, and therefore did not find his personal and sometimes quite harsh opinions to be great reading material. If I wanted to read people slate Metallica I'd go on blabbermouth, not spend £20 on a biography of them!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

    Had to try this bio of Metallica - I listened to them in high school and they're fascinating. It was, on the whole, interesting and informative, but I couldn't stand the writing. It was awful. Beyond the typo-every-page editing, he was just a whiny narrative voice with something to prove to the world at large. He wanted to prove that he knew the guys well (that didn't seem to be the case), he wanted to prove that he was a hard partier, he wanted to prove that his exact opinion of which songs and Had to try this bio of Metallica - I listened to them in high school and they're fascinating. It was, on the whole, interesting and informative, but I couldn't stand the writing. It was awful. Beyond the typo-every-page editing, he was just a whiny narrative voice with something to prove to the world at large. He wanted to prove that he knew the guys well (that didn't seem to be the case), he wanted to prove that he was a hard partier, he wanted to prove that his exact opinion of which songs and albums were best and worst were gospel. I agreed with that taste 70% of the time, but it's a biography, not "one fan/music writer's view of what's good about a huge international band." Anyhow, it was fun to read and find out how fucked up these guys are, and what they put themselves through, but the writing was a little hard to get through.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy Wagner

    Enter Night is one of the best band biographies I've ever read. It touched upon many important points in Metallica history, answered numerous things I'd only known as rumors or unbelievable, and dug into dirt and a dark side I'd never know about one of my biggest musical influences--things never known to me before because Metallica hid darkness and pain so well...until now. All that said, the book isn't some tabloid dish, but rather, parts the curtains to reveal the naked evolution of an incredib Enter Night is one of the best band biographies I've ever read. It touched upon many important points in Metallica history, answered numerous things I'd only known as rumors or unbelievable, and dug into dirt and a dark side I'd never know about one of my biggest musical influences--things never known to me before because Metallica hid darkness and pain so well...until now. All that said, the book isn't some tabloid dish, but rather, parts the curtains to reveal the naked evolution of an incredible, juggernaut of band, what the band members have endured in all their years, and it has ultimately given me a much greater appreciation for Metallica. F-ing genius of a book!!!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Aurora Dimitre

    I cried like four times reading this, mostly because I just couldn't handle them talking about Master of Puppets (for two of them), so I'm like, a little biased. But on a book-standpoint rather than just a holy-fuck-I-love-Metallica standpoint, I did like how this guy wrote this book. I like how he set it up, how he would weave together the stories, the little italic parts in the beginning. I also liked how he didn't even try to be objective. He wasn't like, outright "I hate this album", but he w I cried like four times reading this, mostly because I just couldn't handle them talking about Master of Puppets (for two of them), so I'm like, a little biased. But on a book-standpoint rather than just a holy-fuck-I-love-Metallica standpoint, I did like how this guy wrote this book. I like how he set it up, how he would weave together the stories, the little italic parts in the beginning. I also liked how he didn't even try to be objective. He wasn't like, outright "I hate this album", but he would explain it in a way that you could tell, yeah, this guy hates Reload, but also he really really likes Kirk Hammett, because almost every time he's talking about an album, he makes it a point for at least one song to say "...and the song was saved by KIRK HAMMETT " and it's like my dude I am a Kirk girl myself, but your mancrush is showing. But no, I really enjoyed this. Made me emotional. Lars's tenacity/entitlement/stubbornness?/whatever you call it never ceases to amaze me.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Michael Hermann

    Very good read, if you are a Metallica fan of any sort, you really should read this book. It gave me insight into the band that I never knew. I joined the Metallica crowd with the "And Justice For All" CD back in the late 80's and have been a huge fan ever since, but this gave me perspective on the early stuff that I didn't get to experience like the Dave Mustaine and the Cliff Burton years in the band. It also gave me a perspective on what happened once the band had to replace Cliff Burton and Very good read, if you are a Metallica fan of any sort, you really should read this book. It gave me insight into the band that I never knew. I joined the Metallica crowd with the "And Justice For All" CD back in the late 80's and have been a huge fan ever since, but this gave me perspective on the early stuff that I didn't get to experience like the Dave Mustaine and the Cliff Burton years in the band. It also gave me a perspective on what happened once the band had to replace Cliff Burton and the struggles of overcoming his loss and the hard times Jason Newsted had trying to replace someone like Cliff. The book tried to pain the St. Anger and Death Magnetic CD's in a somewhat favorable light, but while the author shows you the numbers, he is also quite fair on explaining the fan response to the albums. In my opinion, the book is great because while Mick Wall tries to paint a positive picture of the band as a whole, he does not hide anything either and you get a really good sense of what the band was about in the beginning and the things they went through to get to where they are today. After reading this I will honestly say that I am looking forward to seeing what Metallica does in the next few years to add to their legacy.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Matt R.

    What a great book! Let me say first that I am a huge fan of heavy metal. That being said, Metallica was one of my first favorites as a teenager and they have influenced so many other bands. I followed Metallica over the years as they got bigger and went through a series of changes. What surprised me is how many stories in this book were new to me. The book is written well and chronicles the early years to present. A lot of the focus (which I liked about this book) is on the earlier years. It cov What a great book! Let me say first that I am a huge fan of heavy metal. That being said, Metallica was one of my first favorites as a teenager and they have influenced so many other bands. I followed Metallica over the years as they got bigger and went through a series of changes. What surprised me is how many stories in this book were new to me. The book is written well and chronicles the early years to present. A lot of the focus (which I liked about this book) is on the earlier years. It covers the time when Dave Mustaine was on lead guitar (although I think the author does not like Mustaine very much). The book includes some great stories and captures the band with a "back-stage" mentality. This is a must-read for any fan of heavy metal. My only gripe with the book is how the author describes the Metallica release "And Justice for All". He downplays the album quite a bit with criticism - I happen to think that album is great. As fans, we can't all agree. Without a doubt, I give this book 5 stars!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Tyrone

    I have read a couple of Mick Wall's biographies, and apart from "When Giants Walked The Earth" and his John Peel bio, they were all rather dull. This isn't exactly dull, but Enter Night is more about the wheeling and dealing of record label execs and promotors, than interesting band adventures. Pages and pages of boring, seemingly irrelevant details surrounding individuals who happened to be in Metallica's circle of colleagues or friends is not what I bought this book for. Wall also placed Cliff I have read a couple of Mick Wall's biographies, and apart from "When Giants Walked The Earth" and his John Peel bio, they were all rather dull. This isn't exactly dull, but Enter Night is more about the wheeling and dealing of record label execs and promotors, than interesting band adventures. Pages and pages of boring, seemingly irrelevant details surrounding individuals who happened to be in Metallica's circle of colleagues or friends is not what I bought this book for. Wall also placed Cliff Burton on far too high a pedestal. Sure he was a crucial part of that band's early sound, but his replacement was just as good a player, and Newstead is mostly just glossed over. Enter Sandman is written more like an album review, one with lots of quotes from Metallica's less successful contemporaries or influences. I picked this up because I thought it would be a great exposé on a band that was pivotal in my pre-adolescent music development, but I was disappointed. For die hard fans only.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Eric Leach

    Interesting book. Realized two important facts: Master of Puppets might very well be one of the greatest albums ever recorded and I still listen to those first three albums regularly; I haven't bought or listened to a single new Metallica album since Metallica in 1991, which was also the last time I saw them live. Mick Wall's take seems similar to my own impression: not very much good happening musically after Cliff.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Twerking To Beethoven

    Lars' difficulties on the drums were more problematic. "I thought he was absolutely useless." Flamming says now. "I remember the very first thing I asked when he started playing was: 'does everything start on an upbeat?' and he went 'what's an upbeat?' Holy shit!" AHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA! Mick Wall, me lovez ya bunch!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Timothy

    Such a great biography.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Turgwaith Gondren

    “If you came here to see spandex, eye make-up, and the words ‘Oh baby’ in every fuckin’ song, this ain’t the fuckin’ band!” (p. 201) – favorite young JH quote ever Excellently written, in-depth, detailed, critical, well-structured. This book contains lots of interesting, and for me new, information about the greatest metal band of all time, despite being a fan for almost twenty years by now. Author gives a reader great insight about different characters and personalities involved in this story, a “If you came here to see spandex, eye make-up, and the words ‘Oh baby’ in every fuckin’ song, this ain’t the fuckin’ band!” (p. 201) – favorite young JH quote ever Excellently written, in-depth, detailed, critical, well-structured. This book contains lots of interesting, and for me new, information about the greatest metal band of all time, despite being a fan for almost twenty years by now. Author gives a reader great insight about different characters and personalities involved in this story, about musical scene, trends, background, circumstances and gives lots of good explanations for various decisions band made throughout their ongoing career. I liked a lot author’s analyses of the band’s discography. His review of …And Justice for All totally changed my previous perspective of the album and made me rethink and relisten to it one more time. Also, his take on the Death Magnetic is also to the point and I agree with it one hundred percent. Our point of departure being the Lulu record. I simply can’t say that Lulu is “a masterpiece” or “their best work done in decades”. I simply can’t. First part of the book, dealing with pre-Justice era, is fantastic and will surely be a fan favorite. I agree, the book is lengthy, but all of that had to be said and the author had done it exceptionally well. Probably definitive book about Metallica. “A huge blow to the family, it had a profound effect on the teenage Cliff, reinforcing the idea that life was not to be squandered on trying too hard to make other people happy. Time was short and the day was long. Whatever you had in mind, it was best done today, not tomorrow, which really might not ever come.” (p. 87)

  15. 5 out of 5

    Yoshi Takahashi

    Five stars for a thorough and interesting review of each band member and their respective backgrounds, as well as what was going on with the band and what they (and producers) were trying to achieve with each album and even many individual songs. It proved to be one of those books that I couldn't wait to start reading again to shed light on what would happen in the next few months/years/events for the band. Since reading and finishing the book I've found myself listening more to Metallica and th Five stars for a thorough and interesting review of each band member and their respective backgrounds, as well as what was going on with the band and what they (and producers) were trying to achieve with each album and even many individual songs. It proved to be one of those books that I couldn't wait to start reading again to shed light on what would happen in the next few months/years/events for the band. Since reading and finishing the book I've found myself listening more to Metallica and thinking about what it was going through at the time the song was wrote and what went into writing that particular song. Admittedly I did not like how freely the author would criticize or speak ill of many songs and some albums, some of which I think were some of Metallica's better songs and work overall. These are Mick Wall's personal opinions, and he is certainly entitled to them, but I didn't appreciate nor value his thoughts on them, I read the book to know about the band itself. I would recommend this book to anyone who is a Metallica fan or even just a fan of hard rock music.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Dave Relph

    As a biography this is fantastic, it's very informative and tells the Metallica story well, adding in lots of information about events and other artists and influences at relevant points in the timeline, admittedly often to the point of tedious repetition. This does fall down in other areas though, being pretty poorly written for a start, with disjointed/tangential sections squeezed in to no great effect being a little too common. There's also a great number of typo's and clunky sentence structu As a biography this is fantastic, it's very informative and tells the Metallica story well, adding in lots of information about events and other artists and influences at relevant points in the timeline, admittedly often to the point of tedious repetition. This does fall down in other areas though, being pretty poorly written for a start, with disjointed/tangential sections squeezed in to no great effect being a little too common. There's also a great number of typo's and clunky sentence structures that call into question the competency of the editor. The other main thing I dislike about this though is the questionable angle that the writer is coming from; having dedicated such a great amount of time to following and documenting the band and their career, you'd assume he was a big fan, which I'm sure he is, but his tendency to state praise very matter-of-factly, then leather out harsh criticism like its really from the heart at other points (often unjustly and unfairly) really leaves you wondering.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Luc Forget

    Decent book. Worth the read. Good history about the band but I felt it hurried thru the second half of the book and kinda skipped some stuff I would've liked to know more about. I'd recommend still. Informative read

  18. 5 out of 5

    Joe

    the author spends too much time stating his opinion as fact. Like any art, music is subjective. The italicized beginnings of each chapter did nothing other than try and convince us the author is cool. But other than that, an informative and enjoyable bio of the mighty Met.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ben Baker

    I'm not a Metallica fan, I'm barely interested in anything under the heading of metal. But I do love a good rock biog and this is pleasingly raw and open, unafraid to criticise the band where the author feels its necessary. Almost makes you want to listen to Metallica! Almost.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Emon

    It w as s quite a good read. I started listening to Metallica some 15 years ago and since been enamored with them. Also it was quite good to learn about the feud between Dave Mustaine and Lars and Hetfield from a third party PoV.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Allen Rudd

    The best Metallica bio in existence

  22. 4 out of 5

    Eric Orchard

    A pretty exhaustive and riveting story of the band but also somewhat mean spirited.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Boz Reacher

    When the author can relax for two seconds and actually present some information about the rock band Metallica, the information is generally good.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Laurie

    I tried to give 3-1/2 stars. America's top-selling thrash band and their rise to the top of the metal heap are well documented; more interesting to someone with an interest in music business history than a fan looking for juicy info. Anecdotes are often at arms-length, with most time spent on the compelling early years of the band - the Kerrang! years ; like later Metallica recordings the book peters out in content after the 90s. A good read, if you want a salacious read - get the Ministry book I I tried to give 3-1/2 stars. America's top-selling thrash band and their rise to the top of the metal heap are well documented; more interesting to someone with an interest in music business history than a fan looking for juicy info. Anecdotes are often at arms-length, with most time spent on the compelling early years of the band - the Kerrang! years ; like later Metallica recordings the book peters out in content after the 90s. A good read, if you want a salacious read - get the Ministry book I have recommended - if you are curious about how a thrash band sold millions of records - this is the book for you.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jacob.Malek

    As a musician and avid rock music fan, Enter Night: A Biography of Metallica seemed to be a perfect choice. As a fan of the thrash pioneers, I was excited to read the book put together by Mick Wall, and, though I had mixed feelings about the biography, as a whole I was definitely not disappointed. Wall’s take on the band’s more-than 30 year history was extremely thorough and personal. Enter Night is a two part chronology of the metal band Metallica. The story focuses on all aspects of the band, As a musician and avid rock music fan, Enter Night: A Biography of Metallica seemed to be a perfect choice. As a fan of the thrash pioneers, I was excited to read the book put together by Mick Wall, and, though I had mixed feelings about the biography, as a whole I was definitely not disappointed. Wall’s take on the band’s more-than 30 year history was extremely thorough and personal. Enter Night is a two part chronology of the metal band Metallica. The story focuses on all aspects of the band, life of the members before Metallica, their musical influences, interviews with the band, and a long history of shows and albums played and created by the band. Wall also gives his personal connection to the band within the biography, having interviewed them and followed them for many years. From finding an ad in The Recycler, the death of a member, a long history of substance abuse, and commercial success, Mick Wall is able to put into words the over 100 million record history of Metallica. When you do something for a long time, you tend to learn a lot about it. That was shown throughout this biography, as Wall, who’s history with Metallica goes back to nearly the beginning, is able to retell nearly all stories, influences, and opinions of not only him, but the band, those close to the band, and critics and fans alike. When I say all stories, I truly do mean ALL stories. Coming it at over 445 pages, the story itself is extremely thorough, and though I found it to be interesting, others may have have found it to be drawn out. This is extremely evident in part one, as part one, which only covers the band’s first three albums, is longer than part two, which covers the band’s last six albums. Some readers, including me, may have also found the repetition to be quite annoying. I did not need over thirty references to diamond head being an influence to the band. Even though it was quite annoying, the constant reminders of things like diamond head’s influence on the band gave a new perspective on why and how things sounded or were written the way they were. A casual fan of the band would receive more information than they would have expected, or maybe even cared about, however those who have followed the band would be very intrigued to learn much of what was in the book. Having such a wealthy knowledge of Metallica history has given Wall the ability to share that knowledge with his audience. Wall also gives his own personal take on the band on numerous occasions throughout the biography. Mick Wall has interviewed and had positive relations with Metallica and others who have been able to contribute to this story. Such personal inputs, in my opinion, have no place in a biography such as this. I enjoy reading the opinions or retrospective views of those in the band or those involved in specific stories, however I have a hard time caring about the personal opinion of an author I do not really know. His addition of personal opinions and outlooks only bored me, and after reading other reviews, it seemed I was not the only one. Part two seemed to have less personal input, which may be due to a separation between the band and Wall, such as a loss of contact with the members of the band, with the two parties growing apart. This made part two more about the information than the personal input, which was a fresh change of pace. The personal connection that Wall made throughout Enter Night was fairly unnecessary, however did support possible perspectives that some readers may have had. I believe that hardcore fans of Metallica, or Mick Wall for that matter, would enjoy this book quite a bit. It gave in depth look into the last three decades of thrash metal from Metallica, presenting new information that some may not have known. A casual fan of Metallica may not have found the book all that exciting or intriguing, as it may seem like Wall over exposed his personal opinion and included too much, creating a lengthy, drawn out biography. Overall, I would not recommend this book to just anyone, but only those who absolutely love Metallica. Otherwise, I believe the reader would be extremely disinterested in what they were reading. The biography Enter Night: A Biography of Metallica was very informative, packed with information, and gave insight to the views of author Mick Wall. Despite some criticism I have for Enter Night, such as an overuse of personal opinion from Wall, and a wealth of knowledge that caused the book to drag on, I enjoyed the book and learned a lot about one of the greatest metal bands in history.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Laura Beth

    False advertising. This is more a book written by an outsider that thinks he is an insider about himself with a larger emphasis on his Metallica adventures than his other adventures. I'm not sure if it had an editor; if it did, the editor did not do the job. It should have easily been 150-200 pages shorter. It is full of errors, too much background info concerning many other bands & business stuff, and many, many, many stories about the author. I get including stories in context and talking False advertising. This is more a book written by an outsider that thinks he is an insider about himself with a larger emphasis on his Metallica adventures than his other adventures. I'm not sure if it had an editor; if it did, the editor did not do the job. It should have easily been 150-200 pages shorter. It is full of errors, too much background info concerning many other bands & business stuff, and many, many, many stories about the author. I get including stories in context and talking about influences, but much is included for no discernible reason. The author talks about himself at the beginning of every chapter and uses the word "I" for himself way too much for a biography. He also throws in quotes from other people that have nothing to do with the story including other writers versus people actually involved with the band. He also pulls a lot of info from other biographies, autobiographies, etc. and again, doesn't really touch on the Metallica story. The majority of the book is about the first couple of years with Metallica. Way too much emphasis on Cliff Burton who was in the band for less than 5 years, then Rob (in the band for about 2 years, then Jason Newsted (the longest suffering member for close to 15 years), and then the current new guy. I'll admit I've always been a Newsted fan so the omission of him in this book is a disappointment; I was hoping to hear more about him and how he felt about much of his time in the band. Guess he didn't want to talk to Mick Wall. The author isn't a credible third person/narrator but rather a fawning groupie fan (which he was actually called by someone in Def Leppard's camp while on their plane - which showed up in this book for no reason I can fathom; I reread that multiple times to figure out what the point was). I'm sure I would have enjoyed this book if it'd been entitled "True Stories from the Rock Era by Someone that worked for a music magazine" instead of "Enter Night Metallica" which lead me to believe it would be about Metallica's over 30 years in the music business. The author had obvious personal feelings that he proudly portrayed throughout the book. Lars - MW loved him & was up his a$$ 24/7. James - Mick was scared of & passive aggressive towards him (quote about James being very loyal and when you're with him, you're family then goes on to offer story after story after story showing James as a disloyal, robotic, back-stabbing jerk you can't trust). Cliff - held up as the Messiah on Earth (which fits well with a Mick Wall story abut himself being in a park when approached by a mysterious hippie/Jesus figure - I really thought the next paragraph was going to say that it was the exact time Cliff died and he was making a final appearance to Mick). Jason - Mick dismissive, contemptuous & came off like he (Mick)felt he made a bigger contribution to the band than Jason. Rob - who???. Kirk - the sweet little fairy from Never Never Land that likes lavender (another story about Mick). I suppose the front cover (James) and back cover (Lars) are quite telling. Personally if I were Lars, I'd have spent at least half as much energy on stopping this book as I spent on suing my fans over Napster. Which is actually one of the best represented things in the book. If you want to read a real rock biography, go for something that's been endorsed by the band or just go for an autobiography. If you liked Walk This Way or The Dirt, you are going to be massively disappointed in this book.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Easton Adams

    Metallica Is a hard rock band formed in 1981 when James Hetfield saw an advertisement in the paper sent out by Drummer Lars Ulrich that he wanted to start a band. They had a few more men join the band such as Kirk Hammet, Dave Mustaine (Megadeth), and Cliff Burton and they released they're first studio album "Kill em' all" in 1983 with very little success. A month after its release, the band kicked the Bassist guitarist Dave Mustaine out of the band, who later created his own successful Metal Ba Metallica Is a hard rock band formed in 1981 when James Hetfield saw an advertisement in the paper sent out by Drummer Lars Ulrich that he wanted to start a band. They had a few more men join the band such as Kirk Hammet, Dave Mustaine (Megadeth), and Cliff Burton and they released they're first studio album "Kill em' all" in 1983 with very little success. A month after its release, the band kicked the Bassist guitarist Dave Mustaine out of the band, who later created his own successful Metal Band, Megadeth. Then in 1984 later, Metallica released Ride The Lighting with incredible success. Including the two hit singles "Ride the Lightning," and "Fade to Black." With the success of this album Hetfield was inspired to record an even greater album for the next. It was a rough time for Metallica recording, then re-recording songs to do it just right. Then in 1986 they released their most heaviest album in their diskography, Master of Puppets. Six million copies sold in the US and nominated for one of the best albums ever. For angry, thrash metal, and shredding guitars is what put this CD on the map and paved Metllicas way to greatness. However, the next album released by Metallica did not achieve such greatness or success, "...and Justice for All," then in 1991 came one of the greatest Metal albums of all time. "Metallica" (Better known as "The Black Album") This amazing album includes the #1 hit single/song of the year "Enter Sandman." It included other very incredible singles such as "Sad but True, The Unforgiven, Nothing else matters, Of wolf And Man," and "The God that failed" Then a few more albums were recorded and then came the making of "Some kind of monster" and thats when the bad almost fell apart. Then they relized that this has been there whole lives and they couldn't give it up. My thoghts about this book, I really enjoyed the istory of Metallica and I have never been really big fan of metal, but I really liked this story. The information was good I feel like I learned alot, and I now know more about one of my favorite bands. I also really enjoyed the wording it was almost like i was a ghot just whatching over Mtallica and it was really cool picturing everything. I didn't really like the profanity, like i said when i did book six but, in this novel it was used differenlty so I was okay with it. would deffinetly read this agan.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kyle

    Wall's biography of the Boys in Black is well written and despite the fact that I'm a huge Metallica fan (just went to Indio, CA from OH to see the Big 4 show, my 10th Metallica concert) I learned quite a bit that I didn't know. For example, Wall makes the case that before Cliff Burton died, he and James Hetfield had discussed finding a replacement for Lars (specifically with Slayer's Dave Lombardo). How different would music history be if this had happened? Obviously compared to Burton (a subli Wall's biography of the Boys in Black is well written and despite the fact that I'm a huge Metallica fan (just went to Indio, CA from OH to see the Big 4 show, my 10th Metallica concert) I learned quite a bit that I didn't know. For example, Wall makes the case that before Cliff Burton died, he and James Hetfield had discussed finding a replacement for Lars (specifically with Slayer's Dave Lombardo). How different would music history be if this had happened? Obviously compared to Burton (a sublime bass player), Hetfield (possibly the greatest rhythm guitar player of all time) and Hammett (an incredible lead guitar player, Lars's drum skills appeared lacking. However, Wall's book also makes it clear how Lars' drive, ambition, and business acumen were responsible for a large part of Metallica's success. In fact I think the cover of the book does a great job portraying the essential elements of Metallica's success. The front cover shows Hetfield mid-vocal, and his emergence as the frontman of the band played a vital role in their success (I had no idea that it took as long as it did for James to embrace this role). The back cover has Lars, not playing the drums, but I swear you can almost see the wheels turning behind his dark shades. Finally, the motif of the cover (as well as the title of course) alludes to the Black album, Metallica's 5th album that catapulted them into the mainstream exposing millions of people (including me as I was just getting into music) to Metallica. Wall does a great job of covering the band's career from its highpoints (Master of Puppets, the Black Album) to its lowpoints (Cliff's Death, the mistreatment of Jason Newsted, St. Anger). In the last pages he makes the case that bands such as Metallica are an endangered species in this day and age and Metallica might be the last one standing. Only 7 bands have sold more albums in the United States than Metallica (Beatles, Led Zepplin, Pink Floyd, the Eagles, Aerosmith, the Rolling Stones, and Van Halen). As Wall states, the first 3 are finished and the last 4 aren't really that relevant to creating new music and touring on a consistent basis. Metallica might just be the last of the giant rock bands.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Harkonen

    Per my published review from examiner.com: As Metallica are rolling out a tour to celebrate nearly 30 years of history as one of 'The Big Four' it seemed fitting to release a biography. The Big Four refers to the four largest selling 80s 'Metal' bands: Metallica, Megadeth, Slayer and Anthrax. In his book Enter Night: Metallica - The Biography, Mick Wall denotes several instances when members of these competing groups temporarily joined or were attempted to be recuited into rival bands. Of course Per my published review from examiner.com: As Metallica are rolling out a tour to celebrate nearly 30 years of history as one of 'The Big Four' it seemed fitting to release a biography. The Big Four refers to the four largest selling 80s 'Metal' bands: Metallica, Megadeth, Slayer and Anthrax. In his book Enter Night: Metallica - The Biography, Mick Wall denotes several instances when members of these competing groups temporarily joined or were attempted to be recuited into rival bands. Of course it's well known that Dave Mustaine, original member of Metallica, was fired from the legendary group early in their career. What if Dave Mustaine stayed in Metallica? The above article by David Konow does a good job encapsulating this history. Lesser known perhaps is the struggles James Hetfield had with being the frontman. Since their early beginnings, the members sought out a singer to lead them. Mustaine did his best to steal the spotlight and work the crowd in light of Hetfield's shyness. Undoubtably this early power struggle, not to mention over indulgence in life's pain killers, lead to his early yet inevitable dismissal. Metallica tried to shanghai singer John Bush (Armored Saint) for lead singer duties around 1982. Ironically Bush joins rival band Anthrax ten years later after Armored Saint is disbanded. Seemingly due to a lack of a suitable candidates, Hetfield embraced the singing role. Wall implies that Hetfield prefered not to relinquish the innate power that comes with being the frontman, despite his admission of his less than strong singing skills. Writing of a time before the death of bassist Cliff Burton, Wall recounts when drummer and founder Lars Ulrich status within the band was in doubt. In a power play similar to the ousting of bassist Ron McGovney years before, Ulrich was viewed as the musical weak link. Slayer's drummer Dave Lombardo was among the short list of candidates considered to replace Ulrich. However once beloved member Cliff Burton was killed in a bus accident these thoughts were abandoned. Burton was replaced by Jason Newsted, who was raised locally in Niles, Michigan.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Scott Wilson

    Mick Wall writes the most detailed and interesting rock biographies around. I’ve read his previous ones on Iron Maiden and Led Zeppelin and couldn’t wait to pick up a copy of his latest book on Metallica. Enter Night is written in two main parts, the first being Born to Die about the early years and up until the Master of Puppets album and the tragic death of bass player Cliff Burton. The second part, The Art of Darkness, covering the reinvention of the beast known as ‘tallica from the ...And Jus Mick Wall writes the most detailed and interesting rock biographies around. I’ve read his previous ones on Iron Maiden and Led Zeppelin and couldn’t wait to pick up a copy of his latest book on Metallica. Enter Night is written in two main parts, the first being Born to Die about the early years and up until the Master of Puppets album and the tragic death of bass player Cliff Burton. The second part, The Art of Darkness, covering the reinvention of the beast known as ‘tallica from the ...And Justice For All album onwards. Wall’s research into the history of Metallica is extensive, covering the humble beginnings with McGovern through the Napster incident to their last album, Death Magnetic. At only just only 460 pages, there is a lot of information that the reader is given in a fantastic style of writing Wall has become known for from his previous biographies and articles with Kerrang. While there are 24 pages of colour photos, there was the lack of album covers and t-shirt art that are synonymous with Metallica and is the only part of the book that disappointed me. The photos of the teenage lads are hilarious, especially the one of a young Kirk with a nerdy hair cut and glasses. If you saw these photos back in the day, there is no way you would have pictured these guys becoming such a driving force in the Metal Music industry. The section on the early years of Metallica were very interesting and will probably be a real eye opener to some of the younger fans who only started listening from the Load album onwards. Wall’s commentary on the evolution of the bands style and direction is fantastic. I also found the pages about Kirk Hammett to be the best ones I’ve read. Everyone has heard enough from James and Lars over the years and it was great to see more about the silent guitarist who has inspired thousands of teenagers to pick up a six string and hammer out some riffs. This is definitely worth reading.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.