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Frankenstein The Graphic Novel

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Conceived as part of a literary game among friends in 1816, Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein is today regarded as a classic piece of 19th century literature. The story begins with the journey of an adventurer, Robert Walton, who saves the life of a man at the North Pole. That man, Victor Frankenstein, tells Walton about his experiments with the creation of life and how he ended Conceived as part of a literary game among friends in 1816, Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein is today regarded as a classic piece of 19th century literature. The story begins with the journey of an adventurer, Robert Walton, who saves the life of a man at the North Pole. That man, Victor Frankenstein, tells Walton about his experiments with the creation of life and how he ended up at the North Pole. Through this simple plot device, Shelley was able to deal with serious real-world issues like acceptance, tolerance, and understanding, as well as the universal human need for companionship and love. The novel, of course, inspired a host of films, from the 1931 classic starring Boris Karloff to Andy Warhol’s Frankenstein, and more recently, a series of novels by Dean Koontz. This version, though slightly abridged, retains much of the original dialogue and remains true to Shelley’s brilliant vision.


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Conceived as part of a literary game among friends in 1816, Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein is today regarded as a classic piece of 19th century literature. The story begins with the journey of an adventurer, Robert Walton, who saves the life of a man at the North Pole. That man, Victor Frankenstein, tells Walton about his experiments with the creation of life and how he ended Conceived as part of a literary game among friends in 1816, Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein is today regarded as a classic piece of 19th century literature. The story begins with the journey of an adventurer, Robert Walton, who saves the life of a man at the North Pole. That man, Victor Frankenstein, tells Walton about his experiments with the creation of life and how he ended up at the North Pole. Through this simple plot device, Shelley was able to deal with serious real-world issues like acceptance, tolerance, and understanding, as well as the universal human need for companionship and love. The novel, of course, inspired a host of films, from the 1931 classic starring Boris Karloff to Andy Warhol’s Frankenstein, and more recently, a series of novels by Dean Koontz. This version, though slightly abridged, retains much of the original dialogue and remains true to Shelley’s brilliant vision.

30 review for Frankenstein The Graphic Novel

  1. 5 out of 5

    Melissa ♥ Dog/Wolf Lover ♥ Martin

    I really liked this graphic novel, but I am sad to say this is the only Frankenstein book I have ever read!!! I need to get the mass market paperback! I have seen a million movies but never read a book until this graphic novel. The graphics are good, but I hate how Victor just leaves the poor monster. He doesn't try to help him or anything, he just makes him and then freaks out. Victor is telling his story to some men that saved him from the frozen sea, where he was chasing a beast. He told them I really liked this graphic novel, but I am sad to say this is the only Frankenstein book I have ever read!!! I need to get the mass market paperback! I have seen a million movies but never read a book until this graphic novel. The graphics are good, but I hate how Victor just leaves the poor monster. He doesn't try to help him or anything, he just makes him and then freaks out. Victor is telling his story to some men that saved him from the frozen sea, where he was chasing a beast. He told them the whole story. You would think after the beast killed one of Victor's family members because of how Victor just ran away and left him, he would become friends with the beast. Even after the beast tried to be friends and told him what he wanted so he wouldn't be lonely. Did Victor do this.. well no.. not in this book.. duh.. what are you think is going to happen when you keep being cruel to creatures... I felt sorry for poor ole beast/man/would be a cool friend/Frankenstein... I mean he was in son if you look at it that way.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Carol

    ..........FRANKENSTEIN..........Gosh, I feel like a kid! Love the cover.....Love the feel and size of the book.....Love the beautifully colored illustrations.....Love that I own it....can display it....can read it again and again.....but most of all.....Love that the story is true to the classic first published in 1818 when Mary Shelley was only twenty years of age! It's also good to know the movie versions I've seen over the years deviate a long way from this original gothic tale.While the stor ..........FRANKENSTEIN..........Gosh, I feel like a kid! Love the cover.....Love the feel and size of the book.....Love the beautifully colored illustrations.....Love that I own it....can display it....can read it again and again.....but most of all.....Love that the story is true to the classic first published in 1818 when Mary Shelley was only twenty years of age! It's also good to know the movie versions I've seen over the years deviate a long way from this original gothic tale.While the story was a great read, it was interesting to find out about Mary Shelley's personal life too and how she actually came to write this timeless novel.As I read more graphic novels, I now understand why so many of my adult GR friends are enjoying these fun works of fiction!

  3. 5 out of 5

    L. McCoy

    I recently tried the original story but couldn’t finish because I wasn’t into the writing style and the audiobook was glitchy but after reading this... I will probably re-add the original to my reading list because this was good! What’s it about? In case you’ve been living under a rock or in a coma since the 19th century, Frankenstein is the story of a doctor (Victor Frankenstein) who ends up creating a new life form using a corpse... It goes horribly wrong. Pros: The story is very interesting and n I recently tried the original story but couldn’t finish because I wasn’t into the writing style and the audiobook was glitchy but after reading this... I will probably re-add the original to my reading list because this was good! What’s it about? In case you’ve been living under a rock or in a coma since the 19th century, Frankenstein is the story of a doctor (Victor Frankenstein) who ends up creating a new life form using a corpse... It goes horribly wrong. Pros: The story is very interesting and never made me bored. The art is fantastic! It really brings this book to life! The horror aspect of the book is really well done through both the story and illustrations! This book has some fast paced action scenes that are very well done. That doesn’t mean it’s an action book or anything, it is a bit more slow paced (it suits the story well though) but it has those good, exciting scenes! This book is extremely suspenseful! Cons: The characters are not interesting. Victor goes from bland to a**hole. Victor’s wife who we are meant to care about is barely in the book. Frankenstein’s monster was interesting but when he starts his whole (view spoiler)[ revenge killing thing, though it makes sense and I like a good revenge story, it almost proves to Victor that his creation is a monster so it’s kinda stupid. (hide spoiler)] I didn’t care for the narrative. Overall: This is a good book that I think most horror fans will enjoy but is not a masterpiece or anything in my opinion. I would recommend this to horror fans or fans of the classic tale in general (this is meant to be one of the most accurate retellings of the story in the comic book format. Can’t tell you if that’s 100% accurate though). 4/5

  4. 4 out of 5

    Christine

    I have quickly become a fan of Classic Comics, original text versions of classic literature. Last month I read Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte and now this month, Frankenstein by Mary Shelley, which was as equally thought provoking as it was heart wrenching. Prior to reading the Frankenstein graphic novel, I admittedly knew very little of this classic literary work other than it was a story about a man who created a monster who gets loose in the world and frightens, torments and even murders innoc I have quickly become a fan of Classic Comics, original text versions of classic literature. Last month I read Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte and now this month, Frankenstein by Mary Shelley, which was as equally thought provoking as it was heart wrenching. Prior to reading the Frankenstein graphic novel, I admittedly knew very little of this classic literary work other than it was a story about a man who created a monster who gets loose in the world and frightens, torments and even murders innocent people. I did not know the characters, the plot or the thought provoking themes of the story including the moral implications of scientific and medicinal advancements and the responsibilities that lie therein. Nor did I have any inkling as to how very sad and tragic this story is. Before, I merely thought it a horror story. This graphic novel version of Frankenstein also includes a brief, yet informative biography of Mary Shelley and an account of the immediate and long term success of Frankenstein from when it was first published in 1818 when the author was merely 21 years old to the present day. Nearly two hundred years later, Frankenstein is still widely known all over the world and has been adapted into countless retellings and productions on stage, in radio and film. Frankenstein is an exceptionally insightful and expressive story. I highly recommend this graphic novel to everyone. You might just be surprised at how little you truly know about Victor Frankenstein and his creation.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kris

    A pretty decent adaptation of Frankenstein, which is one of my favorite novels. I liked that it used Shelley's actual language for the most part, and the art added to it. A fun read, but go read the actual novel, too!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Mauoijenn

    I was excited that I found this at my local library. I have been on a graphic novel kick for the past couple of months, so checking this one out was a no-brainer. Excellent story, of course!! Good graphics. A Frankenstein must for any fan.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kristen

    My MT and I are considering teaching this graphic novel version of the classic instead of the novel itself (supplementing the unit with excerpts from the real thing, of course). After reading, I definitely support the switch! This version exclusively used language from the original text, the rendering was extremely easy to follow and accessible for students who are unfamiliar with graphic novel jargon and logistics, and the artwork really preserves the haunting enchantment of the classic without My MT and I are considering teaching this graphic novel version of the classic instead of the novel itself (supplementing the unit with excerpts from the real thing, of course). After reading, I definitely support the switch! This version exclusively used language from the original text, the rendering was extremely easy to follow and accessible for students who are unfamiliar with graphic novel jargon and logistics, and the artwork really preserves the haunting enchantment of the classic without so much of the (at times) sticky language. I think my students will love it!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Bjorn

    Lazy adaptation, simply keeping a simplified version of Shelley's text and letting Frankenstein monologue on top of images. The one thing I do like is that it downplays the monster's ugliness, making him (at least in the text) more horrifying and wrong than simply ugly. Much better recipe for horror.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Spectre

    Graphic presentation of the classic horror story of human engineering gone astray.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Logan Brown

    Disclaimer: I haven't read the original. I absolutely hated the art in this. The overuse of shadows just made it feel like there was an issue in the printing process. I thought the story's pacing was really disjointed and I just wanted to it be over the entire time. I haven't decided yet if this version has made me want to read the original or stay far away from it.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kaycee

    Back in high school I read Frankenstein Frankenstein and to much of a popular opinion I absolutely hated it with every ounce of my being.. I didn't need to read page after page of how the characters felt with every step they took. It was a complete snooze fest. So based upon that I was leery when I received a copy of the graphic novel. So with udder dread and harsh feelings I dove in with the attitude of this is going to "suck more then the book did and it won't change how I feel." About 30 page Back in high school I read Frankenstein Frankenstein and to much of a popular opinion I absolutely hated it with every ounce of my being.. I didn't need to read page after page of how the characters felt with every step they took. It was a complete snooze fest. So based upon that I was leery when I received a copy of the graphic novel. So with udder dread and harsh feelings I dove in with the attitude of this is going to "suck more then the book did and it won't change how I feel." About 30 pages in, I found myself actually enjoying the graphic novel. It became such an easy read and the art work was amazing. I absolutely love this version of Frankenstein. I would have probably loved the book more if the graphic novel was available when I was in high-school.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Icats

    As I mentioned before when my husband asked me what I wanted for Christmas, I told him The Sandman Volume 10: The Wake. I received Hellboy Volume 1: Seed of Destruction. My birthday was at the end of January and when he asked what I wanted I said I was good with Hellboy Volume 2: Wake the Devil. I was once again surprised with Frankenstein The Graphic Novel. Despite the all black front cover, the graphics are very colorful and vivid. I thought they did a good job in the conversion to the graphic As I mentioned before when my husband asked me what I wanted for Christmas, I told him The Sandman Volume 10: The Wake. I received Hellboy Volume 1: Seed of Destruction. My birthday was at the end of January and when he asked what I wanted I said I was good with Hellboy Volume 2: Wake the Devil. I was once again surprised with Frankenstein The Graphic Novel. Despite the all black front cover, the graphics are very colorful and vivid. I thought they did a good job in the conversion to the graphic novel, though there were a few illustrations of the creature where I thought its expressions did not go along with the text. For me the most fascinating part of the book was at the end where they gave a 6-page biography of Mary Shelly, including how she came up with the inspiration for Frankenstein. I had always heard it was from a dream, but according to this book it started with a challenge from her circle of friends to all write a supernatural tale. At first she struggled to come up with any ideas and it was after the challenge was over following another gathering and bad weather that sparked the vision for her Frankenstein. There are several passages from her journal through out the biography. Mary Shelly's short life was anything but typical for the times and unfortunately encompassed a great deal of grief. After the biography the book goes on with the history of Frankenstein and how the creature from the book evolved to the creature we know today including when we began to blur the name of the doctor with the name of the creature. It ends with a brief section on the steps involved of creating the graphic novel. I know this will sound bad, but I think I enjoyed the additional section at the end more than the story itself. Still, I would recommend this book to those who are huge gothic horror fans, those curious on the transformation from classic novel to graphic novel, or those who like to get their history from other sources versus Wikapedia ;) .

  13. 5 out of 5

    Alexa

    3.5 stars

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jacqi

    Great way to get kids to read the classics!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Kael

    Frankenstein by Mary Shelly. I really enjoyed this book mainly because I love the story of Frankenstein. It was sad how a couple of people died because of Frankenstein, especially his brother. That was sad to see his family fall apart. My favorite character is Dr. Frankenstein. I loved how he was able to cope will all the trials and struggles that Frankenstein threw at him. He says, "You must create a female for me, this you alone can do, you must not refuse to concede!" (Shelley 81). As you can Frankenstein by Mary Shelly. I really enjoyed this book mainly because I love the story of Frankenstein. It was sad how a couple of people died because of Frankenstein, especially his brother. That was sad to see his family fall apart. My favorite character is Dr. Frankenstein. I loved how he was able to cope will all the trials and struggles that Frankenstein threw at him. He says, "You must create a female for me, this you alone can do, you must not refuse to concede!" (Shelley 81). As you can see Frankenstein has to, in order to save mankind, must make Frankenstein a female to be with forever alone.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Leah

    4.5 stars! This graphic adaptation was incredible. The team did a wonderful job of portraying the complex themes present in the original story via this medium. It was a page-turner despite the fact that I knew the entire outcome of the story. The colors were vivid, the imagery sharp, the lessons mapped out. I would recommend this to all! (I guess I should add that some of the drawings were a bit graphic in parts, but it added to the story for me, so if that sort of thing freaks you out or sticks 4.5 stars! This graphic adaptation was incredible. The team did a wonderful job of portraying the complex themes present in the original story via this medium. It was a page-turner despite the fact that I knew the entire outcome of the story. The colors were vivid, the imagery sharp, the lessons mapped out. I would recommend this to all! (I guess I should add that some of the drawings were a bit graphic in parts, but it added to the story for me, so if that sort of thing freaks you out or sticks with you against your wishes, maybe the original Mary Shelley novel is for you.)

  17. 4 out of 5

    Quasaro

    It's a good option if you are learning English. It uses a basic vocabulary, perfect for beginners. In addition, it inclues a CD, so that you can listen to the dialogues and that will help you assimilate the pronunciation. Moreover, the graphic design looks wonderdul.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ashton

    The book was really interesting and is a good read if you are in need of a book that takes little time to read taking me only 2 days to read. However short it maybe doesn't mean it's not a great take on this classic!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Elle Kay

    Very accessible and easy to read graphic retelling of this classic story of love and torment and the weakness of man. A nice version for those new to the classics.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Valentine Boyev

    Rush storyline with a pretty typical graphic style.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kate

    My only complaint is that in some scenes, some of the minor characters were tough to tell apart, and this could be confusing for readers with no prior experience with the story.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Miya

    super. i really enjoy these graphic novels...

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sean Dorsey

    I did not like Mary Shelley's original Frankenstein but I respect it. This book does not do it justice

  24. 4 out of 5

    Caro

    3/5 Read it for school. It was good though a little bit short in my opinion. The drawings were great.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Chloe Pullar

    It was HORRIBLE!!!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Katie Solt

    i love it was every good it made want two read the book

  27. 5 out of 5

    Yasiru (reviews will soon be removed and linked to blog)

    On Classical Comics as a concept, I must say this an excellent format with which to bring classic works across the divide and gain them a new and enthusiastic audience, and ought to be embraced by parents and teachers alike where reticence towards sticking with the original works becomes an issue. In this particular adaptation of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, the execution certainly does not leave much to be desired. The artwork (including the colouring) on the whole is top notch, and the letterin On Classical Comics as a concept, I must say this an excellent format with which to bring classic works across the divide and gain them a new and enthusiastic audience, and ought to be embraced by parents and teachers alike where reticence towards sticking with the original works becomes an issue. In this particular adaptation of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, the execution certainly does not leave much to be desired. The artwork (including the colouring) on the whole is top notch, and the lettering, though dense due to extracting text from the original novel, is also without fault and not as distracting as one might expect. As such, the availability of a 'Quick Text' edition doesn't make much sense to me in this particular case, though I can see how a sense for the story can be instilled before coming to the archaic speech in something like a Shakespearean play (of course, part of the experience with Shakespeare is the language, and as such this isn't a replacement for the original so much as an aid to grasping its meaning; but here we go somewhat far afield), aiding the pace that comes easily to the graphic novel format at the hands of a talented artist and adapter (or in the case of the Original Text versions, an editor). In the capacity of an aid, a list of dramatis personae at the beginning and a neat biography of the author along with some notes on the enduring impact of the work at the end are provided. The book itself is a quality product, printed on thick paper and sturdily bound. The cover of the edition I borrowed at the library seemed all black at first and the lightly shaded figure was not readily apparent. This may however be due to the thin plastic cover they had overlaid, and the website above now shows a less uniform cover. Of Shelley's Frankenstein I have little to add that might not be found in a review below or of the original novel here or elsewhere. It is a poignant tragedy which veers from the seeming cautionary tale due a newly unshackled age (hinted early in my opinion, by the casual mention of Agrippa, Paracelsus and Albert Magnus- men held in high estimation by young Victor Frankenstein) and becomes an exploration of what remains of a man when the fires of obsession kindled in confident method (which is why the work is important as a progenitor of the science fiction genre) have consumed him and borne fruit, and how the man sees always his hand reflected in that work of toil he comes to find hideous, having been risen to passion by the toil and the goal, but not the eventual achievement (a twist on the Promethean parallel, though I think Victor embodies both the Titan and Zeus himself). The loss of purpose too, passes from the maker to the creation, prompting the reader to look upon a truer 'monster' within Victor and apprehend him through the eyes of Victor's creation (the Miltonian parallel). The tone of the story is much distorted in modern depictions, which leave much of this sophisticated interplay out in order to pile on cheaper horror elements (horror as a mainstream genre, perhaps due to the rise and prevalence of film, has much changed since Shelley's time; I would today more precisely call Frankenstein a 'psychological horror story' despite the long-exploited monster imagery), but the art is never so overt in this adaptation to overwhelm the sense the author presumably sought to convey.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Nono Qiu

    I read the book called Frankenstein the Graphic Novel. Mary Shelley wrote it. It was about a man called Victor Frankenstein who made a huge monster. Victor’s monster had a hard time “living” with humans. The story ended by the monster destroying his creator and his family. My favorite part was the part when Victor was making the monster. He was patiently making the body and focusing a lot. The monster came alive by a big machine Victor made. There were so much blood in the room, but victor didn I read the book called Frankenstein the Graphic Novel. Mary Shelley wrote it. It was about a man called Victor Frankenstein who made a huge monster. Victor’s monster had a hard time “living” with humans. The story ended by the monster destroying his creator and his family. My favorite part was the part when Victor was making the monster. He was patiently making the body and focusing a lot. The monster came alive by a big machine Victor made. There were so much blood in the room, but victor didn’t really care about it. The monster was strong and big, his skin was a color between grey and green. It was a little ugly. I like that part because the author used lots of onomatopoeias to describe how painful it was when the monster was receiving the electricity from the machine that Victor used. The author also drew cool fictional pictures of the monster. I felt like I was right next to them and watching them. The author’s purpose was to tell us to think before you do things. That was Victor’s mistake in the story. I have to say it was a good reminder for me. My connection to this book was just like what Victor did in the story, he didn’t really think before he made the monster that killed his whole family. I don’t think before I do things sometimes either. I learned to think and to pay attention to things I am doing or I might hurt someone. I also learned to control myself when I really want to do something that I can’t do. Just like Victor, he was so addicted to science that he made something that destroyed his life. I would recommend this book to those people who like to read fantasy books because it has cool pictures about amazing scientific stuff that had been made up. It also has a good, realistic story. I have to say it is a really exciting fantasy graphic novel storybook after all. I like this book very much.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Moopies

    I read this because I couldnt get through the book; I'd started it a few times, and I didnt really like the style it was written in so I couldnt finish it; I think it suites comic much better. I didnt like the story very much, it shows the Ugly side of humanity and then justifies it in the end. The "monster" who hates mankind starts to agree with the Idiot Creator in thinking that he was a monster and didnt deserve anything but misery and hatred, which is all he ever had. I Hate Frankenstein. He I read this because I couldnt get through the book; I'd started it a few times, and I didnt really like the style it was written in so I couldnt finish it; I think it suites comic much better. I didnt like the story very much, it shows the Ugly side of humanity and then justifies it in the end. The "monster" who hates mankind starts to agree with the Idiot Creator in thinking that he was a monster and didnt deserve anything but misery and hatred, which is all he ever had. I Hate Frankenstein. He deserved the insanity and terror and misery he got, I think he deserved much worse for what he did. He was a Selfish Coward who could never finish what he started, I think the only character worth any salt was the Monster. He tried to be good and kind, but every time the humans would scream and run or try and maim him. He tried again and again, always the same reactions. I'm not entirely sure if Shelley was in agreement with the idea that we should hunt and ostrasize things and people that are different, or if she was trying to point out that it is wrong. She tells it through a third person, but the Coward is the teller so I think it was the former because she Never Ever Ever had any other character say otherwise, the only one to say it was the monster, not even the blind Guy was kind! The monster received no kindness, and was hated for being different. I would not suggest Frankensteins monster to my enemy. I really did not like this Thing One thing I did Like about this story was how it points out that everything starts Good, but somtimes misery intervenes and changes that.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Manda

    Nomadic SA Chick's book Reviews Summary Mary Shelley's classic Frankenstein is retold (original text) in a graphic novel. Dr. Frankenstein has created a creature. THE creature. Now it is loose, and Frankenstein is on the hunt for it before it can kill again. Review I'm a huge fan of Shelley's original work. I'm also a huge fan of graphic novels. I was excited and a bit skeptical when I found this in a used book store recently. I am really happy that I took a chance on this. The fact that Shelley's Nomadic SA Chick's book Reviews Summary Mary Shelley's classic Frankenstein is retold (original text) in a graphic novel. Dr. Frankenstein has created a creature. THE creature. Now it is loose, and Frankenstein is on the hunt for it before it can kill again. Review I'm a huge fan of Shelley's original work. I'm also a huge fan of graphic novels. I was excited and a bit skeptical when I found this in a used book store recently. I am really happy that I took a chance on this. The fact that Shelley's original text was used, put me at ease. Though you can get a "quick" (read: modern) text version as well. Cobley only added to a favorite classic by putting it in GN form with beautiful illustrations. The tundra climate Shelley had described in her book, and that I had created in my mind, looked nearly identical to the one Cobley created in this novel. Very well done. I am so happy I found this. Ratings (based on a 10 point scale) Quality of Writing - 8 Pace - 7 Plot Development - 8 Characters - 7 Enjoyability - 9 Insightfulness - 5 Ease of Reading - 8 Photos/Illustrations - 9 Overall Rating - 4 out of 5 stars

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