Hot Best Seller

More Than Enough: Claiming Space for Who You Are (No Matter What They Say)

Availability: Ready to download

“Elaine gifts us all with a beautifully intimate and powerful retelling of her ever-unfolding journey. In sharing her joys, pitfalls, adventures, self-doubt, and successes, she reminds us that through uncovering and discovering the many facets of ourselves, we are more than enough.” —Yara Shahidi “Elaine’s book is a call for young women to find their voice and spark their co “Elaine gifts us all with a beautifully intimate and powerful retelling of her ever-unfolding journey. In sharing her joys, pitfalls, adventures, self-doubt, and successes, she reminds us that through uncovering and discovering the many facets of ourselves, we are more than enough.” —Yara Shahidi “Elaine’s book is a call for young women to find their voice and spark their courage—it’s a book I would have loved to discover as a young woman starting my own career.” —Reese Witherspoon In this part-manifesto, part-memoir, the revolutionary editor who infused social consciousness into the pages of Teen Vogue explores what it means to come into your own—on your own terms Throughout her life, Elaine Welteroth has climbed the ranks of media and fashion, shattering ceilings along the way. In this riveting and timely memoir, the groundbreaking journalist unpacks lessons on race, identity, and success through her own journey, from navigating her way as the unstoppable child of an unlikely interracial marriage in small-town California to finding herself on the frontlines of a modern movement for the next generation of change makers. Welteroth moves beyond the headlines and highlight reels to share the profound lessons and struggles of being a barrier-breaker across so many intersections. As a young boss and often the only Black woman in the room, she’s had enough of the world telling her—and all women—they’re not enough. As she learns to rely on herself by looking both inward and upward, we’re ultimately reminded that we’re more than enough.


Compare

“Elaine gifts us all with a beautifully intimate and powerful retelling of her ever-unfolding journey. In sharing her joys, pitfalls, adventures, self-doubt, and successes, she reminds us that through uncovering and discovering the many facets of ourselves, we are more than enough.” —Yara Shahidi “Elaine’s book is a call for young women to find their voice and spark their co “Elaine gifts us all with a beautifully intimate and powerful retelling of her ever-unfolding journey. In sharing her joys, pitfalls, adventures, self-doubt, and successes, she reminds us that through uncovering and discovering the many facets of ourselves, we are more than enough.” —Yara Shahidi “Elaine’s book is a call for young women to find their voice and spark their courage—it’s a book I would have loved to discover as a young woman starting my own career.” —Reese Witherspoon In this part-manifesto, part-memoir, the revolutionary editor who infused social consciousness into the pages of Teen Vogue explores what it means to come into your own—on your own terms Throughout her life, Elaine Welteroth has climbed the ranks of media and fashion, shattering ceilings along the way. In this riveting and timely memoir, the groundbreaking journalist unpacks lessons on race, identity, and success through her own journey, from navigating her way as the unstoppable child of an unlikely interracial marriage in small-town California to finding herself on the frontlines of a modern movement for the next generation of change makers. Welteroth moves beyond the headlines and highlight reels to share the profound lessons and struggles of being a barrier-breaker across so many intersections. As a young boss and often the only Black woman in the room, she’s had enough of the world telling her—and all women—they’re not enough. As she learns to rely on herself by looking both inward and upward, we’re ultimately reminded that we’re more than enough.

30 review for More Than Enough: Claiming Space for Who You Are (No Matter What They Say)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Mantas

    Wow, I have to say Wow! This book really put some things into perspective for me. Some which I knew already, being a woman, and the challenges we face everyday in the work place and life and even touch on the #MeToo movement. It also really helped open my eyes to some amazing pieces I wasn't aware of for the Black community. There are so many beautiful inspiring stories in this book, I recommend it to all my friends. It has also helped me, as I am starting up at a new company, to find my voice a Wow, I have to say Wow! This book really put some things into perspective for me. Some which I knew already, being a woman, and the challenges we face everyday in the work place and life and even touch on the #MeToo movement. It also really helped open my eyes to some amazing pieces I wasn't aware of for the Black community. There are so many beautiful inspiring stories in this book, I recommend it to all my friends. It has also helped me, as I am starting up at a new company, to find my voice and speak up for what I don't agree with, and where I see change needs to happen. I even want to see about getting shirts made for our staff or in our store that say: #BetheChange We all have an impact to make in this world, and we can all be allies to one another. I hope many of the people who were shared about in Elaine's life have found the way to correct their course, and deal with that inner being which seeks to blame others for their hardships, mistakes, or misunderstandings. I still cannot believe what happened to Jonathan in the west village, but now I want to be more awake to the fact that these things are happening, all the time. And we need to change. We can all be a part of the change in our worlds.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth Darrell

    Never has a memoir made me feel so seen and motivated. More Than Enough is a book that will resonate with any minority who has ever felt invisible, any woman who's ever been in a shitty relationship, and any young budding millennial activist trying to pave their way through their professional field. Elaine is nothing short of an icon. I could easily read this book a thousand times over.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Morgan

    Wow. This book. I have no words and so many words about why I loved this book so much. Elaine Welteroth is truly an inspiration for so many reasons, and getting to read her story in her beautifully written words- I am thankful for the experience. Her rise to Editor-In-Chief of Vogue is extraordinary. She even says in the book that people are often interested in the results and the firsts, but now the hustle it takes to get there. For me as a young black woman professional reading about her ups a Wow. This book. I have no words and so many words about why I loved this book so much. Elaine Welteroth is truly an inspiration for so many reasons, and getting to read her story in her beautifully written words- I am thankful for the experience. Her rise to Editor-In-Chief of Vogue is extraordinary. She even says in the book that people are often interested in the results and the firsts, but now the hustle it takes to get there. For me as a young black woman professional reading about her ups and downs gave me another boost I didn't know I needed. Elaine really has a beautiful way with words (this is not shocking because she's a journalist duh) and reading her book was equal parts page turner and inspirational. I laughed and cried with her. I feel like a better person for having read this book. She gave me a boost and I'm just so grateful. What a beautiful reminder that I am...MORE THAN ENOUGH <3

  4. 5 out of 5

    Robin

    Since Elaine is a new judge on Project Runway, I wanted to hear her story, but assumed I would skim through this book just to get the gist of it. I ended up reading every word. Loved it.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Cathline

    So many quoteable moments in this book. Really inspiring and helpful for people from all walks of life

  6. 5 out of 5

    Cortney

    “We went through what we went through so that you could live, baby girl. So you gotta live. Run after it. And know that we are all with you.” I was tearing up at the first chapter. This book was easy to read and Elaine passes on so many little gems and life lessons. I loved how she made sure to talk about the many challenges she faced while trying to achieve her goals. Watching someone’s life play out on social media can make things appear more prefect than they really are. Looks can be deceivin “We went through what we went through so that you could live, baby girl. So you gotta live. Run after it. And know that we are all with you.” I was tearing up at the first chapter. This book was easy to read and Elaine passes on so many little gems and life lessons. I loved how she made sure to talk about the many challenges she faced while trying to achieve her goals. Watching someone’s life play out on social media can make things appear more prefect than they really are. Looks can be deceiving. I related to her on a professional and personal level. Totally understood her mixed feelings concerning how she first got the “editor” position at Teen Vogue. Having to paste on a half hearted smile for every one who is happy for you but doesn’t know the real situation. Feeling like you should be grateful for the opportunity but also like you are being taken advantage of by people who know they are doing it. Also that sting of micro aggressions from people who you consider friends. Having to constantly hold your tongue because you would rather spend your time and energy on more important things. There are so many good takeaways from this book and I highly recommend it. Everyone can benefit from reading it, especially young girls.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    Holy shit, go read this book. Welteroth is a formidable talent and her memoir is raw and honest, equal parts confession and advice. Totally inspiring and bad-ass. Ending the first day of the #24in48readathon at 6 hours and 20 minutes, not too shabby!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Alison Caldicott

    This is a brilliant read and Elaine is one truly inspirational woman. I am still floored that they closed Teen Vogue when Elaine was at the helm and creating some of the most compelling female focused content on the planet. Jam packed with super useful personal and professional life lessons for women of all ages and backgrounds.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Casey Frank

    This was a lovely and lovingly crafted memoir that both took me inside an unfamiliar world with someone I was only vaguely familiar with, a welcome bit of kinship in the places where my experience overlapped, and a inspirational charge to be unapologetic in who you are and what you want- especially if you come from a marginalized community. As a white cisgendered heterosexual woman this book was another piece of storytelling I needed to hear in order to continue to gain more awareness about the p This was a lovely and lovingly crafted memoir that both took me inside an unfamiliar world with someone I was only vaguely familiar with, a welcome bit of kinship in the places where my experience overlapped, and a inspirational charge to be unapologetic in who you are and what you want- especially if you come from a marginalized community. As a white cisgendered heterosexual woman this book was another piece of storytelling I needed to hear in order to continue to gain more awareness about the privileges my status in this culture has afforded me. But it was also a place where I felt seen, knowing that I have spent years feeling othered or ashamed of my curly hair and of having a large body in a world that attaches worth to my smallness. Elaine writes speaks to the experience of being a black woman in this country and the world, but also speaks to the importance of acceptance and progress in an intersectional and inclusive way. Elaine's story is an inspiring one to be certain, but one that for those of us who can't thrive in a hustle, one that doesn't have to be aspirational. Sometimes when I read memoirs like these, with someone who is so diligent, constantly going above and beyond to achieve their dreams and more I'm inclined to start shaming myself for not engaging in that kind of drive in my own past. But I've never been able to be in that lane, and there's nothing wrong with celebrating it in others while doing what works for you. Elaine also acknowledges the burn out that comes with functioning at that level so consistently for so many years. Elaine counts on her faith and her belief in God as part of what shapes her life. This wasn't something that I personally subscribe to, but as she never insists that one must be a person of faith in order to achieve success, I felt it was simply a welcome difference of beliefs- a case of "great for you, not for me" as Amy Poehler would say. My only mild note of annoyance is that while I admire Ava Duvernay and her incredible work, I disagree with the main tenet that she explores in her foreword- "Nothing bad ever happens to me. It's all to learn and grow." I think it diminishes the fear and grief that we need to experience, to feel our feelings, when terrible things happen. My getting cancer was a learning experience, but it was also a bad thing that happened. People have the right to see something as wholly bad even if there are silver linings or helpful tools to be discovered. I would never tell someone who was raped that it was so they could learn and grow, and I find that mindset to be surprisingly naive and excluding in its attempt to be uplifting. All of that aside, this was a lovely and inspiring book that I would happily recommend to many readers of all ages.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Gabrielle

    When announced in the fall that Elaine Welteroth would be publishing a memoir, I immediately had this title on pre-order. We've seen her take over as Teen Vogue's EIC (only the second black woman in Conde Nast's history), as a guest producer on Grownish, and a beloved judge on Bravo's Project Runway. We all know that she is a boss, but down to the core, who is Elaine Welteroth? For those that truly know me, you know that I can't get through a non-fiction read unless on audio. I truly enjoyed this When announced in the fall that Elaine Welteroth would be publishing a memoir, I immediately had this title on pre-order. We've seen her take over as Teen Vogue's EIC (only the second black woman in Conde Nast's history), as a guest producer on Grownish, and a beloved judge on Bravo's Project Runway. We all know that she is a boss, but down to the core, who is Elaine Welteroth? For those that truly know me, you know that I can't get through a non-fiction read unless on audio. I truly enjoyed this listen - not only is Elaine an incredible writer (I doubt her publishing editor had to make many/any edits), but I could both hear and see myself throughout the chapters. Here's a powerful woman that's still discovering her magic, and abundance of her power on a daily basis. While she's accomplished so much already, I truly believe that she hasn't even reached her prime just yet. And that's saying a lot. My favorite takeaway from this book was the following quote: "Trust that life will continue molding you, challenging you, and readying you for your next adventure. But only you can choose to walk away from what no longer serves you. To leave what you've already conquered and to step boldly into what's next." - Elaine Welteroth

  11. 5 out of 5

    Paige

    Amazing I teared up so many times reading this book. I felt seen through Elaine’s words. I didn’t realize how much I needed to hear I am more than enough and Elaine’s book really inspired me to believe it and keep saying it.

  12. 4 out of 5

    April

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. An important voice to hear right now. She empowers us to claim our spaces and show up authentically as women of color. I appreciated her honesty and sharing vulnerable stories about herself and her life experiences with little self-indulgence. So many lessons contained in this book about dreaming big, being ambitious, working hard, showing curiosity and enthusiasm, falling down and getting back up, and being first to do something. I related to so much of Elaine's story from growing up in Califor An important voice to hear right now. She empowers us to claim our spaces and show up authentically as women of color. I appreciated her honesty and sharing vulnerable stories about herself and her life experiences with little self-indulgence. So many lessons contained in this book about dreaming big, being ambitious, working hard, showing curiosity and enthusiasm, falling down and getting back up, and being first to do something. I related to so much of Elaine's story from growing up in California to moving to NYC and to how her love and work experiences played out. So grateful that she is continuing to rise up and that she shared her story thus far with us. It's a book and message that I needed to hear right now while I'm figuring out my next steps and moving towards more meaningful and empowering work centered on women and self-care, which includes setting boundaries and creating space for dialogue. "We are all born with a sense of possibility and limitlessness. This is before the labels are placed upon us, those social stratifications of race, gender, sexuality, and status that start to shape our idea of who we are and that often erode the dreams of what we can become. We are also born with a certain indestructibility that can withstand every one of those tests--if only we recognize it. And it is the power of our own possibilities that keeps us fighting to get back to who we were born to be." pg. 3 "Until then, I hadn't ever considered that I could become a writer. Let alone a great writer. But those early affirmations, those moments of feeling seen--particularly by the man who created you--they matter so much to a little girl." pg. 30 "I was mad because I was waking up to the ways in which society sets up Black people to hate ourselves. I was mad because so many of us are complicit in perpetuating this self-hating cycle of oppression, one designed to make us cling to Whiteness for validation. I was mad because of how insidiously racism works to keep us from claiming our beauty, our worthiness, our power. I was mad to see so many of us operating out of brokenness and shame." pg. 83 "Harriette was my first example of a female boss who elevated everybody around her. She was early evidence that a truly confident leader stands in her power without using it to make others feel small. She ran the show with integrity, grace, kindness, and class." pg. 116 "I realized that if we aren't vigilant, we can move through our entire lives giving away our power, by dimming our radiance, by not recognizing there is always so much more waiting for us on the other side of fear. But when we are brave enough--to go there, to grab what we want, to tap into who we are--damn, it feels so good." pg. 117 "Pause: If you ever find yourself walking on eggshells and contorting yourself into ill-fitting ensembles just to prove yourself in a relationship, run. Fast. And do not look back. He ain't The One." pg. 156 "What I know now is that when we derive our worth from the relationships in our lives--the intimate ones, the social circles we belong to, the companies we work for--we give away our power and become dependent upon external validation. When that is taken away, our sense of value, and identity, goes with it." pg. 168 "I became determined to win back the warmth of his love because on some level I actually believed I wasn't enough on my own without him. I wanted the life that looked picture perfect, and I felt like I needed him in it to complete that portrait for me--even if it didn't always feel good inside. I wanted to find my way back into his light more than I wanted to find the light inside me--the light he had dimmed." pg. 168 "So often, [beauty] is a reflection of how you feel, and how you want to be seen. We can all transform through the power of makeup and hair, but young people in particular often use beauty as a tool for learning and loving themselves. Editorially, I saw beauty as a lens through which to explore identity, culture, self-expression, self-acceptance, and diversity. That, for me, made working in beauty endlessly inspiring. It felt like fun but important work, particularly speaking to young people who are still developing their sense of self and identity. I got excited by the idea of making the kind of magazine I needed when I was growing up. One that reflected all different kinds of beauty. That broke down the hierarchies we see every day, and challenged the damaging beauty standards that convince so many of us from a young age that we aren't enough." pg. 187 "Rather than trying to be what I wasn't--in my work and in my life--I made a conscious commitment to fully own everything that made me who I am. Because those were the very things that made my point of view as an editor that much more valuable. It wasn't easy and it didn't happen overnight, but I set the intention." pg. 189 "A funny thing happens when you become what Shonda Rhimes has so brilliantly dubbed an FOD: First. Only. Different. There is an assumption that simply by being first, by succeeding in rarified White spaces, your existence comes with built-in credentials that make you an expert on diversity and inclusion. And maybe to some degree it does, but sensitive topics surrounding race and gender are not easily unpacked in America, and the truth is we have to teach ourselves how to speak intelligently about them, just like anyone else. Yet we are expected to learn quickly how to walk the often precarious line between representing an underrepresented perspective without speaking in sweeping generalizations that trod on the White power structure that gave you the platform to begin with. At times it can feel as if you are being asked to carry the torch for an entire race of people who never had our voices, our experiences, our cultures represented with dignity in mass media. It's a dance you learn quickly because, ready or not, it comes with the FOD territory." pg. 189-190 "As a culture, we love a celebration. We love a first. We hold them high. We all marvel at headlines and highlight reels. But we rarely discuss the marks and scars and bruises that come with breaking through glass ceilings. Rarely do we talk openly about the tumult of the come up, the underside of a dream realized--rarely do we share that even good things can sometimes play out in complicated, painful, and confusing ways. We feel pressure to post about the joy and the gratitude and the triumph of the biggest moments in our lives--promotions, graduations, engagements, marriages, even childbirth--like it's all supposed to make us feel up, up, up And we're supposed to keep quiet about the things that don't feel so good inside. But things aren't always as they appear. And even your biggest promotions can come along with some of your most bewildering blows." pg. 231 "One lesson I learned the hard way: Never give your number before you're ready to. Do not allow anyone to force you into a negotiation that you haven't had time to prepare for. You can simply say, 'I'd love to take the night and come back to you on that first thing.' If I had someone coaching me, I would have been so much more prepared in that moment. But I wasn't. I had no coach and no idea that this happens all the time--especially to women. Even more often to young women of color." pg. 233 "Women are taught to work hard and to play by the rules. We are taught to never overstep, to stay in our lane, to keep our head down, to go with the flow, to never be too loud or disagreeable. Not to be bossy. Not to be pushy. We are not encouraged to know our worth, let alone to demand it. We are not given the tools to fight for ourselves or taught to challenge authority. Instead, we are taught--in subtle and overt ways--to give up our power, to take what we can get, and to be grateful. Whatever it is, whatever it takes, you just do it. And you do it well. With a smile. Whether it feels good or not. Women aren't taught to get comfortable with making people uncomfortable." pg. 234 "We all come up in a world that is set up to make us feel that we are not enough--so we strive even harder to earn respect, we put in the overtime, we bend history and we stretch ourselves thin to reach and exceed the expectations of the powers that be. We rise to every occasion. We strive for excellence. Because that is what Black women do. We take what we can get, and we make magic happen. We make lemonade." pg. 239 "I erupted into the kind of sobs someone cries when they've lost someone they love. And I had. Myself. I'd lost her in the day-to-day grind. In the process of becoming the woman I always wanted to be, I forgot that it involved becoming a whole person, not just the success story I had been trying to write my whole life." pg. 274 "I learned the hard way that there is a thin line between being a hard worker and a workaholic--someone who buries herself in work and inadvertently avoids participating in her own life. In hindsight, it is clear that I have always possessed tendencies toward the latter. What began early on as a kid's overcorrection to her parents' struggles manifested into a fear of failure that drove me into a relentless, myopic race with myself, one that had no end in sight. I found myself in a pattern of perfectionism. Always striving, even for what would ultimately prove to be futile missions--relationships that became toxic and jobs I had outgrown. When you are invested in building something you believe in, and you know there is no safety net if you fail, it is all too easy to lose perspective. It is by no means a bad thing to be ambitious, but I needed to develop healthier habits in order to be truly successful." pg. 275 "Oprah says the hardest thing about breaking up is never just the end itself. It is the death of the dream. Whether it's a promising romantic relationship, a cherished friendship, or a dream job, in the end, you can't help but daydream about the if onlys and what-ifs. You mourn what could have been, until you are forced to confront what it is: over." pg. 286 "On the other side of fear is freedom--but you have to be willing to look it in the face." pg. 286 "And I did what I always do whenever life lets me down: I looked up at the same blue sky that stretched past the shiny high-rise tower, and into the clouds that promised it would get better. I trusted that there was so much more than this for me." pg. 287 "This was the effect he had on me from day one. This was the difference between the adrenaline of puppy love and the chaos of chasing what seems right on paper. This was real love. Real love that wakes up in the darkest part of the night to redirect you toward the light. Real love that calms every roaring wave inside you with a certain steadfast grace, powerful enough to remind you of your own strength." pg. 295 "Our lives are a series of dreams realized. We don't say that enough. Instead, we repeatedly ask children, 'What do you want to be when you grow up?' As if one answer, one dream, one career path can define you throughout your whole life. The truth is, job titles are temporary. But purpose is infinite. There are no destinations, no happily ever afters in real life, no glossy pots of gold at the end of the rainbow. There are only new beginnings. Just as you reach your first summit, you'll find a new horizon awaits, one with new mountains to climb, new peaks and valleys to wander across. Trust that life will continue molding you, challenging you, and readying you for your next adventure. But only you can choose to walk away from what no longer serves you, to leave what you've already conquered, and to step boldly into what's next. When you find yourself existing in the space between dreams realized, parts of you will feel too big for where you are, while other parts of you will feel too small for where you're going. Go anyway. Do not wait. Do not wonder if you can. Do not ask for permission. When you get lost, it's okay to stop, to look up, to look within for the answers--they're always there. And when the world tells you to shrink, expand. Remember: You have done enough. You are enough. You were born enough. The world is waiting on you." pg. 315-316 Book: borrowed from SSF Main Library.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Alinna

    I am so glad I read this. As a fellow woman of color, I found her questions, her struggles, her insights to move me and to resonate with me. Her hustle has no bounds and the work that she has done to empower women for women, especially women of color is really incredible. She is fucking badass and maybe I’ll stop hating on millennials.

  14. 4 out of 5

    WellReadNegress

    I mean, wow! So beautifully written, so heartfelt, and so freaking real! My favorite memoir this year, thus far. It's definitely going to be on my Best of 2019 reads!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Katie Burke

    I love Elaine's writing style and perspective on race, gender, ambition, and courage in the modern workplace-I was a fan of hers before and am an even bigger fan after reading this.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Denise

    A beautifully written and totally inspiring memoir from one of the most brilliant media people of this generation. I've been fascinated by Elaine for years after she took up her post at Teen Vogue and have been following her on social media ever since. When I saw she had a book out, I knew I wanted to know more about her story. I loved reading about Elaine's early influences and how she was able to pull up a seat to the table for herself. When an opportunity to make a connection presented itself A beautifully written and totally inspiring memoir from one of the most brilliant media people of this generation. I've been fascinated by Elaine for years after she took up her post at Teen Vogue and have been following her on social media ever since. When I saw she had a book out, I knew I wanted to know more about her story. I loved reading about Elaine's early influences and how she was able to pull up a seat to the table for herself. When an opportunity to make a connection presented itself, she took it, but she never makes it feel like she was trying to use people to climb up the corporate ladder. It was her passion for her work and her determination to carve a new path for girls like her that made her impossible to ignore, be it at Ebony, Glamour, Teen Vogue, or beyond. She clearly practices what she preaches too, sharing the wealth of knowledge she got from mentors with a new generation of writers and media personalities. She also balances stories about her work with stories about her personal and family life that helped shape who she is today. It was candid and totally relatable but all felt very necessary to the story. What I really admire about this book is Elaine's ability to balance being humble with celebrating her incredible achievements. Not to mention that while her accomplishments are amazing, her insistence that she does not want to be defined just by her career is a refreshing change of pace from so many "business" memoirs. It's so easy to look at someone so beautiful, so successful, so influential, and think that every aspect of their life is perfect. But Elaine shows in this book that the facade can be dangerous, and ignoring the signs that you're burning out and living only to work can be devastating. She's clearly a woman who values her family and friends, and shows that it's okay to slow down every once in a while. For every amazingly cool anecdote about her life, there are quieter paced moments where her personality and values really shine through. This is a very worth read -- for young girls, especially ones who are black, biracial, or those questioning their identity in a white-centric world, who want to see a realistic story of a girl overcoming obstacles (but never truly evading them, as later chapters show) and still working things out. For college-aged and young adults who feel stuck and don't know what their next move should be, and are looking for a sign. For young career people, looking for the inspiration to take that next big leap, to ask for what they're worth, and to speak up at work. Needless to say, this book leaves off at a really interesting juncture for Elaine's career, but I'm really keen to see what she gets up to next!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jessica M

    http://jessjustreads.com Elaine Welteroth is a dynamic groundbreaker in media and fashion. In her memoir, More than Enough, she talks about her journey towards being a journalist and rising above the ranks in the world of fashion magazines. At 29, Elaine became the youngest Editor-In-Chief at Teen Vogue, and the second black editor-in-chief of a Conde Nast publication. At first, I wondered if Elaine had enough of a story for a memoir. The book moves quite slow to begin with and I worried that it w http://jessjustreads.com Elaine Welteroth is a dynamic groundbreaker in media and fashion. In her memoir, More than Enough, she talks about her journey towards being a journalist and rising above the ranks in the world of fashion magazines. At 29, Elaine became the youngest Editor-In-Chief at Teen Vogue, and the second black editor-in-chief of a Conde Nast publication. At first, I wondered if Elaine had enough of a story for a memoir. The book moves quite slow to begin with and I worried that it was going to be another one of those memoirs where the person has written it quite young and perhaps too early — I often question the need for a memoir from someone under the age of 35. Wouldn’t it be better if they waited another ten years and had more to tell readers? But I soon squashed that thought, because this book has so much to offer and so much insight for all types of readers. “When I look back, I see a little girl running, pushing, working creatively to compensate for things that were beyond her control. For years, I felt like an imposter with a hidden flaw waiting to be found out. I worried that I might be stained, too, just like that cheque in my dad’s pocket.” Elaine grew up in California, the child of a black mother and a white father. From childhood, she was ambitious, devoted and determined to succeed. Elaine talks a lot about how different she felt from other kids — because of her hair, her skin colour, her upbringing or her heritage. As a biracial girl, she didn’t always feel like she belonged with the black kids, but she knew she didn’t belong with the white girls either. But, in college, Elaine met like-minded people who shared the same drive and passion for a successful career as she did, and she prospered. She thrived with internships and work and by trusting her instincts and always pursuing what she felt was right, she climbed to the top of the fashion world incredibly quick. She worked for fashion powerhouses such as Ebony, Glamour, and then Teen Vogue. Young girls will read this memoir and be inspired — particularly if those young girls are interested in working in the fashion industry. But, more importantly, young black girls will read this memoir and be reassured that they have a place at the table. They’ll realise how important it is for their voices to be heard and acknowledged, and they’ll realise that they have the power to make real change in the world. “When I returned to college after my New York internship, I felt overwhelmed and intimidated. Not just by East Coast White People and the extremely ill-fitting advertising world. But by the entire world. And the daunting notion of figuring out where I belonged in it.” More than Enough highlights Elaine’s devotion to celebrating diversity in the fashion industry — an industry that is predominantly full of white and privileged people. Elaine uses her own experiences to transform Teen Vogue into a more socially conscious publication, with girls of all colours on the covers and feature stories within its pages that reflect our multicultural society. An empowering memoir from an incredibly inspiring trailblazer. Thank you to the publisher for mailing me a review copy in exchange for an honest review.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Venessa

    This book went beyond what I could have imagined. It was excellent! I was hesitant to read it because memoirs aren't my thing and I wondered what could a thirty year old millennial possibly be talking about that would make me want to read her. The answer was alot. Elaine writes with raw emotion about the challenges of being a black girl in this world. She chronicles her life growing up Biracial on the west coast and how she never felt good enough or black enough. Her teen and early college years This book went beyond what I could have imagined. It was excellent! I was hesitant to read it because memoirs aren't my thing and I wondered what could a thirty year old millennial possibly be talking about that would make me want to read her. The answer was alot. Elaine writes with raw emotion about the challenges of being a black girl in this world. She chronicles her life growing up Biracial on the west coast and how she never felt good enough or black enough. Her teen and early college years were like the sound track to 90s hip hop. When all she wanted was to be like MJB and happy. She finally finds that happiness in her work in magazines like Ebony,Glamour and ultimately Teen Vogue. Through the process of self discovery she realizes that life is about taking risks, asking for what you want and believing that by faith it will happen. For everyone who ever had a dream and feared it would never come to pass, Elaine shows us that it can. She also shows you how to not let perfection destroy you. By learning to put up a front early in life because of family issues and later in her romantic relationships, she suffers from the same insecurities that all women face at one time or another; That she had be perfect to be enough at work and in her relationships. That need for perfection manifests as anxiety until she learns to walk into her power and authenticity of being a young black woke woman at the helm of a powerful magazine. She finds her voice and , a real love when she started loving herself more. If you want a feel good story with some real life lessons, More than Enough is for you.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Yazzy

    "For the first time, I understood that the bigness of my life would be determined not only by the bigness of my dreams, but also by my capacity to trust that there is a Higher Power who would always take those dreams and multiply them." I really enjoyed (and breezed through) this autobiography / memoir / guidebook by Elaine Welteroth. As a fellow Sagittarius, black woman, and long-time lover of magazines, I felt a lot more connected to Elaine than I expected, and was deeply moved by her commitme "For the first time, I understood that the bigness of my life would be determined not only by the bigness of my dreams, but also by my capacity to trust that there is a Higher Power who would always take those dreams and multiply them." I really enjoyed (and breezed through) this autobiography / memoir / guidebook by Elaine Welteroth. As a fellow Sagittarius, black woman, and long-time lover of magazines, I felt a lot more connected to Elaine than I expected, and was deeply moved by her commitment to an honest + earnest commentary on life's behind the scenes moments & lessons. I have been seeking a mentor for a few years now (yet to be found, but I'm hopeful) and this book felt like a wonderful foray into the power of women (esp black women) lifting each other up into the light. My only critique would be that Elaine sometimes relied on the term 'woman of colour' in moments where the specificity of black women's experiences was playing out. While there is some overlap in the experiences of 'WOC' under white supremacist structures + systems - antiblackness (+ antiblack misogyny) bears its teeth in *particular ways* not experienced by otherwise racialized women. I don't appreciate the way this term can homogenize our experiences and obscure the ways in which non-black women of colour can access whiteness and/or navigate systems of white supremacy with greater ease DUE TO their relative distance FROM blackness. Overall, I learned a lot from Elaine, and I think you will too. Give this one a read.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kibkabe

    There is a divine order, a divine flow to our lives. We don't need to have all the answers. But our job is to keep on dreaming and trusting enough to put on foot in front of the other. "More Than Enough" by Elaine Welteroth is a perfect snapshot of a biracial woman who reached such a historic career pinnacle at a young age and is willing to share her climb on the ladder, knowing based on race and upbringing that her climb is unique. I found myself finding a lot in common with Elaine. I'm a black There is a divine order, a divine flow to our lives. We don't need to have all the answers. But our job is to keep on dreaming and trusting enough to put on foot in front of the other. "More Than Enough" by Elaine Welteroth is a perfect snapshot of a biracial woman who reached such a historic career pinnacle at a young age and is willing to share her climb on the ladder, knowing based on race and upbringing that her climb is unique. I found myself finding a lot in common with Elaine. I'm a black woman editor with NorCal roots who had similar dreams but mine took me elsewhere and, like her, there were signs already putting me on a path that I didn't see then. She starts her story from her childhood, pulling out certain memories that she now knows signaled her destiny. For example, she would make her own magazines for her fake beauty salon in her backyard with her friend. Like a lemonade stand, it made her realize her entrepreneurial and creative spirit. By the time she gets to college, she's in a toxic relationship with the boy she followed to Sac State (being from Sacramento luckily a rep from that college told me my grades were too good and I should go to my dream school). She mentioned it on her book tour and in her book that she regretted not applying for her dream school, Stanford, because she was following a boy, a common mistake. But in college, she meets a lifelong mentor, a professor whom she connects with over their similar parentage (black mother, white father). On a trip, she shares with the professor and another student that she wants to be a magazine editor-in-chief at Essence. They praise her confidence to follow that dream. When she does earn the Essence internship, the Ebony editor-in-chief she idolizes finally contacts her after she bombarded the editor with messages and asks her to work with her on a photo shoot in Malibu. There, Elaine suggests the model, tennis star Serena Williams, wear a blue bathing suit. She notices her faux pas, but it turns into an assistantship in which she lets go of her dream internship to pursue the opportunity. After being on the fast track, she's let go at Ebony and worries about being pigeonholed in black media. But because of her networking, she finds her way into Conde Nast, first at Glamour then at Teen Vogue, with eventually taking the top editor role at the now esteemed teen publication. Once there, she realizes being the first black woman in charge holds a lot of responsibility, and that means navigating the direction of content to include all teen girls. What I enjoyed the most about this book is the candidness. She admits to her stumbles, goes into details over those stumbles, and lets the reader know she thought it was the end until her life took another turn. Before every chapter, one of her quotes is highlighted, and it shows how carefully she chose her words to inspire others with her story. The book is on the long side with over 300 pages (like Michelle Obama's Becoming), but it reads smoothly as you see her growth. Since I am in the same field and from the same area, I felt a strong connection with her and felt inspired by her moves, but it's a memoir with a positive message that can transcend to women of all ages, but particularly those who are in college and their early 20s when they're still trying to find their way when it comes to their careers.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Laken Horton

    This book is a mirror that I am currently looking through, struggles that I have, visions and goals that I wish to accomplish and a hope for love. Everything that I needed, she discussed and experienced. Often times we go through hardships and life and we hold them in because they are too embarrassing but she shared her trials and mistakes and used it as a lesson to be better. Thank you, Auntie Elaine. Anyone reading this or planning to will have an absolute joy of a time.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Nicole Martin

    This was a great listen. I love the narration from the Welteroth family (her parents have great voices), this inclusion was new to me in an audiobook. Not only was this well written, it was genuinely relatable for me. Chapter 21 hit me hard as it highlighted the areas in which I've heavily struggled when trying to achieve a work/life balance, but overall, Elaine Welteroth has given us a memoir that is raw, honest, and (most importantly) inspiring.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Lauren Morton

    "If you don't understand my record, you don't understand me, so this is not for you." -Master P This book was everything. The way she beautifully told her story, her prayers, and advice was something I could never fully explain. You have to read it for yourself. This is the autobiographical version of “The Alchemist”...you will read it when your soul is ready and you will find yourself coming back to it when the next horizon is unfolding.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Torimac

    This book took me soooooo long to read! I had to take time to reflect every few pages! I can’t remember the last time I enjoyed a book that way. I really admire her talent with words. I love how many times she points out the people who’ve helped her choose her best path. Near the end of the book, when she again says she wouldn’t have had her success without her mother, I want to give her an award for her clarity. This is a Platitude people often give their mothers and/or fathers at a public noti This book took me soooooo long to read! I had to take time to reflect every few pages! I can’t remember the last time I enjoyed a book that way. I really admire her talent with words. I love how many times she points out the people who’ve helped her choose her best path. Near the end of the book, when she again says she wouldn’t have had her success without her mother, I want to give her an award for her clarity. This is a Platitude people often give their mothers and/or fathers at a public notice of their success but Elaine doesn’t just tell us, she shows us. As a parentless daughter, I am elated that she genuinely shows us how much her parents support meant to her.

  25. 4 out of 5

    veronica

    This book was phenomenal. I strangely feel as though I've gained an older sister. Reading Welteroth's highs and lows hit so close to home that sometimes I found myself bawling through pages. Welteroth is one of a kind, and I am inspired and in awe of not only her accomplishments but her spirit as well. This book was a reminder for me to not doubt myself, to take space, and to not be afraid to go after what I want. Thank you Elaine!! A must read.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Tia

    Just another spectacular memoir I’ve read in the last year. I keep feeling that I’ve read enough of them but folks are writing and sharing the thought-provoking, inspiring stories of their lives. Another read I’d definitely recommend for any FOD (look it up) in any field.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Vince McCollum

    Wow. This book was exactly what I needed. Elaine Welteroth is an inspiration, showing exactly what happens with defined goals, a strong work ethic, and the courage to make the spaces for yourself if they aren’t there already. I finished this inspired and ready to take on the next chapters of my own life. Throughout her book, she mentions how she didn’t know she needed something and then it was presented to her. This is how I feel about this book. I didn’t know I needed her final two chapters, bu Wow. This book was exactly what I needed. Elaine Welteroth is an inspiration, showing exactly what happens with defined goals, a strong work ethic, and the courage to make the spaces for yourself if they aren’t there already. I finished this inspired and ready to take on the next chapters of my own life. Throughout her book, she mentions how she didn’t know she needed something and then it was presented to her. This is how I feel about this book. I didn’t know I needed her final two chapters, but I did.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Katherine D. Morgan

    I really needed to hear this message and read this book. I’ve always admired Elaine and for good reasons: she just seems so cool! But now, I know how hard she’s worked to get there and how much she has truly sacrificed. Her story felt like my story: lackluster relationships; insecurity mixed with self-assurance. I feel like I’m more equipped to take on the world now, and it’s all thanks to Elaine.

  29. 4 out of 5

    De'Osha

    If you are a fan of Elaine Welteroth you will appreciate this book. More proof that she's truly an incredible writer, storyteller and inspiration.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Eden Takele

    I really went back and forth on this. She grew up with a white dad and in a white town so you'd imagine there's a lot of material for her to get into but all her comments on race felt superficial and like they were written for her white readers more than anyone else i.e. awkwardly pandering. I think she knows where the solid ground is for her; the chapters on her come up in the magazine industry as a really young woman read as a lot more self-assured. A fun read overall with some heartwarming mo I really went back and forth on this. She grew up with a white dad and in a white town so you'd imagine there's a lot of material for her to get into but all her comments on race felt superficial and like they were written for her white readers more than anyone else i.e. awkwardly pandering. I think she knows where the solid ground is for her; the chapters on her come up in the magazine industry as a really young woman read as a lot more self-assured. A fun read overall with some heartwarming moments, plus the constant name-dropping kept me hooked.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.