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In the Valleys of the Noble Beyond: In Search of the Sasquatch

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On the central and north coast of British Columbia, the Great Bear Rainforest is the largest intact temperate rainforest in the world, containing more organic matter than any other terrestrial ecosystem on the planet. The area plays host to a wide range of species, from thousand-year-old western cedars to humpback whales to iconic white Spirit bears. According to local res On the central and north coast of British Columbia, the Great Bear Rainforest is the largest intact temperate rainforest in the world, containing more organic matter than any other terrestrial ecosystem on the planet. The area plays host to a wide range of species, from thousand-year-old western cedars to humpback whales to iconic white Spirit bears. According to local residents, another giant is said to live in these woods. For centuries people have reported encounters with the Sasquatch--a species of hairy bipedal man-apes said to inhabit the deepest recesses of this pristine wilderness. Driven by his own childhood obsession with the creatures, John Zada decides to seek out the diverse inhabitants of this rugged and far-flung coast, where nearly everyone has a story to tell, from a scientist who dedicated his life to researching the Sasquatch, to members of the area's First Nations, to a former grizzly bear hunter-turned-nature tour guide. With each tale, Zada discovers that his search for the Sasquatch is a quest for something infinitely more complex, cutting across questions of human perception, scientific inquiry, indigenous traditions, the environment, and the power and desire of the human imagination to believe in--or reject--something largely unseen. Teeming with gorgeous nature writing and a driving narrative that takes us through the forests and into the valleys of a remote and seldom visited region, In the Valleys of the Noble Beyond sheds light on what our decades-long pursuit of the Sasquatch can tell us about ourselves and invites us to welcome wonder for the unknown back into our lives.


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On the central and north coast of British Columbia, the Great Bear Rainforest is the largest intact temperate rainforest in the world, containing more organic matter than any other terrestrial ecosystem on the planet. The area plays host to a wide range of species, from thousand-year-old western cedars to humpback whales to iconic white Spirit bears. According to local res On the central and north coast of British Columbia, the Great Bear Rainforest is the largest intact temperate rainforest in the world, containing more organic matter than any other terrestrial ecosystem on the planet. The area plays host to a wide range of species, from thousand-year-old western cedars to humpback whales to iconic white Spirit bears. According to local residents, another giant is said to live in these woods. For centuries people have reported encounters with the Sasquatch--a species of hairy bipedal man-apes said to inhabit the deepest recesses of this pristine wilderness. Driven by his own childhood obsession with the creatures, John Zada decides to seek out the diverse inhabitants of this rugged and far-flung coast, where nearly everyone has a story to tell, from a scientist who dedicated his life to researching the Sasquatch, to members of the area's First Nations, to a former grizzly bear hunter-turned-nature tour guide. With each tale, Zada discovers that his search for the Sasquatch is a quest for something infinitely more complex, cutting across questions of human perception, scientific inquiry, indigenous traditions, the environment, and the power and desire of the human imagination to believe in--or reject--something largely unseen. Teeming with gorgeous nature writing and a driving narrative that takes us through the forests and into the valleys of a remote and seldom visited region, In the Valleys of the Noble Beyond sheds light on what our decades-long pursuit of the Sasquatch can tell us about ourselves and invites us to welcome wonder for the unknown back into our lives.

30 review for In the Valleys of the Noble Beyond: In Search of the Sasquatch

  1. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    Alright. So as a person who was raised in New Mexico, and Eastern California, I had never heard of this Bigfoot hoopla. Although I was born in Anchorage,Alaska,.it was just a place I was born. New Mexico, and California was.home to me. The desert and the mountains! When my parent's moved us to Northern Washington state in the 7th grade, I discovered snow, and season's! Love them! Unfortunately, I also discovered some strange arsed people who believed in Bigfoot! Sorry, but laying here in bed, ju Alright. So as a person who was raised in New Mexico, and Eastern California, I had never heard of this Bigfoot hoopla. Although I was born in Anchorage,Alaska,.it was just a place I was born. New Mexico, and California was.home to me. The desert and the mountains! When my parent's moved us to Northern Washington state in the 7th grade, I discovered snow, and season's! Love them! Unfortunately, I also discovered some strange arsed people who believed in Bigfoot! Sorry, but laying here in bed, just typing this on my kindle makes me laugh! I'm not talking about that fake lol crap. I'm seriously laughing my flannel pajamas off! I understand the need to believe in a Bigfeet "huh, huh" community. I really do. I totally believe in đź‘» ghosts. I almost, "but not really" believe in Vampires. Why not? Sure, it's crazy. But, so is a lot of other shit too! Hello, bible! I'll pick my cray, cray, and you pick yours! Do I hunt for the existence of vampires? No. I'm not that nuts. I, like others dare to believe, but don't really. That's why I love books about people who waste their time hunting for the Quatch. The fact that someone would spend so much time looking for something they believe in is fascinating to me. That's a commitment! Can't hate on that! My thanks to Netgalley and John Zada.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Juli

    Tales of a giant North American ape-like creature have been told for hundreds of years. Native peoples, explorers, pioneers, travelers, hunters, farmers, fisherman, campers, vacationing families....there are many legends and stories of this elusive giant cryptid creature. There are many names as well....Bigfoot. Sasquatch. Skunk Ape, Wild Man, and more. Here in Western NC, the local legend calls the creature Knobby. Does Bigfoot exist? No clue. But I have an open mind and this book caught my eye Tales of a giant North American ape-like creature have been told for hundreds of years. Native peoples, explorers, pioneers, travelers, hunters, farmers, fisherman, campers, vacationing families....there are many legends and stories of this elusive giant cryptid creature. There are many names as well....Bigfoot. Sasquatch. Skunk Ape, Wild Man, and more. Here in Western NC, the local legend calls the creature Knobby. Does Bigfoot exist? No clue. But I have an open mind and this book caught my eye. Author John Zada travelled to British Columbia, Canada to talk to area residents and to see if he could catch a glimpse of the creature himself. He talked to all sorts of people scientists, experts, members of the First Nations, hunters, trappers, farmers and gathered up tales about the Sasquatch. I enjoyed reading this book. Zada talks about British Columbia, the forest, wildlife, the local people, and all of the stories. He weaves a rich narrative that ends up not being just about a legendary creature, but more about the rich culture, people and beautiful landscape that keeps the legend alive. I'm pretty much still a skeptic that Bigfoot is an actual creature. Some sort of factual evidence (scientifically verifiable evidence not things like blurry video and bad concrete casts of footprints) would have been discovered by now, even with the remote and densely forested areas where the creatures reportedly hang out. But....I could be wrong. Up until a few years ago, most people thought giant squid were just tales told by superstitious sailors....until an actual dead giant squid was found. It was a real creature all along...not just a myth. So while I tend to be skeptical....in the event of provable fact, I would immediately change my mind. I feel the same way about any mythical creature or entity....ghosts, demons, mermaids, Mokele-Mbembe....so many tales of really awesome creatures. If giant squid were proven to be real, maybe some....or even just one....of the legendary creatures people tell stories about might also be real. And that would be awesome! Very enjoyable read! Zada is a very talented story teller! **I voluntarily read an advanced readers copy of this book from Grove Atlantic via NetGalley. All opinions expressed are entirely my own.**

  3. 4 out of 5

    Bandit

    This book had me at a mere mention of Sasquatch. Yeah, I’ll read about a guy going Sasquatch hunting. Certainly read enough about fictional versions of this story. But this book actually turned out to be so much more. A very pleasant surprise. Not a mere quest, but also a travelogue of the British Columbia coastal region and First Nation settlements there and also a meditation of why we look for mythical creatures and what it says about us as a society. The author in a very precise journalistic This book had me at a mere mention of Sasquatch. Yeah, I’ll read about a guy going Sasquatch hunting. Certainly read enough about fictional versions of this story. But this book actually turned out to be so much more. A very pleasant surprise. Not a mere quest, but also a travelogue of the British Columbia coastal region and First Nation settlements there and also a meditation of why we look for mythical creatures and what it says about us as a society. The author in a very precise journalistic fashion takes no sides, despite his childhood passion for Sasquatch and the like. This isn’t a passionate cryptozoology account meant to convince the disbelievers. No, this is very much a level unbiased look at the peculiar obsession with the great hairy (ape)man of the woods that has persevered throughout generations and across the world. Are they out there and are just really good at hiding? Is everyone just seeing things overwhelmed by the majestic greatness of nature? Are they an evolutionary offshoot? A legend? A fairy tale? For peoples of British Columbia’s great forested coast they are sort of an accepted fact of life. Seen or at least glimpsed with something of a frequency. John Zada visited many of these settlements (too small to qualify for any other assignation) and interviewed many of the locals. But also he observed their way of life, such distinguished historical past and such severe modern privation, where living as one with nature is no longer possible and present day commercialism, so often lacking respect for tradition and environment, threatens their very existence. It’s a very interesting representation of the inconsiderate brutality of economic progress, especially relevant for anyone living in a country like USA where as of late such things have become rampant. Apparently Canada is trying to do the right thing, but, politics being as they are, who knows for how long. If they are out there, hiding out in the great unbridled wilderness, Sasquatches are exactly right to stay away from civilization. Certainly their way of life wouldn’t be preserved either. Are they out there? John Zada isn’t saying yes and the man spent a lot of time looking in a lot of places, he does, however, gives some very clever psychological explanations for why and how someone might think they saw one. And why not, there are far less exciting things to hallucinate out there. So it’s down to what you believe or what you want to believe. Frankly, Sasquatch and co. are very easy to debunk and explain away as this book amply demonstrates. But…they are much more fun to believe in. Given the opportunity, why not choose a world with such magic in it. And as for the book, it’s a well written account, it’s interesting and dynamic. It has a positively spectacular title. One might wish for some photos, but the author makes due with vivid descriptions, so there’s that and it was a very enjoyable read. Thanks Netgalley.

  4. 5 out of 5

    J.S.

    So, do I believe in Bigfoot, or Sasquatch? That’s probably not the right question. A better question would be: do I ever even think about Sasquatch? And the answer would have to be no. It’s not that I believe or disbelieve, it’s just that it’s not something I spend any time thinking about. At least not since I was ten years old, but even then... John Zada thought about Bigfoot when he was ten years old, too, but when the opportunity came to write a book about Sasquatch encounters in British Colum So, do I believe in Bigfoot, or Sasquatch? That’s probably not the right question. A better question would be: do I ever even think about Sasquatch? And the answer would have to be no. It’s not that I believe or disbelieve, it’s just that it’s not something I spend any time thinking about. At least not since I was ten years old, but even then... John Zada thought about Bigfoot when he was ten years old, too, but when the opportunity came to write a book about Sasquatch encounters in British Columbia, he jumped at it. He traveled to the Great Bear Rainforest and sought out people there who have stories of Sasquatch encounters. Most of them are simply stories of hearing them yell or seeing the footprints or being terrorized by them in the middle of the night, even though they didn’t actually see them. But he found a few who did see them, and were willing to share their stories. So... if I’m not really that interested in Bigfoot, why would I read this? Well, the cover is really beautiful. And it’s a really great title. But mostly because my kids like stories like that - although I’m not sure they believe/disbelieve either - it’s just kind of fun for them. (And they still want to plan a return camping trip to the California Redwoods just so we can stop at the Bigfoot museum in Santa Cruz that was closed last time.) And I guess it just sounded interesting to me. Zada doesn’t come up with any earthshaking conclusions. He doesn’t even really have a whole lot of stories. What he does have is an interesting travelogue of his time among the First Peoples of BC in their remote towns and villages as he hunts stories. And that actually turned out to be kind of interesting. Maybe not quite 4 stars interesting, but close enough to round up. And I seriously want to visit some of these small towns and out of the way places he went to. And in the end, it was kind of a fun an interesting read.

  5. 5 out of 5

    dori

    Absolutely enthralling, well-written, entertaining and thorough. I picked this up as a curiosity (not my typical choice of read) and read it straight through, grateful that it wasn't a simpering, new age quackery of a read. Trust me when I say the author did a great job at presenting as objectively as possible on a topic such as this. Initially, I had my doubts, given the topic itself, but was far too curious not to request this (thank you, NetGalley!) My wife is from Vancouver Island and we live Absolutely enthralling, well-written, entertaining and thorough. I picked this up as a curiosity (not my typical choice of read) and read it straight through, grateful that it wasn't a simpering, new age quackery of a read. Trust me when I say the author did a great job at presenting as objectively as possible on a topic such as this. Initially, I had my doubts, given the topic itself, but was far too curious not to request this (thank you, NetGalley!) My wife is from Vancouver Island and we live in Sasquatch territory here in far northern California, and footprints have been seen. What we call the Sasquatch has existed in indigenous stories for thousands of years, here and in the unceded land many refer to as British Columbia. Many of these stories are very similar (one local tribe here says that back in the day, their ceremonies were not considered complete without an appearance). I'm not saying I fully believe just yet, but... I'm inspired to further thought by this well-written telling of yet another quest to find the big guy. It most certainly doesn't solve the mystery (what fun would that be? Quite honestly, despite it all, I hope Bigfoot continues to evade this mess of a human race) but if even if you've never questioned the existence of Bigfoot, you'll enjoy a ride through some incredible territory and some very interesting parts of history and geography.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kamisha

    I was pleasantly surprised by how much I absolutely enjoyed reading this book! Based on the fact that it was about searching for Sasquatch in the Great Bear Rainforest of British Columbia (one of the most fascinating ecosystems in the world to me) I already knew this book was up my alley, but it was so much better than what I expected. In the Valleys of the Noble Beyond is about a journalist searching for signs of Sasquatch in one of the most ecologically rich forests on earth. But this is so muc I was pleasantly surprised by how much I absolutely enjoyed reading this book! Based on the fact that it was about searching for Sasquatch in the Great Bear Rainforest of British Columbia (one of the most fascinating ecosystems in the world to me) I already knew this book was up my alley, but it was so much better than what I expected. In the Valleys of the Noble Beyond is about a journalist searching for signs of Sasquatch in one of the most ecologically rich forests on earth. But this is so much more than simply another Squatch hunt. Zada excels at creating this beautiful narrative about this almost otherworldly place that exists on the edge of society, his empathy and respect for the Great Bear Rainforest and its denizens (human, animal, plant, and cryptid) shines through the story. I was so compelled by this read that I realized I was reading it faster than I wanted to and ended up having to slow myself down! Not only does Zada approach Sasquatch with hopeful rationality but he also adds an especially respectful and compelling account of the complex nature of what seeing Sasquatch or humanoid-like creatures means for certain cultures, for humans in general, and occasionally for our emotional states. I appreciated the way he balanced science and tradition. He covers many different scientific views on Bigfoot, both skeptics and believers, while also taking the time to speak with local indigenous communities and finding out what Bigfoot traditionally meant to them as a culture. Overall, I cannot recommend In the Valleys of the Noble Beyond enough for fellow cryptozoology enthusiasts, or even someone looking for well done nature writing!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Julie Gray

    In the Valleys of the Noble Beyond is really a deeply satisfying travelogue and social study about how our environments shape us and why our minds are so well suited to believe in supernatural phenomena. I grew up in "Bigfoot country" and so was always terrified of the myth of the Sasquatch, but I have never found any writing about the subject which isn't sensationalized or silly. I live in the Middle East, so reading about the dappled forests and silence of the Great Bear National Rain Forest w In the Valleys of the Noble Beyond is really a deeply satisfying travelogue and social study about how our environments shape us and why our minds are so well suited to believe in supernatural phenomena. I grew up in "Bigfoot country" and so was always terrified of the myth of the Sasquatch, but I have never found any writing about the subject which isn't sensationalized or silly. I live in the Middle East, so reading about the dappled forests and silence of the Great Bear National Rain Forest was an armchair vacation for body and mind. Zada is a poetic writer and he takes a brave, deep dive into the local culture and beliefs of the area, as well as taking seriously the claims of "Sasqualogists" without demeaning or mocking them, but rather, putting it all into a fascinating context about why we need meaning and myths in our lives. Intellectually and philosophically intelligent, without a trace of sensationalism or cynicism, In the Valleys of the Noble Beyond is a worthy read.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Amit Verma

    This journal attempts to discuss myth of Sasquatch ( Big foot, Yeti) in British Columbia area by author. Book is wide in its coverage and covers all aspects of history, present events and hotspots related to sasquatch encounters. . It throws light on epic yeti researcher John Brindenagel and various books and testimonials about encounters with bigfoot. Book covers beauty of the great bear rainforest, koeye, hoodoovalley, kitasoo valley, oceanaa falls and solitude ridden wuiknuxv village. Author is u This journal attempts to discuss myth of Sasquatch ( Big foot, Yeti) in British Columbia area by author. Book is wide in its coverage and covers all aspects of history, present events and hotspots related to sasquatch encounters. . It throws light on epic yeti researcher John Brindenagel and various books and testimonials about encounters with bigfoot. Book covers beauty of the great bear rainforest, koeye, hoodoovalley, kitasoo valley, oceanaa falls and solitude ridden wuiknuxv village. Author is unbiased and discusses various psychological baises which may lead to erroneous descriptions of encounters. Problems of global warming, oil spillage and reckless bear hunting is underlined and incidence showing author's encounter with bear is interesting. . . Part describing his feelings when when fires gunshot for first time is very nice. Writing is engaging and enjoyable. Description of natural beauty is awesome. Interspersed quotes are very nice. Authir has captured feelings of characters at various points in a expert manner. . When author returns home after spending days in natural solace and beauty, he has clearer vision about meaning of life and futility of modern pacy life. Book is recommended as a scientific exploration of human longing to decipher mysteries even at personal risk.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Ryan

    Part travelogue and part mediation on travel, this is a sublime book that truly captures a unique place and explores in depth the reality of what we know about the Sasquatch and more importantly what we know about the idea and meaning of such phenomena. By far the best travel book of the summer of 2019.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Michelle Boyer-Kelly

    Note: Thank you to NetGalley, the Publisher, and author John Zada for allowing me to read an eARC of this novel in exchange for an honest review. I've been fascinated by Sasquatch and was thrilled to see an upcoming title pertaining to one of the great mysteries that continues to plague us: Is Sasquatch real? Whether you believe or don't believe in Sasquatch, you're familiar with the stories, famous sightings, and plenty of fun reality television shows that surround hunting for Sasquatch. And as Note: Thank you to NetGalley, the Publisher, and author John Zada for allowing me to read an eARC of this novel in exchange for an honest review. I've been fascinated by Sasquatch and was thrilled to see an upcoming title pertaining to one of the great mysteries that continues to plague us: Is Sasquatch real? Whether you believe or don't believe in Sasquatch, you're familiar with the stories, famous sightings, and plenty of fun reality television shows that surround hunting for Sasquatch. And as with many things, "no proof" doesn't mean that these creatures do not exist. So--I jumped right into this novel hoping to gain more insight into Sasquatch. Zada details his journeys across Canada, especially in First Nations locations where the Sasquatch (who goes by many names in these areas) has reportedly been seen. By speaking with individuals and going on his own treks, Zada begins to realize how intricate the question "is Sasquatch real?" really is. He posits that either (1) the creature is indeed real and has not been categorically proven to the scientific community yet or (2) a lot of people are seeing similar things when they're (basically) having a bit of a mental breakdown in the isolated woods. Could it be that people trick themselves into seeing Sasquatch because they want to see him/her? Or is there really something out there that maybe we just have not fully discovered yet? I was in love with this book the moment I started reading. I'm a sucker for any novel that tries to explain the unexplained and this one was well written, had great information about Sasquatch, and used a lot of dialog from people who have seen things. What I loved the most though: Zada's discussion of indigenous peoples, their issues, and especially acknowledging that in order to research on their lands you should introduce yourself first. As an Indigenous Studies scholar, I really appreciated that this information and some of the tensions Zada encountered made it into the book. This shows this book is more "scholarly" and not entirely pop-culture (not that there's anything wrong with either!). A really fun read, very compelling, and I would highly recommend this for those interested in Sasquatch.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Caidyn (SEMI-HIATUS; BW Reviews; he/him/his)

    This wasn't a bad book, but just different than I thought it might be. I've always had a huge interest in cryptozoology. It's just something that I find very interesting to read about, from the crackpot theories to the very plausible ones. Personally, I find Bigfoot pretty credible based on the information I've been presented. But, this book isn't entirely about them. It's more about the culture around them. As I've seen in cryptozoology, usually it's about the people who lived with the creatures This wasn't a bad book, but just different than I thought it might be. I've always had a huge interest in cryptozoology. It's just something that I find very interesting to read about, from the crackpot theories to the very plausible ones. Personally, I find Bigfoot pretty credible based on the information I've been presented. But, this book isn't entirely about them. It's more about the culture around them. As I've seen in cryptozoology, usually it's about the people who lived with the creatures first. In this case, this book is more of a cultural history of these people. It's a very interesting story, of course, but it's more of snapshots of these tribes and towns and what they're currently struggling through with all of the upheaval recently. Still an interesting book, just not quite what I wanted it to be.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Julie (HufflepuffGirl90)

    I started this book with no real idea what it was about, was it fact, fiction, or hopeful supposition. What I found was beautiful descriptions of the Canadian wilderness and Pacific Northwest. Zada did a good job with researching all form of the Sasquatch legend; bringing in the Yeti, Abominable Snowman, forest devil, bush Indians, etc. I greatly enjoyed travelling through Canada in this book. The scenery depicted was breathtaking, I only wish that there were photos to go along with the writing. T I started this book with no real idea what it was about, was it fact, fiction, or hopeful supposition. What I found was beautiful descriptions of the Canadian wilderness and Pacific Northwest. Zada did a good job with researching all form of the Sasquatch legend; bringing in the Yeti, Abominable Snowman, forest devil, bush Indians, etc. I greatly enjoyed travelling through Canada in this book. The scenery depicted was breathtaking, I only wish that there were photos to go along with the writing. The well-researched and reasoned facts about Sasquatch were fantastic to read through. Zada did a good job of bringing in all types of witnesses, from back woods guides to Teddy Roosevelt and a local teacher, John Burns. Adding in his own personal accounts and stories really helped the narrative as well. I enjoyed that he did not come out and say that “yes, there is such thing as Sasquatch”; instead he gives plenty of well-reasoned examples and ideas that could lead people to believe. Great book overall. Thank you Netgalley and John Zada for the opportunity to read this ARC in exchange for a honest review.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Samantha

    I was expecting a book about Sasquatch but I was pleasantly surprised to instead get a book about the Pacific coast of British Columbia and the native people that still live there. I found the Sasquatch stories interesting, but it was the stories and first-hand accounts of life among the First People that provided the true story. The author travels up and down the remote and sparsely inhabited west coast of British Columbia and experiences it's beauty and danger and learns about the lives of the I was expecting a book about Sasquatch but I was pleasantly surprised to instead get a book about the Pacific coast of British Columbia and the native people that still live there. I found the Sasquatch stories interesting, but it was the stories and first-hand accounts of life among the First People that provided the true story. The author travels up and down the remote and sparsely inhabited west coast of British Columbia and experiences it's beauty and danger and learns about the lives of the tribes and tiny villages that live there. The book seems to be about the Great Bear Rainforest and it's ecology more than anything else. This is by no means a criticism. I was intrigued and fascinated by the author's descriptions of his travels, the people he talked to, and the adventures he experienced during his hunt for Sasquatch. His faithful representation of the tribal people of the area was a refreshingly up-front depiction of the complicated issues they face. The whole Sasquatch thing did turn out to be kind of interesting too. I highly recommend it. I'm definitely convinced that I need to visit the area and experience its wild beauty for myself.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Dakota

    Zada travels to remote communities in the Great Bear Rain Forest compiling Sasquatch lore and first hand accounts. This beautifully written book is at once sobering account of the impact of big industry, thrilling mystery and, ecological ode to the vast wildness of BC. Perfect for any lover of adventure who has ever wondered if there might be more to be discovered. As someone who is from BC (my town is actually mentioned in the book!) who has grown up camping and hearing stories of Sasquatch, I' Zada travels to remote communities in the Great Bear Rain Forest compiling Sasquatch lore and first hand accounts. This beautifully written book is at once sobering account of the impact of big industry, thrilling mystery and, ecological ode to the vast wildness of BC. Perfect for any lover of adventure who has ever wondered if there might be more to be discovered. As someone who is from BC (my town is actually mentioned in the book!) who has grown up camping and hearing stories of Sasquatch, I've always wanted to know more. I've never felt that there were enough resources on this topic and I appreciated the serious yet open minded approach to the subject. It helps that Zada is a talented writer who draws you right in to the story of his trip. I found that I came away from this book with more than I had expected.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Boden

    I'd never read about the Sasquatch before, but this book seized my attention from the first page. Zada captures not only the rainswept valleys and rugged coasts of the Great Bear Rainforest, but the beating heart of the region, too: with its rich characters, strange adventures and, of course, its first hand accounts of the Sasquatch. But Zada's story isn't so much about finding this illusive creature, but about seeking something of the extraordinary in our sometimes too ordinary lives. If you're I'd never read about the Sasquatch before, but this book seized my attention from the first page. Zada captures not only the rainswept valleys and rugged coasts of the Great Bear Rainforest, but the beating heart of the region, too: with its rich characters, strange adventures and, of course, its first hand accounts of the Sasquatch. But Zada's story isn't so much about finding this illusive creature, but about seeking something of the extraordinary in our sometimes too ordinary lives. If you're worried that this book might be a bit out there, because of the subject matter -- I assure you that it's not. Zada writes with the same level-headed insight that I found in John Vaillant's The Golden Spruce and The Tiger. I hope to see more from Zada soon.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Julia Keizer

    I always wanted to be a journalist, and this novel brought back all those feelings. Of wanting to discover something new and provide that insight to the world. A very descriptive novel of the beautiful wilderness of British Columbia. Of trying to uncover the truth about big foot, or Sasquatch. A novel rich with traditions of the different aboriginal people of British Columbia. Of the different beliefs surrounding Sasquatch. This novel is a journey into Great Bear Rain forest with the author. Int I always wanted to be a journalist, and this novel brought back all those feelings. Of wanting to discover something new and provide that insight to the world. A very descriptive novel of the beautiful wilderness of British Columbia. Of trying to uncover the truth about big foot, or Sasquatch. A novel rich with traditions of the different aboriginal people of British Columbia. Of the different beliefs surrounding Sasquatch. This novel is a journey into Great Bear Rain forest with the author. Into a wildlife dense with bears. It was an all encompassing story where I laughed out loud and wondered at reality with the small psychology lessons included. John Zada is clearly a beautiful writer that makes you think about the bigger picture surrounding one of the most talked about myths. Incorporating fact and fiction into a unstoppable story. I am now looking forward to the documentary about Great Bear Rain forest and have a better understand of the politics that go on surrounding nature conservation.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Peter

    This book is to misquote the Michael Rosen poem feels like We're All Going on A Bear Hunt but in this case its seeking out Bigfoot. The book is a sum of many parts, there is natural history and ecology, psychology, local politics and much human experience all combining into a narrative. The book is very easy to read and is informative, never preachy and takes an evidence based approach to the mythology surrounding Sasquatch. For me the key to this book is the stories from those who are eyewitness This book is to misquote the Michael Rosen poem feels like We're All Going on A Bear Hunt but in this case its seeking out Bigfoot. The book is a sum of many parts, there is natural history and ecology, psychology, local politics and much human experience all combining into a narrative. The book is very easy to read and is informative, never preachy and takes an evidence based approach to the mythology surrounding Sasquatch. For me the key to this book is the stories from those who are eyewitnesses, they are just telling their story and as is shown there is a long history of these stories across many cultures. Do I believe that they exist? Does that even matter? The answer is probably not to both, but what I found from reading this book is the importance of an open mind and the ability to be fascinated by the things in this world that we don't yet fully understand and surely this is the human condition. The quest for knowledge goes on. Read, learn and marvel with this book and admire the First Nations and their resilience and connection to the natural environment - something we could all do with a reminder of. #InTheValleysOfTheNobleBeyond #NetGalley

  18. 4 out of 5

    Videoclimber(AKA)MTsLilSis

    This was a beautiful book. The descriptions of British Columbia and the Native people were fascinating. Zara made me feel like I was along the journey with him. I appreciate the fact that the author is unbiased. He is there to investigate, any decisions on what exists are yours alone. I thought the book was well laid out and easy to follow. I think travelers, crypto fans, history buffs and wildlife lovers, will all enjoy this book. I look forward to seeing what John Zara goes in search of next t This was a beautiful book. The descriptions of British Columbia and the Native people were fascinating. Zara made me feel like I was along the journey with him. I appreciate the fact that the author is unbiased. He is there to investigate, any decisions on what exists are yours alone. I thought the book was well laid out and easy to follow. I think travelers, crypto fans, history buffs and wildlife lovers, will all enjoy this book. I look forward to seeing what John Zara goes in search of next time! *Thank you to Atlantic Monthly Press, John Zara, and Netgalley, for allowing me to read an advanced copy of this book.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jypsy

    I've never read a book pertaining to Sasquatch, so I decided to give it a good. The story is informative, and I'm glad for that. I learned some things from the story. Really, it's a type of research journal narrative. The main character is unbiased and engaging. It's an interesting field of work about all things Sasquatch. Definitely an educational read about things I knew nothing about. A solid read overall.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Dan Sperling

    I absolutely loved this book and had a hard time putting it down. Beautifully written and brilliantly conceived, it treats a controversial topic in an eminently sensible way that avoids the twin pitfalls of foolish credulity and narrow-minded skepticism. But IN THE VALLEYS OF THE NOBLE BEYOND is, at heart, about far more than the Sasquatch, with the author's search for that creature providing the frame-story for a much larger quest for truth. I wish there were more books of its caliber and look I absolutely loved this book and had a hard time putting it down. Beautifully written and brilliantly conceived, it treats a controversial topic in an eminently sensible way that avoids the twin pitfalls of foolish credulity and narrow-minded skepticism. But IN THE VALLEYS OF THE NOBLE BEYOND is, at heart, about far more than the Sasquatch, with the author's search for that creature providing the frame-story for a much larger quest for truth. I wish there were more books of its caliber and look forward to reading John Zada's next one, whatever the topic might be.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Darla

    A combination of travel memoir, Sasquatch sightings and philosophy. As John Zada searched for Sasquatch, he vacillated between "it exists" and "it doesn't exist." He traveled from one village to the next seeking out firsthand reports and searching for evidence. Along the way he became intimately acquainted with the beauty of the Great Bear Forest -- the Noble Beyond -- in British Columbia and saw the ecological struggles occurring there. As a child of the 70's, I was drawn to this book and the s A combination of travel memoir, Sasquatch sightings and philosophy. As John Zada searched for Sasquatch, he vacillated between "it exists" and "it doesn't exist." He traveled from one village to the next seeking out firsthand reports and searching for evidence. Along the way he became intimately acquainted with the beauty of the Great Bear Forest -- the Noble Beyond -- in British Columbia and saw the ecological struggles occurring there. As a child of the 70's, I was drawn to this book and the search for Sasquatch. This book will also appeal to travel aficionados, cryptozoologists and philosophers. Perhaps we all have our own version of the Noble Beyond. Thank you to Grove Atlantic and NetGalley for a digital ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen Gray

    Fans of nature writing and those interested in British Columbia should pick this up immediately. Yes it's framed around the Sasquatch but it's so much more. Make no mistake, Zada is not arguing for the existence of this legendary creature- he's letting a whole range of people talk about it, as well as about the region. It's a terrific read. Thanks to Netgalley for the ARC. I hope this gets the audience it deserves.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jean

    I loved this book! The best part of the book for me was the beautiful area, I love nature and wildlife and this book is well written about this beautiful area. Thank you so much, Netgalley, John Zada and the Publisher for the chance to read this wonderful book!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Deidre

    This journalistic look at Sasquatch sightings and local myths and legends didn’t make me a believer. A lot of bear stories. The author waxed philosophical too often, and it slowed the story down.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Steve Earle

    This is a wonderful book about how we believe what we do and why.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Les

    Excellent. The author's descriptions of places and people are vivid and make you feel as if you are standing beside him. But what really makes this special is his vulnerability and insight into what it means to believe in the existence (or possible existence) of Bigfoot.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Wendi

    Based on the description and early reviews, I requested and was granted an ARC from Grove Atlantic. The final narrative feels like a bit of a bait and switch. At one point about a third of the way through, Zada mentions that while he has returned to Canadian tribal areas with the intention of hunting for Bigfoot or, more likely, local stories and experiences with Bigfoot, he's given a lecture by a local that he should be ashamed of himself for writing about Bigfoot instead of about the poor socia Based on the description and early reviews, I requested and was granted an ARC from Grove Atlantic. The final narrative feels like a bit of a bait and switch. At one point about a third of the way through, Zada mentions that while he has returned to Canadian tribal areas with the intention of hunting for Bigfoot or, more likely, local stories and experiences with Bigfoot, he's given a lecture by a local that he should be ashamed of himself for writing about Bigfoot instead of about the poor social and economic conditions suffered by the people of the area (I immediately asked myself why this clearly literate and seemingly articulate lecturer wasn't writing about his community instead of browbeating a stranger into doing so). Zada admits to feeling shamed, and to wondering if he is, in fact, in the wrong but he's just so interested in his initial attraction to Bigfoot that he intends to persevere. However, he kind of... doesn't. He does, indeed, seem to succumb to the guilt and the majority of the narrative is about his joining with different cultural groups and their expeditions/adventures (not all of the time to look for Bigfoot) and soliciting their potential experiences with the creature but ultimately expounding upon their way of life and their social, political, and financial concerns. He wanted to learn more about Bigfoot and told us he was going to, and we wanted to learn more about Bigfoot and so jumped in to ride along, but then he became mired in guilt (or, obviously, an honest and deeper interest in these concerns than in Bigfoot; it's just that's not what the title/description indicate) and went off on a tangent much of the time and so dragged us along, too. I'm in the cohort. I agree with the environmental concerns and I appreciate being better educated about the conditions that the people who are most likely to encounter Bigfoot are living in but this is, unfortunately, not what I signed up for. I'm not bemoaning cultural, contemporary, and historical context. I was interested in reading this book because it seemed like an intellectual step up and not a rehashing Bigfoot-experience history and it is that. But it's also really not all that much about Bigfoot.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Justin Matthews

    I was surprised by this book. The quality of the writing is really good, and the picture of the Pacific Northwest that Zada paints is dazzling. By the end it wasn't so much about Sasquatch as it was about life itself. I highly recommend it!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kerry Pickens

    Beautifully written tale about a writer's exploration not only of the myths surrounding Sasquatch, but the psychology behind the human experience of "seeing" strange phenomena. The writer discusses the Native people's reactions to his interest in the myths and his lack of focous for their own societal problems, as well as his ability to relate to them as outsiders of the midstream American life. The author is Middle Eastern, and I enjoyed his reflections on being seen as "the other" as well havi Beautifully written tale about a writer's exploration not only of the myths surrounding Sasquatch, but the psychology behind the human experience of "seeing" strange phenomena. The writer discusses the Native people's reactions to his interest in the myths and his lack of focous for their own societal problems, as well as his ability to relate to them as outsiders of the midstream American life. The author is Middle Eastern, and I enjoyed his reflections on being seen as "the other" as well having come from a dry climate that he would be fascinated with the lushness of the Northwest/Canadian remote areas.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Tiffany

    I remember being fascinated as a child about "Bigfoot" and worrying about spying him in the woods (even though we didn't live anywhere that one had ever been 'sighted'). This book renews that fascination and I found myself ever hopeful throughout that the author, John Zada, would find ultimate proof of their existence. There is certainly enough history through thousands of years of indigenous storytelling to indicate that this is not a new phenomenon. And recent discoveries of species long-belie I remember being fascinated as a child about "Bigfoot" and worrying about spying him in the woods (even though we didn't live anywhere that one had ever been 'sighted'). This book renews that fascination and I found myself ever hopeful throughout that the author, John Zada, would find ultimate proof of their existence. There is certainly enough history through thousands of years of indigenous storytelling to indicate that this is not a new phenomenon. And recent discoveries of species long-believed to be extinct does give one a greater sense of the possibilities! Well written and drawing a beautiful picture not only of the environments that Mr. Zada explored, but the indigenous people with whom he interacted.

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