Hot Best Seller

Pyramids

Availability: Ready to download

It's bad enough being new on the job, but Teppic hasn't a clue as to what a pharaoh is supposed to do. After all, he's been trained at Ankh-Morpork's famed assassins' school, across the sea from the Kingdom of the Sun. First, there's the monumental task of building a suitable resting place for Dad -- a pyramid to end all pyramids. Then there are the myriad administrative d It's bad enough being new on the job, but Teppic hasn't a clue as to what a pharaoh is supposed to do. After all, he's been trained at Ankh-Morpork's famed assassins' school, across the sea from the Kingdom of the Sun. First, there's the monumental task of building a suitable resting place for Dad -- a pyramid to end all pyramids. Then there are the myriad administrative duties, such as dealing with mad priests, sacred crocodiles, and marching mummies. And to top it all off, the adolescent pharaoh discovers deceit, betrayal - not to mention a headstrong handmaiden - at the heart of his realm.


Compare

It's bad enough being new on the job, but Teppic hasn't a clue as to what a pharaoh is supposed to do. After all, he's been trained at Ankh-Morpork's famed assassins' school, across the sea from the Kingdom of the Sun. First, there's the monumental task of building a suitable resting place for Dad -- a pyramid to end all pyramids. Then there are the myriad administrative d It's bad enough being new on the job, but Teppic hasn't a clue as to what a pharaoh is supposed to do. After all, he's been trained at Ankh-Morpork's famed assassins' school, across the sea from the Kingdom of the Sun. First, there's the monumental task of building a suitable resting place for Dad -- a pyramid to end all pyramids. Then there are the myriad administrative duties, such as dealing with mad priests, sacred crocodiles, and marching mummies. And to top it all off, the adolescent pharaoh discovers deceit, betrayal - not to mention a headstrong handmaiden - at the heart of his realm.

30 review for Pyramids

  1. 4 out of 5

    Adrian

    So this was close to a 5 star ⭐ book, but topped out at 4.49 recurring, thus meaning due to the law of fractals and quantum, it rounds down to 4, well that’s all according to ”You Bastard” you understand 😂 More to follow when Jeht, the Boatman of the Solar Orb, rises on the morrow. So I'm guessing that Thrrp, The Charioteer of the Sun has also been through since I finished the book, but never mind, I'm sure I shall be forgiven if I build a pyramid in my garden. So this book, is outrageously funny a So this was close to a 5 star ⭐️ book, but topped out at 4.49 recurring, thus meaning due to the law of fractals and quantum, it rounds down to 4, well that’s all according to ”You Bastard” you understand 😂 More to follow when Jeht, the Boatman of the Solar Orb, rises on the morrow. So I'm guessing that Thrrp, The Charioteer of the Sun has also been through since I finished the book, but never mind, I'm sure I shall be forgiven if I build a pyramid in my garden. So this book, is outrageously funny and just such a brilliant observation on human character, from Teppic the new King, through Chidder the assassin to Ptraci the handmaiden, Endos, the listener, Ptaclusp the builder, Dios the head priest and Teppicymon the dead King. But then it is Sir Terry's oh so accurate portrayal of humans that makes his books so poignant and amusing. This book focuses on the new Kings plans to drag his (small) kingdom into the modern age, with items like plumbing and mattresses. He's learnt about these mod cons by being sent to assassins training school in Ankh Morpk, and on graduation and the death of his father tries to bring these modern ideas back to his kingdom. Unfortunately he doesn't bank on his "conservative" Head Priest Dios, who lives his life by ritual and regularity and has no time for religion despite believing that Net was the Supreme God, oh as was Hast, Fon, Set, Bin, Sot, Dhek and Ptooie, as well as a host of others. The trouble was the kingdom was a slave to ritual and to a multitude of Gods for every occasion, with many duplicates. With his father about to be entombed in the mother of all pyramids, calamity strikes and well, you just have to read it to find out how Teppic restores the kingdom and where the greatest living mathematician at the time, the camel, You Bastard fits in !!. And come to think of it why was it only 4.49 recurring, maybe it was 4.51 ?? Quick send for You Bastard.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Lyn

    Pyramids is Sir Terry Pratchett’s 7th Discworld book and the Pratchett Smile-O-Meter is dancing happily as this is another fun ride with cool Uncle Terry. This is a blisteringly funny satire on religion, faith and loyalty taking place in the blisteringly hot desert of Discworld in the Old Kingdom of Djelibeybi (which is of course analogous to Egypt in our world). First published in 1989 and by this time Pratchett’s fame and fortune with the Discworld was established and he mixed things up a bit. T Pyramids is Sir Terry Pratchett’s 7th Discworld book and the Pratchett Smile-O-Meter is dancing happily as this is another fun ride with cool Uncle Terry. This is a blisteringly funny satire on religion, faith and loyalty taking place in the blisteringly hot desert of Discworld in the Old Kingdom of Djelibeybi (which is of course analogous to Egypt in our world). First published in 1989 and by this time Pratchett’s fame and fortune with the Discworld was established and he mixed things up a bit. The first of the “stand alone” Discworld books, this does not feature many of the standard Discworld characters or themes but Pratchett’s writing is as expected and this is just as funny and as acerbically satirical as any of his other excellent adventures. Actually, though, this one goes a step further and was almost Vonnegutesque in it’s over the top, tongue-in-cheek attack on blind faith. Pratchett asks some tough questions and the answers are more than just playful spoofery as he demonstrates the bad and the worse of organized religion and the tyranny of traditionalism. This also delves into some time and quantum elements that are hilariously Pratchett and we meet a very unexpected greatest mathematician in the Discworld. A must read for Pratchett fans.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Bradley

    I think I may have enjoyed this one a bit more the second time around, but not enough to change my rating. :) Indeed, I had a lot more fun with all the quantum irregularities surrounding the Pyramids out in the boonies of Discworld. There's a lot of great ribbing for conspiracy theorists who go on and on about the dimensions of the real pyramids and the mystical importance, even going so far as to make these monuments (at least here) into time-recyclers. It's very funny and Death isn't pleased. F I think I may have enjoyed this one a bit more the second time around, but not enough to change my rating. :) Indeed, I had a lot more fun with all the quantum irregularities surrounding the Pyramids out in the boonies of Discworld. There's a lot of great ribbing for conspiracy theorists who go on and on about the dimensions of the real pyramids and the mystical importance, even going so far as to make these monuments (at least here) into time-recyclers. It's very funny and Death isn't pleased. Fortunately for Death, however, what he doesn't know won't kill him. It was also rather funny seeing a "handmaid" who'd never "serviced" a king and an "assassin" who'd never killed anyone fumble around their conversations with one another. But really, I think I had the most fun with the camels. They were a very nice touch. I always thought there was something of a math genius in all of them. Quantum accounting aside, I thought this was a very interesting and funny novel, giving us a nice background for the Assassin's guild while not precisely overburdening us (at all) with characters we'll grow to love later. That being said, I had a good time and probably a bit more than the other one-off Discworld novels that came before it. :)

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ms. Smartarse

    The desert kingdom of Djelibeybi is THE country to get yourself the ultimate eternal resting place. Boasting a history of thousands of years, its kings and queens had ample time to pepper the shore of the river Djel with pyramids of various sizes. Of course, such an endeavor is not exactly cheap and unsurprisingly, the entire kingdom is neck deep in debt. It is now up to 12-year-old crown prince Pteppic to save the country. He was signed up at the prestigious Assassin's Guild in far off Ankh Morp The desert kingdom of Djelibeybi is THE country to get yourself the ultimate eternal resting place. Boasting a history of thousands of years, its kings and queens had ample time to pepper the shore of the river Djel with pyramids of various sizes. Of course, such an endeavor is not exactly cheap and unsurprisingly, the entire kingdom is neck deep in debt. It is now up to 12-year-old crown prince Pteppic to save the country. He was signed up at the prestigious Assassin's Guild in far off Ankh Morpork, to become a certified assassin... provided of course, he can survive the grueling training. Pyramids had a lot of potential as a concept, and to his credit, sir Terry Pratchett really tried to cover as much of Egyptian history and customs as possible... and therein lies the problem. The first part (my favorite) mainly covers Pteppic's assassin training. We learn a lot about the customs of the Assassins' Guild, about the type of people who'd enlist for training, not to mention the extremely difficult graduation exam. So an excellent treat for anyone wishing for Discworld world-building. The second part focuses on Pteppic's life back in Djelibeybi, as he tries to adapt (again) to life at home, sans the modern comforts of Ankh Morpork... such as plumbing. I was torn between humor and genuine sadness when he finds out just how powerless a king is in his country. The third and final part details the supernatural adventures of Pteppic and Ptracy, while trying to save the kingdom, from all its legends and beliefs. This was the place where my patience became rather thin, and my close-to-non-existent attention span began to take a hike. Sore: 3/5 stars A very good starting point, but lost in a much too convoluted storyline. For those of you hoping to encounter one of your favorite Discworld characters, choose another book... unless you're happy with a minor guest appearance from Death. In theory, there should be something for almost everyone in this book. Cramming ancient Mythology, History and Mathematics in less 350 pages, is not the best way to go about it, though.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    Pyramids (Discworld, #7), Terry Pratchett Pyramids is a fantasy novel by British writer Terry Pratchett, published in 1989, the seventh book in his Discworld series. The main character of Pyramids is Pteppic, the crown prince of the tiny kingdom of Djelibeybi, the Discworld counterpart to Ancient Egypt. Young Pteppic has been in training at the Assassins Guild in Ankh-Morpork for several years. The day after passing his final exam he mystically senses that his father has died and that he must ret Pyramids (Discworld, #7), Terry Pratchett Pyramids is a fantasy novel by British writer Terry Pratchett, published in 1989, the seventh book in his Discworld series. The main character of Pyramids is Pteppic, the crown prince of the tiny kingdom of Djelibeybi, the Discworld counterpart to Ancient Egypt. Young Pteppic has been in training at the Assassins Guild in Ankh-Morpork for several years. The day after passing his final exam he mystically senses that his father has died and that he must return home. تاریخ نخستین خوانش: روز بیستم ماه جولای سال 2017 میلادی عنوان: مجموعه جهان صفحه - کتاب 07 - اهرام؛ نویسنده: تری پرتچت (پراچت)؛ مترجم: محمد حسینی مقدم؛ تهران، ویدا، 1395؛ در 469 ص؛ شابک: 9786002911834؛ موضوع: داستانهای نویسندگان بریتانیایی - سده 20 م ا. شربیانی

  6. 4 out of 5

    Paul O'Neill

    Terry Pratchett takes the mick out of ancient Egyptians, hilarity follows Overview Pyramids gets a solid 4 star rating. I rarely have a physical reaction when I'm reading but I was chuckling on the train to this one…hopefully not too loudly! This has turned me from a fan to a Pratchett fanboy. Structure Pyramids uses a fairly straight forward structure. It's linear and focuses, mainly, on Teppic our main character. The paragraphs are nice and short in the main. It also includes the nice little foot Terry Pratchett takes the mick out of ancient Egyptians, hilarity follows Overview Pyramids gets a solid 4 star rating. I rarely have a physical reaction when I'm reading but I was chuckling on the train to this one…hopefully not too loudly! This has turned me from a fan to a Pratchett fanboy. Structure Pyramids uses a fairly straight forward structure. It's linear and focuses, mainly, on Teppic our main character. The paragraphs are nice and short in the main. It also includes the nice little footnotes that Pratchett uses in most of his works. All in all, a very easy book to read. Characters Teppic is one of the better characters I've come across in the Discworld. There are funny moments littered throughout and I did end up feeling sorry for him throughout this book. And that's the holy grail when writing characters isn't it, make me feel for them. Pratchett certainly does so here. There isn't a huge amount of character development, Teppic’s arc is good, but considering the type of book this is there is no need to have a hugely meaningful and introspective dive into the character. The side characters are all well formed. I loved Teppicymon when he was a ghost commenting how silly all the pyramid nonsense was. Writing This is where Pratchett thrives, in his writing. If you laid out any two or three sentences and asked me to identify it's owner, it would be easy to spot Pratchett’s work. It's simply beautiful. Here's a few of my favourites: Mere animals couldn’t possibly manage to act like this. You need to be a human being to be really stupid. ‘In layman’s terms,’ the doctor sniffed, ‘he’s as dead as a doornail.’ ‘What are the complications?’ The doctor looked shifty. ‘He’s still breathing,’ he said. <><><>‘Well, what can you do about it?’ said Arthur. ‘Nothing. He’s dead. All the medical tests prove it. So, er … bury him, keep him nice and cool, and tell him to come and see me next week. In daylight, for preference.’ He also gets brownie points for using the word inhume to describe assassination. Complaints I didn't spot any errors within. My only minor complaint came with the end where it got a little confused and jumped to different povs almost from paragraph to paragraph which meant I found myself having to back track just to keep up. As I said though, fairly minor.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Toby

    When I think about the Discworld series I instinctively want to give them all 5 stars, they (via Sir Pratchett) provide such a huge amount of entertainment, fire such delights of imagination and offer much food for thought on any number of subjects both Big and small and yet as I run through the audio books in an attempts to stem the flowing tide of flabby bits about my middle I find myself unable to truthfully say that every entry is worthy of that ultimate rating. Pyramids is one such title, i When I think about the Discworld series I instinctively want to give them all 5 stars, they (via Sir Pratchett) provide such a huge amount of entertainment, fire such delights of imagination and offer much food for thought on any number of subjects both Big and small and yet as I run through the audio books in an attempts to stem the flowing tide of flabby bits about my middle I find myself unable to truthfully say that every entry is worthy of that ultimate rating. Pyramids is one such title, it is a fabulously funny book, loaded with memorable moments, classic Pratchett characters and his trademark dismantling of every day absurdities in our own reality via his fantastical world, in this instance religion, and yet it doesn't quite cause me to explode with enthusiasm for it as Mort or Wyrd Sisters did previously and I expect Guards! Guards! to do next. "What's lacking?" I hear you scream and the answer is that I honestly couldn't tell you, if I knew that I'd probably be a poor struggling book editor/publisher instead of a comfortable house husband with a lifetime of renovations with a cold beer in my hand to look forward to. The teenage years of Teppic is our first real look at the inner workings of that most illustrious of Ankh-Morpork guilds, the Assassins and Pratchett pretty much nails it first time, creating a believable and fascinating world within the city within the world and if anything there isn't ENOUGH attention paid to it. The Kingdom of Djelibeybi (potentially a silly joke but one that seems to work and make me smile every time, especially in audio book!) with its ancient customs and giant pyramids is a minefield of clever puns, and religious satire and the overall plot is one that is both completely obvious from the outset and yet the path to enlightenment is littered with detours through crocodile infested rivers and camel laden deserts so that you can easily forget that you know how things will end. Considering the humble beginnings of this series Pratchett has very quickly spread his wings and in doing so the scope of the Disc has opened up enormously in just a few short novels. It's really quite remarkable the changes in style and content and already by book seven there's nobody else quite like him or likely ever will be again.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Trish

    This seventh Discworld novel is, for once, divided into three parts. The first part, The Book of Going Forth, tells the story of the main character Pteppic (I'm reminded of the German word Teppich, which means carpet). He is the son of the ruler of the desert-country of Djelibeybi (the Discworld equivalent of Egypt) but because his mother insisted on a foreign education before her death, he spent most of his years at Ankh-Morpork's Assassin's Guild. The second part, The Book of the Dead, takes the This seventh Discworld novel is, for once, divided into three parts. The first part, The Book of Going Forth, tells the story of the main character Pteppic (I'm reminded of the German word Teppich, which means carpet). He is the son of the ruler of the desert-country of Djelibeybi (the Discworld equivalent of Egypt) but because his mother insisted on a foreign education before her death, he spent most of his years at Ankh-Morpork's Assassin's Guild. The second part, The Book of the Dead, takes the reader and Pteppic back to Pteppic's home country after his father's death, where he become's the new king (pharaoh). We learn about Djelibeybi's culture and beliefs. The third and final part, The Book of the New Son, details Pteppic's and Ptraci's quest to undo the problems from the gigantic pyramid and putting everything back in order. The story itself was not as laugh-out-loud funny as the ones about the witches or Death, but the very sarcastic and ironic view on Egyptology (culture and mythology of Ancient Egypt) was immense fun nonetheless - I suppose because I always liked anything to do with Ancient Egypt so much. Naturally, since this is Terry Pratchett, he also talks about all manner of other topics from religion and the power of belief to tradition vs. reform, antique and modern concepts, the role of women in all of that (although only lightly here) and education in all its forms. What stands out here is the amount of clever puns and twists on well-known stories from our world. The puns are not only used to explain phenomena on the Discworld but are even used as names of characters (like IIb which spells as "to be" and is the name of the eldest son of Ptaclusp, who is of course destined to become his father's successor - his younger brother is called IIa). So while the book has a straight-forward story, as usual for Pratchett's Discworld, it's more about what the story is used to explore in the author's trademark humour, which isn't for everyone but I love it.

  9. 4 out of 5

    David Sarkies

    And the gods go crazy 24 November 2012 I am really glad that I decided to reread a the Discworld novels to give them a better commentary as I have found that I have been quite enjoying them, and in many ways they have been getting better and better. However, this is the second to last one that I read (and it seems that I may have originally read them in order of publication, since the last one I read was Guards, Guards, and that is sitting next to me waiting to be reread very soon). Pratchett see And the gods go crazy 24 November 2012 I am really glad that I decided to reread a the Discworld novels to give them a better commentary as I have found that I have been quite enjoying them, and in many ways they have been getting better and better. However, this is the second to last one that I read (and it seems that I may have originally read them in order of publication, since the last one I read was Guards, Guards, and that is sitting next to me waiting to be reread very soon). Pratchett seems to have tried another experiment in this one where he has created a number of new characters and a new setting, though like the other Discworld novels Anhk-Morpork does play a role. In this story we travel to the kingdom of Djelibeybi (pronounced Jellybaby) which sits on the river Djel. It is very clear that this kingdom is based on Ancient Egypt, and it is nestled between the nations of Tsort and Ephebe (which is supposed to be Greece, right down to their drunken symposiums). The thing about Djelibeybi is that it is a kingdom where tradition rules, to the point that it is impossible for the king to actually break with tradition. However, the king is not actually the ruler but rather the priests, and in particular the priest Dios. I really don't want to give too much away but Dios is actually one of Pratchett's most memorable characters. The reason being is that despite being the antagonist of the novel, he does not come across as being either bad or misguided. He simply does things the way that things have always been done. He is a man of tradition, and tradition must be followed. As mentioned, he is the actual ruler of the kingdom, though he never actually says that, simply because he is the one who advises the king, and interprets what he says. In fact it is very clear that the subjects never actually listen to the king, but rather to him, so that when the king tries to change tradition, Dios will always interpret the words as sticking with tradition ('I shall set him free,' says the king, as which Dios interprets as being 'throw him to the crocodiles'). The problem arose when the previous king decided that he wanted his son to have a good education, and normally that would simply mean being taught by the priest, specifically Dios. Instead the king sent his son, the protagonist of the piece, to the Assassin's Guild in Ankh-Morpork. As it turns out, the Assassin's Guild actually provides probably the best well rounded education on Discworld, and the comments about the assassins are actually quite good as well. An assassin does not murder for any other reason than money, and it is not that life is cheap, on the contrary, it is actually very expensive, especially if you get an assassin to kill somebody. Interesting concept though, because in reality that is true. It doesn't cost you much, in fact, it doesn't cost you anything, to be dead. You simply lie there and rot. However, to live, it costs you quite a lot of money ($35.00 AU per day, which includes rent and bills, public transport, groceries, health insurance, and a mobile phone). Moreso, it costs you an awful lot of money to actually stay alive and to keep on living. Hmm, I could actually do the sums, and work out how much it actually costs to live for one day, but I won't. Anyway, if you like maths, and like the idea of maths being turn on its head, you will like this book as well. As it turns out camels are the greatest mathematicians in the world (which I disagree with because it actually turns out that it is cats who are the world's greatest mathematicians - I remember having a dream back in 1994, before I had read this book, where I came to the realisation that my sister's cat, Twinkle, understood imaginary numbers and calculus, however had no reason to actually use it). One of the interesting things about this book is the concept of belief, and it is something that I come across again and again in my Christian walk. Simply because you believe something does not make it true. I may believe that a plane will get me from Melbourne to Hong Kong, but no amount of belief is going to actually stop the engine from blowing up over the South China Sea. This idea is explored in this story, particularly with the idea that the kings of Djelibeybi believed that after death they would travel to the netherworld. This was a really strong belief that turned out to be wrong. Instead, they spent eternity as ghosts stuck in their pyramids. The absurdity of belief comes to the fore when the entire kingdom collapses in on itself. Basically it has been said by the gods (namely Dios) that the late king would be buried in the greatest and biggest pyramid ever built, however pyramids have a habit of storing time, and the stored time must discharged regularly. Unfortuantely this pyramid was so big that it ended up throwing everything out of whack, causing Djelibeybi to be sucked into its own dimension where all of the belief became reality. As such, the gods, who only existed in the mind of Dios, became real, to the point that the five sun gods ended up playing soccer with the sun (to produce a very amusing sporting commentary), and the gods, who had no real personality or character, simply went around destroying the kingdom because they had nothing else to do. I guess this is one of this things that I at least got out of this book: how we tend to prefer to listen to another person's interpretation of faith than actually finding out for ourselves. I have even experienced it where a priest will actually twist the words of a religious book around so that it says the complete opposite. It is not so much the priests that are the problem, but rather us, who are allowing ourselves to listen to the priests and not actually think for ourselves. Granted, many priests do not allow their interpretations to be questioned, and have studied their respective texts for so long that they are experts in interpreting it in their own way. However, the Bible was written in Koine Greek for a reason, and that was so that it could be read and understood by the common person of the day, rather than having it interpreted through a priestly cache. That was why Jesus was such a revolutionary, because his teachings took the power out of the hands of the priests and gave it back to where it rightfully belonged, and that was with God. However it is a shame that we as humans always seem to allow the priests to step in between us and God, to continue to twist his words around to suit their own selfish purposes.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Celise

    "People needed to believe in gods, if only because it was so hard to believe in people." Here's one for the history buffs. Anyone who's familiar with the Trojan War or has an interest in Ancient Egypt and Greece would probably get a kick out of this. So many good references. In case that doesn't interest you, there are also some assassins and some camels who are very good at math. I didn't enjoy this one as much as I had expected to. I think it just felt too long (for a Pratchett novel) and the "People needed to believe in gods, if only because it was so hard to believe in people." Here's one for the history buffs. Anyone who's familiar with the Trojan War or has an interest in Ancient Egypt and Greece would probably get a kick out of this. So many good references. In case that doesn't interest you, there are also some assassins and some camels who are very good at math. I didn't enjoy this one as much as I had expected to. I think it just felt too long (for a Pratchett novel) and there were too many tangents. Still, three stars on a Discworld novel is equivalent to what I would rate four stars on something else. He sets his own bar pretty high.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Lindsay

    Back to the Pratchett reread with the SpecFic Buddy Reads group. I skipped Wyrd Sisters because I've only recently reread it, but now I'm back on the main thread of the read. This is at least my third read of this (and probably more; I can remember when there were only ten or so Discworld books and I would read a selection of them every year). Pteppic (Teppic) is the crown prince of the Old Kingdom of Djelibeybi and has been studying abroad in Ankh-Morpork with the Assassin's Guild when his fathe Back to the Pratchett reread with the SpecFic Buddy Reads group. I skipped Wyrd Sisters because I've only recently reread it, but now I'm back on the main thread of the read. This is at least my third read of this (and probably more; I can remember when there were only ten or so Discworld books and I would read a selection of them every year). Pteppic (Teppic) is the crown prince of the Old Kingdom of Djelibeybi and has been studying abroad in Ankh-Morpork with the Assassin's Guild when his father King Teppicymon XXVII dies. As he starts manifesting the powers of the God of his Kingdom he quickly returns only to find that the King doesn't get to do or decide very much with the High Priest Dios interpreting everything he says. But then he commits the Kingdom to building the largest pyramid ever, and the whole thing begins to unravel as the power inherent in the Pyramids of Djelibeybi is unleashed. This is a Discworld novel that's very nearly there. It has a similar structure to later books in the series, but with a completely new set of characters that we don't get to revisit. The story is also nowhere near as rooted in allegory as later books. The characters are great though, with even the "bad guy" being written sympathetically, although this is a sad lapse into previous type in terms of his writing of women with Ptraci being treated relatively poorly. Still, she's a step up from Conina and Bethan.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Rob

    Executive Summary: Another good, but not great entry in the Discworld series. This one seems to read pretty much stand alone, though I think it would be best to have some knowledge of the series prior to this book. Full Review It's been a few months since my marathon of several of the previous books, and I was in the mood for Mr. Pratchett's humor. I'd been in a bit of a reading slump after my previous book, and hoped this would be a light quick read to break me of that. Unfortunately that wasn't Executive Summary: Another good, but not great entry in the Discworld series. This one seems to read pretty much stand alone, though I think it would be best to have some knowledge of the series prior to this book. Full Review It's been a few months since my marathon of several of the previous books, and I was in the mood for Mr. Pratchett's humor. I'd been in a bit of a reading slump after my previous book, and hoped this would be a light quick read to break me of that. Unfortunately that wasn't the case. It was light, and quite funny at times, and usually very quotable. I just never really got into it like I have some of the other books. I didn't care too much about the characters I guess. I found Teppic largely forgettable, Dios quite annoying and the camel and all its related jokes groan worthy. I loved the setting though. When I was younger I absolutely loved ancient Egypt, pyramids and the Sphynx. I'm surprised I didn't like it more as a result. A lot of the pyramid related humor was pretty good, but not enough to always hold my interest. I went many days between reading, and was never really in a rush to get back to it. In a series this long and varied, there are likely to be some books I'll enjoy more than others, and this one just falls into that latter category for me. I'll probably take another month or two long break before finally tackling Guards! Guards!, which will hopefully live up to the high expectations people have built up for me.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan

    Philosophically, this is the richest Discworld novel so far. (I'm reading them in order of publication.) It mounts a delightful critique of tradition and religion. It's not just another tiresome empiricist refutation-by-lack-of-imagination, or even another tiresome denunciation of priestcraft -- although it contains elements of both. It's actually an idealist critique, in the end. Here's a scene from pp. 202-3: Belief is a force. It's a weak force, by comparison with gravity; when it comes to mov Philosophically, this is the richest Discworld novel so far. (I'm reading them in order of publication.) It mounts a delightful critique of tradition and religion. It's not just another tiresome empiricist refutation-by-lack-of-imagination, or even another tiresome denunciation of priestcraft -- although it contains elements of both. It's actually an idealist critique, in the end. Here's a scene from pp. 202-3: Belief is a force. It's a weak force, by comparison with gravity; when it comes to moving mountains, gravity wins every time. But it still exists, and now that the Old Kingdom was enclosed upon itself, floating free of the rest of the universe, drifting away from the general consensus that is dignified by the name of reality, the power of belief was making itself felt. For seven thousand years the people of Djelibeybi had believed in their gods. Now their gods existed. They had, as it were, the complete Set. And the people of the Old Kingdom were learning that, for example, Vut the Dog-Headed God of the Evening looks a lot better painted on a pot than he does when all seventy feet of him, growling and stinking, is lurching down the street outside. Now, the weakness of Pratchett's approach is that it concedes that religions do have the key efficacy they claim for themselves. Thus, it leaves open the possibility that a religion exists that does not involve a Vut the Dog-Headed God of the Evening.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    Pyramids is, so far, my favourite Terry Pratchett book. The humour is sublime, and that's why I read him. This takes place on the Discworld, but isn't part of any other series. The characters here don't get to have any more adventures. But that's fine, because their stories are complete. This is one of the true Discworld standalones (I know everyone says that you can read any Discworld book in any order, but that's madness!). What actually happens in this book? An assassin that's taking his final e Pyramids is, so far, my favourite Terry Pratchett book. The humour is sublime, and that's why I read him. This takes place on the Discworld, but isn't part of any other series. The characters here don't get to have any more adventures. But that's fine, because their stories are complete. This is one of the true Discworld standalones (I know everyone says that you can read any Discworld book in any order, but that's madness!). What actually happens in this book? An assassin that's taking his final exam receives a letter from home that he needs to return because he's the rightful heir to the throne. Then some stuff happens. As it always is with Pratchett, the "stuff" doesn't really matter. I can't point to a single part of this book and tell you why it's my favourite in the series, because I've forgotten all of the funny parts that made me laugh, because jokes are fleeting and of the moment. And yet it's those jokes that make me love this book above his others. Okay, here's a random quote from the book that I googled to cap this review off: “People needed to believe in gods, if only because it was so hard to believe in people.”

  15. 4 out of 5

    Yara (The Narratologist)

    In Pyramids, the seventh book in the Discworld universe and the first in the gods/ancient civilisations subseries, Pratchett tackles ancient Egypt and the pseudoscientific “pyramid power” theory. It tells the story of a young prince-turned-assassin and the strange the country of Djelibeybi (ha!), where pyramids dominate the landscape and the king is believed to be a god. Mummies come to life, deities wreak havoc, time and space are bent beyond all recognition, and Pratchett even manages to squee In Pyramids, the seventh book in the Discworld universe and the first in the gods/ancient civilisations subseries, Pratchett tackles ancient Egypt and the pseudoscientific “pyramid power” theory. It tells the story of a young prince-turned-assassin and the strange the country of Djelibeybi (ha!), where pyramids dominate the landscape and the king is believed to be a god. Mummies come to life, deities wreak havoc, time and space are bent beyond all recognition, and Pratchett even manages to squeeze a few jabs at the ancient Greeks in there. While nothing earth-shattering, it is a solid entry in the Discworld series. And yet, I am giving it five stars. You see, even though Pyramids is not a perfect novel, but it was the one I desperately needed to read and the reason I will be eternally grateful to Terry Pratchett. (Warning: highly personal story ahead.) Read More

  16. 4 out of 5

    Christine

    Pratchett vs. Egypt? Guess who wins? What happens when an assassin inherits a kingdom that is stuck in the past? Read this to find out. In fact, I think Pratchett might have been on to something.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Alfred Haplo

    This is a novel lost in praises, but not of its own. Wedged between two immensely popular books, Wyrd Sisters #6 (2nd of Witches sub-series) and Guards! Guards! #8 (1st of City Watch sub-series), Pyramids #7 suffers from understatement by proximity. It is the book your finger passes as it brushes perpendicularly across the upright spines of DiscWorld books in the bookstore to invest that US$9.99 saved just enough to buy one Pratchett book. It is also the book you may not see displayed at the lib This is a novel lost in praises, but not of its own. Wedged between two immensely popular books, Wyrd Sisters #6 (2nd of Witches sub-series) and Guards! Guards! #8 (1st of City Watch sub-series), Pyramids #7 suffers from understatement by proximity. It is the book your finger passes as it brushes perpendicularly across the upright spines of DiscWorld books in the bookstore to invest that US$9.99 saved just enough to buy one Pratchett book. It is also the book you may not see displayed at the library, and is only available online, as precious shelf space is occupied by books in higher demand. So, unless you are staunchly reading in publication order (*raises hand*) or a first-timer seeking a random launching pad since all books can be read on their own, or have excess funds and time so you will try a lesser known book, then chances are you will bypass Pyramids. More’s the pity... But! You are still reading after this long preamble, so there is hope yet. Much goes on in Pyramids, but not much is central to what you may expect. Summarily, it has no wizards, no witches, no standout larger-than-life character, no clear villains, no pairings of obverse personalities, no extensive world-building, no traipsing adventures, no active magic system and is only loosely tethered to Ankh-Morpork. Bereft of such trappings, or a combination thereof, found in early DiscWorld, Pyramids is a tentative feeler of sorts, I think, of how a divergence into more erudite philosophical themes and less reliance on magical gimmicks might appeal to a fast-growing, and savvier, readership. It is unknown to me if the books were published in the order they were written. Would Pyramids (1989) be better received by an audience primed for deeper works along the same thematic vein if it had been released after Small Gods #13 (1992), which is widely acknowledged as one of Pratchett's best? Contrariwise, was Pyramids a deliberate primer for Small Gods? Pyramids is not entirely unfamiliar settings-wise. It extracts shamelessly from ancient Egypt and humorously transpose its cultural essence into a tiny kingdom named Djelibeybi (go ahead, giggle). An Egyptophile like me laps it all up - pharaohs, hieroglyphics, mummies - but the superficiality while super fun, is not the story’s substance. With characteristic non-shouty manner, Pratchett pokes holes at religious dogma and age-old traditions by quietly calling out the practice of blind faith so detrimental to economy and modernity. Time stands still in this backward state, as if Djelibeybi is entombed in a metaphorical pyramid and preserved in slow decay. Change, to the Djel citizenry, is as foreign as toilet plumbing. Both are privately contemplated but never publicly sought. However, as time will attest, nothing is constant except change. Upon his father’s demise, crown prince Teppicymon XXVIII (oh, call him Teppic) returns home after a stint as assassin in Ankh-Morpork. Now, you can take Teppic out of Djelibeybi but you cannot take Djelibeybi out of Teppic. Not initially. He ruled as his father and forefathers did, with ignorance and obeisance until time exposes a civilization at the brink of obscurity and in dire need of a king to step up. And up, and up... Teppic may well be my favorite protagonist. Here is a character who for once, is not an underdog or disadvantaged by hormones or the supernatural but with increasing personal insights, nudges closer to the edge of a paradigm shift. I really love his assassin story in the first chapter, but in retrospect, it is disconnected to the remaining three chapters. By and large, the supporting characters add breadth and depth by virtue of their often misguided, but always hilarious, commentaries and eventual self-realizations. Pyramids may be the most character-focus story to-date, though it would be quite perfect if it was just a little more character driven. Anyone who knows me, knows that is my kind of story. The finale is fabulous in every way; there is closure without the abruptness or rush seen in earlier books, and even leaves off with an open-ended possibility for a main character. Though sadly, with Pratchett’s passing, this Djel baby ends here. Whatever this says of my warped sense of humor, the puns and witticism on unsexy, science-y subjects in this book are just dead on funny. Here is a riddle I imagine the Sphinx may ask right before it tears you apart - how many mathematicians, accountants, architects, embalmers, priests, philosophers, assassins, kings, handmaidens, camels, tortoises, live mummies and dead daddies does it take to save Djelibeybi from the biggest pyramid it has ever built? The answer begins at page 1 of Pyramids. Find out. 4.5 stars, rounded up.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Peter

    Read this today while my youngest daughter is recovering from surgery. Another Pratchett that I have read before, but an edition I never owned. Bless you Pterry.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Choko

    Oooo, i needed that!!!! Just as exquisite and funny and inelegant as i needed it to be!!!! i LOVE this author!!!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    The only good thing about commercial air travel is that it provides ample opportunity to read. And if anything can make a delayed flight tolerable, it's Pratchett in fine form. This is top-shelf Discworld. I don't know how I managed not to ever have read this particular one before. If Small Gods is my favorite Discworld volume, this one's certainly in the top five. It's got plenty of witty asides and groaner puns, but being an early book in the series, spares the reader the tedium of the usual An The only good thing about commercial air travel is that it provides ample opportunity to read. And if anything can make a delayed flight tolerable, it's Pratchett in fine form. This is top-shelf Discworld. I don't know how I managed not to ever have read this particular one before. If Small Gods is my favorite Discworld volume, this one's certainly in the top five. It's got plenty of witty asides and groaner puns, but being an early book in the series, spares the reader the tedium of the usual Ankh-Morpork stock characters. A very nice stand-alone, should you be looking to visit Discworld for the first time (or seduce a friend to the series).

  21. 5 out of 5

    Michael Campbell

    Good for a laugh and it has some thoughtful insights, but overall, it's not one of his better books. The plot drags a bit at times, and it felt too long. The references to Ancient Egypt and the Trojan War were probably my favorite parts. I also love the way Terry Pratchett writes characters, even if none of these particularly struck me as likable. To be honest, I'd probably like this more if it didn't feel like Pratchett did this and did it better in Small Gods. There were lots of similarities, Good for a laugh and it has some thoughtful insights, but overall, it's not one of his better books. The plot drags a bit at times, and it felt too long. The references to Ancient Egypt and the Trojan War were probably my favorite parts. I also love the way Terry Pratchett writes characters, even if none of these particularly struck me as likable. To be honest, I'd probably like this more if it didn't feel like Pratchett did this and did it better in Small Gods. There were lots of similarities, and Small Gods is just significantly better at making all the points Pratchett tried to make here.

  22. 5 out of 5

    YouKneeK

    This book is a more-or-less standalone novel in the Discworld universe. The chart shows it as the start of the Ancient Civilizations subseries, but it only has a dotted line (minor connection) to other books. I enjoyed this, but not as much as some of the previous Discworld books. The protagonist is Teppic, the only son of the king of a small kingdom. This kingdom has stayed relatively unchanged for about 7000 years and its citizens rarely venture beyond its borders. They value ritual and traditi This book is a more-or-less standalone novel in the Discworld universe. The chart shows it as the start of the Ancient Civilizations subseries, but it only has a dotted line (minor connection) to other books. I enjoyed this, but not as much as some of the previous Discworld books. The protagonist is Teppic, the only son of the king of a small kingdom. This kingdom has stayed relatively unchanged for about 7000 years and its citizens rarely venture beyond its borders. They value ritual and tradition and they’re terrified of change. One of those traditions includes mummifying their kings and building pyramids to place them in. Pyramids are apparently very tricky things… Before the book begins, Teppic decides to go off to assassin’s school. The book starts with Teppic taking his final exam, with brief flashbacks about how he got there. The early part, where Teppic was still at the school, was the part I enjoyed the most. After that, my interest in the story fluctuated. I enjoyed it over-all, but it was easy to put the book down. Teppic annoyed me sometimes, because I thought he handled some things too passively. However, the other characters were far worse. The Pratchett-style humor is still there in full force, though, and I laughed out loud several times. This book did have one awesome thing going for it, though. Camels! I love camels because they have funny faces, and Discworld’s version of camels are pretty funny too. I wanted to read more about the camels. The next Discworld book on my list is Guards! Guards!, the first book in the Watch subseries. I’m looking forward to that one, but first I’m going to resume the Discworld break I was taking before The Sheep Look Up sent me scrambling for something light and fluffy.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sukayna

    Just finished re-reading this one, and wanted to say how wonderful it is! It's mind bendingly quantum, has fabulous parallels with the roundworld, puns galore (Djelibeybi? Ptraci?) and the greatest mathematician on the Disc: You Bastard. The characters are beautifully drawn, and Pratchett's humanism is once again apparent. There are no really evil characters, just misguided ones, and in portraying these characters he highlights universal human failings and encourages introspection and understand Just finished re-reading this one, and wanted to say how wonderful it is! It's mind bendingly quantum, has fabulous parallels with the roundworld, puns galore (Djelibeybi? Ptraci?) and the greatest mathematician on the Disc: You Bastard. The characters are beautifully drawn, and Pratchett's humanism is once again apparent. There are no really evil characters, just misguided ones, and in portraying these characters he highlights universal human failings and encourages introspection and understanding. Quite apart from all the philosophy, and boy is there some, the humour is at it's best. As always it's the little touches that make it, like the Tsortean wooden horse on rockers, the religion in Viper House and all Teppic's mattresses and plumbers (so small I only found it on my fifth reading). Another joy, for Discworld regulars, is the deepening of one's store of knowledge about the brilliant Assassin's Guild, and affiliated school. Obviously it's an early book, so it's still Dr. Cruces, not Lord Downey, who is in charge, but it's a brilliantly detailed insight into an establishment we all know and love. Filled with Ephebians, Tsortians, stunned seagulls, Commerce, knives, handmaidens and High Priests, not to mention the mummies, a sphinx, embalmers and paracosmic architects; this is one of the very best of the early Discworld books. Oh and I almost forgot to mention the PYRAMIDS!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    I enjoyed this one, even though it felt a bit like a trilogy of short stories pulled together in one volume, honestly the Assassin Guild beginning was quite good on its own, but I also liked the returning home and home not being the same part, and then finally the magical pyramid part. I left feeling like some of that ending was left undefined, I’m hoping we see a few of these characters again somewhere along the way.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Karin

    My daughter is only three months old and she's already read her first Discworld novel...or at least listened to it. We decided last month that we wanted to create a family tradition of reading out loud before bedtime and, not wanting to have this hanging out there as something we wanted to do but might never start, we decided to start early. This way she won't ever remember a time when there wasn't bedtime reading. She loves it as far as we can tell. She spends time smiling at whichever parent i My daughter is only three months old and she's already read her first Discworld novel...or at least listened to it. We decided last month that we wanted to create a family tradition of reading out loud before bedtime and, not wanting to have this hanging out there as something we wanted to do but might never start, we decided to start early. This way she won't ever remember a time when there wasn't bedtime reading. She loves it as far as we can tell. She spends time smiling at whichever parent isn't reading and then falls asleep toward the end. So this book has been read 10 pages at a time, night after night, which required patience when we wanted to keep reading but needed badly to go to bed. Pyramids is the 7th book in Terry Pratchett's fantastically popular Discworld series, though the numbering is mostly arbitrary since this book is a standalone that requires no prior knowledge of Discworld or its stories. It follows the adventures of Teppic or, as the high priest Dios repeatedly recites, "His Greatness the King Pteppicymon XXVIII, Lord of the Heavens, Charioteer of the Wagon of the Sun, Steersman of the Barque of the Sun, Guardian of the Secret Knowledge, Lord of the Horizon, Keeper of the Way, the Flail of Mercy, the High Born One, the Never Dying King" who is called back from his training as an assassin in Ankh-Morpork to rule Djelibeybi. Along the way we meet the many contradictory gods of Djelibeybi, all of Teppic's ancestors, and the greatest mathematician on the disc, You Bastard, a camel. Pratchett has a flair for puns both immediate and extended. He jokes about philosophy, modern society's fascination with ancient Egypt, religion, and sexism, all with such levity that it's hard to disagree that all of these things are to some degree absurd. The entire book was hilarious. I can't wait to read the next Discworld novel. General consensus is that they only get better from here and, I'm sure, when she's old enough, I'll get to read this one again when my daughter can actually understand it.

  26. 5 out of 5

    colleen the convivial curmudgeon

    Entering the reread of this one, I didn't really remember a single thing about the story. The only thing I knew was that this was never one of my favorites. I think I enjoyed it more on the reread than I did on my first go around, though it probably still won't be one of my faves. It won't be in the bottom tier, either. This is pretty much a standalone in the series. I don't believe we ever encounter Teppic again - or, if we do, I don't recall it just now - but it's also a companion piece with Sma Entering the reread of this one, I didn't really remember a single thing about the story. The only thing I knew was that this was never one of my favorites. I think I enjoyed it more on the reread than I did on my first go around, though it probably still won't be one of my faves. It won't be in the bottom tier, either. This is pretty much a standalone in the series. I don't believe we ever encounter Teppic again - or, if we do, I don't recall it just now - but it's also a companion piece with Small Gods (which is one of my faves) because both deal with life outside of the usual places and also, more importantly, deal with the realities of faith and gods and religion - not all of which go well together. There were some really nice quotes from this book, and I did find it an enjoyable and interesting read. (As a side note, I'm note sure I got the sound-joke of Djelibeybi the first time, and now I'm wondering how in the hell I would've missed it!)

  27. 5 out of 5

    aPriL does feral sometimes

    Absolutely top form with jokes, puns, and word play coming so fast one hardly has time to calm down when the next sentence has the eyes tearing up with laughter. I was snorting and guffawing without cease. Hilarious. The mummies just about killed me I was laughing so hard. I hope we see the camel again in a later book. I love that bastar - ahem, beast.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Audrey

    This episode of Discworld stars a new pharoah, just graduated from Assassin’s College. (The parts at the assassin school were my favorites.) The young pharoah’s dad has just died, but the dad gets to remain a character in the book. Death has only a very small appearance. The dead pharoah, now aware of what death is like, decides he doesn’t want to be buried in a pyramid; his country (D’Jelly Baby) has gone bankrupt building elaborate pyramids. But, being dead, his wishes are ignored, and a grand This episode of Discworld stars a new pharoah, just graduated from Assassin’s College. (The parts at the assassin school were my favorites.) The young pharoah’s dad has just died, but the dad gets to remain a character in the book. Death has only a very small appearance. The dead pharoah, now aware of what death is like, decides he doesn’t want to be buried in a pyramid; his country (D’Jelly Baby) has gone bankrupt building elaborate pyramids. But, being dead, his wishes are ignored, and a grand pyramid is under construction. However, giant pyramids have a way of attracting quantum magic of a sort, and that results in crazy stuff in the kingdom. So the plot is kind of strange, but there are plenty of funny bits. The camels were my other favorite part. Her singing always cheered him up. Life seemed so much brighter when she stopped. This means either that the universe is more full of wonders than we can hope to understand or, more probably, that scientists make things up as they go along. His ancestors had been keen on pyramids. The pharaoh wasn’t. Pyramids had bankrupted the country, drained it drier than ever the river did. The only curse they could afford to put on a tomb these days was “Bugger Off.” He pushed the food around on his plate. Some of it pushed back. Book Blog

  29. 5 out of 5

    Vi

    This one was incredibly painful to get through. While there are wonderful flickers of Pratchett's literary command and wit sprinkled throughout, the plot was uninteresting and the characters hard to care about. I finished the book after a month and a half with sheer stubbornness pulling me along. If you're not a die-hard fan of the author or the Discworld series (and man, even if you are...), I say STEER CLEAR.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Esme

    This is another one that I haven’t read in years, so long, in fact, it almost read fresh for me. This could be one of the rare Discworld books I may not have ever re-read before. This is a true stand-alone, there’s not another Discworld book that features Teppic as a main character and I think for that reason I tend to overlook it. Part of the joy of Discworld for me is getting to know the characters really well and watch them progress, like Sam Vimes. So, I tend not to revisit the stand alones This is another one that I haven’t read in years, so long, in fact, it almost read fresh for me. This could be one of the rare Discworld books I may not have ever re-read before. This is a true stand-alone, there’s not another Discworld book that features Teppic as a main character and I think for that reason I tend to overlook it. Part of the joy of Discworld for me is getting to know the characters really well and watch them progress, like Sam Vimes. So, I tend not to revisit the stand alones as often as maybe I should. Teppic is the son of a king, the king of the “Old Kingdom” where their kings are considered to be gods in the flesh. His father’s main responsibility to the kingdom is making sure the sun comes up, the rains come, and the river floods when it’s supposed to. All said it’s a pretty cushy job since Teppic doesn’t remember seeing his father put any real effort into making the sun come up, and the priests run the day to day necessities of the kingdom. His parents decide that they want him to be educated and send him off to the Assassin’s Guild in Ankh Morpork. This is a serious culture shock for Teppic who’s accustomed to people waiting on him hand and foot. He’s figured out that he’s not anything special at the assassin’s academy, and is treated like any other student. The book opens with Teppic trying to pass his last exam known as The Run, where they do a mock trial of an assassination. Many students try and fail the last exam, and are never seen or heard from again, it’s best to just pass the test. There’s a lot of flashbacks, especially in the beginning, and it can be difficult to follow at first, but it all comes together eventually. Shortly after taking the final exam, Teppic’s father dies and he has a divine calling to go back home and take his place as ruler. Once he goes back home, however, he realizes that his country is sort of backwards, and not modern at all. He misses indoor plumbing, he wants medicine and to treat his subjects with some form of dignity. His country is deeply steeped in tradition, rituals, and strict rules to follow. Despite his good intentions, Teppic finds his rule constantly undermined by those around him because deliberately misinterpret his orders so they fall in line with old traditions. Or, they straight up interfere with his orders, like the ships that were supposed to be carrying the feather beds and plumbers from Ankh mysteriously losing their way or their cargo on their journey to the Old Kingdom. Since Teppic is now the Pharoah his subjects are made uncomfortable when he tries to approach them, viewing him more as a god than as a man. Approaching his subjects can even put them in danger as he soon learned when he went to shake the hand of a stonemason and it resulted in the mason getting his hand cut off. He was shocked and appalled and tried his best to make things right, saying that the practice is barbaric and he has no intention of following through with the punishment. However, the man he touched was so devout it was taking an effort from the priests to prevent him from using a chisel to chop off his own hand. Things take a turn for the dire when a handmaiden is brought before him for judgment. She was refusing to “take the potion”, which was effectively a suicide potion so she could serve the previous king in the afterlife. She doesn’t want to kill herself, she doesn’t want to live in the netherworld, but custom demands that she be a loyal servant. Despite Teppic saying she should be set free, his priest/advisor twists the words and sentences the girl to death. This was the tipping point for Teppic and he decides to use his assassin skills to rescue her. The world building in this one got expanded quite a bit since much of the book is set in the Old Kingdom and not one of the more familiar places like Ankh or Lancre. There’s a whole different culture, religion, geography and what have you, so this read very fresh and new. The pyramids themselves are magical, often spouting off cold and silent fire into the night illuminating the surrounding city. The pacing for this one took a while, the real meat of the story didn’t really begin until Teppic was out of Ankh Morpork and back in the Old Kingdom. From there though the story kind of took off and also took a turn for the weird and surreal. I did like Teppic, although he won’t ever rank as one of my favorite characters in Discworld. He really did try his best to do right by his kingdom, he wanted to make changes for everyone’s benefit and certainly didn’t see himself as some god ruling over mere mortals. I didn’t laugh as much as I did with the last book, Wyrd Sisters, but this did have me smiling throughout it. More of a mild warmth and amusement over laugh out loud moments. Audience: nonwestern setting comic fantasy Egyptian lore King/ruler POV’s likable main characters satire of fantasy tropes Ratings: Plot: 11.5/15 Characters: 12/15 World Building: 13/15 Writing: 13/15 Pacing: 11/15 Originality: 13/15 Personal Enjoyment: 7.5/10 Final Score: 81/100

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.