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All of a Kind Family Downtown: (All of a Kind Family 2) Life in an Earlier America

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~ Available as an audio book in download format at LoDingo This sequel finds talented Ella, mischievous Henny, studious Sarah, dreamy Charlotte, and little Gertie helping Mama with their new baby brother, Charlie. Everyone will want to join the girls and their loved ones in yet another series of stories about life in an earlier America, where affection and understanding mor ~ Available as an audio book in download format at LoDingo This sequel finds talented Ella, mischievous Henny, studious Sarah, dreamy Charlotte, and little Gertie helping Mama with their new baby brother, Charlie. Everyone will want to join the girls and their loved ones in yet another series of stories about life in an earlier America, where affection and understanding more than made up for riches and luxury. "This excellent audiobook will find an eager audience in schools and public libraries." - School Library Journal "Sidney Taylor's All-of-a-Kind Family books remain a staple with readers who enjoy building long, comfortable relationships with ficitonal families." - The Horn Book "Toren lends her beautiful speaking voice to the tales, differentiating the characters in an understated storytelling style." - Today's Librarian Sydney Taylor has written many books for children, including the All-Of-A-Kind Family series: All-Of-A-Kind Family, All-Of-A-Kind Family Downtown, More All-Of-A-Kind-Family, All-Of-A-Kind Family Uptown and Ella of All-Of-A-Kind-Family. Suzanne Toren has appeared on and off Broadway and in regional theaters throughout the country. She occasionally appears on television, most recently in "Law and Order." and has recorded hundreds of audiobooks. She was the recipient of the Narrator of the Year Award for her recordings of Talking Books for the Library of Congress and of the TORGI Award from the Canadian National Institute for the Blind. File Format: M4B File Size: 100 Mb Length: 3 hrs 30 min (audio book download) Downloading from LoDingo is easy, safe & customer friendly... All audio books come in chapter format M4B for easy listening. No (DRM) file restrictions & Your audio books at LoDingo can never get lost or broken. They are always shelved in your download center at LoDingo and you can come back and instantly download them at any time.


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~ Available as an audio book in download format at LoDingo This sequel finds talented Ella, mischievous Henny, studious Sarah, dreamy Charlotte, and little Gertie helping Mama with their new baby brother, Charlie. Everyone will want to join the girls and their loved ones in yet another series of stories about life in an earlier America, where affection and understanding mor ~ Available as an audio book in download format at LoDingo This sequel finds talented Ella, mischievous Henny, studious Sarah, dreamy Charlotte, and little Gertie helping Mama with their new baby brother, Charlie. Everyone will want to join the girls and their loved ones in yet another series of stories about life in an earlier America, where affection and understanding more than made up for riches and luxury. "This excellent audiobook will find an eager audience in schools and public libraries." - School Library Journal "Sidney Taylor's All-of-a-Kind Family books remain a staple with readers who enjoy building long, comfortable relationships with ficitonal families." - The Horn Book "Toren lends her beautiful speaking voice to the tales, differentiating the characters in an understated storytelling style." - Today's Librarian Sydney Taylor has written many books for children, including the All-Of-A-Kind Family series: All-Of-A-Kind Family, All-Of-A-Kind Family Downtown, More All-Of-A-Kind-Family, All-Of-A-Kind Family Uptown and Ella of All-Of-A-Kind-Family. Suzanne Toren has appeared on and off Broadway and in regional theaters throughout the country. She occasionally appears on television, most recently in "Law and Order." and has recorded hundreds of audiobooks. She was the recipient of the Narrator of the Year Award for her recordings of Talking Books for the Library of Congress and of the TORGI Award from the Canadian National Institute for the Blind. File Format: M4B File Size: 100 Mb Length: 3 hrs 30 min (audio book download) Downloading from LoDingo is easy, safe & customer friendly... All audio books come in chapter format M4B for easy listening. No (DRM) file restrictions & Your audio books at LoDingo can never get lost or broken. They are always shelved in your download center at LoDingo and you can come back and instantly download them at any time.

30 review for All of a Kind Family Downtown: (All of a Kind Family 2) Life in an Earlier America

  1. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Vegan

    I’d skipped this one and the Ella book when I read books 1, 3, and 4 because I’d been informed that this one had been written later (turns out not to be true, though it was published later) and that the tone and story were too different, and it was not worth reading. For me it was very worth reading, and I wish I’d read them “in order” meaning in the chronological order of the ages/lives of these family members. I do wish I’d read this book right after the first book. It’s just as good and the s I’d skipped this one and the Ella book when I read books 1, 3, and 4 because I’d been informed that this one had been written later (turns out not to be true, though it was published later) and that the tone and story were too different, and it was not worth reading. For me it was very worth reading, and I wish I’d read them “in order” meaning in the chronological order of the ages/lives of these family members. I do wish I’d read this book right after the first book. It’s just as good and the style & storyline fit in well with the other 3 books, All-of-a-Kind Family, More All-of-a-Kind Family, and All-of-a-Kind Family Uptown. The fifth Ella book seems least popular and I’m not sure whether or not I’ll read it, but I probably will eventually; I’d have rather the focus been on Sarah (Sydney). I’ve always felt particularly fond of Sarah, and did again here too, and this time I also had a particular soft spot in my heart for Henny. The additions of Guido and Miss Carey were wonderful. This story is a series of connected vignettes in a year in the life of this Jewish family. Wonderfully atmospheric historical fiction mostly taking place in NYC’s Lower East Side. I always learn a lot when I read these books. The characters are memorable and endearing. Charming illustrations.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    I LOVED these books when I was a little girl and read them over and over - I learned so much about the Jewish religion - how to be in a family, the power of love, the richness of the holidays - the joys of having sisters - I could see and smell what was happening in these books - I have been on the look out for them for some time as I want to purchase them for a few of the little people in my life

  3. 4 out of 5

    Abigail

    That loving, close-knit Jewish family, five girls and one boy, whose life in New York City during the early years of the twentieth century is chronicled in author Sydney Taylor's five-book series, return in this delightful new adventure, which covers events occurring between All-of-a-Kind Family and More All-of-a-Kind Family . Because it backtracks in the chronology of the series, some readers consider it the second book, although it was published fourth. For my part, More All-of-a-Kind Fami That loving, close-knit Jewish family, five girls and one boy, whose life in New York City during the early years of the twentieth century is chronicled in author Sydney Taylor's five-book series, return in this delightful new adventure, which covers events occurring between All-of-a-Kind Family and More All-of-a-Kind Family . Because it backtracks in the chronology of the series, some readers consider it the second book, although it was published fourth. For my part, More All-of-a-Kind Family will always be the second book, although I admit this may be owing to the prejudice of childhood habit, as I always read it second on my innumerable rereads of the entire series. That said, there is a misconception, it would appear, that this was written, like the fifth book, Ella of All-of-a-Kind Family , long after the others, when in fact it wasn't. All-of-a-Kind Family Downtown was written shortly after the first book, and was intended by Taylor as a sequel. Her publisher, the Chicago-based Follett, wouldn't publish it because it contained a grittier, more realistic depiction of life on the Lower East Side than that seen in the earlier book. As a result, More All-of-a-Kind Family was published instead, and Taylor has to wait until the 1970s to see this title in print. I knew none of this as a girl, but it makes sense to my adult self, as unlike so many other readers, I was never able to spy any significant difference in style between this, and the three earlier books. The themes are a little more serious, but other than that, this in no way stands out, either in my memory or on this latest reread, as being significantly different in feeling, than the others. Leaving all of that aside, All-of-a-Kind Family Downtown is every bit as engaging as its predecessors (if a little more serious), following the ups and downs, joys and sorrows in the life of the eponymous (never named) family. Here we see Henny getting up to her usual mischief, even going so far as to "run away" for one evening, when she is sent home from school with a letter for her mother. Ella is still the responsible eldest sister, and her singing talent once again plays a role, when she is given the part of the jester in her Hebrew School's Purim play. Sarah is as sweet and generous as ever, sacrificing her tenth birthday gift in order to help family friend Guido, while Charlotte has a frightening experience involving some lovely-looking, but very dangerous burning coals. Charlie, born at the end of All-of-a-Kind Family , is still a baby, while Gertie, still quite young herself, is ever-present at all family events and celebrations. In addition to the personal adventures, and religious holidays - Purim, Simchas Torah, and Sukkot all play a role in the story - the family here also become involved in the life of a young Italian-American boy, Guido, whose mother is terribly ill, and who has no other family or friends. Their friendship with Miss Carey, one of the nurses at the nearby Settlement House, is also a theme throughout the book, which takes a much closer look at the poverty and suffering all around the girls. Although there is tragedy here, in the (view spoiler)[death of Guido's mother from consumption (hide spoiler)] , and the (view spoiler)[deaths of Miss Carey's son and husband (hide spoiler)] , some time before, there is also love, kindness, and hope, with an unlikely happy ending, in the form of (view spoiler)[Miss Carey's adoption of Guido (hide spoiler)] . As should be plain from the discussion above, I have no memory of enjoying this one less than the other books in the series, when I was a girl, although I did reread it less often as, unlike the first three, I didn't own a copy of my own. That said, I think I have a greater appreciation for it now, on this reread, than I did as a child, as I now have a better knowledge of some of the realities it is depicting. Just this past year my mother and I visited The Tenement Museum here in New York City, which recreates a number of real-life tenement apartments from various eras in the history of the building, located on Orchard Street, on the Lower East Side. We toured the "Irish Outsiders" exhibit, set during the 1860s and 1870s, and the "Hard Times" apartment, which belonged to an Italian-American family in the 1920s and 30s. Educational, by turns sobering and inspiring, it was a marvelous experience - one I cannot recommend enough! - and I feel it really gave me a better insight into and appreciation of the realities the All-of-a-Kind Family and their neighbors must have confronted, living in the area. I appreciated the inclusion of darker realities here, both as a girl and as an adult, and have never felt that they ruined the story. Taylor, as mentioned, knows how to create hope and instill confidence, even when depicting sad or disturbing truths. Highly recommend to all fans of the first three books about this family, and to anyone looking for children's stories about life on New York City's Lower East Side specifically, or new immigrant enclaves in America's cities generally.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Rebekah Morris

    There is just something refreshing about this series! The writing style is simple yet not boring. The characters are so real that I sometimes think I could go visit them. And life on the East Side of New York for this Jewish American family in the early 1900s is vivid. I love each of the girls: Ella, Hennie, Sarah, Charlotte, and Gertie, and baby Charlie. So much fun, trouble, and love.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    Just as good as the first, or maybe, even better.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Cynthia Egbert

    While I ended up reading this family's story out of order it was still warm and wonderful and I loved every word. The characters are delightful and it opened my eyes to the lives of immigrants at the turn of the last century. I am grateful that Sydney Taylor took the time to put pen to paper and record a fictionalized version of the childhood she experienced as in immigrant in New York.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Luisa Knight

    I absolutely loved the first book in this series and found this one just as adorable. The family are all so wonderful and such dear characters! These would make great family read-alouds! Ages: 9 - 12 Cleanliness: Romance Related - 5 Incidents: Girls have a crush on a certain boy. An older girl says how handsome a boy is - just observance, not a crush etc. There is family dancing - non-romantic. An old woman has a dream about a beau coming courting. “And you know what Ma, … there was a dopey boy fol I absolutely loved the first book in this series and found this one just as adorable. The family are all so wonderful and such dear characters! These would make great family read-alouds! Ages: 9 - 12 Cleanliness: Romance Related - 5 Incidents: Girls have a crush on a certain boy. An older girl says how handsome a boy is - just observance, not a crush etc. There is family dancing - non-romantic. An old woman has a dream about a beau coming courting. “And you know what Ma, … there was a dopey boy following Ella around the place. He was making goo-goo eyes at her the whole time. And Ma …” Attitudes/Disobedience - 5 Incidents: A girl sticks her tongue out at her sister. A girl decides to rip her clothes so she looks poor and can get a doll. She tells a half-truth. She repents, makes amends and learns a lesson. A girl pushes her sister on a swing too high, knowing she doesn’t like it. She is sorry and makes up. A girl recollects taking something that wasn’t hers. She says it was just a joke, but she shivers at the thought. A girl gets up on the wrong side of the bed and she behaves poorly, learning some lessons though. For a full cleanliness report, which includes Children's Bad Words, Conversation Topics and Parent Takeaway, visit my website. I have hundreds of other detailed reports too, and I also have Clean Guides (downloadable PDFs) which enable you to clean up your book before reading it! Visit my website: The Book Radar.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Gehayi

    Despite the label that indicates that this is the fourth book in the series--and it is the the fourth book published--It's the second chronologically. It begins when Charlie, the little brother of the five protagonists who was born at the end of the last book, is three months old. This book was new to me--I only owned three in the series as a child--so it was good to read stories about the family that I hadn't seen before, such as the child with theatrical ambitions and musical talent getting a p Despite the label that indicates that this is the fourth book in the series--and it is the the fourth book published--It's the second chronologically. It begins when Charlie, the little brother of the five protagonists who was born at the end of the last book, is three months old. This book was new to me--I only owned three in the series as a child--so it was good to read stories about the family that I hadn't seen before, such as the child with theatrical ambitions and musical talent getting a part in a Purim play, but not the part she wanted and the girls befriending a kindly nurse who works in a settlement house for immigrants on the Lower East Side. At the same time, there's a great deal of focus on another child (Guido, the son of a tubercular widow) rather than on Ella, Henny, Sarah, Charlotte and Gertie, and I confess that I was less invested in him than I was in the five sisters. Guido was a nice enough kid, but I knew that he wouldn't show up in the next two books and didn't expect him to appear in the final one. (Spoilers--he didn't appear.)

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jess

    This was such a feel good read. So sorry I missed that there were sequels when I was a kid!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ruth

    4.5 stars loved it on audio

  11. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    I had to read another book in the series!! Always fun!!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Audrey

    I didn't think I had read this before, but certain scenes sounded really familiar. I'm still rather amazed that the girls are allowed to wander around NYC with only thirteen-year-old Ella to watch them (and sometimes without her). Like the other books, I really enjoyed this one. The stories are just so simple and sweet. I think publishing all of the books together in a treasury would be a great idea! I hope someone does that. I was a bit confused as to how this fit into the series, as I was seei I didn't think I had read this before, but certain scenes sounded really familiar. I'm still rather amazed that the girls are allowed to wander around NYC with only thirteen-year-old Ella to watch them (and sometimes without her). Like the other books, I really enjoyed this one. The stories are just so simple and sweet. I think publishing all of the books together in a treasury would be a great idea! I hope someone does that. I was a bit confused as to how this fit into the series, as I was seeing conflicting statements as to what number it was. What I finally found out was that, although this was the second-to-last book written, the events in it take place just after All-of-a-Kind Family—so it is the second book in the series.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Melody

    Chalk up another crushing disappointment to re-reading an old favorite. I'm certainly still fond of the characters, but this book feels awkward. The dialogue is stilted, the plot clunky, and the illustrations just stink. There's certainly a place for Beth and Joe Krush, I love their work in several books- but their drawings here make my teeth hurt- their free, almost messy style doesn't gibe with Mama's bandbox neatness. This one's not going back on my shelf (which is to say, goodreads friends, Chalk up another crushing disappointment to re-reading an old favorite. I'm certainly still fond of the characters, but this book feels awkward. The dialogue is stilted, the plot clunky, and the illustrations just stink. There's certainly a place for Beth and Joe Krush, I love their work in several books- but their drawings here make my teeth hurt- their free, almost messy style doesn't gibe with Mama's bandbox neatness. This one's not going back on my shelf (which is to say, goodreads friends, if you want it, it's yours).

  14. 5 out of 5

    Wendy

    I just reread this to confirm my childhood impression--it's by far the weakest of the first four books, perhaps on a level with ELLA. The language is awkward and the dialogue is stilted. The characterizations are weak (especially of the parents and two new characters). Makes me wonder why the author decided to write this book--maybe she wanted to write something about settlement houses, and decided to give it to the AOAKF characters.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    What I never realized until today was that this book was written years after the other four--and it shows, big time. Of course, I didn't know that when I was little, and I think I read this one almost as many times as I read All-of-a-Kind Family. But it's not as charming, and neither are the illustrations. They look dated instead of classic like the beautiful pen-and-ink drawings of the other books. I mean, it's not a bad book, but the others have a lot more to recommend them.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Donna

    I have this book in hardback from childhood. This is another rating based on good memories. How I loved this family and the way they helped one another. And how I grieved for all thier troubles. This book was my first introduction to the lives of people not like myself (who were otherwise drawn from life and not fairy tales or animals).

  17. 5 out of 5

    Lesley

    Clearly an afterthought, missing the crisp characterization of earlier books in the series. Feels like Taylor was following a script with this one, which was written several years after the first three. Chronologically, it takes place between books I and II.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Leslie

    What can I say? These are really cute books about five sisters and their baby brother living in NYC around 1913. My children (8 & 9 yrs old) really enjoyed this book and learning a little about what it was like during that setting in America. We will be looking for more stories about this family!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Wendy Darling

    Probably 3.5 stars--1, 3, and 4 are my favorites in this series.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    I read these when I was in 3rd grade, I think, and it's a sweet little series of books. Great books to help educate a youngster about other cultures in an unobtrusive way.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Heidi

    All -of a- Kind Family Downtown is a work of historical fiction. It is a part of a series that chronicles the life of an immigrant Jewish family living on the Lower East Side of Manhattan in the early 1900’s. The five daughters have distinctive personalities that develop throughout the series. The book was published in 1972. It educates about Jewish religion and culture for early immigrants. Although this book is a beloved series and medals are mentioned, I cannot find a specific award it has re All -of a- Kind Family Downtown is a work of historical fiction. It is a part of a series that chronicles the life of an immigrant Jewish family living on the Lower East Side of Manhattan in the early 1900’s. The five daughters have distinctive personalities that develop throughout the series. The book was published in 1972. It educates about Jewish religion and culture for early immigrants. Although this book is a beloved series and medals are mentioned, I cannot find a specific award it has received. The author, Sydney Taylor has established awards for Jewish literature and manuscripts. The series is intended for children and teens; however, the Downtown book was initially rejected for publication because it was deemed to grim for young readers. While the All-of-a-Kind family is loving and fairly comfortable they meet up with a young Italian boy whose mother works in the harsh and unforgiving garment district environment. The hardships endured by immigrants are described and Guido’s mother eventually dies. The Kind family intervenes to lessen the boy’s suffering and embraces him after his loss. While the descriptions of poverty and illness are complete and vivid they are far from graphic. The Kind family tried to help the worst happened anyway. This may be difficult for some children to understand. Although the boy finds a home with his mother’s visiting nurse, it is still a tragic tale. The Family and their new friends are able to move on and find joy. This is an overall happy type ending but the darker themes in this book may make it more appropriate for a slightly more mature reader. The black and white illustrations throughout depict both the warmth of the kind family and the harshness of immigrant life. Although these illustrations are enjoyable they are not entirely necessary. They are a little too vague and generic to really provide us with any information to further our understanding of the characters of the story. This book would be a great accompaniment for middle schoolers learning about history and the immigrant experience in early America.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Joan

    I have to agree with other reviewers: this one is simply not as enchanting as the others. I don't think it is stilted language, as others said. It is more that the story didn't hold together very well. We have Henny being a real brat and all that we learn is that Mama had a long talk with her. It just stops short. We do have an ongoing story with Guido to hold together the book, but it isn't really enough. Somehow the story isn't particularly memorable. It isn't particularly bad, but it isn't pa I have to agree with other reviewers: this one is simply not as enchanting as the others. I don't think it is stilted language, as others said. It is more that the story didn't hold together very well. We have Henny being a real brat and all that we learn is that Mama had a long talk with her. It just stops short. We do have an ongoing story with Guido to hold together the book, but it isn't really enough. Somehow the story isn't particularly memorable. It isn't particularly bad, but it isn't particularly good either. I won't be keeping my paperback copy of this. I have no plans to read this one again.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Sara Arrigoni

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I haven’t read the others in this series, but the whole family loved this one. We listened to it on audiobook, and contrary to some critiques on Goodreads, we didn’t find the language stilted or awkward at all. I can’t speak to the illustrations as we obviously didn’t see those. I love the sisters’ empathy, the way the book tackled parental loss sensitively, and the way the adults acted in community to support one another. I also thought the descriptions of the Jewish Thanksgiving holiday were p I haven’t read the others in this series, but the whole family loved this one. We listened to it on audiobook, and contrary to some critiques on Goodreads, we didn’t find the language stilted or awkward at all. I can’t speak to the illustrations as we obviously didn’t see those. I love the sisters’ empathy, the way the book tackled parental loss sensitively, and the way the adults acted in community to support one another. I also thought the descriptions of the Jewish Thanksgiving holiday were particularly noteworthy. Highly recommend this book. Narration very well done by Suzanne Toren.

  24. 5 out of 5

    PinkAmy loves books, cats and naps

    ALL-OF-A-KIND FAMILY DOWNTOWN, the second in Sydney Taylor’s five part series has the sisters enjoying their baby brother. Most of the five girls experience growing pains, make mistakes and learn important life lessons. They befriend Guido, a boy with a sick mom who doesn’t have enough to eat and help him when his mother is hospitalized. I read this out of order, but each book can be read as a stand-alone story.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Shirley

    I didn't realize there was more in the All-of-a-Kind family books. We really love these. Very simple but fun realistic fiction set in the 1900s New York City. The chapters are a good length to read aloud and the illustrations are nice. We all enjoyed them. Boy that Henny is still a trouble maker!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kate H

    The All-of-a-Kind Family books were some of my mother's favorites growing up so of course I read them as a child. I recently re-read them and still enjoyed them as an adult. There are some parts of them that are rather problematic from a religious tolerance perspective but in general they stand the test of time and are sweet well written books.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Madame Jane

    1913 - Lower East Side, New York City. The All-of-a-Kind Family continues with the five sisters befriended troubled Guido. Dependable and rational Ella leads the way to befriend Guido. Henny continues being a mischievous little girl, and Sarah is adorable as always.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Nupur

    My 7 year old loves these gentle, everyday stories of a large family. They give her a glimpse into a life very different from hers and introduce some serious concepts- poverty, hardship, losing a parent, as well as fun and playful situations.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Ms. B

    A continuation of the first book, it appears to start where All of a Kind Family left off with the birth of Charlie, the youngest child and only brother to Ella, Henny, Sarah, Charlotte, and Gertie. Like the first book; this one is a little more than a collection of anecdotes about the sisters. This is the story of how Guido, a young boy who sometimes stops by Papa's junk shop to sell things and Miss Carey the nurse who delivered Charlie become a family.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Tressa

    I loved All-of-a-Kind Family Downtown. I loved this family--they were so kind, warm, compassionate, generous, and friendly. The narration by Suzanne Toren was great.

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