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Emily the Strange

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Emily may be odd, but she always gets even!Meet Emily, the peculiar soul with long black hair, a wit of fire, and a posse of slightly sinister black cats. Famous for her barbed commentary and independent spirit, this rebel-child in black has spawned an Internet and merchandising phenomenon (Emily's Web site gets 35,000 hits per month!). Emily the Strange, her first book, c Emily may be odd, but she always gets even!Meet Emily, the peculiar soul with long black hair, a wit of fire, and a posse of slightly sinister black cats. Famous for her barbed commentary and independent spirit, this rebel-child in black has spawned an Internet and merchandising phenomenon (Emily's Web site gets 35,000 hits per month!). Emily the Strange, her first book, captures the quintessential Emily, featuring her most beloved quips and a host of new ones. Anarchist, heroine, survivor, this little girl with a big personality appeals to the odd child in us all.


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Emily may be odd, but she always gets even!Meet Emily, the peculiar soul with long black hair, a wit of fire, and a posse of slightly sinister black cats. Famous for her barbed commentary and independent spirit, this rebel-child in black has spawned an Internet and merchandising phenomenon (Emily's Web site gets 35,000 hits per month!). Emily the Strange, her first book, c Emily may be odd, but she always gets even!Meet Emily, the peculiar soul with long black hair, a wit of fire, and a posse of slightly sinister black cats. Famous for her barbed commentary and independent spirit, this rebel-child in black has spawned an Internet and merchandising phenomenon (Emily's Web site gets 35,000 hits per month!). Emily the Strange, her first book, captures the quintessential Emily, featuring her most beloved quips and a host of new ones. Anarchist, heroine, survivor, this little girl with a big personality appeals to the odd child in us all.

30 review for Emily the Strange

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sheela

    I definitely did not expect this. I thought the "Emily the Strange" series consisted of stories. Despite the brevity of the book, there is a lot of substance, with some profound one-liners - my favorite: "Emily doesn't make imaginary friends...she creates imaginary enemies." They remind me of Chuck Norris quotes - "Chuck Norris doesn't have a watch - HE decides the time." Emily the Strange is the new Chuck Norris. The pictures were very bright and vivid. It's a great coffee-table book. I can see I definitely did not expect this. I thought the "Emily the Strange" series consisted of stories. Despite the brevity of the book, there is a lot of substance, with some profound one-liners - my favorite: "Emily doesn't make imaginary friends...she creates imaginary enemies." They remind me of Chuck Norris quotes - "Chuck Norris doesn't have a watch - HE decides the time." Emily the Strange is the new Chuck Norris. The pictures were very bright and vivid. It's a great coffee-table book. I can see why this is a cult favorite, and I'm very curious to see how this translates into a major motion picture.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Devlin Scott

    I liked the premise and I believe it could be a true bestseller if the creators had given the first book a decided plot rather than a "day in the life of Emily Strange" type of design. I could really grow to love this character but, she needs a clear destiny to capture my heart. Devlin

  3. 4 out of 5

    Dolly

    Fun, quirky, and a bit fierce, Emily is one young lady that knows who she is and does not bend to popular opinion. Kind of a bit like Grumpy Cat in human form. The black, white, and red illustrations are dramatic and used very effectively. Overall, it's an entertaining, fast read. interesting quotes: "Emily isn't lazy...she's just happy doing nothing." (pp. 12-13) "Emily may be odd...but she always gets even." (pp. 28-30)

  4. 5 out of 5

    Mimi

    Not what I expected. I thought this story was for young children to confront their fears and embrace their insecurities. However, I was wrong! This book relishes in promoting bad attitudes and behavior. Boo!!!! The graphics are nice consequently the one star -- not my taste!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Keri (JD)

    I don't know what the hype is about, I love weird, I love dark, I love bloody. I don't love immature writing, I don't love plotless stupidity, I don't love Emily. I found myself WANTING to like her, hoping she was a Johnny the Homicidal maniac type. She is not. Son I am disappoint

  6. 4 out of 5

    Alex Rojas

    Emily the Strange is a book about 13-year-old Emily who wakes up in a small town called Blackrock, without knowing her purpose she sets out to look around town and finds many peculiar things like golems and a mind reader. The book is written in first person meaning you are reading the book as Emily so the writing is not professional and is described as a journal. This is a very good book 10/10 IGN recommended

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jan

    Enter the dark and very strange world of Emily, who is always bored. Emily looks for ways to kill the boredom by conducting strange experiments on headless kangaroos, adding strange sauce to school cafeteria meatloaf, and hanging out in the cemetery. If you have ever been so bored that you could scream and your humor tends towards the dark side, this graphic novel is for you.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Ann

    I had no idea what was going on in this book. It seemed like loosely connected nonsense or the kind of nightmare you get if you try to nap in the afternoon, where everything is freaky but nothing has any meaning. The art was interesting, though.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Heinrich

    Emily is GREAT! Having been a bit of a morose teen myself, I got such a kick out of her. I had never heard of the comic. I saw the book on a sales table at a book store somewhere and it jumped out at me. It's a super-quick read, yet somehow the writer gets you deep into Emily's head. Love it!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Mauoijenn

    First, this was not what I expected. This was not really a graphic novel. This was more like a picture book with 3 primary colors with some interesting statements. I will continue to see if I might understand this Emily the Strange just a bit more.

  11. 5 out of 5

    melissa

    Another fun, quick, evil read with great artwork.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Ruby

    Emily is so cool! Being strange is awesome! Emily reminds me a lot of one of my best friends, Meri, who is also very strange and likes cats.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Moses Fosburgh

    The one that started it all! I absolutely loved this awesome, er, strange girl. Everything she does, says and experiences is beyond interesting. I highly recommend anything with Emily the Strange on it.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    I give very few one star ratings, but gosh, I didn’t like this one. I think that the artist is talented but each page too busy to get through. The stories within were just not for me. Read this as part of the Rory Gilmore Reading Challenge.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Robin

    I never actually got around to reading this during my earlier years when I frequented Hot Topic (yikes), but I’ve always meant to. Reading it now, I can see why it was so popular! The book reads as smart, deep, and gloomy in a cute way.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Christie

    An introduction to Emily... I was a teen when she came out and I so identified with her then. Going through it now just beings back those memories. For anyone, especially teens, who just feel they don't fit in. This is just an introduction book, there are three other books that are more in depth.

  17. 5 out of 5

    HowardHomeEd

    Rated 4 stars purely for the artwork.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Candace

    Cute.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Amalie

    This was pretty funny. I laughed out loud at times 😂

  20. 4 out of 5

    Melissa C

    Cute little book. Expected more words to it instead of felling like I’m reading a children’s books.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sharri Delk

    Amazing graphics/illustrations. Quirky adult read. Not something to help young ones embrace being different... it’s just in and of itself different.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Liz

    There really was no substance to this "novel." I thought I might like it but there was just nothing there to like. The artwork was pretty great hence the 2 stars.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Intellectual Magpie

    Emily the strange ... she has been close to my soul since the 90s 🖤♥🖤 short simple graphic novel with very few words, but that is exactly Emily the strange in a nutshell ... simple yet powerful Emily the strange ... she has been close to my soul since the 90s 🖤♥️🖤 short simple graphic novel with very few words, but that is exactly Emily the strange in a nutshell ... simple yet powerful

  24. 5 out of 5

    Melanie

    Have a hunch that I'm missing out on the point of this book, and it's driving me mad, I can sense it but not get a grab on it.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Natlukens

    There's maybe 150 words in the whole thing? Meh it's okay.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Lynley

    Straight from the official blog: Emily continues to be a voice for individualism and self-awareness, and her appeal is especially strong among alternative-minded young women and girls who identify with her signature singularity. Her presence in the worlds of art, pop culture, literature, and fashion celebrates non-conformist and reminds us all to cultivate that which makes us unique. Emily the Strange may be a little TOO strange for many readers. Certainly, the YA novels jump around a lot from tho Straight from the official blog: Emily continues to be a voice for individualism and self-awareness, and her appeal is especially strong among alternative-minded young women and girls who identify with her signature singularity. Her presence in the worlds of art, pop culture, literature, and fashion celebrates non-conformist and reminds us all to cultivate that which makes us unique. Emily the Strange may be a little TOO strange for many readers. Certainly, the YA novels jump around a lot from thought to thought, and we really do get a glimpse into a strange girl's mind. Emily is outward looking. She is constantly trying to make sense of the world around her. You won't find Emily staring into a mirror because she's worried about a spot on her chin. Emily has a very high opinion of herself, which borders on arrogant, and she is therefore a refreshing change from all those YA female characters with serious (though realistic) self-image issues. I'm beginning to think male writers should partner up with female writers more often. Perhaps men have a lack of insight into typical adolescent female neuroses, and are therefore able to create something fresh? In an interview with Rob Reger, I could see how much Emily's creator prizes individualism. Little wonder it comes across in the books. As a side note, I really really love the book design of the young adult Emily novels. The ones I've seen are black, white and primary red, and every page features artwork from Reger. Emily the Strange started out as art and only turned into books later, so I guess this isn't too surprising either. Perhaps because of advances in printing, more and more YA books feature a lot of original page design. I'd like to see even more original page design as readers migrate from paper books to digital editions. Even without the artwork, Emily the Strange book designers make use of every kind of formatting trick there is. That may annoy some readers, but I really enjoy the lists, the bold, the size variation and font combinations. In this series, the book designers really knew their stuff. The Emily books may not appeal to readers who are annoyed by 'diary style' writing, with shortened sentences, made popular (I think) by Bridget Jones' Diary and similar. Also, these books aren't for everyone. I don't even think they're for me. Noted succinctly in Goth: Undead Subculture (Goodlad and Bibby): "Emily the Strange is nothing so much as a brand name trading off the worldwide cachet of goth subculture. Such attempts to turn goth into a brand are the all but inevitable sequels to the mid-1980s commodification of the concept of subculture. And while the advent of Emily the Strange can be read as the *ne plus ultra* of late-capitalist commodification, it is also continuous with the practices of a subculture that, long before goth lists were published on Amazon.com, anchored the constitution of goth identities to privileged forms of consumption. Cosmic Debris's promotion of a class of well-heeled, teeny-bopper goth wannabes may well affront the sensibilities of some who, like blood_rose, equate goth with lived authenticity and subcultural purity. On the other hand, there is no telling how many goths experience pleasure in finding the image of a little goth girl on a black diary for sale at Barnes and Noble, or how many young girls who acquire such goods will grow up to be self-styled goths."

  27. 5 out of 5

    Susan Wight

    This is the first in a series. Emily is a 13-year-old scientist, inventor, artist, wicked guitarist, prankster and a bit of a goth. She loves maths and science and her best friends are cats – oh yeah and her favourite number is 13, so each book is sprinkled with Emily’s humourous lists of 13 items. During her life, she has spent a total of 13 days in school. In book three Dark Times, Emily homeschools herself in order to avoid the ‘tyranny of maniac teachers’. She has actually always learnt very This is the first in a series. Emily is a 13-year-old scientist, inventor, artist, wicked guitarist, prankster and a bit of a goth. She loves maths and science and her best friends are cats – oh yeah and her favourite number is 13, so each book is sprinkled with Emily’s humourous lists of 13 items. During her life, she has spent a total of 13 days in school. In book three Dark Times, Emily homeschools herself in order to avoid the ‘tyranny of maniac teachers’. She has actually always learnt very effectively at home; she just hasn’t thought of it as homeschooling up until now – no one taught her how to make a time machine for example. Emily goes ahead and sets herself assignments and awards credit for completed ones, but this is Emily, so there is nothing boring or schooly about them. Emily’s adventures include amnesia, accidentally cloning herself, time-travel and trying to harness her inheritance and special talent. Home Ed Style: Project-based and mostly self-directed. Home Ed Portrayal: Very positive. Emily is definitely too cool for school. Conclusion: Emily is a cool quirky character and, although some parents may object to her antics, I found the books a whole lot of fun and have confidence that kids are well aware of the difference between fiction and reality. There are also graphic novels, comic books and merchandise available.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Katherine Martin

    I can honestly say that this short book did not meet my expectations. I definitely see how it gives off a message of just be you, but it seemed to focus on a darker side than I would want to introduce to a child. Stronger than just be yourself I read it doesn't matter if you're bad, as long as you are you. Also, that it's okay to be stagnant and complacent with any current circumstances. These beliefs are very much outside of my own. I honestly don't think I would personally actively introduce t I can honestly say that this short book did not meet my expectations. I definitely see how it gives off a message of just be you, but it seemed to focus on a darker side than I would want to introduce to a child. Stronger than just be yourself I read it doesn't matter if you're bad, as long as you are you. Also, that it's okay to be stagnant and complacent with any current circumstances. These beliefs are very much outside of my own. I honestly don't think I would personally actively introduce the book to my children, if/when I have them. And if I did, it wouldn't be unless I thought that it would be helpful during the dreaded middle school years, but it would come with discussion. Cute idea, but not as well executed as I had hoped for.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy Stephens

    I wouldn't normally bother to review such a short book but I'm making an exception with this one since it so greatly appeals to that part of me which is drawn to weird things. At first glance, one would think this is a children's book and in terms of readability I think many kids of the second or third grade level wouldn't have a problem reading and understanding it. It is the content within the book that sets it apart as being for more obscure and mature. I saw this book as a weird person's gu I wouldn't normally bother to review such a short book but I'm making an exception with this one since it so greatly appeals to that part of me which is drawn to weird things. At first glance, one would think this is a children's book and in terms of readability I think many kids of the second or third grade level wouldn't have a problem reading and understanding it. It is the content within the book that sets it apart as being for more obscure and mature. I saw this book as a weird person's guide to being emo or goth. While it could have been longer and more developed as are other Emily the Strange books, it's worth looking at for a laugh.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    "Emily saw the light... and she wasn't impressed." I loved this! It was short and (not) sweet. At all. I actually love the morbidity to this! And I feel like I relate to this book Emily. Great illustrations! I loved the shiny effects on the black matte pages! Like little hidden treasures. And this book is my favorite color scheme! Red, black, and white! WIN! Want to read more of these! Yes, please! XO

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