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The Red Pyramid

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From the author of the blockbuster best-selling series Percy Jackson and the Olympians comes the first installment of the Kane Chronicles, combining nonstop action, humor, and suspense in an epic tale of loyalty and heroism. Since his mother's death six years ago, Carter Kane has been living out of a suitcase, traveling the globe with his father, the brilliant Egyptologist From the author of the blockbuster best-selling series Percy Jackson and the Olympians comes the first installment of the Kane Chronicles, combining nonstop action, humor, and suspense in an epic tale of loyalty and heroism. Since his mother's death six years ago, Carter Kane has been living out of a suitcase, traveling the globe with his father, the brilliant Egyptologist Dr. Julius Kane. But while Carter's been homeschooled, his younger sister, Sadie, has been living with their grandparents in London. Sadie has just what Carter wants — school friends and a chance at a "normal" life. But Carter has just what Sadie longs for — time with their father. After six years of living apart, the siblings have almost nothing in common. Until now. On Christmas Eve, Sadie and Carter are reunited when their father brings them to the British Museum, with a promise that he's going to "make things right." But all does not go according to plan; Carter and Sadie watch as Julius summons a mysterious figure, who quickly banishes their father and causes a fiery explosion. Soon Carter and Sadie discover that the gods of Ancient Egypt are waking, and the worst of them — Set — has a frightening scheme. To save their father, they must embark on a dangerous journey — a quest that brings them ever closer to the truth about their family and its links to the House of Life, a secret order that has existed since the time of the pharaohs. An unabridged recording on 12 CDs (14 hrs, 42 mins).


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From the author of the blockbuster best-selling series Percy Jackson and the Olympians comes the first installment of the Kane Chronicles, combining nonstop action, humor, and suspense in an epic tale of loyalty and heroism. Since his mother's death six years ago, Carter Kane has been living out of a suitcase, traveling the globe with his father, the brilliant Egyptologist From the author of the blockbuster best-selling series Percy Jackson and the Olympians comes the first installment of the Kane Chronicles, combining nonstop action, humor, and suspense in an epic tale of loyalty and heroism. Since his mother's death six years ago, Carter Kane has been living out of a suitcase, traveling the globe with his father, the brilliant Egyptologist Dr. Julius Kane. But while Carter's been homeschooled, his younger sister, Sadie, has been living with their grandparents in London. Sadie has just what Carter wants — school friends and a chance at a "normal" life. But Carter has just what Sadie longs for — time with their father. After six years of living apart, the siblings have almost nothing in common. Until now. On Christmas Eve, Sadie and Carter are reunited when their father brings them to the British Museum, with a promise that he's going to "make things right." But all does not go according to plan; Carter and Sadie watch as Julius summons a mysterious figure, who quickly banishes their father and causes a fiery explosion. Soon Carter and Sadie discover that the gods of Ancient Egypt are waking, and the worst of them — Set — has a frightening scheme. To save their father, they must embark on a dangerous journey — a quest that brings them ever closer to the truth about their family and its links to the House of Life, a secret order that has existed since the time of the pharaohs. An unabridged recording on 12 CDs (14 hrs, 42 mins).

30 review for The Red Pyramid

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jayson

    (B) 74% | More than Satisfactory Notes: Frantic, hollow and artificial. [And no, parenthetical bickering does not reinforce presence, it's just sounds contrived.]

  2. 4 out of 5

    Mitchel Broussard

    Update: I've recently degraded this to a one star from a two when I realized how much of a disappointment it was. This review is, as a result, a lot more nicer than I'd like it to be. If you'd like, just add a lot more unnecessary cursing and asides about that idiotic taco-sauce showdown. *Sigh* Now I can't stop thinking about that goddamn battle anymore. Damn it. If you're thinking "Oh it's just Percy Jackson with Egyptian Gods", you'd be correct. But, in it's own weird way, it's a bit more. At Update: I've recently degraded this to a one star from a two when I realized how much of a disappointment it was. This review is, as a result, a lot more nicer than I'd like it to be. If you'd like, just add a lot more unnecessary cursing and asides about that idiotic taco-sauce showdown. *Sigh* Now I can't stop thinking about that goddamn battle anymore. Damn it. If you're thinking "Oh it's just Percy Jackson with Egyptian Gods", you'd be correct. But, in it's own weird way, it's a bit more. At one point there's a little bit of Cassandra Clare's Mortal Instruments , some Secrets of the Immortal Nicholas Flamel by Michael Scott, and even a tad bit of Harry Potter thrown in. And, if you get though the first 200-300 pages you may enjoy yourself. Now is it worth having to get through that to find the good stuff? I'm not entirely sure. The set up is promising, as the two narrators (and protagonists) relay their plan to take an entire record of their adventure and then hide it in a locker and some school for the right person to find. If you read the opening chapter of The Lightning Thief and loved its warning, you'll thoroughly enjoy this. But it quickly became gimmicky to me, as Carter and Sadie take turns telling the tale, they also interrupt each other to crack awfully corny jokes and spout "witty" one liners. I think it would have been better to leave that narrative device to the opening and closing. Otherwise it distracts you from what is going on in the plot, which is quit more important than Sadie telling Carter how hilarious he was when a bird pooped on his face. And on the note of the characters, I'm all for alternating chapters between character perspectives, I've always loved it and find it highly effective as a way to open up the plot. But here, well, the characters speak a tad to similarly. I mean very early on Sadie uses her British accent heavily, but later in the book its almost completely gone, to the point where i had to check the top of the page to make sure i was reading a Sadie chapter. It wouldn't happen too often, but when it did i always felt a tinge of frustration. And it was always 2 Carter chapters, then 2 Sadie chapters. It seemed like an odd way to set everything up, why not just do 1:1? The only other thing that bothered me was the length. It took way too long to do what The Lightning Thief did in under 400 pages. Don't get me wrong, they do have fun battles, with a pretty cool magic system. But i found the battles went by too fast (one God they literally best by stuffing it with salsa so it turns into a cow. The most work Carter does is open huge vats of the hot Mexican sauce). On the positive side, Sadie and Carter do grow to respect one another and become pretty likable in the end. I still refuse to believe their age, 12 and 14? It just didn't fit their personalities to me, but i guess they're mature for their age. And on the reference above to all the other books, I'm not saying he copied from them, i simply meant there were similarities in story, characters and plot locations. Like the old church that Clary and her paranormal friends stay at in City of Bones is quite similar to the "First Nome" in this book. The twins from the Nicholas Flamel books have a similar relationship that Carter and Sadie have (albeit far more mature). And the magic system felt inspired by J.K. Rowling's famous teen magician, with similar uses of wands, the need to speak spells, and generally same types of spells (fire, wind, ice, light, etc). I guess the big question is will i read the sequels? And again, i'm forced to say I'm not entirely sure. There is a great twist in the end, and i'd love to see how it plays out and what happens. I most likely will, i just really hope they don't get progressively bigger. Unless it's stuffed with cool and lengthy battles, and a lot less stupid pre-teen distractions, i'm out.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Maureen

    This book was SO GOOD! I really really enjoyed it! The world building wasn't super solid - I think that was my main and only issue, but the rest was so great. It's hard to compete with PJO and HOO, but this is still such a great book from Riordan. I also appreciate that though it's still about mythical gods, it's not an exact copy of what PJO is. It's super different and stands on its own as a really unique and interesting story. I love Carter and Sadie and I'm really excited to read the rest of This book was SO GOOD! I really really enjoyed it! The world building wasn't super solid - I think that was my main and only issue, but the rest was so great. It's hard to compete with PJO and HOO, but this is still such a great book from Riordan. I also appreciate that though it's still about mythical gods, it's not an exact copy of what PJO is. It's super different and stands on its own as a really unique and interesting story. I love Carter and Sadie and I'm really excited to read the rest of the trilogy! GONNA BE FUN!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    The Red Pyramid (Kane Chronicles #1), Rick Riordan The Red Pyramid is a 2010 fantasy-adventure novel based on Egyptian mythology written by Rick Riordan. It is the first novel in The Kane Chronicles series. The novel was first published in the United States on May 4, 2010. The novel opens with Carter and his father Julius Kane going to visit Carter's sister Sadie, who has lived with her maternal grandparents since the death of their mother, Ruby Kane. Julius, who is secretly a magician, but posin The Red Pyramid (Kane Chronicles #1), Rick Riordan The Red Pyramid is a 2010 fantasy-adventure novel based on Egyptian mythology written by Rick Riordan. It is the first novel in The Kane Chronicles series. The novel was first published in the United States on May 4, 2010. The novel opens with Carter and his father Julius Kane going to visit Carter's sister Sadie, who has lived with her maternal grandparents since the death of their mother, Ruby Kane. Julius, who is secretly a magician, but posing as a simple Egyptologist, takes the siblings to the British Museum, where he tries to bring Osiris (the Egyptian god of the Underworld) back into the mortal world. His magic also has the unintended side effect of summoning the gods Horus, Isis, Nephthys, and Set, as well as alerting the magicians Zia Rashid and Michel Desjardins to his actions, which are illegal in the magic community. Set, a god of chaos, captures Julius and destroys the museum. Unbeknownst to Carter and Sadie, each of the gods chooses a mortal host from the humans in the room. Carter and Sadie are taken to Brooklyn by their uncle Amos, who tells them they are descended from a long line of magicians, beginning with the Egyptian pharaohs Ramesses the Great and Narmer. He also explains the grave danger Set poses to the world, and goes to find him. While he is away, the mansion is attacked by Set's minions. With help from Sadie's cat Muffin, who is host to the goddess Bast, and Zia Rashid, they escape to Cairo. Once there, Carter and Sadie discover they are hosts to the gods Horus and Isis, respectively. They train in magic until the magicians' leader Iskandar dies and Michel Desjardins orders their deaths for collaborating illegally with the gods. The siblings escape and formulate a plan to defeat Set hoping to rescue their father and clear their names within the magic community. They travel to Set's lair in New Mexico, gathering ingredients for a magic spell and evading hostile monsters and magicians. Bast sacrifices herself while defending Carter and Sadie from Sobek; they encounter Amos and then Zia. The foursome heads to Set's hideout where they learn the final piece of the spell they need from a dying Zia, the unknowing host of Nephthys. Carter, Sadie, Horus, and Isis use the spell to subdue Set, although they stop short of completely destroying him because they realize his actions were dictated by a far worse enemy Apophis, a much more powerful god of chaos. Desjardins reluctantly allows Carter and Sadie to go free after they part with Horus and Isis. After a tearful goodbye with Zia, who turns out to have been a magical copy of the real young magician, Carter and Sadie return to Brooklyn. They visit their father, now in the underworld with their ghostly mother. As a gift, Osiris (hosted by the deceased Julius) helps Bast return to the mortal world. Carter and Sadie describe their plans to recruit other magicians to (illegally) study the path of the gods, while the former also resolves to seek out the real Zia Rashid. تاریخ نخستین خوانش: روز بیست و نهم سپتامبر سال 2016 میلادی عنوان: هرم سرخ - کتاب 1 - سه گانه خاطرات خاندان کین؛ نویسنده: ریک ریوردان؛ مترجم: آیدا کشوری؛ ویراستار: فرزام حبیبی اصفهانی؛ تهران، بهنام، 1391؛ در 536 ص؛ از مجموعه خاطرات خاندان کین - کتاب اول؛ شابک: 9789645668936؛ موضوع: داستانهای نویسندگان امریکایی سده 21 م عنوان: هرم سرخ - کتاب 1 - سه گانه وقایع نگاری کین؛ نویسنده: ریک ریوردان؛ مترجم: احمد محمدزاده؛ تهران، ای.بوک: پرشین بکس، 1391؛ در 396 ص؛ این داستان در مورد زندگی: سادی کین؛ کارتر کین؛ و پدرشان است، که هر کدام قسمت هایی از داستان را روایت میکنند. داستان پس از ناپدید شدن پدر روی میدهد و آندو درمییابند که از اعضای خانواده ای قدیمی و مصری هستند، و مرگ مادرشان نیز به این موضوع ربط دارد. وقایع نگاری کین / جلد اول / هرم سرخ؛ اثر ریک ریوردن / مترجم: احمد محمدزاده؛ کارتر؛ فصل اول: مرگ در محل سوزن: ما فقط چند ساعت فرصت داریم، پس به دقت گوش کنید. اگر در حال شنیدن این داستان هستید، پس از حالا در خطرید. شاید من و سادی تنها شانس شما باشیم. به مدرسه بروید. قفسه را پیدا کنید. نمیگویم چه مدرسه ای یا چه قفسه ای، چون اگر شما همان فرد باشید پیدایش میکنید. رمز قفل 33/32/13 است وقتی همه ی ماجرا را شنیدید، معنای این شماره ها را خواهید فهمید. فقط به یاد داشته باشید داستانی که میخواهیم برایتان بازگو کنیم هنوز تمام نشده است و پایان آن به شما بستگی دارد. مهمترین نکته این است که بعد از باز کردن و دیدن محتویات آن، بسته را بیشتر از یک هفته نگه ندارید. مطمئنا،ً وسوسه کننده است. منظورم این است که قدرتی تقریباً نامحدود به شما میدهد. اما اگر برای مدتی طولانی آن را نگه دارید، شما را از پا میاندازد. رازهایش را کشف و آنرا برای نفر بعدی مخفی کنید؛ همانطور که من و سادی آن را برای شما مخفی کردیم. سپس خودتان را برای زندگی بسیار جالبی آماده کنید. بسیار خب، سادی میگوید سریعتر سر اصل مطلب بروم. خیلی خوب. فکر کنم از لندن و از شبی که پدرمان موزه ی بریتانیا را منفجر کرد، شروع شد. و ...؛ ا. شربیانی

  5. 4 out of 5

    Robin (Bridge Four)

    Buddy read with a few friends at Buddies Books and Baubles Rick Riodan (RR) is one of the few M.G. authors I read, I mean I’m in my 30s so usually a M.G. book isn’t going to hold my attention but RR is one of the few authors who can pull it off and does it well at that. What makes him special???? Well there are a few things that I really like about his writing. - He writes teens like teens. They aren’t 12-16 year olds who act like they are in their 30s they are kids, behaving like kids. Carter a Buddy read with a few friends at Buddies Books and Baubles Rick Riodan (RR) is one of the few M.G. authors I read, I mean I’m in my 30s so usually a M.G. book isn’t going to hold my attention but RR is one of the few authors who can pull it off and does it well at that. What makes him special???? Well there are a few things that I really like about his writing. ① - He writes teens like teens. They aren’t 12-16 year olds who act like they are in their 30s they are kids, behaving like kids. Carter and Sadie argue like real siblings would and I totally enjoyed their interactions and teasing of each other. ② - Action….Action….Action. Seriously there is always something happening. The stories move along quickly with chases, fights and discovery scenes everywhere. There are lots of clues along the way and some of them can be misleading until you get to the big picture of it all. ③ - The mythology used is fantastic and so well thought out. I love RR’s interpretation of the Egyptian gods, magic and lore. There is a new interesting interpretation of them and how they interact with the world. It is new and exciting and I really loved how it was all shown and explained. ④ - The magic and world building. I get so upset when reading a book and not understanding how powers work. I don’t care if it takes a little while to roll it out but I NEED to understand it. I want to feel like if I lived in this world I too could do magic. I’m still convinced I would have done as well as Hermione at Hogwarts if I got an invitation. So I appreciate it when authors incorporate learning how to use the magic in their story. After this book I was sure I could do the magic of this world if I was in it. ⑤ - Interesting cohesive story and plotting that lend to a bang up conclusion. RR totally has a good voice and knows where his story is going. I never feel at the end that he has just thrown something in at last minute to fix everything. It is a fantastic trait to have in a story teller. There are a ton of reviews on this so I’ll just say Sadie and Carter were separated and raised apart after the death of their mother six years ago. But now through a series of events they are thrown together and must find a way to work with one another to save their father. With the help of a few unusual friends they must find ways to unlock the Power of the Gods (Egyptian ones) within themselves and try to save the world. Easy peasy….if they can quit squabbling long enough. If you add a few Gods, an albino crocodile, a cat named muffin, some spunky clay creations, a secret magical society and an orangutan with some special dietary needs together and shake you come up with one hell of a good time. I liked the Percy Jackson stories just a tad better but if you like mythology then this could be a great time for you too.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Laz

    “It takes strength and courage to admit the truth.” Honestly, who does it better than Rick Riordan when it comes to middle-grade fantasy books? The answer is no one. He never ceases to amaze me with the ideas he's coming up with, and although one could say that his books and ideas are being recycled I downright disagree with that notion. He's written about the Greek Gods, about the Roman Gods and then the Egyptian Gods, and each time he comes up with completely different ideas and twists to enc “It takes strength and courage to admit the truth.” Honestly, who does it better than Rick Riordan when it comes to middle-grade fantasy books? The answer is no one. He never ceases to amaze me with the ideas he's coming up with, and although one could say that his books and ideas are being recycled I downright disagree with that notion. He's written about the Greek Gods, about the Roman Gods and then the Egyptian Gods, and each time he comes up with completely different ideas and twists to encase his stories in. Carter and Sadie Kane are two siblings, they've never seen much of each other since their mother died and their father took custody of Carter (the eldest) whereas Sadie was taken under their grandparents' care. Carter is that smart, humble kid, who's always there to help and Sadie is that outgoing, sassy girl you were classmates with when you were in elementary school. And now, let's fast forward to the part where the Egyptian Gods are unleashed and they find shelter in human hosts. Amongst these Gods, there is the worst of them, the God of Chaos, Set who's hell bent upon destroying the world. So, the kids learn who they are (which is for you to find out... I mean, were their parents Gods? Or are they Gods themselves? Or maybe they're just common humans trying to save the world?) You may think you're a little too familiar with this storyline, especially if you're an avid Riordan reader, but you'll be up for a surprise, trust me. This somehow felt a lot more fast-paced than all of his other books. Usually, Mr. Riordan takes his time with the characters and the plot but in this one everything was faster than usual and I admit that I loved the change. I'm saving my five stars for the next book, this was just shy of getting it.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Aaron Vincent

    I ranked Rick Riordan's The Lighting Thief 5th on my Top Ten Fave Books for 2009, tied with Michael Scott's The Alchemist. I reasoned out that I can't choose which one is better cause both made learning history fun and both have that cool factor reliving the things in the past. Now, I have suspicion that I unknowingly can see the future cause The Red Pyramid is exactly the combination of both books. Is that a good thing? Yes, if it had been well executed. Let's review that sentence: "Yes, if it I ranked Rick Riordan's The Lighting Thief 5th on my Top Ten Fave Books for 2009, tied with Michael Scott's The Alchemist. I reasoned out that I can't choose which one is better cause both made learning history fun and both have that cool factor reliving the things in the past. Now, I have suspicion that I unknowingly can see the future cause The Red Pyramid is exactly the combination of both books. Is that a good thing? Yes, if it had been well executed. Let's review that sentence: "Yes, if it had been well executed." Yeah, as what my stars above says(don't look up to the sky dumbass, I mean the rating stars.), it is not an awesome book. Its given that Egyptian History is not as fascinating as the Greek and Roman History but egyptian culture has that sense of mystery that Riordan could have played. I didn't get the Egyptian feel to it at all. The existence of the egyptian gods in the book is not that cool either. Thoth playing Rock Band is not as cool as Ares riding the Big Bike or Horus being cranky is not as funny as Dionysius being stubborn. The whole god thing is like just for the sake of having them. You can substitute them with normal people's name and would have still the same effect. The spells are cool. The thing about glowing hieroglyphs after saying the spell is brilliant but I can't see "Ha-di" replacing "Alohomora" for young people getting locked out when they go home late (It's pretty easy to guess why I know this.) The storyline even gets repetitive: Sadie and Caine goes to one place. They start bickering. [Shut up, Sadie and Carter! It's my review:](Read the book to get the sarcasm.) One of them falls asleep and their soul drifts somewhere. Enemy attacks them. They fight(a little). Their company fights alone to buy time for them while they run. They eventually be reunited with that someone. The whole recording thing is distracting most of the times especially the [:] remarks. It would have been better if it's only on the beginning and the end just like in the Lightning Thief. As for the main characters, Sadie and Carter is the least likable sibling I ever read. They are not awesome nor annoying, they are just blah. Forgettable. They continuously throw corny jokes and weak sarcasms. And at some point, their voice on the chapters gets confusing. I have to look up to the top of the page to be sure who is talking. Even towards the end, I still didn't get what kind of personality they have. Now I am unsure if I will still follow this series. Maybe if Riordan will able to redeem himself on The Last Hero(a book that tells about something he is really good at), I will read the second installment for the Kane Chronicles to make up for the time while waiting for the second Heroes of Olympus book. Don't worry Rick Riordan, I still like you and I understand that you, like every writers out there, sometimes just needs the pay check. Peace' :)

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ann

    I quite enjoyed Riordan's new adventures featuring the Kane siblings, Carter and Sadie (I believe 14 and 12 years of age... though I thought Sadie seemed older), who are introduced to the possibilities that Egyptian mythology may be a bit more real than they realized. Sadie and Carter's mother died when they were young, and since then they have had to live apart - Sadie with her mother's parents in London, and Carter with his father, traveling the world looking for Egyptian artifacts. Since they I quite enjoyed Riordan's new adventures featuring the Kane siblings, Carter and Sadie (I believe 14 and 12 years of age... though I thought Sadie seemed older), who are introduced to the possibilities that Egyptian mythology may be a bit more real than they realized. Sadie and Carter's mother died when they were young, and since then they have had to live apart - Sadie with her mother's parents in London, and Carter with his father, traveling the world looking for Egyptian artifacts. Since they only see each other once a year or so, it nicely adds to the story to have their relationship develop and evolve. When visiting the museum something goes terrible wrong, and Carter and Sadie discover that there may be more to their father, and the Kane family, than they realized. I listened to the audio book, which I thought was wonderful! It is narrated by Kevin R. Free and Katherine Kellgren. Because the story is told both by Carter and Sadie, each narrator reads the appropriate section. The book is very suited to an audio recording, as it is supposed to be Carter and Sadie making a recording of the events that have transpired. I enjoy the Percy Jackson books, and I think that this book has a similar style, a similar since of fun and lightness, but happily it didn't feel the same, like I was reading the same story just with differently named characters. To me, Red Pyramid felt a little more mature and complex (not in a bad way, just in that the protagonists are older, there's more history, details, etc.). I enjoyed this, and - like the Percy Jackson books with Greek mythology - The Red Pyramid made me intrigued with Egyptian mythology and history (the author's note, by the way, is fantastic!). Also, it was very nice and refreshing to have the Kane siblings be mixed race, with a black father and white mother. Not only does this bring about some interesting sibling points (since Carter is darker and Sadie lighter they are often not perceived to be brother and sister) but I also thought Riordan handled it all really well, not making a big deal about, letting the story still be the story, but with a few mentions here and there where this is mentioned. I'm hoping that there will be more to this series, and I'm anxiously awaiting reading the rest - I mean, what's not to love with dueling avatar half-man-half-bird forms, wands and staffs, and a protective cat?

  9. 5 out of 5

    Priscilla

    Such a fun, entertaining read! Initial thoughts: 1. Interactive with the reader. Riordon pulls you into the story! 2. Amazing Egyptian mythology! Gods, and magic everything! 3. Elements that remind me of Percy Jackson and Harry Potter. Didn't bother me, but it's noteworthy. 4. Full of banter, and sarcasm. Loved it! 5. Action-packed, and fast paced! Lot's of story but it's filled with something insane. Check out my full book video review!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Natalie

    I hate when this happens. I see it all the time. Great writer writes book. Book gets discovered, gets really famous. Writer makes a billion copies of said book in deteriorating quality. Rick Riordan should've stuck to his Percy Jackson series and his sister-series to that. Instead, I can see the dollar-signs in his eyes and the mocking "cha-ching!" in the background, and here we have the Kane Chronicles. Part of the reason I enjoyed The Lightning Thief so much is because the insight and dialogue we I hate when this happens. I see it all the time. Great writer writes book. Book gets discovered, gets really famous. Writer makes a billion copies of said book in deteriorating quality. Rick Riordan should've stuck to his Percy Jackson series and his sister-series to that. Instead, I can see the dollar-signs in his eyes and the mocking "cha-ching!" in the background, and here we have the Kane Chronicles. Part of the reason I enjoyed The Lightning Thief so much is because the insight and dialogue were very true to a teenage boy. Awkward, confused, and with the emotional range of a teaspoon, yet he still had the depth of a good and likable character. The Red Pyramid switches dialogue between a sister and brother, Sadie and Carter, in which he drops the awkward dialogue, picking up a sort of vague, non-specific voice for both of the characters. I hate switching POVs unless it's done VERY well, and the problem is, most people who are good at creating voices don't switch. Because they're smart, unlike these sorry souls. And if you're going to feel the need to switch POVs, have some sort of difference between the two, ESPECIALLY if you're going to mention how unlike the two characters are every bloody second. If they're so different, how do they have the exact same dull voice? Also, I found the characters themselves dull, just like their vocal counterparts. Sadie had no depth at all- she just acted bored, snarky or confused and helpless. While the Lightning Thief's characters might have been slightly cliche, that's something I could get past. I just snoozed through the whole book. Carter was pretty much as bad. The plot was already used; I liked the whole son-needs-to-save-mom thing in the Lightning Thief, but you can't just use it twice! Also, in The Lightning Thief, Riordan spent time nurturing and explaining the relationship between Percy and his mom, so you actually cared when she got captured. Honestly, I didn't give a flying ankh whether Mr. Kane lived or died. Frankly, by the end I wanted to be crushed by a Rosetta Stone. Plus, as they explained so well, Sadie didn't even know her dad. The plot itself was used and meaningless, and the characters bored me to tears. And there was no Leo Valdez or random minor god to crack me up either, I mean seriously. Go do yourself a favor and buy Les Miserables, it's funnier.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Alexxy

    Let me confess something before I start my review: I dived in this book with lower than zero expectations. My sister has read them and she kind of hinted at them not being as good as the PJO series so I was very hard on the story. Thus, the three stars. I mean, I went in to hate the characters -which I kind of did- but overall, how could I even think about hating a Rick Riordan book? The Red Pyramid, is sort of similar to other Rick books but had its own special moments. For one, it was about Egy Let me confess something before I start my review: I dived in this book with lower than zero expectations. My sister has read them and she kind of hinted at them not being as good as the PJO series so I was very hard on the story. Thus, the three stars. I mean, I went in to hate the characters -which I kind of did- but overall, how could I even think about hating a Rick Riordan book? The Red Pyramid, is sort of similar to other Rick books but had its own special moments. For one, it was about Egyptian Gods. One of the reasons I didn't really enjoy this story -which is my fault, not the book's- is because my knowledge of the Egyptian Gods was Zero. In result, I had a hard time having fun because I was busy figuring out the Gods. My second problem is that I didn't like the characters, Sadie in particular. Which is again me, not the book. But in the end, everything was fast-paced and the plot was interesting. I also liked they were kind of narrating the story as a recording. I'm going to continue with this serious and try to be less of a judgmental asshole. Hopefully, I will have more fun.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Lena

    I own 19 physical copies by Rick Riordan and out of the 16 I've read, none have disappointed me. And the same can be said about this one. No idea why this series has such a low rating because I for one adored this book!! The Egyptian mythology is just as interesting as the Greek and Norse he brought us near and proves that a) not only is Rick an unprejudiced sort of character, he also has a vast knowledge of other mythologies and manages to capture the essence of said mythologies in his stories. I own 19 physical copies by Rick Riordan and out of the 16 I've read, none have disappointed me. And the same can be said about this one. No idea why this series has such a low rating because I for one adored this book!! The Egyptian mythology is just as interesting as the Greek and Norse he brought us near and proves that a) not only is Rick an unprejudiced sort of character, he also has a vast knowledge of other mythologies and manages to capture the essence of said mythologies in his stories. Well done as always :)

  13. 5 out of 5

    Erin Dunn

    Riordan's books are always great!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jesica

    “Fairness does not mean everyone gets the same,” Dad said. “Fairness means everyone gets what they need. And the only way to get what you need is to make it happen yourself. Do you understand?” I always adore Rick Riordan’s ability to turn odd and boring mythologies into fun stories. The first I read was the famous Percy Jackson and The Olympians series. Basically this series has a lot of similarities to Percy Jackson series only it’ a Egypt instead of Greek and magicians instead of demigods. Of “Fairness does not mean everyone gets the same,” Dad said. “Fairness means everyone gets what they need. And the only way to get what you need is to make it happen yourself. Do you understand?” I always adore Rick Riordan’s ability to turn odd and boring mythologies into fun stories. The first I read was the famous Percy Jackson and The Olympians series. Basically this series has a lot of similarities to Percy Jackson series only it’ a Egypt instead of Greek and magicians instead of demigods. Of course there were silly gods and goddesses too but the magicians didn’t worship them, they feared and fought them. This first book of the series tells of Carter and Sadie Kane, brother and sister, who found out that they were magicians after their father, magician too, performed a forbidden spell and accidently freed five most powerful Egyptian gods. Osiris, Horus, Isis, Nephtys, and Set. Carter and Sadie then were brought to a magician organization in Egypt, The House of Life, where they found out that they had involuntary each hosted one of the escaped gods, Horus and Isis. So Carter and Sadie escaped the house od life with the minimum magic they had learned, two not-so-helpful Egyptian gods inside their heads and their pet cat Muffin/the cat goddess, set off to save their lives and prevent the evil god, Set, to build The Red Pyramid and started the end of the world. The story, though I can’t say it’s original since it has a lot of similarities to Rick Riordan’s own other books, was quite exciting. The writing style is fun. It’s a first person POV like so many books, but it was funny how it’s like Carter and Sadie sent to Rick Riordan to write their recorded message about their adventure so other young magicians could read. WARNING The following is a transcript of a digital recording. In certain places, the audio quality was poor, so some words and phrases represent the author’s best guesses. Where possible, illustrations of important symbols mentioned in the recording have been added. Background noises such as scuffling, hitting, and cursing by the two speakers have not been transcribed. The author makes no claims for the authenticity of the recording. It seems impossible that the two young narrators are telling the truth, but you, the reader, must decide for yourself. In the end, it’s a really fun narration with sometimes some funny squabbles between the two narrators. Both Sadie and Carter had their own unique personalities and style and they complemented each other.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Nikita

    hmmm.. I guess if you haven't read Percy Jackson, you'll definitely LOVE this book! It is enjoying to read! Rick Riordan is absolutely humorous! Writing in two different perspectives is really not easy, so thumbs up to him for that! BUT! there's just a few 'but's since i'm an avid fan of Percy Jackson. i didn't quite enjoy it as i thought i would. it's just waaaay too similar to percy jackson. like percy jackson, they're also looking for children with pharaoh blood and everything. and like percy hmmm.. I guess if you haven't read Percy Jackson, you'll definitely LOVE this book! It is enjoying to read! Rick Riordan is absolutely humorous! Writing in two different perspectives is really not easy, so thumbs up to him for that! BUT! there's just a few 'but's since i'm an avid fan of Percy Jackson. i didn't quite enjoy it as i thought i would. it's just waaaay too similar to percy jackson. like percy jackson, they're also looking for children with pharaoh blood and everything. and like percy, the main characters carter and sadie lived in the shadow all throughout their lives but found out the truth later on when they have to save the world from Set. BUT again, i still loved the book. It's interesting since it involves Egyptian gods and goddesses and their rich culture. Ancient Egyptian culture had always intrigued me when I was young and it is great to find a book about it, even greater to know that Rick Riordan's the author. I learned a lot in reading this book. It IS a good book on its own. I absolutely recommend it especially if you haven't read Percy Jackson yet. although it's just my opinion. :)

  16. 4 out of 5

    Aj the Ravenous Reader

    Mythology was one of my favorite classes in college and Rick Riordan is one of the best authors I've known. So, combine them and here's a great book! :)

  17. 4 out of 5

    Montzalee Wittmann

    The Red Pyramid (Kane Chronicles #1) by Rick Riordan is a graphic novel for kids. The illustrations are great, the fonts are easy to read. The story is wonderful and easy to follow. The characters are unique and fun, at least the good ones! All characters were well developed and memorable. I thought this would be a small comic book sized novel but it was a large, full length novel. A novel and a movie in one! Lots of surprises and action. A great book for kids and us oldies that pretend to be k The Red Pyramid (Kane Chronicles #1) by Rick Riordan is a graphic novel for kids. The illustrations are great, the fonts are easy to read. The story is wonderful and easy to follow. The characters are unique and fun, at least the good ones! All characters were well developed and memorable. I thought this would be a small comic book sized novel but it was a large, full length novel. A novel and a movie in one! Lots of surprises and action. A great book for kids and us oldies that pretend to be kids! I got this book from the library.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Cathy

    I liked it a lot. It's very Dan Brown for kids, bouncing around between real historical sites, but always with an imaginative twist. The author really weaves the mythology and history into the modern story in a fun and exciting, sometimes breathtaking, way. The Egyptian gods as described by Riordan are very different from the Greek or Celtic gods I'm more used to reading about, and the heritage of magic from the Egyptian culture adds a very interesting twist to the story. I like the idea the aut I liked it a lot. It's very Dan Brown for kids, bouncing around between real historical sites, but always with an imaginative twist. The author really weaves the mythology and history into the modern story in a fun and exciting, sometimes breathtaking, way. The Egyptian gods as described by Riordan are very different from the Greek or Celtic gods I'm more used to reading about, and the heritage of magic from the Egyptian culture adds a very interesting twist to the story. I like the idea the author uses that just because we see the world a certain way doesn't mean that alternate realities aren't just as true. Or, to quote, "Have you learned nothing of Egypt? Conflicting stories can be equally true." It's a cool concept that allows the story, and imagination in general, to flourish. As an Urban Fantasy fan, it was interesting to see a few familiar elements used here and connected to Egyptian history or mythology. For example, the concept of words having power is very common, and names and their specific pronunciation, but I didn't know that was also an Egyptian mythological theme. I didn't love the first person narration, or the little snipping comments back and forth between the kids as the voices alternated between chapters, but I bet kids will like it. I also bet it would make it really fun as an audiobook, especially since the story is supposedly a recording dictated by the kids (that's why it's first person); I checked and the audio version has 2 narrators, so hearing Carter and Sadie's voices (and even Sadie's English accent?) would probably make it seem very real and exciting, perfect for a long drive during summer vacation perhaps. To address what I'm sure will be a common complaint, yes, the story has some basic similarity to The 39 Clues series. It is about a brother and sister who set off on a dangerous adventure, previously unaware of their family's connection to a mysterious and dangerous hidden secret. And there are a lot of historical facts and stories used to further the adventure. And Bast does take on a few aspects that reminded me of the au pair (not nanny!) in The 39 Clues. But really, this story is very different. And every kid's fantasy book has the same basic premise: kids against the world; adults out of touch, evil or helpless; a mysterious magical heritage to uncover; and evil to be conquered. The trick is to write a fun and original story within that framework, and Riordan succeeds. And no, it's not quite as amazing, at least to me, as the Percy Jackson books, at least not yet. But it was still very good and I recommend it.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Buckby

    actual rating: 3.5/5 stars It takes strength and courage to admit the truth. Plot: Well this one was interesting but i also found it very lacking in that i didn't connect with these characters or story in anyway which is disappointing. This story follows the two different perspectives of Sadie and Carter Kane who both living in different countries and different lives for them to come together when their dad is taken away from them. I did find it a little difficult at times to try and sepera actual rating: 3.5/5 stars It takes strength and courage to admit the truth. Plot: Well this one was interesting but i also found it very lacking in that i didn't connect with these characters or story in anyway which is disappointing. This story follows the two different perspectives of Sadie and Carter Kane who both living in different countries and different lives for them to come together when their dad is taken away from them. I did find it a little difficult at times to try and seperate the two main characters and have two different voices inside my head but it did help with Sadie growing up and living in England so the different language at times did help. One thing that really did stand out for me and in all of Rick's books is how much humour is such a massive part of how these characters interact and it's one thing that i love from these books. The Egyptian history and magic was all very interesting to me because i've never learned about this type of history and i'm glad that it was told in this type of story to make it enjoyable to read and also learn some new facts. Out of the two i think in this book Sadie was the one to shine out more on the page than Carter did and i know this book is setting up the next adventure so theres still time for me to get to know these two but i still stand by Sadie coming through more as the better character for this one. However there was just something that was missing from this book and i think it lasted all throughout the book for me, the first half of the book was a little slow and hard to get into but once things picked up i found my rhythm and got with the story. I did find the characters really harder to like going into this one and i'm not going to compare any of the characters from Percy Jackson or the Heroes of Olympus because all the characters are different and unique in their own ways however i just had trouble connecting to these characters and i have no idea why. Overall this story was enjoyable for the most part and i will continue with the rest of the series because towards the end is where i really started to get into this story so i'm hoping that book two picks up with a more stronger story.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Lucy Qhuay

    You know that I am a mythology sucker. I love mythology! Every single time that I read about it or watch something with mythology I'm like: Besides,Egyptian mythology particularly fascinates me, so I could only love The Kane Chronicles! :) Though I must say that Carter really pissed me off sometimes. He still didn't grow on me like Percy did. I could immediately connect with Percy but with Carter that didn't happen. I didn't like when, in the beginning, he said that he was fine with being with his You know that I am a mythology sucker. I love mythology! Every single time that I read about it or watch something with mythology I'm like: Besides,Egyptian mythology particularly fascinates me, so I could only love The Kane Chronicles! :) Though I must say that Carter really pissed me off sometimes. He still didn't grow on me like Percy did. I could immediately connect with Percy but with Carter that didn't happen. I didn't like when, in the beginning, he said that he was fine with being with his sister only twice a year. I mean, my sister is the freaking devil's personification a little bit difficult child but, still, I love her and I would be very sad if I could be with her only twice a year and we were pratically strangers to each other. I also didn't like when he thought that they had nothing in common and that Sadie never acted normal and that she was stupid. And I really hated when he thought that Sadie was the lucky one because she was left behind while he was travelling around the world with this freaking father! Yeah, it must be really difficult to be with the only parent you've left, constantly travelling, while your sister is in the other side of the world, feeling rejected and alone! :S I was really really like: But whatever, I prospered. I got through that. I like Carter but he has to make me forget this stuff. About Sadie - OMG, she's hilarious! I would love to have a 12 year-old sister like that! :) Like I said, I really connected with her. She was the one who suffered the most with everything that happened to her family. I mean, I wouldn't take it easy as well if my mother died and then my father and my elder brother left me alone. I feel so sorry for her. :( And I hope that she ends up with Anubis. +.+ I really loved Anubis! My reaction when I was reading about him was the same reaction Sadie had when she first saw him:

  21. 5 out of 5

    Darth J

    So, the reviews of this series are more like this But because I love Egyptology and want something to get me in the mood for The Hidden Oracle, I think I'll give this one a shot. I hope it's not as cringey as people have told me it is, but I'll be going in with low expectations anyway.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Brigid ✩

    GAAAHHHHH!!! Well, you know I only start a review that way if I'm really mad or if I'm really excited. In this case, it's the latter. :) I am a huuuuge fan of Rick Riordan's Percy Jackson & the Olympian series, and those of you who love those will enjoy his new Kane Chronicles, too. I was a little nervous at first, thinking it wouldn't be as awesome, but after reading The Red Pyramid I don't feel the need to compare the two. There were some similar elements––Egyptian gods instead of Greek god GAAAHHHHH!!! Well, you know I only start a review that way if I'm really mad or if I'm really excited. In this case, it's the latter. :) I am a huuuuge fan of Rick Riordan's Percy Jackson & the Olympian series, and those of you who love those will enjoy his new Kane Chronicles, too. I was a little nervous at first, thinking it wouldn't be as awesome, but after reading The Red Pyramid I don't feel the need to compare the two. There were some similar elements––Egyptian gods instead of Greek gods, a lot of traveling to random places, both a lot of action and a lot of humor. But there are unique traits to each series, and I can see myself getting just as attached to this new series as I am to PJO. The only thing I had issues with was the believability about the whole thing being a tape recording. I mean, it was cute with the little parentheses notes, like (Ow! Sadie kicked me!). But other than that it didn't really read like someone "talking". It was one of those things like Interview with the Vampire (only that was even worse because the entire thing was actually written in quotation marks …), like "Okay. No one talks that way." But, whatever. At least it was an interesting idea. Over all––great new story, awesome characters, exciting and hilarious and all those other good things. Hooray for Rick Riordan! *applauds*

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ithlilian

    I know Rick Riordan can do better than this since he already has with the Percy Jackson series. I won't compare the two, but I will say that excellent children's books do exist, and this is not even close. Ancient Greek mythology and ancient Egyptian culture are probably the two most popular subjects that exist. Most people find them fascinating. I was very excited when I heard about this book and have been waiting to read it for some time. When I found out more about it I was even more excited. I know Rick Riordan can do better than this since he already has with the Percy Jackson series. I won't compare the two, but I will say that excellent children's books do exist, and this is not even close. Ancient Greek mythology and ancient Egyptian culture are probably the two most popular subjects that exist. Most people find them fascinating. I was very excited when I heard about this book and have been waiting to read it for some time. When I found out more about it I was even more excited. A coming of age story with magical powers thrown in on top of the ancient Egyptian theme-awesome. So what went wrong? First, no character development. There are two narrators, a brother and sister, and they don't really have their own personalities. They go through the motions, complete tasks, and have conversations, but there isn't much there personality wise. Sure, one of them dresses in combat boots, and the other one is a bit bookish, but that's all we get. In other books the characters have clear personalities. Examples: Fablehaven, Harry Potter, or even the Percy Jackson series. Each character is distinguishable and unique. That is not the case here, and the book suffers from it. I really think authors need to know that a long drawn out action sequence is just not good enough. Which brings me to the second problem with this book, the plot. There is a bad guy that wants to destroy the world and the main characters have to stop him. Not too deep, but not much different from the general plot in the other books I mentioned. What makes it a problem in this book? The way plot is developed. The characters go where they are told to start the novel. Then, they run into someone that tells them to go see someone else. They go see that person, who then leads them to another person. Get the idea? In the middle of this there will be some danger in the form of a monster or a dangerous location. A book that consists almost entirely of go here do this, go there do that, fight something, go retrieve something, then go talk to this person, is just not good enough. I've played those video games before, they are boring. My third issue is the bad guys. Why is it that children's books never have deep, intelligent, powerful, bad guys? They are always cardboard muahaha style baddies, and The Red Pyramid is no exception. When the bad guy decides to have a long drawn out conversation in the middle of a fight I cringe. The bad guys are just too cheesy in this book, and it's sad. I guess if the main characters have no depth, then their enemies can't be expected to have any either. The super powerful Egyptian entities are no better. They are all eccentric, and some come off as stupid. I don't appreciate powerful beings acting like five year olds. I don't understand why the author chose to portray them that way, it is certainly not funny to me. I guess having Bast constantly reference Friskies is supposed to be funny, but I personally didn't like it. The last issue that I will mention is progression. I like my characters to mature and progress, but again, if they have no personalities, there isn't much to improve upon. The plot was agonizingly slow as well. I was getting tired of the book by the third of fourth person the characters met, and there was at least twenty more to go at that point. If the interactions with these new characters had any effect on the outcome of the book I may have been more interested. Instead, they simply pointed the characters in the direction of the next task. I can't think of a single thing I enjoyed about this book except maybe the beginning before the danger came into play. I really am sick of books where the characters go through the motions and complete task after task. I've read other books where the entire thing feels like one big chase scene, and this is no different. I won't be continuing with this series, and it's a shame because the author could have done so well with the ancient Egpytian theme. Instead, he chose to trivialize everything in a weak attempt at humor that just didn't work for me.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Namratha

    Mild-mannered, well-dressed Carter Kane is fourteen years old. Until now he has spent a nomadic life, travelling to distant places with his famous Egyptologist dad – Dr.Julius Kane. Carter’s estranged (and rebellious) twelve year old sister - Sadie Kane has been raised in England by her grandparents after their mother died under mysterious circumstances. Dr. Kane is allowed to meet his daughter only twice a year and this works just fine for Carter and Sadie. They never really got along when they Mild-mannered, well-dressed Carter Kane is fourteen years old. Until now he has spent a nomadic life, travelling to distant places with his famous Egyptologist dad – Dr.Julius Kane. Carter’s estranged (and rebellious) twelve year old sister - Sadie Kane has been raised in England by her grandparents after their mother died under mysterious circumstances. Dr. Kane is allowed to meet his daughter only twice a year and this works just fine for Carter and Sadie. They never really got along when they were together (an exploding birthday cake bears testimony to the fact) and the siblings are now perfectly content to lead their separate lives. On one such meet-and-grumble, the trio head off to the British Museum.Suddenly things start going horribly wrong when Dr.Kane magically breaks up a valuable Egyptian Artefact – The Rosetta Stone, in an attempt to invoke Osiris (the Egyptian God of The Dead). Osiris awakens, but so do a host of other Gods, including the much dreaded Set (The God of Chaos, Darkness, Deserts and Storms). Set has been waiting for centuries to be unleashed and he cruelly consigns Dr.Kane to a tomb that vanishes into the ground. And thus begins a series of improbable events for the stunned duo. Sadie and Carter discover that they are Egyptian Magicians...magicians who have the added blessing of being descendents of the mighty Pharaohs. They have the power to teleport, play host to ancient Gods, shape-shift to anything from falcons to fruit-bats and above all…rescue their father and stop Set from unleashing his unique brand of evil nastiness on the world. --------------------------------------------------- Rick Riordan continues his winning, celestial streak. From temperamental Greek Gods, he effortlessly shifts gears to the equally capricious Egyptian Deities. Just when you thought that he wouldn't be able to recreate the magic of Percy Jackson, he presents you with the winning combination of Carter and Sadie Kane. Sadie with her combat boots and smart-talk provides the perfect foil to the more sedate Carter. A host of supporting characters pepper the pages with their superpowers and unique personalities. The dialogue is classic Riordan and comes equipped with sarcastic quips and witty repartee in free flow. Action sequences are vivid and on a scale befitting the…well…Gods. No one does History Lessons better than ex-middle school teacher - Rick Riordan. He dusts the ancient tomes, bombards you with a load of mythical snippets and never, not once do your eyes glaze over in boredom. The Red Pyramid is the first in the trilogy of The Kane Chronicles. 500 odd pages strong, the book is utterly divine and makes you look forward to the next instalment with enthusiasm.

  25. 5 out of 5

    maddi

    this book, like so many of Rick's, is my childhood, so although his books aren't the best, there's too much emotional attachment to them not to rate it 5 stars. I had an amazing time reading this, so hopefully I'll be able to reread another one of his in the future!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    Solid story. If you liked the Percy Jackson books, you're probably going to like Riordan's introduction of the Egyptian gods as well.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Janie Johnson

    I got this book out of the library and read it as a buddy read with several of my friends. This is book one to the Kane Chronicles by Rick Riordan. I have read the Percy Jackson series by this author and enjoyed them, so I figured it was time to read something else by him. Synopsis Since their mother's death, Carter and Sadie have become near strangers. While Sadie has lived with her grandparents in London, her brother has traveled the world with their father, the brilliant Egyptologist, Dr. Juliu I got this book out of the library and read it as a buddy read with several of my friends. This is book one to the Kane Chronicles by Rick Riordan. I have read the Percy Jackson series by this author and enjoyed them, so I figured it was time to read something else by him. Synopsis Since their mother's death, Carter and Sadie have become near strangers. While Sadie has lived with her grandparents in London, her brother has traveled the world with their father, the brilliant Egyptologist, Dr. Julius Kane. One night, Dr. Kane brings the siblings together for a "research experiment" at the British Museum, where he hopes to set things right for his family. Instead, he unleashes the Egyptian god Set, who banishes him to oblivion and forces the children to flee for their lives. Soon, Sadie and Carter discover that the gods of Egypt are waking, and the worst of them —Set— has his sights on the Kanes. To stop him, the siblings embark on a dangerous journey across the globe - a quest that brings them ever closer to the truth about their family and their links to a secret order that has existed since the time of the pharaohs. I absolutely enjoyed everything about this book, the plotline, which was so engaging, the pacing, so quick and how well it all flowed. There was so much adventure and excitement with the turn of every page and each page was filled with so many magical elements, it made it so fun to read. The imagery was so spot on you felt as though you were right there in the middle of all the action. I was completely whisked away by this story, and taken to places I would never in a lifetime get to see. I also enjoyed that the name of character was on each page so it was easy to tell when there was a switch in perspective. I loved that, it made the book so easy to follow. A lot of research went into the writing of this book with a very gifted Author. The characters are all so very unforgettable. Such a wide range of very different, vivid characters. Some are eccentric and quirky characters, while others are terrifying and wicked. The author gives readers so many to love and hate. I also found that the author is very good at planting that small seed of doubt in the minds of readers when it comes to some of those beloved characters, so at times it was hard to decide on who to trust. For this being a fantasy, the characters were so realistic and so believable. I really enjoy that and being able to relate to them so well. I can recommend this book first to anyone who loves Rick Riordan's work. Even if you have not read his stuff, you will still enjoy this if you love fantasy or magic. If you enjoy Egyptian Mythology you will also enjoy this book. It reads more YA than middle grade, in my opinion, so that may appeal to more of the YA audience. I look forward to the other books in this trilogy.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Erica (storybookend)

    Ooh, I loved it! It was amazing. It's kind of long, but there's so much happening, it needed to be that long. And it wasn't boring. I loved reading about the Egyptian gods. My favorite character was probably Bast. It's told as a recording. Sadie and Carter recorded their adventure and then Rick wrote it down. It kind of reminded me of Lemony Snicket's Series of Unfortunate Events. Like the author believes that the story really did happen, and they're just the writer. Which is cool. Within the st Ooh, I loved it! It was amazing. It's kind of long, but there's so much happening, it needed to be that long. And it wasn't boring. I loved reading about the Egyptian gods. My favorite character was probably Bast. It's told as a recording. Sadie and Carter recorded their adventure and then Rick wrote it down. It kind of reminded me of Lemony Snicket's Series of Unfortunate Events. Like the author believes that the story really did happen, and they're just the writer. Which is cool. Within the story there are inserts of Sadie and Carter bickering, telling each other to shut up or whatever as they tell their story. It was interesting. At first I didn't really like it, but near the end I enjoyed their antics. I liked seeing their relationship grow stronger, although they still like to tease each other. With the way they argue and interupt each other as they're telling the story, it seemed like there should have been an interuption from them practically every paragraph. Which would have gotten very old and annoying, so I'm glad Rick didn't overdo it, but I just felt like with their arguing, there would have been a heck of a lot more interuptions in the book. Rick does a really good job at developing his characters and keeping the pace of the story running with lots of action and surprises. And the little romances in it were cute. It definately kept my attention, and I ended up loving it. It's one of my new favorites :) I can't wait for the next books.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Savina M.

    Actual rating: 3.5 stars Reading this was simply like reading Percy Jackson again. Don't get me wrong; I love Percy Jackson. This problem is that The Red Pyramid cannot match up to Percy Jackson. I would have liked it more if the whole thing didn't feel recycled, or if it were funnier. In The Red Pyramid, the protagonists watch their parent get kidnapped. Their protector reveals that they are related to the Gods, and they fate of the world lies on their hands. They set off on a quest to save their Actual rating: 3.5 stars Reading this was simply like reading Percy Jackson again. Don't get me wrong; I love Percy Jackson. This problem is that The Red Pyramid cannot match up to Percy Jackson. I would have liked it more if the whole thing didn't feel recycled, or if it were funnier. In The Red Pyramid, the protagonists watch their parent get kidnapped. Their protector reveals that they are related to the Gods, and they fate of the world lies on their hands. They set off on a quest to save their parent and the world. The protagonists get visions in their dreams. They have a time limit for saving the world. Familiar, right? Because that's the exact same plot as The Lightning Thief. Not only the plot was recycled, the characters felt oddly familiar too. Carter is the less hot, less awesome version of Percy Jackson. Sadie resembles no one as she was very annoying. No one from the Percy Jackson series was annoying. Zia is a combination of Zoe Nightshade and Calypso. Even the villains have the same idiotic hue as they did in Percy Jackson. "I am the Lord of..." He flexed his muscles for maximum effect. "Perfume!" He grinned at me, apparently waiting for the terror to set in. Yes, I laughed, but the point is that the enemies were unbelievably stupid. I liked it in Percy Jackson, but this is getting old. The story is told from alternating POVs of Carter and Sadie, but it really didn't work for me. At first their voices were distinguishable from each other's, but the longer I read, the more similar their voices became. I often got lost and confused about who was speaking. Carter is an idiot. Not the cute kind of idiot, but the you're-so-stupid-I-want-to-strangle-you idiot. Carter needs Set's real name to defeat him. Zia comes and tells him she has his real name. Here's how the conversation went: Zia: I have Set's real name. I can tell you. Carter: Huh? How'd you get it? Zia: That's not important, I can tell you Set's name— Carter: But how did you get the name? And the conversation leads on to some info-dumping about how Zia got the name, instead of Zia telling the actual name. Carter: Sadie is no better. Rick tried to make her tough and snarky, but she came off annoying most of the time. Sorry, Rick, but I like your male protagonists better. One of Sadie's main obstacles is her choice on whether she would choose to save the world or her father when the time came. She chooses the world. The thought of failing [my father], of willingly choosing to let him die even to save the world, what sort of an awful person was I? Whoops, nope. She chooses her dad. If we were going to die, at least we would do it trying to rescue my father (oh, and North America, too, I suppose). You're probably wondering why, if so many things bothered me, I gave it 3.5 stars. There were some funny parts, and the ending did surprise me. I recommend reading Rick Riordan's twitter page instead of this. He has some hilarious tweets.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kathryn

    (I'm too busy to do a plot summary and there are already so many out there so here is my very biased review) I really loved the experience of listening to this book. Engaging narration (by Kevin Freed and Katherine Kellgren) on the audiobook and I've always been a bit infatuated with Egyptian mythology. For me, this book was more enjoyable than the Percy Jackson series. It felt a little more mature (closer to YA), a little more "timeless" (not so many contemporary references and not such a colloq (I'm too busy to do a plot summary and there are already so many out there so here is my very biased review) I really loved the experience of listening to this book. Engaging narration (by Kevin Freed and Katherine Kellgren) on the audiobook and I've always been a bit infatuated with Egyptian mythology. For me, this book was more enjoyable than the Percy Jackson series. It felt a little more mature (closer to YA), a little more "timeless" (not so many contemporary references and not such a colloquial style), and just a more deeply developed story with multiple layers of emotions and motives. I loved the brother-sister duo; it was great how they didn't languish in the stereotypical bro-sis antagonistic state for very long and quickly came to appreciate each other's unique talents and begin to feel friendship. Also, these siblings did have a lot to be "jealous" about given that after their mother's death they were separated at such young ages and each was bound to find something more appealing about the other's life. Older brother Carter got to go with his dad on trips around the world, learning a great deal from his father and having all kinds of adventures. Younger Sadie stayed with her grandparents in London, a stable life of going to school, hanging out with friends, etc. Each circumstance, and their natural-born talents, combine to make them a very important and formidable duo now that the Egyptian gods are stirring again and the fate of the world rests in their adolescent hands. The cast of supporting characters are a great deal of fun; I won't mention any as part of the charm of the series is discovering the new ones that pop up along the way. Suffice to say Riordan has really done his homework and if you are at all familiar with Egyptian mythology you'll find yourself chuckling over how cleverly he's integrated it into this story--and if you aren't familiar with it, chances are the book will inspire you to learn a little more. Finally, I think it's really cool that Carter is homeschooled and that the fact isn't really a main focus. Of course the typical "socialization" issue comes up, but since he never had a home-base and moved constantly with his father from one place to another I don't think this can be blamed on the homeschooling. Meanwhile, he is portrayed as a capable, thoughtful and intelligent young man and I say three cheers for a homeschool hero appearing in mainstream MG/YA literature ;-) The audiobook is a delight and the novel is perfectly suited to this format as the story itself is set up as a "recording" that Sadie and Carter are making. The story shifts between the two narrators (two chapters to Carter, two to Sadie and so on as in the book) and it's quite lively and engaging without being repetitive or confusing. I must say in a few cases I thought Kelgren and Freed could have been a little more in sync with how they vocalized the characters, and I'm afraid Freed's Sadie sounded rather like an old Agatha Christie grandmother sort than a 12-year-old hip Londoner but that is only a small criticism and did not detract from my overall enjoyment of this delightful tale. I'm eager for the sequel!

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