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The Curious Case of Benjamin Button: A Graphic Novel

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Upon completing "The Curious Case of Benjamin Button" in 1922, F. Scott Fitzgerald declared it "the funniest story ever written" and "one of my two favorite stories." It's the strange tale of a man who is "born" 70 years old and mysteriously ages in reverse. This stunning graphic novel adaptation illustrates Benjamin Button's many adventures: He falls in love, starts a fam Upon completing "The Curious Case of Benjamin Button" in 1922, F. Scott Fitzgerald declared it "the funniest story ever written" and "one of my two favorite stories." It's the strange tale of a man who is "born" 70 years old and mysteriously ages in reverse. This stunning graphic novel adaptation illustrates Benjamin Button's many adventures: He falls in love, starts a family, and runs a successful business. In his later years, he goes to war and attends Harvard University. As an old man, he resembles a newborn baby and returns to the care of a nurse. Complete with Fitzgerald's original text, dazzling watercolor illustrations, and an afterword describing the story's origins and critical reception, this edition offers a fresh look at a literary masterpiece.


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Upon completing "The Curious Case of Benjamin Button" in 1922, F. Scott Fitzgerald declared it "the funniest story ever written" and "one of my two favorite stories." It's the strange tale of a man who is "born" 70 years old and mysteriously ages in reverse. This stunning graphic novel adaptation illustrates Benjamin Button's many adventures: He falls in love, starts a fam Upon completing "The Curious Case of Benjamin Button" in 1922, F. Scott Fitzgerald declared it "the funniest story ever written" and "one of my two favorite stories." It's the strange tale of a man who is "born" 70 years old and mysteriously ages in reverse. This stunning graphic novel adaptation illustrates Benjamin Button's many adventures: He falls in love, starts a family, and runs a successful business. In his later years, he goes to war and attends Harvard University. As an old man, he resembles a newborn baby and returns to the care of a nurse. Complete with Fitzgerald's original text, dazzling watercolor illustrations, and an afterword describing the story's origins and critical reception, this edition offers a fresh look at a literary masterpiece.

30 review for The Curious Case of Benjamin Button: A Graphic Novel

  1. 4 out of 5

    Andie

    I couldn't seem to get over my first thought of, "How the hell did someone actually give birth to an old man? How would that work?" It was an interesting, quick read. It's laid out very simply, and really more of an outline of a story. I liked it, but I had a hard time getting past the unrealistic attitudes towards Benjamin Button.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Yoojung Seo

    This particular graphic novel seemed to drag on. Since there was no climax in the story, it was very hard to read even in the form of a graphic novel. The illustrations were meant to play in the era the story takes place in, but it played even more into the boring theme of the whole book. There was no real story plot and the only progression that really seemed to take place was Benjamin Button’s gradual decline in age. There was no character development, whatsoever, and it never seemed to give a This particular graphic novel seemed to drag on. Since there was no climax in the story, it was very hard to read even in the form of a graphic novel. The illustrations were meant to play in the era the story takes place in, but it played even more into the boring theme of the whole book. There was no real story plot and the only progression that really seemed to take place was Benjamin Button’s gradual decline in age. There was no character development, whatsoever, and it never seemed to give an explanation to how the mother gave birth to an old man to begin with. The mother was not in the picture in the book at all and it was not even acknowledged that she was a character in the book, let alone the woman who gave birth to an old man. There was no explanation to his curious case, which was the only thing keeping me from quit reading this book. This book should not be recommended to anyone due to the lack of any event taking place. The graphic novel did not do the original story by F Scott Fitzgerald any justice and frankly, it was a shame that the story didn’t constantly include Button’s real age and perceived age because that would’ve been a fun connection to see. Overall, this book was a drag to read and I would not recommend it to anyone.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Freda Mans-Labianca

    Better than the film! Such a cute story, and yet filled with much sadness too. At times, mostly in youth, it would be fantastic to live that life. Growing younger, when old or when really young wouldn't be so great though, and to do it backwards from everyone else... no, thanks. I can't imagine how the author thought this was the funniest story ever, it wasn't an emotion that went through me. It is an amazing story though. One that everyone should read. Don't let that Brad Pitt movie be all that Better than the film! Such a cute story, and yet filled with much sadness too. At times, mostly in youth, it would be fantastic to live that life. Growing younger, when old or when really young wouldn't be so great though, and to do it backwards from everyone else... no, thanks. I can't imagine how the author thought this was the funniest story ever, it wasn't an emotion that went through me. It is an amazing story though. One that everyone should read. Don't let that Brad Pitt movie be all that you know of the story. I can't comment on the graphic novel part of this. In ebook online, there was no graphics for me to see.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    Not the best graphic novel but definitely an interesting remake of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Curious Case of Benjamin Button.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Debbie

    When Fitzgerald penned Benjamin Button in 1922, he enthusiastically called it “the funniest story ever written” and hoped to write more pieces like it and The Diamond as Big as the Ritz. Publishers and the public, however, had a different idea as evidenced by an anonymous letter by a reader in Cincinnati: Sir–I have read the story Benjamin Button in Colliers and I wish to say that as a short story writer you would make a good lunatic. I have seen many peices (sic) of cheese in my life but of all When Fitzgerald penned Benjamin Button in 1922, he enthusiastically called it “the funniest story ever written” and hoped to write more pieces like it and The Diamond as Big as the Ritz. Publishers and the public, however, had a different idea as evidenced by an anonymous letter by a reader in Cincinnati: Sir–I have read the story Benjamin Button in Colliers and I wish to say that as a short story writer you would make a good lunatic. I have seen many peices (sic) of cheese in my life but of all the peices of cheese I have ever seen you are the biggest peice. I hate to waste a peice of stationary on you but I will. I had a somewhat more favorable reaction to the story of the unfortunate Mr. Button, who was born an old man and grew younger rather than older. I was unable to find a copy of the full text of Fitzgerald’s story, but the graphic novel edition purports to be “complete with Fitzgerald’s original text”. I suspect that the text included was indeed the author’s but I’m not convinced that it was the full text of the story since Fitzgerald tended to be wordy. Nonetheless, there was more than enough, along with the illustrations and the speech bubbles, to tell the story in detail. The 2008 movie starring Brad Pitt and Cate Blanchett was a tour de force of digital enhancement. It won Academy Awards for Art Direction, Makeup and Visual Effects, as well it should have. (Rent DVDs online with Zip.ca or Blockbuster.com ) Critics were divided, some (NY Times, Variety) seeing it as a wonderful film and others, not so. I’m on the side of the Times. Generally, I like movies that are based on books to stick fairly closely to the original. In this case, I’m willing to make an exception. Other than the title and the general concept of a man “aging” younger, there are NO similarities between Fitzgerald’s story (hereafter called the “book”) and the film. In the book, Benjamin was born in a Baltimore hospital in 1860, as fully grown adult–a seventy-year-old man–who can talk & thinks like an adult. He’s raised by his father, spending company in his early days with his elderly grandfather. When he is in his early twenties, and appears about fifty, he marries a younger woman who likes “older men”. As the years pass, Benjamin loses interest in his wife as she becomes middle-aged and he grows younger. His troubles applying to Yale (at 18 but looking 60), his time in the army during the Spanish-American War that began in 1898, his subsequent years as a football hero at Harvard (at 60 but looking 18), and his attempt at re-enlistment in 1914 for the Great War are wryly comically portrayed by Fitzgerald. As the years progress, Benjamin hands over the family Wholesale Hardware business to his son Roscoe, and as an moody adolescent ends up living with Roscoe and eventually attends kindergarten with his grandson as he thinks more and more like a child. The movie has Benjamin being born in 1918 in New Orleans as a wizened baby who is literally thrown away by his father and lands on the steps of an old-age home where he is taken in by one of the attendants and raised as her own. The old age home is a clever device – who would question an old man there, even if he acted like a three year old, which he did, since the movie version has Benjamin born as a child physically and mentally. That works until until dementia sets in when he looks about 12 years old. Then the script picks up the book’s version of his regressing intellect & knowledge. The love story that is central to the movie version is completely an invention of the screenwriter, and is completely opposite to what happens in the book. And the movie version made the elder Mr. Button’s fortune the result of buttons, rather than hardware. You decide if that clever or if it’s cheesy. I rather liked it. After all, the whole story is a fantasy. Differences aside, I greatly enjoyed the movie and much of my enjoyment came from the period sets throughout the twentieth century. Some critics make the charge that the movie is too long, coming in at just under three hours, but I think that it needs that time to progress through the decades and to tell Benjamin’s story: a man who seemed not greatly affected by major history (other than the World Wars) and who just seemed to have life happen to him, rather than to make life happen. Brad Pitt played Brad Pitt – in various make-ups and with a multitude of digital enhancement, both to look young and to look old. Cate Blanchett, also the recipient of age-altering techniques, was far more credible as Daisy (a tip of the hat to Fitzgerald’s Great Gatsby name for his wife Zelda). Although I was initially disappointed that I was able to get only this graphic issue of the story, I found the book to be a pleasure to read (and to re-read). It, no doubt, is true to the original story and makes it accessible to both younger and older readers alike. The book reminded me of the Illustrated Classics of such books as the Prince and the Pauper that my brother & I devoured in the mid-sixties. But they were comic books. This is an elegant, 5.75 x 8.25 inch hardbound edition whose sepia toned pages are a treat to read.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Rukia Hunter

    Hilarious and so worth reading.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Danette

    A tolerable graphic novel. A silly story. 2018 A graphic novel

  8. 4 out of 5

    Megan (ReadingRover)

    Well done! It was basically illustrated exactly as I pictured the book in my mind the first time I read it. Great rendition!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Beth

    The graphic novel is a great way to introduce the classic story to teens or those who don't necessarily like anything classics (like me). I really liked the illustrations; I thought the whole book was very well done. However, there were two things I did not like: There is never a reason given as to why Benjamin Button was born a 70 year old man. I appreciate the authors giving a little information at the end. According to the authors, Fitzgerald was inspired by a quote by Mark Twain stating that The graphic novel is a great way to introduce the classic story to teens or those who don't necessarily like anything classics (like me). I really liked the illustrations; I thought the whole book was very well done. However, there were two things I did not like: There is never a reason given as to why Benjamin Button was born a 70 year old man. I appreciate the authors giving a little information at the end. According to the authors, Fitzgerald was inspired by a quote by Mark Twain stating that it's a shame that the best time of life is at the beginning and the worst time is at the end. Also, the other thing I didn't like was that once Mrs. Button popped out the 70 year old Benjamin, she was never heard from again. I would have like some insight into her feelings on giving birth to an old man. The quote from Mark Twain, found at the end of this graphic novel: "If I had been helping the Almighty when he created man, I would have had him begin at the other end, and start human beings with old age. How much better to start old and have all the bitterness and blindness of age in the beginning! One would not mind then if he were looking forward to a joyful youth. Think of the joyous prospect of growing young instead of old! Think of looking forward to eighteen instead of eighty! Yes, the Almighty made a poor job of it. I wish He had invited my assistance."

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jacob

    Ever since I was a kid, I thought it would be funny for a person to be born old and work their way "back" to childhood. Apparently, so did F. Scott Fitzgerald! "The Curious Case of Benjamin Button" was one of his attempts into the realm of fantasy/science fiction, and he does an amazing job exploring all of the advantages (and the many, many disadvantages) of getting younger while growing older. Such a thing is physically impossible, of course, but it makes for an intriguing story. This graphic n Ever since I was a kid, I thought it would be funny for a person to be born old and work their way "back" to childhood. Apparently, so did F. Scott Fitzgerald! "The Curious Case of Benjamin Button" was one of his attempts into the realm of fantasy/science fiction, and he does an amazing job exploring all of the advantages (and the many, many disadvantages) of getting younger while growing older. Such a thing is physically impossible, of course, but it makes for an intriguing story. This graphic novel version is perfect. The illustrations have muted coloring, which adds to the extra-dimensional perspective of the story. Fitzgerald's original words are used in abridgement, but the spirit of his writing is retained in the sequential art. Many of the things that happen to Benjamin Button are funny (such as his father's insistence on treating him like a baby even though he's an old man), and some of them are heartbreaking (his marriage declines as he becomes younger and his wife becomes older). Again, this is a fantastic read, done masterfully in graphic novel form.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Mycala

    I loved this graphic novel and am in awe of Fitzgerald's creativity. It's really too bad that the publishers and society were too narrow-minded to enjoy true brilliance, but then again the story itself is a perfect illustration of the intolerance of those who are different. I was irritated by the way that Benjamin was treated by his father following his birth -- by the way, no mention of how his mother fared? Seriously? So much concern about what others will think -- who gives a flip!? I was equ I loved this graphic novel and am in awe of Fitzgerald's creativity. It's really too bad that the publishers and society were too narrow-minded to enjoy true brilliance, but then again the story itself is a perfect illustration of the intolerance of those who are different. I was irritated by the way that Benjamin was treated by his father following his birth -- by the way, no mention of how his mother fared? Seriously? So much concern about what others will think -- who gives a flip!? I was equally irritated with his son as he grew younger -- "just call me uncle, it's absurd for someone your age to refer to me by my first name"? Really? This is your father you're talking to, pal. It's a shame Fitzgerald gave up on writing stories like this because society just wanted more flapper stories and that's what sold. Who knows what else he may have come up with if his creativity were encouraged?

  12. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    This book is a great way to get through the story quickly. I did not know that the original story was by F. Scott Fitzgerald. Fitzgerald found it humorous but I think it is very sad. Benjamin Button is misunderstood his entire life because he just doesn't fit in quite right based upon the weird experience of getting younger instead of aging. I was intrigued that Fitzgerald got the idea for the story from a remark made by Mark Twain. It was also sad to learn that Fitzgerald died at the young age This book is a great way to get through the story quickly. I did not know that the original story was by F. Scott Fitzgerald. Fitzgerald found it humorous but I think it is very sad. Benjamin Button is misunderstood his entire life because he just doesn't fit in quite right based upon the weird experience of getting younger instead of aging. I was intrigued that Fitzgerald got the idea for the story from a remark made by Mark Twain. It was also sad to learn that Fitzgerald died at the young age of 44.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    with only 30 pages in all it is tough to not want more. The movie does a fairly good job of expanding the basic gist of the short story but, as usual, the book leaves things open to your imagination and all the actual events that went down.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Savannah

    There's nothing really wow-ing about this story at all. It's more of a "and then this happened" type of story with no real climax or any sort of building to something special. It's the most "okay" book of all of the "okay" books.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Anna Thomas

    When I read that Fitzgerald dubbed this short story as "the funniest story ever written," I was quite doubtful. After all, I saw the Brad Pitt movie back in '08, and I cried so fiercely that I vowed never to watch it again just because I can't handle that amount of snot for no good reason. However, after reading "The Curious Case of Benjamin Button," I am once again reminded of the artistic liberties that Hollywood takes. I found myself laughing out loud during this story. The irony Fitzgerald us When I read that Fitzgerald dubbed this short story as "the funniest story ever written," I was quite doubtful. After all, I saw the Brad Pitt movie back in '08, and I cried so fiercely that I vowed never to watch it again just because I can't handle that amount of snot for no good reason. However, after reading "The Curious Case of Benjamin Button," I am once again reminded of the artistic liberties that Hollywood takes. I found myself laughing out loud during this story. The irony Fitzgerald uses is wonderful, and even though there is sufficient conflict (and, of course, the ending is still a little melancholy), the storyline is lighthearted. I realize this is an adapted version due to it being made into the graphic novel medium. I found the artwork, even with its muted color, to enhance the story, and I highly recommend it for all the Fitzgerald fans out there.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sylvana

    I was vaguely aware of the plot, and since the graphic novel was available in my classroom library, I gave it a try. DeFilippis treats the story well, and the illustrations from Kevin Cornell bring the storyboard to life. The plot itself is frustrating-- I'm okay going to Fitzgerald for that. That was the only aspect of it that I found distasteful. I don't like it for the same reasons I don't like O. Henry's "The Gift of the Magi"-- there's a sense I'm supposed to feel sorry for the protagonist, I was vaguely aware of the plot, and since the graphic novel was available in my classroom library, I gave it a try. DeFilippis treats the story well, and the illustrations from Kevin Cornell bring the storyboard to life. The plot itself is frustrating-- I'm okay going to Fitzgerald for that. That was the only aspect of it that I found distasteful. I don't like it for the same reasons I don't like O. Henry's "The Gift of the Magi"-- there's a sense I'm supposed to feel sorry for the protagonist, but I cannot. This is an easy and palatable way to take in the story, but I would not say I enjoyed it.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Saurabh

    How would a woman give birth to a child who's five feet and eight inches tall? Only a lunatic like Fitzgerald could imagine of it! The sketches were kind of plain and devoid of details - the receptionist at the hospital for instance. Ben Button's wife looked old even at the marriage. However, the original text is delightful and the story as we know is audacious.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Charlene

    I enjoyed this one. The illustrations are wonderfully done and it makes for a fun and easy read. I've read it before but I was unpacking books and rediscovered it. I couldn't resist revisiting this story.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Tessa Baer

    I never really had a desire to read this book, so I really liked having the graphic novel adaptation. It was interesting. I think the drawings really added to the story as you could visualize everything more clearly.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kat Ice

    I like this movie so I thought the graphic novel would be good. But I was wrong. Yes it was a good novel but seemed to just be told not an actually a story. I was not a fan of how it was written but I guess thats kind of how the movie was too. I think it could have been a little bit better though.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Bruce Osslund

    I enjoyed reading this book because of how strange and unreal it was very different from the movie though. It was about a baby that was born with a strange disease where he ages backwards. At first he was in the crib as a 80 yr old man and later on as he grew up, he appeared younger

  22. 5 out of 5

    Emmett Adjmi

    The Curious Case of Benjamin Button is a graphic novel set in the 19th century about a man who ages in reverse. I found it enjoyable and was constantly wondering what would happen at the end. This book would be best for people who like graphic novels and historical fiction.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kari S

    This was a great adaptation of the story. The illustrations are beautiful. I've read the story several times before, but this was the first time it bothered me that Benjamin's mother is barely mentioned.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Cynthia

    Very fitting illustrations for this sad tale! I don't understand how Fitzgerald could've considered it the funniest story ever written, honestly. To me, it seems more a story of continual loss and disappointment... very cool concept though!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Marti

    Meh. The artwork was fine but I guess I'm not a big Fitzgerald fan.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Bella

    short and interesting read (kind of sad actually!!)

  27. 4 out of 5

    Emily Green

    Nunzio DeFelippis and Christina Weir transform F. Scott Fitzgerald’s short story “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” into an amusing and well-constructed graphic novel. To insinuate the setting of the book, beginning during the Civil War, artist Kevin Cornell puts in some ornate touches, such as the repeating wall paper design of hour glasses that separates the sections of the story and the very neat separation of panels on each page, the majority of which are rectangular. Cornell also does a Nunzio DeFelippis and Christina Weir transform F. Scott Fitzgerald’s short story “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” into an amusing and well-constructed graphic novel. To insinuate the setting of the book, beginning during the Civil War, artist Kevin Cornell puts in some ornate touches, such as the repeating wall paper design of hour glasses that separates the sections of the story and the very neat separation of panels on each page, the majority of which are rectangular. Cornell also does a wonderful job of making humorous facial expressions. As Donald G. Sheehy highlights in his Afterword, Button is the classic individual and trend setter, succeeding beyond his peers and not always accepted. Indeed, Button succeeds at business, socializing, and sports. The humor is especially highlighted, as the elderly Button goes to college to avoid his marriage, and he is accepted at the same institution he had previously been laughed out of because he appeared elderly. The story also accentuates the similarities between extreme age and youth. Infants and the extremely elderly need constant care. Both age groups need to be fed, bathed, and entertained. Both groups indulge in simple pleasures, such as eating and being clean and warm. Both groups are also unable to effectively communicate and are not completely aware of their surroundings. The difference is that a baby will eventually be able to interact where the debilitated elderly never will again. One group inspires hope and the other despondency. Two interesting relationships highlighted in the adaptation are between parent and child and husband and wife. Button tries desperately to please his father, and for a brief time, they are able to act as friends and equals. His father does end up being pleased with him for a period of time. Button’s son, however, never manages to connect with his father, and the old man incarnated as child manages to be little more than a burden. Sadder is the relationship between Button and Hildegarde, his wife. The two enjoy a very short period of happiness. As is often still the case, Hildegarde’s aging is more harshly judged than Button’s. At forty, he already judges her as old, even though he had an appearance of a man much older than that when they married. While the two are teased at their wedding about the difference in appearance of age, they can and are happy. However, when Button looks younger than Hildegarde and feels younger, he can no longer love or appreciate her. Poor Hildegarde comes across as an insufferable nag when she accuses Button of being able to control his progress into youth. Overall, DeFilippis and Weir’s adaptation is a delightful read.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Arminzerella

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Benjamin Button was born old – not old as in “he was an old soul” old, but literally, physically, mentally old. He looks about 80 with his long white hair, beard, and mustache. Everyone is flabbergasted. Benjamin’s own parents, not knowing what to do, are firmly in denial. They dress Benjamin in specially tailored “baby clothes,” buy him baby toys, encourage baby behaviors (breaking things and crying, especially), and punish him when they find him smoking. He and his grandfather, however, get on Benjamin Button was born old – not old as in “he was an old soul” old, but literally, physically, mentally old. He looks about 80 with his long white hair, beard, and mustache. Everyone is flabbergasted. Benjamin’s own parents, not knowing what to do, are firmly in denial. They dress Benjamin in specially tailored “baby clothes,” buy him baby toys, encourage baby behaviors (breaking things and crying, especially), and punish him when they find him smoking. He and his grandfather, however, get on famously. Benjamin’s life goes on in this way until he begins to notice that he feels younger, and that his biological age seems to be decreasing as his chronological age increases. Sometimes this creates problems and sometimes it creates opportunities. At the end of his life, Benjamin is back in a cradle, everything about his backwards life forgotten as he fades away into nonexistence. I’ve never read F. Scott Fitzgerald’s original story (nor have I yet seen the movie!), but the cover of this graphic novel drew me in right away (newly born Benjamin Button is crammed into a crib, shins right up against the foot of the bed, a rather irritated expression on his face, and a baby rattle held - rather primly - in his left hand. The artwork in this graphic novel is in muted reds, blues, and grays, which lend it an older, but fantastical air. The story is both light-hearted and a little sad as Benjamin manages to find his own way through the life with which he must make do. Although this is true of everyone, it’s more noticeable in his case - everyone else, at least, gets to move through time in the same direction.

  29. 5 out of 5

    sj

    story wasn't anything, probably was amazing at the time but time whittles all. art was amazing tho. i loved the watercolor feel to it

  30. 5 out of 5

    Amyanne

    I gave this such a low rating not because of the format or the illustrations ( though they could have used more colour and excitement) but because the story was just so boring. Ageing backwards - novel idea, right? and maybe we should ignore the questions it raises such as : She gave birth of that gigantic, leggy, ridiculously hairy old man?! And there was nothing unusual about the way she looked during pregnancy? And this birth didn't kill her? And Benjamin speaks mere hours old - did he pick s I gave this such a low rating not because of the format or the illustrations ( though they could have used more colour and excitement) but because the story was just so boring. Ageing backwards - novel idea, right? and maybe we should ignore the questions it raises such as : She gave birth of that gigantic, leggy, ridiculously hairy old man?! And there was nothing unusual about the way she looked during pregnancy? And this birth didn't kill her? And Benjamin speaks mere hours old - did he pick speech up in the womb? An adult sized brain does not automatically grant one a full vocabulary & understanding... We could ignore logical problems in the story, sure, enjoy the fable, etc, BUT Benjamin was completely un-developed. Plus nothing really happens. Hence the boredom. Also, as a victim of hatred / fear / prejudice himself it seemed odd that as he aged in reverse he became a total douche bag in his attitude towards his naturally ageing wife. A nasty character trait he obviously passes onto his son who treats his father with cold contempt as benjamin becomes younger.

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