Hot Best Seller

The Survivors of the Chancellor, with eBook

Availability: Ready to download

Mr. Kazallon thought that booking passage on a cargo ship from Charleston to Liverpool would be a charming way to return to his English homeland. If he only knew! A crazed sea captain, a disaster in the hold, storms, oppressive heat, sharks, and starvation are just some of the many travails that beset both passengers and crew. Will any of them survive the wreck of the Chan Mr. Kazallon thought that booking passage on a cargo ship from Charleston to Liverpool would be a charming way to return to his English homeland. If he only knew! A crazed sea captain, a disaster in the hold, storms, oppressive heat, sharks, and starvation are just some of the many travails that beset both passengers and crew. Will any of them survive the wreck of the Chancellor?


Compare

Mr. Kazallon thought that booking passage on a cargo ship from Charleston to Liverpool would be a charming way to return to his English homeland. If he only knew! A crazed sea captain, a disaster in the hold, storms, oppressive heat, sharks, and starvation are just some of the many travails that beset both passengers and crew. Will any of them survive the wreck of the Chan Mr. Kazallon thought that booking passage on a cargo ship from Charleston to Liverpool would be a charming way to return to his English homeland. If he only knew! A crazed sea captain, a disaster in the hold, storms, oppressive heat, sharks, and starvation are just some of the many travails that beset both passengers and crew. Will any of them survive the wreck of the Chancellor?

30 review for The Survivors of the Chancellor, with eBook

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    The Survivors of the Chancellor (Extraordinary Voyages, #13), Jules Verne The Survivors of the Chancellor: Diary of J. R. Kazallon, Passenger is an 1875 novel written by Jules Verne, about the final voyage of a British sailing ship, the Chancellor, told from the perspective of one of its passengers (in the form of a diary). The crew and passengers of the Chancellor are at sea for four months, from September 27, 1869 to January 27, 1870. عنوانها: کشتی شکستگان؛ کشتی شکستگان سنتیا؛ نویسنده: ژول ورن؛ The Survivors of the Chancellor (Extraordinary Voyages, #13), Jules Verne The Survivors of the Chancellor: Diary of J. R. Kazallon, Passenger is an 1875 novel written by Jules Verne, about the final voyage of a British sailing ship, the Chancellor, told from the perspective of one of its passengers (in the form of a diary). The crew and passengers of the Chancellor are at sea for four months, from September 27, 1869 to January 27, 1870. عنوانها: کشتی شکستگان؛ کشتی شکستگان سنتیا؛ نویسنده: ژول ورن؛ تاریخ نخستین خوانش: روز پنجم ماه می سال 1987 میلادی عنوان: کشتی شکستگان؛ نویسنده: ژول ورن؛ مترجم: ژان قریب؛ تهران، سپیده، 1365؛ در 208 ص؛ چاپ دوم 1369؛ چاپ سوم 1371؛ چاپ چهارم 1375؛ موضوع: داستانهای نویسندگان فرانسوی - سده 19 م عنوان: کشتی شکستگان سنتیا؛ نویسنده: ژول ورن؛ مترجم: محمدحسین حسن بیگی؛ تهران، دبیر، 1396؛ در 168 ص؛ شابک: 9786008521297؛ ژول ورن در کتاب «کشتی شکستگان» روایت مسافران یک کشتی را به رشته تحریر درمی‌آورد که اسیر طوفان می‌شوند. این داستان نیز همانند دیگر داستان‌های ایشان دارای فضایی مهیج، با صحنه‌ سازی‌های دقیق و روایتی پر التهاب است، که خوانشگر را در هر بخش با کنجکاوی به دنبال خود می‌کشد. ا. شربیانی

  2. 5 out of 5

    Pramod Nair

    A highly satisfying nautical adventure from Jules Verne. The novel is written from a first person perspective and narrates a great tale of tragedy, mystery, and suffering through journal entries made by J R Kazallon, a passenger on the ship 'Chancellor'. The book starts of at a slow pace and builds up suspense and drama once the reader is through the first quarter of the narrative. A fire that happens on the 'Chancellor' forces the unfortunate passengers to abandon their ship for a raft and make A highly satisfying nautical adventure from Jules Verne. The novel is written from a first person perspective and narrates a great tale of tragedy, mystery, and suffering through journal entries made by J R Kazallon, a passenger on the ship 'Chancellor'. The book starts of at a slow pace and builds up suspense and drama once the reader is through the first quarter of the narrative. A fire that happens on the 'Chancellor' forces the unfortunate passengers to abandon their ship for a raft and make them go through a dire journey which is filled with every form of disaster, horror, agony and moral dilemmas as they struggle for survival. One disaster after another follows them and they are blasted by fate with every type of horrors in the form of extreme climates, acute thirst and hunger, tensions of mutiny and death. This epic shipwreck tale is emotionally unforgettable as it tells a story of absolutely normal people becoming mad and doing things for their own survival which they wont even dare to imagine in their civilized life's. There are other tales about Shipwrecks from Jules Verne, but this one is brutishly realistic and takes place entirely at sea.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Duane

    Verne's love for the sea led him to write several novels about ships, shipwrecks, castaways, etc. This 140 year old novel (1875) is the story of the commercial sailing ship, the Chancellor, and it's ultimate demise in the Atlantic Ocean, leaving it's crew and passengers adrift on a raft for 51 days. While it's a good adventure/disaster story, it's also the story of the human experience; how people react to water and food deprivation, the continuous fear of storms and sharks, and the ultimate fea Verne's love for the sea led him to write several novels about ships, shipwrecks, castaways, etc. This 140 year old novel (1875) is the story of the commercial sailing ship, the Chancellor, and it's ultimate demise in the Atlantic Ocean, leaving it's crew and passengers adrift on a raft for 51 days. While it's a good adventure/disaster story, it's also the story of the human experience; how people react to water and food deprivation, the continuous fear of storms and sharks, and the ultimate fear of knowing this is how their life will end. Jules Verne's inimitable style always delivers.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Shabneez

    I finished Le Chancellor on friday but forgot to update goodreads. I liked it. And the illustrated version was on point. It's been a long time since I had picked up an 'adventure' book. It felt nice. 3/5 stars for this one.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Uncle Dave Avis

    Jules Verne, of course, wrote in the mid 19th century, and his style of writing reflects this. Why say in short phrases what can be said in longer flowery phrases. Once the reader gets beyond the style of writing shock, the story is really a good one. Verne develops the characters very well, builds the story with skill, and narrates in the first person the struggle of being shipwrecked. I have read a great many shipwreck narratives over the years, and find that this fictional work is very much l Jules Verne, of course, wrote in the mid 19th century, and his style of writing reflects this. Why say in short phrases what can be said in longer flowery phrases. Once the reader gets beyond the style of writing shock, the story is really a good one. Verne develops the characters very well, builds the story with skill, and narrates in the first person the struggle of being shipwrecked. I have read a great many shipwreck narratives over the years, and find that this fictional work is very much like the real stories of shipwreck survivors. It is a good read. While it's not on the New York Times Top 100, it is very readable, engrossing, and entertaining. I highly recommend it to everyone!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Marts (Thinker)

    Well this is Jules Verne so of course it's a great tale. The excitement is there but the reader must endure every trial with the narrator though. This was my second reading...

  7. 4 out of 5

    Travis

    Following a disaster at sea, the crew and passengers of the Chancellor are left stranded at sea and have to struggle through dealing with hardship, starvation, mutiny, the elements and creeping despair. Verne treats this situation so matter of factly that it can get a bit dry, and most of the cast never gets to be more than a type, but it also emphasizes that there are no heroes here and the calvary isn't coming. These people are on their own and are for the most part ill equipped to deal with th Following a disaster at sea, the crew and passengers of the Chancellor are left stranded at sea and have to struggle through dealing with hardship, starvation, mutiny, the elements and creeping despair. Verne treats this situation so matter of factly that it can get a bit dry, and most of the cast never gets to be more than a type, but it also emphasizes that there are no heroes here and the calvary isn't coming. These people are on their own and are for the most part ill equipped to deal with this harsh situation, so it feels very real. There is no romantic adventure at sea element to this, it is harsh and straightforward.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Stuart Taylor

    Gave me what I wanted from Moby Dick! The Survivors of the Chancellor is a book which for the first 40 - 50 pages felt dull and uneventful. Characters were established and the writing style was very fluid and immersive but it hadn't hooked me and I feared that i'd just plod through the book and conclude by giving it a lacklustre 3 stars, feeling that - though well written - it just didn't hook me. It was about this point though in these later pages where I started to realise how necessary this pa Gave me what I wanted from Moby Dick! The Survivors of the Chancellor is a book which for the first 40 - 50 pages felt dull and uneventful. Characters were established and the writing style was very fluid and immersive but it hadn't hooked me and I feared that i'd just plod through the book and conclude by giving it a lacklustre 3 stars, feeling that - though well written - it just didn't hook me. It was about this point though in these later pages where I started to realise how necessary this part of the narrative was. As the situation becomes worst and worst and the characters deteriorate, you just 'feel' it in the writing. These once lively, persevering and optimistic characters slowly become these broken down, warn out characters who just welcome death. This book is a difficult one to get into but once you're there, it never lets up. The desperation and horror of these character's situation (madness, disease and even cannibalism) paints such a vivid image and feeling of hopelessness, it's almost criminal how relatively unknown this book seems to be. It takes it's time but give it at least 80 pages before giving up. It's definitely worth it! I might also add, it describes one of the greatest Father/Son relationships i've ever read. They're honestly some of the most touching scenes.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sin

    This is one the first books that I have read in my life. I can't remember all details now but I know that it made a deep impression on me at that time. I think I can say it's one the books that got me hooked on reading. It's hard to give a rating for this book now. I will give it 5 stars rating just because of its special place in my childhood.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Will Boncher

    Pretty standard Jules Verne adventure. More cannibalism than usual.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Rashidul Karim Khan

    surprisingly this novella isnt popular. this is so well written and deserves to be noticed more among hundreds of other work of Jules Verne. Read it if you love his works.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Colin Bartol

    A surprisingly dark story. Normally Verne is much more upbeat, but this story practically could be an existentialist novel. Still it kept me engaged.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kimberly Mccrea

    Book referenced on "Lost". Regina is reading the book upside down before she wraps herself in chains and leaps off the freighter.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Amber

    LOST - 207

  15. 5 out of 5

    Steven

    I’m a huge Jules Verne fan, but there are still a few of his books I haven’t read. Until today, this was one of them. Someone unfamiliar with Verne might read Survivors and conclude he couldn’t have written it. After all, there’s no element of science fiction in it. There’s no highly-intelligent engineer or scientist in it to explain whiz-bang stuff to the less-scientific characters (and readers). There’s no amazing new vehicle conveying its occupants to exotic settings where nobody’s gone befor I’m a huge Jules Verne fan, but there are still a few of his books I haven’t read. Until today, this was one of them. Someone unfamiliar with Verne might read Survivors and conclude he couldn’t have written it. After all, there’s no element of science fiction in it. There’s no highly-intelligent engineer or scientist in it to explain whiz-bang stuff to the less-scientific characters (and readers). There’s no amazing new vehicle conveying its occupants to exotic settings where nobody’s gone before. But an avid reader of his could not mistake other Vernian signature elements in this novel. These include a voyage to a region unfamiliar to French readers of the time, the prominence of an island in the plot, a heavy dose of numbers and dates, the use of interesting and rare natural phenomena to further the plot, and female characters who are stereotypical and uninteresting compared to the males. Stories about shipwrecks and strandings were relatively common in Verne’s time. He most certainly read ‘robinsonades’ such as Robinson Crusoe (Defoe), Swiss Family Robinson (Wyss), and The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket (Poe). In fact, Survivors wouldn’t be Verne’s only contribution to that genre, The Mysterious Island being the most famous. Still, he really puts his characters through hell in this book, more so than in any other novel I’ve read by him, including Michael Strogoff: The Courier of the Czar. The book’s title tells us it’s a story of survival, and Verne wants us to imagine ourselves in their places. Would we behave nobly, as some do, or savagely, as some others? Without spoiling anything, I’ll say Verne explores the idea of whether even the noblest person could stoop to the lowest imaginable level under intense stress. Verne has been known to deviate from strict science when needed to heighten the drama. One item I found hard to swallow is that a ship’s hold full of cotton could stay on fire for two weeks. That stretched credibility for me. I listened to the audiobook version narrated by John Bolen. He did a fine job of narration, except for mispronouncing a few words such as forecastle and gunwale. Also the phrase ‘knots per hour’ makes no sense, and for that I’d blame the translator; I can’t believe Verne would make that mistake. Even though this isn’t one of Verne’s more famous works, and even though the subject is a bit dated in our era of precise navigation and instant, worldwide communication, I recommend it.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Tomi Alger

    This is another of Verne's Extra-ordinary adventures. A group of travelers and sailors set out from the Carolinas toward England, but troubles occur and soon they are off course. Eventually, a raft is keeping them alive. This book was not as scientific as his other adventures, which is a plus (in some ways). I am glad I did not have to journey with this group, being the land lubber that I am!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Skirmantė Rugsėjis

    I love stories of sunken ships , tragedies at the sea and people trying to survive . Jules Verne gives us breath-taking , adventure packed book which pulls you in from the very first page . This book will touch your emotions and can even make you wipe a tear if you are sensitive . Don't doubt that book published long time ago this is still worth to read book .

  18. 5 out of 5

    Dennis Lynch

    A shipwreck and then 40+ days at sea on a life raft. Verne works in every possible calamity for the surviving passengers and crew. 50+ short chapters keep things moving along.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Subhash

    I found it average in comparison to other books by Verne.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Royan

    Riveting from start to end! This is my 2nd voyage with Mr. Verne and we found much better footing and pacing then our 1st outing on the Nautilus. A great read for a rainy day adventure!

  21. 4 out of 5

    dragonhelmuk

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Kindled for free. This book was pretty good. A ship for some never-explained reason is steered entirely off cost, is wrecked somewhere between Africa and South America, and the castaways face starvation and slow death. This may be the first Verne book ever where Verne does not seem to be present in the story himself, and it is probably for this reason that the characters do not make their perilous situation into such an amazing opportunity that they are tempted to stay on their desert island/nor Kindled for free. This book was pretty good. A ship for some never-explained reason is steered entirely off cost, is wrecked somewhere between Africa and South America, and the castaways face starvation and slow death. This may be the first Verne book ever where Verne does not seem to be present in the story himself, and it is probably for this reason that the characters do not make their perilous situation into such an amazing opportunity that they are tempted to stay on their desert island/north pole hideout/submarine forever more. Reading about the characters did make me feel thirsty though! Three quotes to illustrate: {Verne style description, not too thick in this book} The scene presented to our eyes is one of strangest interest. The sea, carpeted thickly with masses of prolific fucus, is a vast unbroken plain of vegetation, through which the vessel makes her way as a plow. Long strips of seaweed caught up by the wind become entangled in the rigging, and hang between the masts in festoons of verdure; while others, varying from two to three hundred feet in length, twine themselves up to the very mast-head, from whence they float like streaming pennants. For many hours now, the Chancellor has been contending with this formidable accumulation of algae; her masts are circled with hydrophytes; her rigging is wreathed everywhere with creepers, fantastic as the untrammeled ten- drils of a vine, and as she works her arduous course, there are times when I can only compare her to an animated grove of verdure making its mysterious way over some illimitable prairie. {Example of hunger description} True as it was, we scarcely realized the fact of there being actually nothing until on the following morning the hour came round for the distribution of the scanty ration, and then, indeed, the truth was forced upon us in a new and startling light. Toward evening I was seized with violent pains in the stomach, accompanied by a constant desire to yawn and gape that was most distressing; but in a couple of hours the extreme agony passed away, and on the 3d I was surprised to find that I did not suffer more. I felt, it is true, that there was some great void within myself, but the sensation was quite as much moral as physical. My head was so heavy that I could not hold it up; it was swim- ming with giddiness, as though I were looking over a precipice. {Matter-of-fact writing style} Often, when reading the histories of shipwrecks, I have suspected the accounts to be greatly exaggerated; but now I fully realize their truth, and marvel when I find on how little nutriment it is possible to exist for so long a time. To our daily half-pound of biscuit the captain has thought to add a few drops of brandy, and the stimulant helps con- siderably to sustain our strength. If we had the same pro- visions for two months, or even for one, there might be room for hope; but our supplies diminish rapidly, and the time is fast approaching when of food and drink there will be none.

  22. 4 out of 5

    John Peel

    "The Survivors Of The Chancellor" - the title pretty much tells you the whole plot. An ocean voyage, a tragedy and then a grim struggle for survival. There are some nice aspects to this, with the plot backed up by Verne's meticulous research, but on the whole it isn't really all that satisfying.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Juliana Brandagamba

    (view spoiler)[Verne's works are, in more cases than one, not the cheerful optimistic works as which they are presented. His editor Hetzel had a tendency to remove dark, desolate endings and replace them with dissatisfyingly happy ones. I can only imagine that, as this book has a reasonably positive outcome, the fact that the rest of it was mostly despair, fear and dread didn't really bother the editor too much, and so here is a book that seems far grittier and realistic than most of Verne's adv (view spoiler)[Verne's works are, in more cases than one, not the cheerful optimistic works as which they are presented. His editor Hetzel had a tendency to remove dark, desolate endings and replace them with dissatisfyingly happy ones. I can only imagine that, as this book has a reasonably positive outcome, the fact that the rest of it was mostly despair, fear and dread didn't really bother the editor too much, and so here is a book that seems far grittier and realistic than most of Verne's adventures. (hide spoiler)] I adored Le Chancellor (as it is called in French). I could not but. Sketched convincingly and without a good deal of the detail and somewhat stuffy science that Verne is so good at, it draws you in slowly but deeply. The characters are nothing remarkable, just ordinary human beings, but that is precisely why it is so damned good. We could be these people. They have faults, they are not superhuman, they have temptations to which they give in; only the angelic Miss Herbey seems a bit "too good to be true". We are led on a turbulent adventure for which the outcome is never in the least certain. One finds oneself at once rooting for none of the characters, and all of them. The capricious twists and turns of the book mean that nothing is expected, and there are no heroes and villains, only humans. It is this that makes me wonder why it is not more popular. It is a masterwork, not perhaps of writing, or of literature, but as a portrayal of our own flawed selves and the lengths to which we would go to preserve the spirit of life within us. I adored it. I adore it. I return to it, and weep and smile and shudder with the characters. It's one of my favourites of all of Verne's books, and I am astonished that it is not more well known. It most certainly deserves to be.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Carl

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This book is rather gruesome in its nature and content. However it does contain in it one of my favorite lines from Jules Verne. It is the story of the people on a ship that sinks in the middle of the ocean. The entire book takes place at sea and is the story of how they survive (or don't, as the case may be). The ship leaves harbor with a load of cotton, some of which is wet. After they have been at sea for a few days, they find that the cotton has caught on fire, and all efforts to put it out to This book is rather gruesome in its nature and content. However it does contain in it one of my favorite lines from Jules Verne. It is the story of the people on a ship that sinks in the middle of the ocean. The entire book takes place at sea and is the story of how they survive (or don't, as the case may be). The ship leaves harbor with a load of cotton, some of which is wet. After they have been at sea for a few days, they find that the cotton has caught on fire, and all efforts to put it out to no avail. After a period of about a month they are washed up on a small desert island where they are able to put out the fire and repair the hole in the ship, but when they set out for land again, the ship starts leaking and slowly sinks, until they are sailing with the main deck of the ship five feet below the surface of the water. The passengers and most of the crew are taking refuge in the rigging, while the captain and other parts of the crew construct a raft for them to escape on. Seaman O'Ready, is leery of the raft, claiming to have survived nine other ship wrecks by staying with the ships, while those who left on rafts, or boats all died from exposure. Finally, just as the raft is completed, the ship has sunk to the point where the Captain, and seaman O'Ready are the only ones remaining on top of the mainmast, eveyone else having boarded the raft. They are standing in water up to their waists and the Captain tells O'Ready to board the raft. "And is it quite sure ye are that she's sinkin'?", O'Ready said. "Ay, Ay! sure enough, my man, and you'd better look sharp!" "Faith, then, and I think I will;"

  25. 5 out of 5

    Rodrigo

    This is supposed to be the journal of one of the passengers. It feels more like journalism than literature. It's well written, but it's little more than an account of facts. The characters are developed through dialog with the journal's writer and his opinions, this is well done and does not feel forced. He's the kind of person who never misjudges people, which makes the story less interesting. And all the characters act the same way the whole story, which is odd given the situations they go thro This is supposed to be the journal of one of the passengers. It feels more like journalism than literature. It's well written, but it's little more than an account of facts. The characters are developed through dialog with the journal's writer and his opinions, this is well done and does not feel forced. He's the kind of person who never misjudges people, which makes the story less interesting. And all the characters act the same way the whole story, which is odd given the situations they go through, but plausible. It's entertaining and well written, but it is a "look what happened to us" kind of book and for adventure books I prefer the "look what we did" kind.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Cait Poytress

    I may have actually liked this book had I been able to read the print copy. Unfortunately I will never know. I was stuck listening to the audiobook narrated by John Bolen, as it was all my library had. What a terrible narrator! He kept slipping in and out of accents, which were god awful anyway. On top of that, I've seen people do the thorazine shuffle with more enthusiasm than Bolen could muster in his narration. At least it was short.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Robert

    I read this book because I kind of have a fantasy of being shipwrecked. It was a quick read, but seemed to lack a plot more enticing than the shipwreck itself. It was still enjoyable for a short story, but it never managed to make me care about the characters, and the conclusion seemed quick and non-resolutiony.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Angie

    Don't read before bedtime Wow, this is not what I expected. You can really get some serious nightmares. Still it sure kept my attention. Probably an accurate account of what can happen. Makes me never want to take another cruise.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jose Moa

    A harsh history of a shipwreck and the hard times and conflictive relations of the survivors in a raft

  30. 4 out of 5

    Terri

    A straightforward but nevertheless compelling tale of shipwreck and survival.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.