Hot Best Seller

Justice League Odyssey, Vol. 1: The Ghost Sector

Availability: Ready to download

When a cosmic menace threatens worlds beyond our own in the Ghost Sector, it falls to a new Justice League team to answer the call to battle! Cyborg, Starfire, Green Lantern Jessica Cruz and an out-of-his-element Azrael head to deep space inside a commandeered Brainiac Skull Ship. Spinning out of JUSTICE LEAGUE: NO JUSTICE comes Joshua Williamson’s amazing new s When a cosmic menace threatens worlds beyond our own in the Ghost Sector, it falls to a new Justice League team to answer the call to battle! Cyborg, Starfire, Green Lantern Jessica Cruz and an out-of-his-element Azrael head to deep space inside a commandeered Brainiac Skull Ship. Spinning out of JUSTICE LEAGUE: NO JUSTICE comes Joshua Williamson’s amazing new series Justice League Odyssey! This ragtag team of new recruits will face threats in the deep reaches of space like no League ever before! First up? These wild-card teammates try to stop Despero from slave-trading Coluan refugees, only to discover something that nothing in the universe could have prepared them for: Darkseid…who says he’s there to help?! Written by Joshua Williamson (The Flash) with unbelievable illustrations from Stjepan Sejic (Aquaman), Justice League Odyssey takes the World’s Greatest Super Heroes to places they’ve never been before! Collects issues #1-5.


Compare

When a cosmic menace threatens worlds beyond our own in the Ghost Sector, it falls to a new Justice League team to answer the call to battle! Cyborg, Starfire, Green Lantern Jessica Cruz and an out-of-his-element Azrael head to deep space inside a commandeered Brainiac Skull Ship. Spinning out of JUSTICE LEAGUE: NO JUSTICE comes Joshua Williamson’s amazing new s When a cosmic menace threatens worlds beyond our own in the Ghost Sector, it falls to a new Justice League team to answer the call to battle! Cyborg, Starfire, Green Lantern Jessica Cruz and an out-of-his-element Azrael head to deep space inside a commandeered Brainiac Skull Ship. Spinning out of JUSTICE LEAGUE: NO JUSTICE comes Joshua Williamson’s amazing new series Justice League Odyssey! This ragtag team of new recruits will face threats in the deep reaches of space like no League ever before! First up? These wild-card teammates try to stop Despero from slave-trading Coluan refugees, only to discover something that nothing in the universe could have prepared them for: Darkseid…who says he’s there to help?! Written by Joshua Williamson (The Flash) with unbelievable illustrations from Stjepan Sejic (Aquaman), Justice League Odyssey takes the World’s Greatest Super Heroes to places they’ve never been before! Collects issues #1-5.

30 review for Justice League Odyssey, Vol. 1: The Ghost Sector

  1. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    I thought this was actually a pretty neat idea to spin out of a crummy event Justice League: No Justice. All the planets that Colu shrank have all expanded now and form the Ghost Sector. Starfire, Cyborg, and Azrael are drawn there and Green Lantern Jessica Cruz actually is there to stop them. Azrael makes absolutely no sense in this book as his thing is that he's devoted to God as his avenging angel. Here he's trying to get people to worship him. It's just poor writing, trying to fit a square peg in a I thought this was actually a pretty neat idea to spin out of a crummy event Justice League: No Justice. All the planets that Colu shrank have all expanded now and form the Ghost Sector. Starfire, Cyborg, and Azrael are drawn there and Green Lantern Jessica Cruz actually is there to stop them. Azrael makes absolutely no sense in this book as his thing is that he's devoted to God as his avenging angel. Here he's trying to get people to worship him. It's just poor writing, trying to fit a square peg in a round hole. There's a timey- wimey element that Williamson is definitely setting up as well. The reveal in issue 5 is actually kind of cool. I'm hoping the writing and art will tighten up in the next volume as the series has a lot of potential. Stjepan Šejić creates some awesome character designs. Unfortunately, he only drew the first 2 issues. Phillipe Briones did the next two and his art wasn't as polished as normal. Carmine Di Giandomenico draws the last issue and it's better than his typical acular artwork.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Wing Kee

    By far the worse of the new JL titles. World: The art is not good, I love Sejic and he killed in Aquaman but the first two issues looked rushed, the line work was less detailed and the backgrounds looked simple and basic. The facial expressions were still there but Starfire’s hair is a perfect example of the lack of detail in the art and it’s not Sejic quality at all. The rest of the issues are just as bad they are bland and scratchy, with the last issue taking the cake. I know I don’ By far the worse of the new JL titles. World: The art is not good, I love Sejic and he killed in Aquaman but the first two issues looked rushed, the line work was less detailed and the backgrounds looked simple and basic. The facial expressions were still there but Starfire’s hair is a perfect example of the lack of detail in the art and it’s not Sejic quality at all. The rest of the issues are just as bad they are bland and scratchy, with the last issue taking the cake. I know I don’t like the Williamson Flash art and this is that and wow is it every muddled and scratchy. The world building here is really suspect and takes a lot of logic leaps “because comics” and “because the writer wanted it” moments for this story to work. I don’t really know how to express it without spoilers but Grant Morrison already laid out very clearly where New Genesis and Apokolips existed outside of the DC Multiverse in “Multiversity” and that how there is only ONE even in the 52 DC universes, it’s canon, it’s established, it’s clearly known and talked about in DC books and most recently Dark Nights Metal also acknowledged it but now why is Williamson doing this entire premise with Darkseid that is completely different but also completely pointless? The problem with the world building is that this major fact is the anchor in which this entire book exists and it’s already wrong. Then there is the fact of the internal logic of how the Lost Sector works and how these new worlds works and the way time is portrayed in this new world and how it all works with the these ‘Old Gods’ that the book talks of. It’s all timey wimey bull that if written well would make internal logical sense, but it’s not here it is just a collection of half baked ideas that makes no sense at all and the world therefore is really just not created properly. Story: If the premise and the world itself does not make any sense how can the story make sense? Add to that the drive for the characters (which I’ll get to below) is spotty at best and you have a really poorly written book that barely makes any sense at all. The idea of a group entering the lost sector makes sense, it’s not difficult to imagine that JL sending a group into it to make sure it’s okay, same with the GL Corps, that makes sense but nope Williamson says that they are not allowed to enter and that only 1 sentry was set up outside the sector by the GL Corps...why?????? When they do enter, big surprise, the way they get in, the idea of what they do there and the Old Gods and the Darkseid stuff, all of it makes no sense. How does time work in there? Why are they worshiping these ‘Old Gods’ what does it tie together? It’s preposterous when you read the book, and it makes no sense that argh I don’t even want to talk about it. The dialog is bad, the world building is bad, the writing and pacing is bad, the premise is idiotic. This could have been a very straightforward adventure, action adventure space opera tale in a new and undiscovered sector, that would have been fun, but no...this book wants to be something more and grander and bigger than it should be without even doing the homework to set up this sector in the first place. I’ve said that Williamson is a bad writer and this is another example of it. Characters: Wow these characters don’t sound and act like themselves at all. I have had issue with Williamson in his writing for the Flash books and saying that those characters are off and not written correctly and this is the case here. Bringing this group of characters together was really spotty and iffy logically but let’s get past that and just listen to what words come out of their mouths and also the choices that they make in these 5 issues and you will want to rip the book apart. Cyborg is not like that, he’s not that dumb. John Paul Valley is not like that, he’s not that dumb. Jessica is not like that, she’s not that dumb. Kori is not like that she’s not that dumb. They are also not completely opposite of what they are as characters in all other books except this one. I hate this series, it’s poorly written, it’s not thought out properly, the world building is lazy and the character work is atrocious. Williamson is the new Lobdell of the DC (where Lobdell was racist and sexist...Williamson is just a lazy writer). Onward to the next book! *read individual issues*

  3. 5 out of 5

    Malum

    Decent start to DC's new cosmic book (and WAY better than Marvel's similar Asgardians of the Galaxy title). Just a few notes on this one: I like Darkseid's new look. I thought Azrael was super religious? He's running around like "I finally get my own worshippers, haha!". I don't know a ton about him, but this seems a little out of character from the little bit that I have read about him.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Chris Lemmerman

    This book was plagued with re-writes and re-draws even before it launched, which explains why this first volume isn't quite as strong as the other Justice League titles are right now. Cyborg, Starfire, Azrael, Jessica Cruz, and Darkseid find themselves in the middle of a millenia-long plot featuring all of the missing planets that were captured by Brainiac, and now only they can save the Ghost Sector and possibly the entire universe as well. It's a solid idea, and there's a lot more u This book was plagued with re-writes and re-draws even before it launched, which explains why this first volume isn't quite as strong as the other Justice League titles are right now. Cyborg, Starfire, Azrael, Jessica Cruz, and Darkseid find themselves in the middle of a millenia-long plot featuring all of the missing planets that were captured by Brainiac, and now only they can save the Ghost Sector and possibly the entire universe as well. It's a solid idea, and there's a lot more under the surface, but it takes a while to get to it. It does feel like it's being made up as it goes along, and I think that's just a symptom of the book not getting to hit the ground running as it would have done if the behind-the-scenes stuff had been ironed out entirely to start with. The artwork's not bad, although Stejpan Sejic doesn't get to hang around quite as much as I'd have liked. Carmine Di Giandomenico is a good fit though, while Phillipe Briones does his best to keep up with the pair of them. Not a bad start, but definitely not reaching its potential just yet. I can confirm however that the current volume (which is about halfway through) is a vast improvement, so it's definitely worth sticking with it for now.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Shannon Appelcline

    Great premise: The Justice League: No Justice series released a bunch of Ghost Worlds, and now some members of the Justice League need to explore them, out of guilt, loyalty, or desire to find home. Great setting: A whole sector of worlds previously lost to the galaxy. Great mystery: why were these precise worlds taken by the Coluans? And, from there, it pretty much falls apart. The Justice League is made up of C-grade heroes: Azrael, Cyborg, Starfire, and Green Lantern Great premise: The Justice League: No Justice series released a bunch of Ghost Worlds, and now some members of the Justice League need to explore them, out of guilt, loyalty, or desire to find home. Great setting: A whole sector of worlds previously lost to the galaxy. Great mystery: why were these precise worlds taken by the Coluans? And, from there, it pretty much falls apart. The Justice League is made up of C-grade heroes: Azrael, Cyborg, Starfire, and Green Lantern #6 (Jessica Bey). And they don't really get much characterization. The worlds get even less detail than a one-note Star Wars planet. Darkseid, who was a big draw for this series as the fifth member, pretty much fades away. And then after five issues of pointless meandering we get a kinda dumb answer to our big mystery. The whole lots-of-Justice-Leagues idea was always a bit iffy, but this was worse than anticipated.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kat

    Basic Plot: An odd conglomeration of JLA members heads into the Ghost Sector to find the source of a strange voice. This is an odd conglomeration of heroes, and they don't really gel together terribly well. They all have separate agendas, and Azrael is just obnoxious. Cyborg and Starfire work decently well, but Jessica Cruz just feels tacked on. The concept is good- Darkseid looking to bring back Apokolips, and using people to do so, but the execution isn't really coming together full Basic Plot: An odd conglomeration of JLA members heads into the Ghost Sector to find the source of a strange voice. This is an odd conglomeration of heroes, and they don't really gel together terribly well. They all have separate agendas, and Azrael is just obnoxious. Cyborg and Starfire work decently well, but Jessica Cruz just feels tacked on. The concept is good- Darkseid looking to bring back Apokolips, and using people to do so, but the execution isn't really coming together fully for me. The art is really quite good- vivid and detailed.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Brendan

    4 I enjoyed this spin-off from the central Justice League series. Joshua Williamson has been a name that I came across with the excellent Nail-biter series from Image Comics, check it out. He tends to not hold back with the violence and story beats. I enjoyed the artwork and the story was unfolding with a kicker conclusion. I had seen this had mixed reviews here, but I actually liked it and can't wait for volume 2. Why the 4? Interesting concepts and a plotline that has roo 4 I enjoyed this spin-off from the central Justice League series. Joshua Williamson has been a name that I came across with the excellent Nail-biter series from Image Comics, check it out. He tends to not hold back with the violence and story beats. I enjoyed the artwork and the story was unfolding with a kicker conclusion. I had seen this had mixed reviews here, but I actually liked it and can't wait for volume 2. Why the 4? Interesting concepts and a plotline that has room to grow. The introduction of a core villain was an interesting idea and one that delivers towards the end of the volume. The characters were a fun idea, they aren't your normal everyday characters so a volume that has them right in the front line was a great idea. Joshua Williamson has delivered a solid introduction and there is room to grow.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Sud666

    Justice League Odyssey was better than I expected. It is made up of Cyborg, some random female GL named Jess, Azrael (yeah the guy from Batman's Knightfall era) and Starfire are wandering around a place called the "Ghost Sector". So apparently these JLs unleashed a bunch of trouble when they stole Brainiac's ship and released his mini-worlds. Now the various planets seem to worship the JL's as gods. On top of this nonsense, we have Darkseid, sporting a new look, running around trying Justice League Odyssey was better than I expected. It is made up of Cyborg, some random female GL named Jess, Azrael (yeah the guy from Batman's Knightfall era) and Starfire are wandering around a place called the "Ghost Sector". So apparently these JLs unleashed a bunch of trouble when they stole Brainiac's ship and released his mini-worlds. Now the various planets seem to worship the JL's as gods. On top of this nonsense, we have Darkseid, sporting a new look, running around trying to help save the end of the universe (sounds like Thanos). Of course, this is not his reasoning but I will not spoil it. While this sounds very convoluted and not very good, the strange setting for the story and the odd chemistry between the members of this JL made this an interesting story. Also Darkseid's machinations made for some interesting reading as well. By no means is this some magnum opus, but relative to much of the dreck that is out there in the comic market this was a good read. I must point out that the artwork for the first three issues is quite good. Credit to Stjepan Sejic for a nice smooth art style, it works very well for the colors to make a very attractive art style. Sadly they went away from Mr. Sejic and the artists for the final issues were not quite as good (though not terrible either) and that is a shame. So an interesting story, set in an odd setting, with a weird group dynamics going on all add up to a good three star JL story. I think most JL fans will enjoy this.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Adam Fisher

    3.5 Stars. Following the destruction of Colu in "Justice League: No Justice", all of the planets that had been shrunk down and collected there were able to come back, albeit in a very tight cluster. The Guardians of Oa have named this "The Ghost Sector", and always have one Green Lantern protecting it. At the beginning of this Volume, it happens to be Jessica Cruz's turn. One day on patrol, one of Brainiac's ships (the one that was being kept in the Hall of Justice) enters Ghost Sector spac 3.5 Stars. Following the destruction of Colu in "Justice League: No Justice", all of the planets that had been shrunk down and collected there were able to come back, albeit in a very tight cluster. The Guardians of Oa have named this "The Ghost Sector", and always have one Green Lantern protecting it. At the beginning of this Volume, it happens to be Jessica Cruz's turn. One day on patrol, one of Brainiac's ships (the one that was being kept in the Hall of Justice) enters Ghost Sector space and Jess must go to bring it down. Imagine her surprise when she finds Cyborg, Starfire, and Azrael on board, all coming to the sector in response to a "guiding voice". Unfortunately, that "voice" is coming from Darkseid. He tells them that the worlds of the Ghost Sector should have never been released due to the power that comes from them and their worship of the "Old Gods": The Goddess, The Machine, and The Angel. Darkseid's plan is for them to claim their rightful place in the Ghost Sector: The Goddess - Starfire, brought to find her home planet of Tamaran The Machine - Cyborg, brought because of his close connection with Darkseid from Mother Boxes The Angel - Azrael, brought because of his desperation to find purpose after his time with Batman The rogue element in the equation is Jessica, and Darkseid isn't happy about it. They eventually find a reason that he didn't share with them: the Multiverse Key. It seems to be a control to not only our universe, but to many in the multiverse. Regardless of what it exactly does, we are shown that it is a very powerful artifact. They each get the opportunity to meet their followers. In a temple, Starfire (seeing a hug statue of herself) has one of "her priests" sacrifice himself to pass on his knowledge to her. When they escape that world and go to another (based on the recommendation of a "holy man", who was actually Darkseid in disguise), Cyborg gets a taste of his followers too. Huge statues and many Coluans who are trying to become cyborgs in their own right. Azrael has the most dangerous of the followers: Rapture, a trained assassin who is trying to murder them. Part of Darkseid's plan is revealed: giving ownership of Tamaran to Blackfire (Starfire's sister), he is able to find the "Other Box", an artifact that looks like a bio-organic version of a Mother Box. The artifacts he's accumulating in the Ghost Sector are going to enable him to make New Apokolips. The whole Volume has a lot to it and is difficult for me to process completely. I like the dynamic of the team, but I wonder if this title is going to have ramifications for other titles or for continuity. Will this unfortunately become one of Darkseid's failed schemes? I'm beginning to feel like Darkseid is becoming DC's version of Marvel's 90's Apocalypse. In the 1990's, every time something huge was happening, it was Apocalypse's fault. Darkseid is becoming overused, at least in my opinion. I will continue with this title, but I hope we get to see a stronger level of impact and chaos for the characters. Recommend, but with slight hesitation.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Roy

    I've become a Williamson fanboy so a bit biased with this. The art changing styles was annoying.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Brian Poole

    Justice League Odyssey gets off to a much stronger start than its troubled launch might have suggested with The Ghost Sector. At the conclusion of No Justice, a collection of planets that had been miniaturized and hidden on the destroyed planet Colu were restored to normal size and pushed into a tight cluster, dubbed “The Ghost Sector.” Green Lantern Jessica Cruz guards the quarantined sector and follows when the heroes Cyborg, Starfire and Azrael go barreling through the radiation zone surrounding the sector Justice League Odyssey gets off to a much stronger start than its troubled launch might have suggested with The Ghost Sector. At the conclusion of No Justice, a collection of planets that had been miniaturized and hidden on the destroyed planet Colu were restored to normal size and pushed into a tight cluster, dubbed “The Ghost Sector.” Green Lantern Jessica Cruz guards the quarantined sector and follows when the heroes Cyborg, Starfire and Azrael go barreling through the radiation zone surrounding the sector. The trio had been lured from Earth by an irresistible impulse that leads the heroes to the reborn Darkseid. He insists he wants to save the endangered multiverse, but proves elusive. The heroes make a rather startling discovery about their connection to the Ghost Sector and get enmeshed in local planetary skirmishes. Darkseid manipulates them from the shadows as the heroes discover the secret reason these planets had been locked away. The launch of Justice League Odyssey had been delayed by several months when editorial issues dictated that the creative team scrap a significant amount of already-completed material and start over. That could give potential readers pause, but with The Ghost Sector, writer Joshua Williamson makes the most of an oddball “Justice League in Space” concept to produce an appealing first arc. The book benefits from the friction of its random cast, a non-intuitive mix that winds up working better than it has any right to. This series provides a more natural leadership role for Cyborg and, in a nod to pre-New 52 history, acknowledges his long-time friendship with Starfire, who’s matured into a warrior in touch with her compassion. Out-of-his-element Azrael provides an agreeable X-factor, while Jessica Cruz has developed into a solid, steadying rock for this misfit non-team. Williamson devises a clever connection to the Sector that jolts the heroes, while deploying Darkseid as an operatic manipulator whose shadow looms over the quartet of heroes, even as his motivations emerge only slowly. This is a nice example of taking an unlikely group of characters and mixing them in a way that makes them a compelling whole. With new concepts and threats in the mix, Williamson is doing enough to keep the proceedings worth watching, with some potentially significant impacts for other books. One aspect of the delayed launch that has a significant impact is on the artists involved. Stjepan Sejic had been lined up for the entire first arc, but following the re-start was able to complete only two issues (providing his own inks and colors) before having to depart. And while this may not be peak Sejic, he’s always an interesting artist and sets the right visual tone for the book, getting the mix of horror-tinged sci-fi and space opera just right. His character work is expressive, even if the cast is prone to dramatic posing, and his design ideas are imaginative and mine Williamson’s plot for some fun visual riffs. Philippe Briones, working with colorist Jeremy Cox, plies a similar aesthetic on the next two issues, though not quite with the flair of Sejic. Carmine Di Giandomenico rounds out the arc, leaning more into the sci-fi aspects, which gives colorist Ivan Plascencia the opportunity to expand the issue’s palate beyond the darker, more muted colors of the earlier installments. The artwork is all interesting, but given the necessity of bringing in pinch hitters after Sejic’s departure, readers can’t help but wonder what the long-term look of the series will be. Even with some bumps and a few questions about its visual direction, The Ghost Sector establishes Justice League Odyssey as an agreeably odd book whose development bears watching.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Dakota Morgan

    I feel a bit like the outlier in that I found Justice League Odyssey's first volume to be a great deal of fun. It reminded me a bit of Guardians of Galaxy, but with more ancient Gods and fewer scenes played for straight-up laughs. And it all made sense! Unexpected, I know. I think the fact that I recently finished Justice League: No Justice helped quite a bit. I can't imagine jumping into Justice League Odyssey with no background on why these random planets exist in the Ghost Sector or why all the characters keep mentioning I feel a bit like the outlier in that I found Justice League Odyssey's first volume to be a great deal of fun. It reminded me a bit of Guardians of Galaxy, but with more ancient Gods and fewer scenes played for straight-up laughs. And it all made sense! Unexpected, I know. I think the fact that I recently finished Justice League: No Justice helped quite a bit. I can't imagine jumping into Justice League Odyssey with no background on why these random planets exist in the Ghost Sector or why all the characters keep mentioning the destruction of Colu. In any case, the series revolves around Cyborg, Starfire, Azrael, and Jessica Cruz's Green Lantern, four heroes who I really know nothing about. Fortunately, their backstories are not required to understand the plot. Encountering Darkseid in the Ghost Sector, they learn that Cyborg, Starfire, and Azrael are worshiped as Gods by various cultures in the Ghost Sector. Darkseid also makes an ominous request of the heroes because he obviously has devious plans. Beautifully illustrated journeys to numerous cosmic destinations ensue as the heroes gradually come to terms with their strange place in the sector. And there's a less-than-surprising final issue revelation that certainly sets the next volume up for big things! I, for one, am looking forward to it.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Scott Lee

    Probably more a 3.5 that round down, but I'm not confident to give 3.6 (and therefore round it up to a 4). This is an intriguing follow up to Justice League: No Justice that deals with the backstory of the planets that were released from Coluan incarceration and now make up the Ghost Sector. An interesting set of characters (Cyborg, Starfire, Jessica Cruz (a Green Lantern since the New 52), and Azrael [true what the heck casting in using this guy in this space saga]) are tossed out to the Phantom Zone Probably more a 3.5 that round down, but I'm not confident to give 3.6 (and therefore round it up to a 4). This is an intriguing follow up to Justice League: No Justice that deals with the backstory of the planets that were released from Coluan incarceration and now make up the Ghost Sector. An interesting set of characters (Cyborg, Starfire, Jessica Cruz (a Green Lantern since the New 52), and Azrael [true what the heck casting in using this guy in this space saga]) are tossed out to the Phantom Zone for various reasons: Jessica is assigned there to keep everyone else out by the Guardians, Cyborg feels guilty about the events of No Justice and wants to see if there's anything he can do, Starfire is looking to find Tamaran within the Ghost Sector and Azrael...well that one makes no sense, although I think there was some attempt at explaining why he was there in the book. the story does provide some interesting background on why the planets had been locked away and a window on what the consequences of their release into the open DCU might be, but it's not terribly specific, and as such I'm uncertain exactly what to make of it. It was an all right adventure story, worth reading if you're interested in what's been happening in Justice League, but hardly essential to anything as of yet.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Guilherme Smee

    Essa nova equipe da Liga da Justiça - formação e nomes inéditos - surgiu após o evento Sem Justiça. Eu não ia comprar este encadernado, mas depois de ter lido o encadernado da Liga da Justiça Dark e ter gostado muito, resolvi dar uma chance para essa equipe também. Não me arrependi, embora a versão Dark seja melhor que essa versão Space Opera da liga dos maiores heróis da Editora das Lendas. O mote da história é que Darkseid acredita que Estelar, Cyborg e Azrael serão uma nova espécie de deuses Essa nova equipe da Liga da Justiça - formação e nomes inéditos - surgiu após o evento Sem Justiça. Eu não ia comprar este encadernado, mas depois de ter lido o encadernado da Liga da Justiça Dark e ter gostado muito, resolvi dar uma chance para essa equipe também. Não me arrependi, embora a versão Dark seja melhor que essa versão Space Opera da liga dos maiores heróis da Editora das Lendas. O mote da história é que Darkseid acredita que Estelar, Cyborg e Azrael serão uma nova espécie de deuses cósmicos, que precisam ajudar os planetas da Zona Fantasma. Eles recusam a ajuda do deus sombrio de Apokolyps, mas em seguida percebem que o que ele diz tem um fundo de verdade. Para ajudá-los também está a Lanterna Verde brasileira Jessica Cruz. A historinha é bem divertida e fácil de se acompanhar. Um dos problemas dessa revista foi o atraso que o terceiro número sofreu por causa das artes pintadas e realistas de Stephan Seijic, que deveria ser o grande atrativo da publicação. Hoje em dia, a revista não possui uma arte realista, mas uma arte comum como as demais publicações. Vamos acompanhar para ver se a qualidade aumenta ou diminui por causa disso.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Beelzefuzz

    Allow me to recreate the experience of this book for you. Here are a bunch of characters that are terrible and they all go into outer space. The characters all stand around and tell you the plot for several pages. Now we need to move to a different location where plot just happened, but you don't need to see it, we will tell you about it with more dialogue instead. Oh what a twist, these C list characters are worshipped by an alien civilizations. I guess they have $1 bins in space Allow me to recreate the experience of this book for you. Here are a bunch of characters that are terrible and they all go into outer space. The characters all stand around and tell you the plot for several pages. Now we need to move to a different location where plot just happened, but you don't need to see it, we will tell you about it with more dialogue instead. Oh what a twist, these C list characters are worshipped by an alien civilizations. I guess they have $1 bins in space, otherwise who would have ever heard of these losers? More standing around and telling you the plot. Wait, did I say plot? None of that other stuff was coherent enough to matter really. Here comes the big reveal that was spoiled with the stilted dialogue from Darkseid in issue 1. Was that foreshadowing? No, that was broadcasting. Finally a little action. It is boring though, so let's hurry and move the characters to a new location where they can tell us some more events that may add to plot but probably will not. I just skimmed the last issue. I do not care anymore. Please get me out of here.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Hana

    I was super excited when this story was announced, mainly just because I was happy to see my girl Jessica Cruz headlining another series. I read the first two issues when they originally came out and was genuinely excited to see how the story progressed, though I ended up waiting to finish it as a collected edition. Overall, I thought it was a decent story. It's an interesting mix of characters that all have different goals and thus interact in intriguing ways, and the basic premise seems solid. I was super excited when this story was announced, mainly just because I was happy to see my girl Jessica Cruz headlining another series. I read the first two issues when they originally came out and was genuinely excited to see how the story progressed, though I ended up waiting to finish it as a collected edition. Overall, I thought it was a decent story. It's an interesting mix of characters that all have different goals and thus interact in intriguing ways, and the basic premise seems solid. The writing itself felt a bit rushed, with each issue being rather short and not as developed as I would have hoped. The art was solid enough, although it did change frequently, with there being at least three different artists with different styles in these first six issues. Overall, not my favorite storyline, but I am curious enough to continue with it and see where it goes.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jaime Guzman

    This series spins out of the aftermath of Dark Nights:Metal and Justice League:No Justice. Our heroes Cyborg, Starfire, Green Lantern, and Azrael investigate the Ghost Sector with the assistance of Darkseid. Like most of the comics from the Death Metal series the stories are fairly weak and seem to have characters out of their element or whose authors do not seem to have a good grasp of their characters voices. The only saving grace is the art work. Stejpan Sejic illustrates the f This series spins out of the aftermath of Dark Nights:Metal and Justice League:No Justice. Our heroes Cyborg, Starfire, Green Lantern, and Azrael investigate the Ghost Sector with the assistance of Darkseid. Like most of the comics from the Death Metal series the stories are fairly weak and seem to have characters out of their element or whose authors do not seem to have a good grasp of their characters voices. The only saving grace is the art work. Stejpan Sejic illustrates the first two issues beautifully, the third and fourth issues drawn by Phil Briones who is no longer a John Byrne clone and is coming into his own as an artist, and the fifth issue drawn by Carmine Di Giandomenico is also a solid dynamic artist. The art in my opinion is well done but I wish that Sejic stayed for more than just the first two issues. Pass this one up.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Lagerloef

    One of the most disappointing TPBs I’ve read in a while - the characters all making increasingly stupid decisions, many of them very out of character (looking at you, Jean Paul), and by the end you really don’t care about the fates of any of the characters. The art starts out strong, especially with Stjepan’s facial work, but then the title switches artists twice and the art quality takes a heavy dive with each change. The dialogue is bad, especially for Darkseid, and some lines seem ripped stra One of the most disappointing TPBs I’ve read in a while - the characters all making increasingly stupid decisions, many of them very out of character (looking at you, Jean Paul), and by the end you really don’t care about the fates of any of the characters. The art starts out strong, especially with Stjepan’s facial work, but then the title switches artists twice and the art quality takes a heavy dive with each change. The dialogue is bad, especially for Darkseid, and some lines seem ripped straight out of a few DC movies from the last couple of years. I loved the concept for this book and was completely let down by its execution. I won’t bother with volume 2 - this isn’t bringing anything essential to the table.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jamie Revell

    A reasonably fun story of a team of lesser superheroes coming together to explore a forbidden area of space and uncover a mystery there. It's fast-moving, and there are some interesting aspects to the setting, with the locals having somehow already built religions around three of the four main characters. On the other hand, there's no particular depth to the characterisations of the leads (nor much opportunity for it) and the big revelation that the main villain is... um, villainous... is a bit A reasonably fun story of a team of lesser superheroes coming together to explore a forbidden area of space and uncover a mystery there. It's fast-moving, and there are some interesting aspects to the setting, with the locals having somehow already built religions around three of the four main characters. On the other hand, there's no particular depth to the characterisations of the leads (nor much opportunity for it) and the big revelation that the main villain is... um, villainous... is a bit of a "well, duh" moment. Slepic's artwork is very nice, and the other two aren't bad, but the story, while entertaining enough, isn't going to break any ground.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Fiction State Of Mind

    This series deals with the aftermath of DC comics Metal series. The galaxy is broken, Dangerous worlds are becoming free and Cyborg feels a call to go to them. He is joined by Starfire who is looking for her home planet, and a Green Lantern who is policing the sector that Cyborg and his crew want to enter. This series is an epic space yarn and I love it! Seeing different characters working together and all the characters that make up DC's galactic pantheon is really enjoyable. Coyer S This series deals with the aftermath of DC comics Metal series. The galaxy is broken, Dangerous worlds are becoming free and Cyborg feels a call to go to them. He is joined by Starfire who is looking for her home planet, and a Green Lantern who is policing the sector that Cyborg and his crew want to enter. This series is an epic space yarn and I love it! Seeing different characters working together and all the characters that make up DC's galactic pantheon is really enjoyable. Coyer Scavenger Hunt Read a Book with a weapon on the cover 1 pt

  21. 5 out of 5

    J.

    This book was enjoyable, but not quite what I was expecting. I think I wanted something that leaned more into the fun and less into the DC mythology. I guess I was hoping for more of a space romp that didn't require me to have read other comics, but that's not quite where this lands. It's an overall enjoyable read, and I was able to largely understand what was going on without reading any of the other comics that led up to this story, but I always find it a bit frustrating when I can' This book was enjoyable, but not quite what I was expecting. I think I wanted something that leaned more into the fun and less into the DC mythology. I guess I was hoping for more of a space romp that didn't require me to have read other comics, but that's not quite where this lands. It's an overall enjoyable read, and I was able to largely understand what was going on without reading any of the other comics that led up to this story, but I always find it a bit frustrating when I can't read something that can largely stand on its own.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jaron | TheBookBaron

    2.5

  23. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

    Good art. Didn't love the story. *2 and a half stars*

  24. 4 out of 5

    Joey

    This team-up works pretty well! Awesome artwork, and epic story-telling!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sesana

    A dull and unconvincing story, starring characters who spout really, really bad one liners, and a particularly bad showing from an artist I normally really like. This just doesn't work.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Butcher

    Not really a Justice League team per say. Honestly, it's a fine cosmic story, but maybe the mix of heroes falls a little flat for my tastes.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Nicole Westen

    3.5

  28. 4 out of 5

    Tom

    Cyborg, Starfire, and Azrael head into the mysterious Ghost Sector, picking up Green Lantern Jessica Cruz along the way and one other not-quite-ally Darkseid. Some of these characters are being worshipped as gods for some unknown reason by various peoples in the Ghost Sector, and there's generally the mystery of what Darkseid wants. It's a decent start but doesn't seem to go very far.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Persephone

  30. 5 out of 5

    Steve Schafer

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.