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Toda la verdad que hay en mí (eBook-ePub) (Best Seller (sm))

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Hace cuatro años, Judith y su mejor amiga desaparecieron de su pequeño pueblo. Dos años después, solo Judith regresa.  Mutilada para siempre, rechazada por las sospechas sobre su pasado, e ignorada por aquellos que fueron su familia y sus amigos, Judith se convierte en una paria de la comunidad. Pero hay algo a lo que Judith no puede renunciar: su amor por Lucas, un joven Hace cuatro años, Judith y su mejor amiga desaparecieron de su pequeño pueblo. Dos años después, solo Judith regresa.  Mutilada para siempre, rechazada por las sospechas sobre su pasado, e ignorada por aquellos que fueron su familia y sus amigos, Judith se convierte en una paria de la comunidad. Pero hay algo a lo que Judith no puede renunciar: su amor por Lucas, un joven del pueblo al que siempre ha querido en secreto. Cuando Lucas es rechazado por la comunidad, Judith sabe que podría salvarlo si rompiera su silencio. Pero al hacerlo, tendría que volver a su oscuro pasado, lo que puede separarla de Lucas para siempre. Toda la verdad que hay en mí es, al mismo tiempo, una larga carta de amor, una narración de misterio y una exploración de lo que supone estar al margen de la sociedad.


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Hace cuatro años, Judith y su mejor amiga desaparecieron de su pequeño pueblo. Dos años después, solo Judith regresa.  Mutilada para siempre, rechazada por las sospechas sobre su pasado, e ignorada por aquellos que fueron su familia y sus amigos, Judith se convierte en una paria de la comunidad. Pero hay algo a lo que Judith no puede renunciar: su amor por Lucas, un joven Hace cuatro años, Judith y su mejor amiga desaparecieron de su pequeño pueblo. Dos años después, solo Judith regresa.  Mutilada para siempre, rechazada por las sospechas sobre su pasado, e ignorada por aquellos que fueron su familia y sus amigos, Judith se convierte en una paria de la comunidad. Pero hay algo a lo que Judith no puede renunciar: su amor por Lucas, un joven del pueblo al que siempre ha querido en secreto. Cuando Lucas es rechazado por la comunidad, Judith sabe que podría salvarlo si rompiera su silencio. Pero al hacerlo, tendría que volver a su oscuro pasado, lo que puede separarla de Lucas para siempre. Toda la verdad que hay en mí es, al mismo tiempo, una larga carta de amor, una narración de misterio y una exploración de lo que supone estar al margen de la sociedad.

30 review for Toda la verdad que hay en mí (eBook-ePub) (Best Seller (sm))

  1. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    As always, tacky though it may seem to rate and review my own book, how can I not? I love this book with, well, all the love that's in me. ;) I hope you enjoy it too. I love reading your thoughts on Goodreads.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Christine Wallflower & Dark Romance Junkie

    Darrel once read to Mother the tale of a girl in France who heard angel voices telling her to save her people from the English. She dressed as a man and spoke with fire and eloquence. She raised an army and defeated the invaders, all for the love of her motherland. For her courage and her passion, she later burned to death, called a witch and heretic. Do I love you less than she loved soil? I have no words to save you. I'll be honest, when I read the blurb for this book, I did not imagine it as I Darrel once read to Mother the tale of a girl in France who heard angel voices telling her to save her people from the English. She dressed as a man and spoke with fire and eloquence. She raised an army and defeated the invaders, all for the love of her motherland. For her courage and her passion, she later burned to death, called a witch and heretic. Do I love you less than she loved soil? I have no words to save you. I'll be honest, when I read the blurb for this book, I did not imagine it as I read it. To say the blurb and cover are misleading would be an understatement! This is the story of Judith Finch, who disappeared one day, never to be scene until one day she came back. Mute. The reason is shrouded in secrecy. Instead of being welcomed with open arms by her family and community she is ostracized. The fact that she has survived does not matter, the question on everyone's lips: whether or not she is still pure. Because she is mute she cannot give them an answer, and by default she becomes lower than the lowest of creatures. She watches silently on the sidelines as everyone she grew up with lives a full life. No one will speak to her, no one even acknowledges her. Who will help me? Why does everyone presume that I, as damaged merchandise, forfeit any claim to happiness? That I expect nothing, have no ambitions or longings of my own? When was it agreed that my lot would be to gladly serve as prop and a crutch for others who are whole. Now don't get me wrong, Judith never complains, she is the most selfless and caring person I have ever read. Her unconditional love for her mother and brother is amazing! But she never sees herself as worthy, rightly so, because no one ever gives her reason to. She is no longer a person, because of her inability to speak. What did I expect? A modern day novel about a girl who was kidnapped and then later found broken but she would persevere, finding love and healing. What did I get? An historical novel. (The century, year is unclear) A story written in lyrical prose. In fact it was so lyrical I thought I was reading poetry. A darkly depressing novel. Final Thoughts Despite being mislead, I can't give this book less than 5 stars. Why? Because this book moved me, it made me feel deeply. I actually texted Skank (Soraya Naomi) and asked if it is possible to feel angst while reading such lyrical prose? Off course she replied, yes! This is definitely a darker read, with some thriller aspects. Now I'd like to add that this is not a religious book, but because of the time period and kind of community that Judith is from, religion does play a huge part in this story. Unfortunately it does not play in favour of Judith's existence. Note: 1. Yes this is a love story, although the "romance" is secondary. 2. My casting, this is the closest to the Judith I see in my head

  3. 4 out of 5

    Wendy Darling

    4.5 stars There are about 100 reasons why this book wouldn't normally work for me. The story is related in fragments, often consisting of no more than half a page. The timeline is fluid, shifting between past and present. It's told in flipping SECOND PERSON NARRATIVE. But it works, it works beautifully. Full review is on the blog: http://www.themidnightgarden.net/2013...

  4. 4 out of 5

    Giselle

    A strange, yet somehow compelling book, All The Truth That's in Me gives a reading experience like no other. I can't say I've read anything quite like this before. The best way to describe it is different! The way this book is written is as if, especially during the first part, we're seeing a story unfold through bursts of randomized life flashes. There's an editor's note at the beginning of my copy that describes it as "a pinhole narrative - you start out looking through a tiny hole that allows A strange, yet somehow compelling book, All The Truth That's in Me gives a reading experience like no other. I can't say I've read anything quite like this before. The best way to describe it is different! The way this book is written is as if, especially during the first part, we're seeing a story unfold through bursts of randomized life flashes. There's an editor's note at the beginning of my copy that describes it as "a pinhole narrative - you start out looking through a tiny hole that allows you to see only a fraction of Judith's world, and as the story goes on, the pinhole widens" It's the the perfect way to describe the storytelling style. As you can guess, it's not the kind of story where you fall into place right away, it takes time to situate yourself and make sense of anything you're reading. But, it also compels you to move forward despite the disorientation it causes. The 2nd person narrative makes this novel even more unique. Judith is telling her story directly to Lucas - the boy she loves. As if in letter form. As if YOU were Lucas. Even though it threw me off my game once or twice where I had to stop and think for a second who she was referring to, I did find it was a brilliant choice for the type of novel this was. All in all, and it's a strange opinion, but I feel like I enjoyed the book, yet I did not. When I wasn't reading I would find myself constantly thinking about it, but when I was reading, I felt restless, needing to make an effort to focus on the passages I was reading. I found the plot was very slow to progress even after the story got clear enough for me to grasp it in its entirety. Additionally, I was not aware this book was a historical fiction before I picked it up and read it - the blurb being too vague to make out much of anything (funnily, this ambiguity is what made me want to read it in the first place). This genre happens to be one I very rarely read and one of my least favorites. Thus I attribute some of my boredom to that alone. On that note, the setting is never entirely established either, particularly in a historical sense. It makes it difficult to understand what kind of societal mindset we are dealing with. Nevertheless, due to the unique quality of the story and writing, I would still call this an exceptional read despite my ennui. Hence my all-over-the-place feelings (and review) toward the complete package! What compelled me to keep reading, even re-read pages I dozed through, was the mystery as well as Judith's determination in taking her life back after this trauma. Some parts are disturbing, some empowering. Through it all she stays much stronger than I would have in her shoes; not only does she have to live with what's happened, her loss of voice is viewed with repugnance by others. It's nothing but a tiny village with nowhere else to go. Though tiny, it's a village surrounded by a mystery that had me NEEDING to find out the conclusion of. Finally, the fourth part of this book is superb, and it immediately made me want to give this 4 stars upon finishing; except I can't ignore my earlier boredom. I do want everyone to read this, however, if only to experience it. The originality alone might make you a fan among many! -- An advance copy was provided by the publisher for review. For more of my reviews, visit my blog at Xpresso Reads

  5. 4 out of 5

    Lola

    Confusing narration style and difficult connection with the characters.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Keertana

    In life, there are always those books you just know you're going to read, no matter what; maybe it's written by your favorite author or it came highly recommended by a trusted reviewer or maybe the cover is just too pretty to resist. And then there are the books you read because you're curious; because a certain review sparked your interest or the author said something remarkable in an interview or the cover flashed by your vision and you couldn't stop thinking about it. For me,All the Truth Th In life, there are always those books you just know you're going to read, no matter what; maybe it's written by your favorite author or it came highly recommended by a trusted reviewer or maybe the cover is just too pretty to resist. And then there are the books you read because you're curious; because a certain review sparked your interest or the author said something remarkable in an interview or the cover flashed by your vision and you couldn't stop thinking about it. For me,All the Truth That's In Me falls into the latter category. Needless to say, this novel took me by surprise, but in all the best ways. While I began this novel with trepidation - after all, it is full of Things That Shouldn't Work - I closed it with the awed expression of a reader whose expectations have been blown sky high. Things That Shouldn't Work (But Did!) 1. Second Person Narration Only three years ago, a friend and I wrote a short story together. It was an intense, psychological piece about two friends - one German and one Jewish - whose friendship was ripped apart by WWII. Nothing unique, except for the fact that it was written in second person. (A decision our teacher didn't condone at all, so we were forced to revert to third person, though I believe our second person version is still lying around somewhere in the depths of my e-mail folder.) Quite simply put, second person narration doesn't work for a lot of people, both readers and writers. It's tricky, it's frustrating, and at times unnecessarily complicated. Thus, to see Berry execute it with such ease, poise, and sheer talent is nothing short of brilliant. All the Truth That's In Me works as a letter, of sorts, from Judith to her childhood lover, Lucas. Judith, at fourteen, was kept captive in the woods, but is sent back, years later, with her tongue cut off. Unable to talk and thought to be cursed by her small Puritan town - including her own mother - Judith learns to live in silence. Her second person narration works seamlessly with her story line, conveying the horror of her cruel past, the isolation of her present, and the bleakness of her future. Moreover, it is strangely intimate, allowing us to see Judith in both her strongest and weakest lights. Ever since she was a young girl, Judith has been in love with Lucas, and with her directly speaking to him, so much of her nature seeps through these pages - her loyalty, fierce love, and even obsessiveness. It's a truly wise decision that enables us, the reader, to understand Judith on a much deeper level, practically crawling into her thoughts. 2. Puritans I feel as if it's an unspoken rule that only Nathaniel Hawthorne can pull off the Puritans. (And, let me make it very clear, I love The Scarlett Letter like I love The Great Gatsby, so believe me when I say I'd kill to have written that book.) While the precise setting of All the Truth That's In Me is not given, it is clear that the novel takes place in a historical era, one where pilgrims have only recently escaped religious persecution, are required to attend church every Sunday,  and live by rigid moral laws. If that doesn't practically spell "Puritan" then I don't know what does. While I really enjoyed this setting while reading the novel, I thought - extensively - about how the story would have been different in modern-day society. Why does an author make the decision to anchor a novel in a certain time period after all, especially when the events in this book - kidnapping, estrangement, societal mistreatment - could have happened today too? I think the beauty of this novel lies in the answer to that question. From the surface, the cruel punishments Judith bears upon her return - the blame for her father's death, a stigma as a whore, complete estrangement by former friends - can be attributed to the rigidity of the morals the Puritans lived by. After all, in a society with much looser morals, mightn't have Judith's homecoming have been a different experience? Maybe, but maybe not. What this Puritan setting does so well is emphasize the inherent evils visible in humans, and that faint line drawn between black and white becomes all the more hard to see set against this time period. Berry paints depicts this morality question beautifully, creating complicated relationships that can claim no simple label. I love that Judith shares so many different types of relationships - with her mother, with her brother, with her friends - but they all contain aspects of this time period and are deliciously ambiguous when it comes to the question of morality. Moreover, I love my historical fiction, so details of Judith's struggle in this century only made her story more authentic. 3. Childhood Romance I know I struggle with love stories - namely, their believability - but childhood romances practically never work for me. I find that authors seem to take it for granted that the duration of time these characters have known each other should equate love. It doesn't, but thankfully Berry doesn't fall into that trap. Very carefully, she builds a contrast between Judith's love for Lucas as a child, and then as an adult. I particularly love how true to age Berry remains, showing us the naivety of a girl's dreams and then the truth of a woman's reality. Now, after her ordeal, Judith returns to see Lucas gearing up to marry the town belle and, as such, her love changes. It remains, constant and true, no matter what, but it also slowly acknowledges that Lucas is not the paragon of perfection that she's built him up to be. One of my favorite aspects of this novel is that Judith's growth and maturity is so closely tied with the romance; that the most important lesson she learns is to fall in love with the truth - of her past, of her deformity, and of love. Just the fact that Judith is able to eventually come to love Lucas despite - and maybe for - his flaws makes their love story all the more realistic and durable. It isn't an easy journey, but it is certainly a rewarding one. 4. Maiming & Disabilities  I recently read this incredibly detailed post about diversity - or the lack of it - in YA. And while All the Truth That's In Me doesn't necessarily involve non-white characters, it does feature a protagonist who is maimed. Judith's speechlessness is derived from her own physical barriers, unlike most heroines, which makes this novel fall into 2.9% of novels in 2013 with disabled characters. Normally, this fact would probably remain rather unremarkable. After all, many novels feature secondary character with disabilities and, either way, Judith's inability to speak is an enormous plot device. And yet, Berry truly give this issue so much more depth. Not only does Judith work at regaining her ability to speak fluently, but she feels - constantly - the unfairness of her circumstances.  "Will I help him make something of his life? Who will help me? Why does everyone presume that I, as damaged merchandise, forfeit any claim to happiness? That I expect nothing, have no ambitions or longings of my own? When was it agreed that my lot would be to gladly serve as a prop and a crutch for others who are whole?" (Berry, 53%)* Instead of her disability making her the center of attention, Judith is pushed into the very corners of thought, her silence taken for granted as acquiescence. Essentially, her speechlessness makes her come across as a woman with no thoughts or opinions of her own. I love that Berry touched upon these ideals, only because they weren't ever ones I would have considered and this is precisely why I read: to be introduced to new ways of thinking. 5. A "Pinhole" Plot I've heard this novel being described as a "pinhole" one, or one in which the entirety of the story is revealed as the book wears on. Well, let me tell you now, these "pinhole" methods never work for me. Never. I have no patience for authors who tantalizingly dangle answers just out of my grasp, so color me surprised to find myself flipping through the pages of this novel gleefully - "pinhole" storytelling and all. What Berry does, that most authors don't, however, is reveal pieces of information in a timely fashion. It is evident, from early in the story, who Judith's kidnapper is. And yet, the full details of her ordeal are never revealed until the end. Instead, small flashbacks litter the narration, working beautifully to weave mystery and thrill into this otherwise seemingly romantic tale. While I remain a fan of the slow, languid prose used in this novel, not to mention the character-driven plot focus, I am sure that not all readers will agree. And yet, I felt as if these purposeful decisions only worked to strengthen the plot, making us care for these characters and drown in seas of emotion. I know that by the end of this book, I was gripping the edge of my chair, unsure whether or not to laugh or cry or scream. And I love that build-up of tension, that slow unraveling of mystery, and the eventual - realistic - conclusion of a well-told tale. All the Truth That's In Me truly hit all the right notes, at least in my book. Not only did it take a myriad of challenging qualities (see above) and make them work, but it also took the essentials I look for in a good story - characters with depth, thriller plot lines, and emotional undertones - and excelled in those areas as well. While I've never read any of Berry's past novels, you can be sure that I will - eagerly - be checking out her future YA works. After I own this beautiful hardcover on my shelves, that is. You can read this review and more on my blog, Ivy Book Bindings.

  7. 5 out of 5

    ♥Rachel♥

    4.5 Stars All the Truth That’s In Me was a stunning, sharply focused story that ticked all the boxes for me! It was filled with feelings of longing, pain, sadness, anger, hope and joy! At the heart of it is an achy romance, and a clever mystery that surprised me when all was revealed! Judith is one of two girls who went missing two years ago. She came back but the other girl did not. When she walks back to her home there is no warm welcome. Her father died during her absence, and her mother blame 4.5 Stars All the Truth That’s In Me was a stunning, sharply focused story that ticked all the boxes for me! It was filled with feelings of longing, pain, sadness, anger, hope and joy! At the heart of it is an achy romance, and a clever mystery that surprised me when all was revealed! Judith is one of two girls who went missing two years ago. She came back but the other girl did not. When she walks back to her home there is no warm welcome. Her father died during her absence, and her mother blames her for this! Judith’s younger brother doesn’t treat her much better. Judith was maimed making her speech hard to understand. What’s worse though is her mother’s reaction. She’s shocked and horrified by Judith’s attempts at speaking and she forbids her to talk. Her treatment and reaction to Judith made my heart hurt! “You’ve come back maimed. I leave it to God to judge what brought this upon you.”* Before Judith was abducted she was hopelessly in love with her childhood friend, Lucas. Nothing changed her feelings for him. But without speaking and with no explanation of her disappearance, Judith fades into the background, and everyone either regards her as the town freak or ignores her entirely. Lucas falls into the latter category. My heart broke for Judith as life goes on with her as a spectator. But everything changes when the town is threatened, and she knows exactly what must be done. There are several mysteries unfolding in this tale. The identity of Judith’s abductor is revealed early on, but you’re not sure why she was taken, and you’re not sure what happened during her captivity. These mysteries and more are slowly and masterfully revealed throughout the story. All the Truth That’s In Me is told in second person narrative, with Judith basically addressing this story to Lucas. It felt like I was reading her letters to him with dialogue and scenes included. I read so much that a change in storytelling is welcome and refreshing, and I loved it! I admired and rooted for Judith, and was in awe that all she went through didn’t break her spirit. I was heartened when she started to come out of her shell and take control of her life! Because of the second narrative, interactions with the secondary character like her brother, Maria or Goody are somewhat sparse, but that in no way lessens their impact or appeal. The romance between Judith and Lucas is one of longing and sadness on her part, at first. As the story continued my heart filled with joy over changes in situation, and as things were revealed. “It was always you, Ladybird,” you say softly. “Don’t you know?”* Julie Berry’s writing was powerful, concise and almost lyrical. Her captivating story is a definite recommend! Come visit The Readers Den for a chance to win my ARC copy of All the Truth That's In Me. A copy was provided by Viking Juvenile in exchange for an honest review. *Quotes taken from an uncorrected proof and may change in the final copy.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    Okay, wow. I mean . . . wow. Just . . . just read it, okay? I'm not going to tell you anything. I don't want to ruin anything. I just want you to read this book. Do you like historical fiction? Read this book. Do you like mysteries? Read this book. Do you like romance? Read this book. Do you like The Witch of Blackbird Pond? Read this book. Do you like reading books that are really, really, really good and will keep you up all night reading because you have to know how it ends because you care abo Okay, wow. I mean . . . wow. Just . . . just read it, okay? I'm not going to tell you anything. I don't want to ruin anything. I just want you to read this book. Do you like historical fiction? Read this book. Do you like mysteries? Read this book. Do you like romance? Read this book. Do you like The Witch of Blackbird Pond? Read this book. Do you like reading books that are really, really, really good and will keep you up all night reading because you have to know how it ends because you care about the characters so much? JUST READ THE DARN BOOK.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Molly

    Rating, 5 angsty stars Emotional, passionate, heart-wrenching, lyric , melodious .... it pulled all the right strings. Judith Finch has been abducted when she was just fourteen, following the disappearance of another village girl. “I saw life choked out, squeezed out of my young friend. Saw the lights in her eyes extinguished by a pair of hands, hands so filthy they soiled the triangle lace of her dress collar. Whose hands they were, I couldn’t see. I watched her lose her breath forever while I sa Rating, 5 angsty stars Emotional, passionate, heart-wrenching, lyric , melodious .... it pulled all the right strings. Judith Finch has been abducted when she was just fourteen, following the disappearance of another village girl. “I saw life choked out, squeezed out of my young friend. Saw the lights in her eyes extinguished by a pair of hands, hands so filthy they soiled the triangle lace of her dress collar. Whose hands they were, I couldn’t see. I watched her lose her breath forever while I sat in the willow tree holding mine, lest he find me, too, and his hands press into my soft neck like dirty boots into new-fallen snow." When she finally returns home mutilated and unable to speak, four years had passed. Her loving father died during her absence and her mother's heart has hardened towards her. “The warmth I remember in her eyes is gone, replaced with iron. Father is long since dead, and the daughter she remembers is dead to her. She buries the name with the memory. No one calls me by my name. Younger children do not know it. I remind myself each day at sunrise, lest one day I forget. Judith is my name.” She's deemed impure now. She's shunned or at best ignored by the community. What spares her the faith that awaits adulterous or loose women is the fact that despite her inability to speak, when confronted by the Village Council she is adamant that her captor didn't touched her in "that way". She's returned home ... but life is still a struggle despite her regained freedom. She doesn't remember much of the years in captivity ... and that much that she remembers, she tries desperately to suppress. Some secrets could hurt more than her. “Jip’s whole body wags to see me, and when Mother isn’t watching, I break off a corner of a brick of cheese and slip it to him. He licks my hand lovingly with his long, pink tongue. I’m jealous of a dog. He has a warm tongue, and he lives with you.” This book was so beautifully written. Considering my likes and dislikes this one could have been a disaster if written differently. I usually snort at love at fist sight, especially that love-from-the-cradle scenario. Judith acts almost stalker-ish towards Lucas Whiting, her one true love. I usually cringe at such conduct. Yet somehow .... this time I didn't mind at all. There were a few roll-eye moments where I thought ..."Come on girl, stop pining after him, he's to marry another girl. Wake up and move on!", but then ... Through the story we see Judith grow stronger, change, learn, try to open herself to other people (she too distanced herself from others). Judith dreamed the impossible dream of being loved by her childhood love ... and I was surprisingly and ungrudgingly on board. One of the best YA books I've read last year ... and it was a very good year, even for YA.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Melanie

    See more reviews at YA Midnight Reads 4.5 stars Thank you HarperCollins Australia for sending me this copy. No compensation was given or taken to alter this review. I run away, fleeing down the street, so my tears can fall in privacy. I remember, when I was younger, I would imagine what it would be like to be completely mute. The idea didn't seem awfully outrageous. Back then, I was quiet, shy. Anathematized talking. However now, the thought horrifies me. Not only would not having a tongue would me See more reviews at YA Midnight Reads 4.5 stars Thank you HarperCollins Australia for sending me this copy. No compensation was given or taken to alter this review. I run away, fleeing down the street, so my tears can fall in privacy. I remember, when I was younger, I would imagine what it would be like to be completely mute. The idea didn't seem awfully outrageous. Back then, I was quiet, shy. Anathematized talking. However now, the thought horrifies me. Not only would not having a tongue would mean no ice-cream, but also because I am a crazy chatter-box. If I was mutilated, the world be a reticent, monotonous place. All The Truth That's In Me, to be labelled as different, would be one of the world's greatest understatements. Which probably also contributes to why I loved it so dearly. The narrative point is from Judith, written to her childhood best friend, Lucas- meaning that it was basically told in 2nd person. I have only read one other book in 2nd person which is The Truth About You and Me which left disastrous effects as it made all the supporting characters without persona and well, character. Even though All The Truth That's In Me does not capture the full charisma of every single character, it was far better than The Truth About You and Me. All The Truth That's In Me has a contrast of sub-genres mixed together as one; mystery, thriller, romance and historical. Two friends- girls disappeared that year, only one came back. With half a tongue. Without the ability to talk, Judith comes back. All the people that cared about her don't seem to anymore. As stakes rise, the need for truth is more urgent, but if only Judith could speak... Judith's voice has to be one of the strongest I've ever come across. It's rattling and alarming, and so raw. Julie Berry's writing makes it easy to empathise for Judith and her situation. In some ways, it reminded me of 17 & Gone, as the writing and atmosphere was so tangible and skin-crawling. The supporting characters ranged quite contrastingly. I found it hard to connect with Lucas, as Judith is referring to him as 'you'. Nonetheless, his character became more defined as the story developed, and in the end, I can say I adored him. Judith's mother is one to despise. Her hostility to her own child astounded me and made me furious. But also created an interesting movement which played nicely with the plot and highlighted Judith's character. Other characters like Judith's brother and Maria felt extremely authentic- not a single person is wasted here. Pacing of All The Truth That's In Me was a minor problem. I found it thoroughly entrapping but I despite the small size, the pace dragged a tad. I suspect some readers may find this a major issue unlike me. Or, it could be the lack of plot- though I highly doubt it, the plot was delightfully intricate and page-turn-worthy. Creepy, poetic-like and pure genius, All The Truth That's In Me is something superiorly unique and worth reading. The 2nd person narrative and pace threw me off a bit yet other than that, I loved this. And for some extra entertainment, try tawhking wike you havf no thongue.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kat Kennedy

    I did not request this book, I didn’t even know it existed until a publicist in Australia sent it to me. “Read this or I will punch your ovaries in their still-beating hearts until they cry and explode.” Okay, maybe she didn’t use those exact words, but I like to imagine she was secretly thinking it. I’m kind of glad she did mind-threaten me though because this book was fabulous with a capitol FAB! All the Truth That’s in Me follows the events of a small pilgrim-like town. Judith is the town paria I did not request this book, I didn’t even know it existed until a publicist in Australia sent it to me. “Read this or I will punch your ovaries in their still-beating hearts until they cry and explode.” Okay, maybe she didn’t use those exact words, but I like to imagine she was secretly thinking it. I’m kind of glad she did mind-threaten me though because this book was fabulous with a capitol FAB! All the Truth That’s in Me follows the events of a small pilgrim-like town. Judith is the town pariah. She and her best friend disappeared two years ago. Judith returned home after an extended period of disappearance, her best friend did not. The town wants to know what happened to Judith, but she can’t tell them. Her tongue was cut out and she’s mute. The boy she was in love with, who seemed to care for her in return, is out of her reach. Do you ever feel like the world is once again descending into an Atwood dystopia where women are judged on purity, looks and moralities that are valuable to men? Did you ever wonder what that would be like to live in? Thankfully, you don’t need to, because Judith lives in it. She loses any and all status in her town when she returns “spoiled” and suspicion lingers of her morality, derived from a situation where she was held prisoner at the hands of a madman. But that rejection by her own family and society is also kind of freeing for Judith. She’s semi-invisible, untouchable, and also kind of free to be human – to be herself. She’s cut-loose to be this free-spirited, sexual being who longs for all the things she can’t have and, in a way, experience a better version of herself. Her situation allows her to see past the pitfalls and trappings of her grossly imperfect society, so that she can fight for her own value and worth. The romance with Lucas is charming, lovely and heart-wrenching all at the same time. This novel manages to pack an emotional punch as well as remaining consistently noteworthy in its plotting, pacing and writing. I’ll be looking forward to future novels by Berry. Also, just… This review, and others like it, also appear on my blog, Cuddlebuggery Book Blog. This ARC was provided to me by the publisher for reviewing purposes. This did not entice me to be any less annoyingly opinionated than I would otherwise be.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

    If you don't have a voice, can anyone hear you? Or do you not have a voice because no one WANTS to hear you? That's the question at the heart of Berry's swift-paced mystery novel, set in a somewhat Puritanical/cult-like society that's recognizable as historical but never spelled out as to where or when. When Judith returns to her home after two years of being missing, she comes back without a tongue. It's a literal tongue removal, as well as a metaphorical one. She can't speak, and no one wants If you don't have a voice, can anyone hear you? Or do you not have a voice because no one WANTS to hear you? That's the question at the heart of Berry's swift-paced mystery novel, set in a somewhat Puritanical/cult-like society that's recognizable as historical but never spelled out as to where or when. When Judith returns to her home after two years of being missing, she comes back without a tongue. It's a literal tongue removal, as well as a metaphorical one. She can't speak, and no one wants to hear her anyway. Because in her world, whatever happened couldn't have been good. She must no longer be pure. And because she is a female, because she is young and unmarried and she's been gone for some period of time, she must have been engaged in salacious activities. Her mother degrades her, and her entire society shuns her. She's useless to them except in the form of sexual enjoyment -- at a price. (view spoiler)[ When Judith chooses to return to school, to try to get an education with her brother, her teacher makes advances upon her, suggesting the only way he'll be able to help her really learn is if she pays a price. (hide spoiler)] Except (view spoiler)[ Judith wasn't raped. She wasn't impure. Sure, it almost happened. But it didn't. Who would believe her anyway, even if she could speak? In some ways, her silence was a gift. Even if it was a gift she didn't get to choose for herself. Even if it WAS a gift she got to choose herself. (hide spoiler)] At heart, this is a love letter Judith writes to the boy she's been head-over-heels for since she was young, Lucas. It's a story about what she did for him, and how much she loves him and wants nothing more than to be with him. It's a story about why she is not allowed to be with him. It's a story about what happened to Lucas's father. Before. During. And after. I found the romantic storyline to be the least interesting, actually, and that's why the first half of the book dragged for me. In many ways it felt derivative -- a girl who was missing comes back. Some of the snatches of her memory look like they're hinting at Stockholm Syndrome. But when the story shifts, when it becomes about JUDITH FINDING HER VOICE, rather than finding her love, it becomes much more interesting. But it also becomes a little frustrating. This Puritanical setting felt almost too easy. It was almost too easy for her to be voiceless in a society like that, especially as her entire story could so easily be today's world. And while I don't like to review with an eye about why certain choices were or weren't made about big story elements like setting, to me, it felt like a safety net to the bigger, more critical ideas in the novel itself. Add to that the fact there was a little bit of writing indulgence here stylistically -- the before, during, and now, the numbered stanzas, the short and clipped passages, the fact there are multiple "parts" within the parts of the book -- I felt the real pow of the book was diminished a bit. It's not gone. But it's not quite as powerful as it could have been. The editor describes this as a "pinhole narrative," wherein you learn the story bit by bit. It's a nice way to describe it. I also think it's pretty much how a mystery novel works. And this is a mystery -- who killed Lottie? Why and how was Judith caught up in this? Why was it no one wanted to ask Judith what she knew? Why was it she didn't get the chance to say her piece before she was automatically condemned? There is a lot of juicy stuff here about the ways we do and do not respect teen girls. I just wish the over styling and somewhat confusing setting didn't weigh down the real knockout threads here. Think of this as Speak (no voice) meets The Scarlet Letter (the shunned girl) meets If You Find Me (the girl comes back from being secluded in the woods) meets The Chosen One (girl seeks education in a world that doesn't want her to, plus the cultish setting) meets Stolen (if Stolen didn't weave the Stockholm Syndrome in it). It doesn't surprise me the publisher's billing this as one of their award books. It's going to merit some discussion. It'll be interesting to see what happens and I'm definitely curious what people might pull from the setting and style.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Nomes

    I didn't really know what to expect from Julie Berry's debut. the blurb is a little bit elusive (in fact, I got the impression 'aliens?' -- close encounters, etc, haha). I may not even have picked this one up if the lovely publicist hadn't sent me a copy. Which would have been nearly criminal as this book soared to the top of my favourite reads this year. It's written in 2nd person POV -- which has a mildly intoxicating, lilting vibe to it. The prose is gorgeous. At first, everything felt a litt I didn't really know what to expect from Julie Berry's debut. the blurb is a little bit elusive (in fact, I got the impression 'aliens?' -- close encounters, etc, haha). I may not even have picked this one up if the lovely publicist hadn't sent me a copy. Which would have been nearly criminal as this book soared to the top of my favourite reads this year. It's written in 2nd person POV -- which has a mildly intoxicating, lilting vibe to it. The prose is gorgeous. At first, everything felt a little off kilter. I liken it a fraction to the experience of reading Jellicoe Rd: 'what's going on here?' tangled up with 'oh! I am really liking this beautiful prose and intriguing opening'. I was captured from the beginning and as the story wove around me I became deeper invested and more impressed. Until I pretty much just fell in love with everything about this book. It was the first book in a long time that gave me those delicious physical pangs in the gut ~ pangs of anxiety and hope and ache and just the right amount of swoon. There's heartache and sorrow and mystery and so many unexpected events. The characters felt so real and brave and lonely and they squirrelled their way deep in my heart. The story itself is not about aliens. or anything supernatural and freaky. It is set in an unspecified era that feels primitive-ish colonial America ~ small town/settlement vibe. It shifts between past and present, both timelines equally engaging. Judith is amazing. The love story is genuine. The swoons are not cheaply won -- and when they come they are all the more powerful for it :) Everything is unpredictable. Things are genuinely freaky in parts - dark and yet somehow there's always hope. Sorrowful yet a promise of something good waiting somewhere on the horizon. I really truly cannot commend this book enough. It is definitely one to be experienced first hand -- and then shared with friends. I can't wait to revisit it already. Julie Berry is an amazing new talent that I think every YA lover should be checking out. Forgive me if my review is a chaotic rambling of thoughts. And definitely find yourself a copy of this book to try -- even if you're dubious like I was. And when you do -- may you love it just as much as I do x Nomes I gave this 5 stars! I have only given SIX books 5 stars this year (out of 99 books read...) This is the Aussie cover: Coming from Harper Collins October 1.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Tatiana

    SO overwrought! And of course, (view spoiler)[the maidenhead is intact (hide spoiler)] . The Raging Quiet is much better.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Paige Bookdragon

    If you were mine I'd comfort you. If you were mine you'd need no comfort! -Judith Edited review to come.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Diane S ☔

    Strange, original, compelling and intense, I found this book, said to YA, very addicting. Second person narrative, shortish comments and thoughts and yet wonderful. The book does actually name a time period,  but it has the tone of The Scarlet Letter, also women called Goody and the stocks for punishment, so this novel is set in the very judgmental Puritan times. Judith is a wonderful character, a strong young woman with an unquenchable spirit. While reading this I often thought I knew what was g Strange, original, compelling and intense, I found this book, said to YA, very addicting. Second person narrative, shortish comments and thoughts and yet wonderful. The book does actually name a time period,  but it has the tone of The Scarlet Letter, also women called Goody and the stocks for punishment, so this novel is set in the very judgmental Puritan times. Judith is a wonderful character, a strong young woman with an unquenchable spirit. While reading this I often thought I knew what was going on, but I was only partly right, there were still surprises to be found. An interesting story, told about a very hypocritical time, a time that did not favor women or for that matter anyone that was different. Judith is different but not because of her own actions but because of what she has suffered. There was a bit of melodrama to the ending, but due to the target audience of this book it was very fitting. All is answered and all is explained. Sometimes having a voice is a very important asset and I loved how this author used hers in writing this novel.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Maggie Moritz

    I’m so shocked. At almost the halfway point I was so sure I was going to DNF it. The writing style was so different and hard to get used to. The timeline was odd. But something happened man. I pushed through and got used to the writing style and started to really love the book. I want to immediately reread it since I’m used to the writing style. The main character was so beautiful and captivating. I just wanted to sit her down with some tea and ask what happened to her. I know it’s strange to gi I’m so shocked. At almost the halfway point I was so sure I was going to DNF it. The writing style was so different and hard to get used to. The timeline was odd. But something happened man. I pushed through and got used to the writing style and started to really love the book. I want to immediately reread it since I’m used to the writing style. The main character was so beautiful and captivating. I just wanted to sit her down with some tea and ask what happened to her. I know it’s strange to give a book 5 stars when you hated the beginning but I’m doing it. No one can stop me.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Christine

    Quick Preview : No one knows what happened to Judith and Lottie when they disappeared 4 years ago. Two years afterwards, Judith comes back mutilated and lacking the ability to speak. The people she once knew shun her. Even her own mother won't call her by her real name. She finds herself longing after Lucas, her childhood friend, who have always been the one to understand her. When Roswell Station is attacked, things take a turn, and the truth begins to unravel. Judith struggles with the decisio Quick Preview : No one knows what happened to Judith and Lottie when they disappeared 4 years ago. Two years afterwards, Judith comes back mutilated and lacking the ability to speak. The people she once knew shun her. Even her own mother won't call her by her real name. She finds herself longing after Lucas, her childhood friend, who have always been the one to understand her. When Roswell Station is attacked, things take a turn, and the truth begins to unravel. Judith struggles with the decision whether to stay silent or to find her once lost voice. Thoughts : I was a little hesitant to read All the Truth That's in Me at first because it seemed very intense. Having already read Flawed and Uses for Boys, both with dark atmospheres, I wasn't sure if I was ready to plunge into another serious book. I then decided I should just read it, and I'm so glad I did. Let me just say that the cover is perfect. I knew beforehand that this was the type of book that keeps you guessing until the end. At first, I thought that might be somewhat frustrating for me, but it never appeared as a problem when I was reading. The format of the book is written almost like a letter, or as if Judith is telling her friend of an old memory. It was different and written magnificently. This story takes place a while back, in a small town where everyone knew each other and went to church. (Sort of like the setting in Beautiful Creatures) During the story, I found myself feeling for Judith, and the tears never stopped coming. Honestly, I felt like I was crying for her and for every bad thing that came along. I don't think I had felt so bad for a character in my entire life. The other characters were well developed. They all played a role in this book, and I didn't feel like there were any unnecessary characters. While reading, I completely despised her mom. She was terrible and insensitive. I don't want to give away too much, but man, she was bad. Judith seemed so alone, so I was grateful for the friendships she made. This was one of those books that have the potential to be life changing. Throughout the book, people treat Judith so cruelly for crimes she never committed, and I couldn't help but hope that Judith gets her happy ending. I won't spoil anything, but I hope you pick up this whirlwind of a book when it comes out on September 26. Seriously, read this book. You want to, trust me. It's amazing. By the way, I'm so honored to be able to read this book before its release date. **I won a copy at I Read to Relax's BEA event giveaway. Thanks to Kendra Levin, and Viking Children's Books for providing ARCs.* My having a copy did not influence the contents of this review.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Gisbelle

    I don't normally read historical fiction, but if there are more books as good as this one, I'm sure going to read more of this genre. This book is hauntingly beautiful, and I love everything about it, even the parts that wrecked my heart. The story was so captivating that I couldn't think of anything else, but this book - how Judith's life was going be, who had done that to her and why. Just several pages in, I wept like a baby. My heart ached for her and what she had to go through. Being shunned I don't normally read historical fiction, but if there are more books as good as this one, I'm sure going to read more of this genre. This book is hauntingly beautiful, and I love everything about it, even the parts that wrecked my heart. The story was so captivating that I couldn't think of anything else, but this book - how Judith's life was going be, who had done that to her and why. Just several pages in, I wept like a baby. My heart ached for her and what she had to go through. Being shunned and discriminated against even when she herself was a victim was just so cruel beyond words could describe. This is one of the books that I will find time to reread. Because once is not enough. (Some) Favorite Quotes "You are the sun in my world, and how can I endure to watch you set into another woman's arms?" "If you'd let me, I'd kiss away your fear, and let you rest yourself upon me, and I, I would die beside you and count my self lucky." "If you were mine I'd comfort you; if you were mine you'd need no comfort."

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    On two uncertain feet she stood And feared her long unpracticed throat, If tested, might, instead of speech, Keep the mourning lowing she had known. So hushed, and secretly she part lips, And trembling,spoke in her lost voice Lyrical and enchanting. Two words that come to mind when I think of this novel. Beautiful and engaging. There are more but I'll stick with those. I am blown away by the intricate plot and intriguing characters. This took me by surprise. Original and unpredictable. So lucky to have f On two uncertain feet she stood And feared her long unpracticed throat, If tested, might, instead of speech, Keep the mourning lowing she had known. So hushed, and secretly she part lips, And trembling,spoke in her lost voice Lyrical and enchanting. Two words that come to mind when I think of this novel. Beautiful and engaging. There are more but I'll stick with those. I am blown away by the intricate plot and intriguing characters. This took me by surprise. Original and unpredictable. So lucky to have found this hidden gem! Love love loved it! Highly Recommend this one!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    (Source: I own a copy of this book.) Judith was abducted 2 years ago, and has now returned home with her tongue cut out. She lives in a small village community, in a non-modern time, and is made to feel pretty worthless. She fancies a boy called Lucas, but it seems clear to everyone but her, that he will never marry her. Why was Judith abducted? Why was she returned? What did she suffer during her 2 years of captivity? And what truths is she unable to tell? This was a really strange book, and not at (Source: I own a copy of this book.) Judith was abducted 2 years ago, and has now returned home with her tongue cut out. She lives in a small village community, in a non-modern time, and is made to feel pretty worthless. She fancies a boy called Lucas, but it seems clear to everyone but her, that he will never marry her. Why was Judith abducted? Why was she returned? What did she suffer during her 2 years of captivity? And what truths is she unable to tell? This was a really strange book, and not at all what I was expecting. Judith was an okay character, but living in her head felt a bit messy! As the story went on I began to realise why she was voluntarily mute, but I kinda wished she’d speak up and stand up for herself a bit, and I hated how women were treated as lesser than the men in Judith’s society. This book was not what I was expecting at all. I was expecting a mystery/ suspense story, and instead I got this strange historical fiction/mystery story. I thought that this would be a mystery about Judith’s disappearance, but instead it seemed to be more about her life after she returned, and the way that people behaved towards her. The writing was also odd. In places I appreciated in, and in others I didn’t. At times it was almost like poetry, whilst at others the odd, choppy, stilted sentences were just irritating. It definitely took time for me to get into this book, and I did eventually begin to catch on to the way the author had written the book, but unfortunately for me, by the time I had begun to appreciate the book, the storyline just went downhill, and I was bored. The ending was actually okay, although I was pleased that the book was shorter than I thought. I was pleased that there was a happy ending, but I can’t say that I really enjoyed getting there. This book was just nothing like what I was expecting, and I think a lot of people will find this difficult to appreciate. I had no idea that this book didn’t have a contemporary setting, and I think a lot of people will feel exactly the same way. Overall; a strange historical fiction story, with a very different writing style. 4.5 out of 10.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Elena

    4.5 stars. This book wasn't what I expected, I think because the cover screams contemporary at me (SO MUCH EYELINER). This isn't contemporary. It's a lovely and dark and heartbreaking and triumphant historical novel about a girl named Judith who is back in her suspicious small town after a prolonged absence during which time who-knows-what happened to her--Judith can't say, since she no longer has a tongue. Judith's mother and brother don't treat her terribly well, and she continues to carry a to 4.5 stars. This book wasn't what I expected, I think because the cover screams contemporary at me (SO MUCH EYELINER). This isn't contemporary. It's a lovely and dark and heartbreaking and triumphant historical novel about a girl named Judith who is back in her suspicious small town after a prolonged absence during which time who-knows-what happened to her--Judith can't say, since she no longer has a tongue. Judith's mother and brother don't treat her terribly well, and she continues to carry a torch for her neighbor, Lucas, who seemed inclined to return her sentiments until she disappeared. Now he's engaged to the town's Mean Girl, but Judith can't help but cling to her crush since he's the bright spot in her otherwise awful existence. This book was very choppy and the style was unusual, things that are usually big book turnoffs for me, but for some reason this book grabbed me and wouldn't let go. Seriously, I stayed up all night to finish it. This book made me cry, cringe, and cheer. I ached in sympathy for Judith, I rooted for her as she fought to overcome all sorts of challenges (including but not limited to: confronting her past, keeping calm in battle, standing up to her mother, embarking on a new friendship, fighting to educate herself against the odds, being brave enough to speak, being brave enough to speak up, giving the smackdown to pedophiles, going after what she wants out of life), and in the end, I wanted to hug her. This is one of those books you want to snuggle when it's over because your emotions have been yanked around so much that you feel that you and the book have been through an ordeal together. Much love. Updated 5/21/14 to add trigger warnings: (view spoiler)[Physical and emotional abuse, extreme sexual harassment, attempted rape (hide spoiler)]

  23. 4 out of 5

    Eilonwy

    Four and a half stars. I was very curious about this book, as Julie Berry's previous two books were more middle-grade-level high fantasies. This is a huge departure from those, from what I can tell -- much more mature and much darker. This story carries huge echoes of the Elizabeth Smart abduction in 2002-2003, and I doubt it's coincidence that Julie Berry is also a Mormon. However, the story has been transported from the modern world to Puritan times, with their rigid focus on propriety and fe Four and a half stars. I was very curious about this book, as Julie Berry's previous two books were more middle-grade-level high fantasies. This is a huge departure from those, from what I can tell -- much more mature and much darker. This story carries huge echoes of the Elizabeth Smart abduction in 2002-2003, and I doubt it's coincidence that Julie Berry is also a Mormon. However, the story has been transported from the modern world to Puritan times, with their rigid focus on propriety and feminine "purity." The first third of this book is absolutely amazing. Judith describes her current life, the time she spent with her abductor, and her witnessing of the murder of a friend in a swirling stream-of-consciousness mix that is eerily beautiful and utterly gripping. I was completely absorbed into this portion of the story -- it's evocative, emotional, and vivid. The rest of the book then becomes more linear and more of a love story, so that opening punch is lost a bit -- but it remains deeply felt and intense as Judith shows the abrasiveness of her daily life as people feel free to talk in front of her as if she is stupid as well as mute, and their assumptions about her sexual status and perceived availability to men. The abrasiveness is softened by the kindness shown towards Judith by another young woman who wishes to be friends, by Judith's brother, and by Lucas. I don't want to say too much else for fear of spoilers. This is a highly unusual, powerful, and heartfelt novel that shows the worst -- and the best -- of human nature. Very strongly recommended.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Tee loves Kyle Jacobson

    Okay first off I am going to say that this book was a weird read for me and for this I gave it a five.I mean the world was set up where it was kinda strict and the people who lived in this town were prudes and they had set ways of doing things and for that I am not going to lie I was like WTF am I reading????????? But then I continued on and the book really started to pick up and held me captive until the very last page where it left me with more questions than answers. So I know I will be readi Okay first off I am going to say that this book was a weird read for me and for this I gave it a five.I mean the world was set up where it was kinda strict and the people who lived in this town were prudes and they had set ways of doing things and for that I am not going to lie I was like WTF am I reading????????? But then I continued on and the book really started to pick up and held me captive until the very last page where it left me with more questions than answers. So I know I will be reading this book again when it comes out because I feel like I missed something while I was reading and being all mad at some of the characters I did miss somethings. This is such a strange story about a girl Judith and her best friend who were kidnapped. After two years Judith comes back and is unable to speak because she was tortured and an unspeakable act has been done to her. Being totally mutilated and unable to speak Judith is treated like an outcast and even her teacher who is a filthy disgusting pig does something to her and she can't speak so it goes away like it never happened. But one bright spot in Judith's crazy life is her love for Lucas. She is crushing on him so bad and at first Lucas does not know about her crush but eventually he finds out. Lucas is a great character and what happens after he finds out Judith likes him is the crux of the story and I will not spoil it for anyone but this is a must read because stuff starts popping off!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Brigid ✩

    3.5 Stars Hmm, this was an interesting one. It really wasn't what I was expecting, so that was cool. The style of it was unique and engaging––although the super-short chapters and use of second person were sometimes a bit irritating, I thought they still worked most of the time. I found the characters a little lacking and the end felt rushed to me (and maybe not very realistic, either). But over all I thought it was a memorable and intriguing book, and different from anything I've read in a while 3.5 Stars Hmm, this was an interesting one. It really wasn't what I was expecting, so that was cool. The style of it was unique and engaging––although the super-short chapters and use of second person were sometimes a bit irritating, I thought they still worked most of the time. I found the characters a little lacking and the end felt rushed to me (and maybe not very realistic, either). But over all I thought it was a memorable and intriguing book, and different from anything I've read in a while. Longer review coming eventually!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ariel

    A solid story, likeable characters, and a good theme. It was good. It wasn't, however, outstanding, or particularly original. That's the thing about a 3-star read. For me it means that I did like it, that maybe I didn't even have that many problems with it, but that overall, when everything is taken into account, I don't have much to say. I actually read the majority of this in one sitting - it's interesting, for sure, but it didn't inspire me to run out ant talk about it. Honestly I'm dragging t A solid story, likeable characters, and a good theme. It was good. It wasn't, however, outstanding, or particularly original. That's the thing about a 3-star read. For me it means that I did like it, that maybe I didn't even have that many problems with it, but that overall, when everything is taken into account, I don't have much to say. I actually read the majority of this in one sitting - it's interesting, for sure, but it didn't inspire me to run out ant talk about it. Honestly I'm dragging this review out trying to think of something valuable to say!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Katherine

    ”I don’t believe in miracles, but if the need is great, a girl might make her own miracle. Even if that means enlisting the devil’s help.” I hate it when this happens. I hate it when I don’t like a book that everyone else seems to love. Does anyone else feel that way? It makes me want to personally apologize to it. And get into a big spiel about how it’s me and not them. Especially when you scroll through three pages of reviews and come to the slow realization that your rating will probably be th ”I don’t believe in miracles, but if the need is great, a girl might make her own miracle. Even if that means enlisting the devil’s help.” I hate it when this happens. I hate it when I don’t like a book that everyone else seems to love. Does anyone else feel that way? It makes me want to personally apologize to it. And get into a big spiel about how it’s me and not them. Especially when you scroll through three pages of reviews and come to the slow realization that your rating will probably be the lowest of the bunch. The premise sounded so interesting, and was quite possibly the only good thing about this book. A girl and her friend disappear in the woods and only one of them comes back, but unable to speak because her captor cut her tongue out. A social pariah among her town, she pours out her unspoken thoughts and feelings to her childhood friend and unrequited love Lucas. ”No one calls me by my name. Young children do not know it. I remind myself each day at sunrise, lest one day I forget. Judith is my name.” This book couldn’t decide what time period it wanted to be in. This probably doesn’t bug a lot of people, and normally it doesn’t bug me. But there were so many different elements of different time periods that I was completely confused as to when (and more specifically where), this book was set. The prologue gives off the vibe that it’s set in pre-colonial America. The hints of homestead life make it sound like we’re in the 1800s (possibly 1840s-1860s, if I had to take an educated guess). Towards the middle there’s a war going on, making it seem like it’s taking place in the 1700s. With a 200 year timespan in which I could make an educated guess on when this takes place doesn’t make it very clear, does it? For a historical buff such as myself, mishmashing time periods don’t sit well with me when they aren’t explicitly stated. Secondly, the book perpetrates to be one thing, but I got a totally different vibe. I was expecting this to be more of a psychological mystery as to who (or what), took Judith and her friend into the woods. Maybe I was also expecting a tale of vigilante vengeance as Judith seeks justice for her best friend and herself. But that never happened. What I did get was a lot of teenage bemoaning how Lucas doesn’t love her. Which you’ll hear about over... ”You are the sun in my world, and how can I endure to watch you set into another woman’s arms?” And over... ”All the other little broken hearts- and there are bound to be many- will burn on the altar to your youthful beauty and love. It’s thin comfort to think I’m not alone in my woe.” And over... ”We came here by ship, you and I. I remember my mother telling tales of the trip when I was young. Now she never speaks of it at all. She said I spent the whole trip wide-eyed, watching you.” Again. It got to the point where it became rather ridiculous. Which leads me to the third and final problem. This book is told in second person POV. Since Judith can’t speak, she’s telling the story, in her head, to Lucas, her childhood friend and crush. It’s like an old-timey version of Lucy and Schroeder from the Peanuts comic strips. Second person POV is extremely tough to pull off in terms of writing, and few books can pull it off well. In some cases, it works. Unfortunately, in this case, it comes off more stalkerish than something groundbreaking, or adding something new to the story. What should be a sweet, unrequited love story comes off as a teenage girl completely obsessed, from sneaking out of her own house to watch him leave his house, ”I watched your cabin as long as I could before I had to hurry back, lest Mother notice me missing.” to waxing fairly poetic, thinly veiled threats against his intended, ”Will she? Will her soft hands spin your wool, and bind your wheat into sheaves, and pluck the grubs off your potatoes? Will her china face turn bronze beside you as you labor in your fields?” , and finally going full on Heathcliff from Wuthering Heights on the poor kid by offering to commit suicide and haunt him for the rest of his days. ”I would leave this errand, follow the horses, and fly to your side. If you’d let me, I’d kiss away your fear, and let you rest yourself upon me, and I, I would die beside you and count myself lucky.” So romantic, I know. In short, this book has the barest inklings of being a beautiful masterpiece but ends up being a convoluted mess. Warring time periods, failed usage of second person POV, a misleading premise, and a character who is more interested in getting her crush to notice and love her instead of finding justice for herself and her dead best friend make this a disappointing read.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Liz Janet

    Do not be disconcerted over the rating I gave this book, because I do believe everyone should read it, however, sadly, this book was missing some elements that would have made it more worthwhile for myself. Basically this is a book combining a bunch of things that should have never worked but did anyways. Look at where the title comes from : “To tell the truth will make me loathsome in your eyes. Even more than I already am. I pledge to give you all the truth that’s in me. And you want me to tell y Do not be disconcerted over the rating I gave this book, because I do believe everyone should read it, however, sadly, this book was missing some elements that would have made it more worthwhile for myself. Basically this is a book combining a bunch of things that should have never worked but did anyways. Look at where the title comes from : “To tell the truth will make me loathsome in your eyes. Even more than I already am. I pledge to give you all the truth that’s in me. And you want me to tell you this.” Judith and her best friend disappeared from their small town four years ago, and two years passed before only Judith was seen again. But she has returned with her tongue cut out, and everyone ignores her, unaware of the evil that did such a thing to her. But bad things are coming about to the town, and it is time for everyone to hear her voice. Main reasons why this book was not for me: -The resolution seemed to simple considering all endured throughout the novel. -Certain fragments in which the story is mostly told. -The second person narrative was not as great as it could have been. -The timeline, I am not a big fan of America at the time the novel takes place, it simply is not the time nor place I like to read my stories. Main reasons to read it nonetheless: -Puritan folk that are not really good, but rather judgmental, as per historical context, it seemed very keen on keeping people as they most likely were back then. I hate Puritans, well in the historical sense, they were judgmental and self-righteous, and Julie Berry kept them to this level instead of making them the angels they are sometimes presented as. -A mother’s cruelty and what the main character finds through it. Second-person story-telling was actually not bad, it could have been better, but it was very good. Lucas, my poor little farm boy. He is not the overly hot and very sexually aware man-child depicted in loads of Young-Adult literature (it would be weird if he were anyways) but he is a character with personality, and a blind eye when it comes to Judith’s feelings for him. I want to knock some sense in to him. -The romance, in this case, childhood romance, and how messed up it turns out to be according to other aspects, but how it triumphs in the end. There is also the detail that sometimes how we imagine certain people to be is not the pinnacle of their true selves, and that love should not blind us. -A child/teen that might suffer from PTSD overcoming it, or more likely, fighting through it to create a life for herself. -This quote: “There is a curious comfort in letting go. After the agony, letting go brings numbness, and after the numbness, clarity. As if I can see the world for the first time, and my place in it, independent of you, a whole vista of what may be. Even if it is not grand or inspiring, it is real and solid, unlike the fantasy I’ve built around you. I will do this. I will triumph over you.” -The point that sometimes friendships can save people, no matter how they were formed, but rather what they bring to a broken down person. -A disabled character. I mean it is far from perfect, since her disability kind of dominates her at the beginning (understandably so), but also, her disability does not stop her in the end, and with the lack of diversity in literature for young people, this seemed like an improvement. -When Judith chooses to go back to school, a respectful member of this society makes a pass at her, showing that if she wants to better herself, he will want some payment. See? There are more reasons to read it, so give it a shot, it might just tickle your fancy. I am going to leave you with two questions: 1-Can anyone truly hear you if you have no voice? 2-Or do people not hear you because they choose not to?

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jeann (Happy Indulgence)

    This review has been cross-posted on my blog, Happy Indulgence. Check it out for more reviews! Actual Rating: 3.5 All The Truth That's In Me is a hauntingly beautiful tale about Judith, a girl who went missing with her best friend and returned 2 years later with half her tongue cut out and mute. The tale is a tragic, chilling, and touching as Judith learns to deal with the past and rebuild herself as a respected person. Everyone treats Judith as if she's a ghost, as the townspeople assume that she' This review has been cross-posted on my blog, Happy Indulgence. Check it out for more reviews! Actual Rating: 3.5 All The Truth That's In Me is a hauntingly beautiful tale about Judith, a girl who went missing with her best friend and returned 2 years later with half her tongue cut out and mute. The tale is a tragic, chilling, and touching as Judith learns to deal with the past and rebuild herself as a respected person. Everyone treats Judith as if she's a ghost, as the townspeople assume that she's either stupid or pretend she isn't there, despite being a bright, observant young girl in the past. The treatment of Judith is tearjerkingly sad, cruel at times, and just heart breaking as we witness the townspeople ignoring her, her mother barely acknowledging her, and a schoolmaster wanting to take advantage of her. These people are almost too cruel to be believable, I'm so glad for the one character Maria because otherwise it would be too horrible to bear. Judith puts up a mental barrier for the horrors that has happened to her and her best friend Lottie, and the mystery behind her ill treatment and her friend's death are slowly revealed throughout the book. We don't get any immediate answers for Judith's trauma and the mystery is dragged out until the end of the book as Judith finally warms up to recalling her memories. The story is told in a poetic, disjointed fashion that takes a bit of getting used to, but is in a art form in itself. It is written entirely in the second perspective, addressed towards Lucas, a boy she was in love with before the tragedy happened. The story isn't cohesive as snippets of information are delivered bit by bit, and we don't get a full picture of what is happening. I enjoyed the literary experience that this poetic, obscure novel provides and Julie Berry definitely knows what story she wants to tell here. I could imagine the book to be studied as a literary art, much like The Book Thief. While I enjoyed the poetic, chilling nature of All The Truth That's In Me, I found Judith's behaviour towards her tormentor difficult to believe. We find out who he is early on and strangely returns to him for help midway through the book. Even though she's been mutilated and abused by this man (which is a crime in itself), Judith still relies on the man. There was no rape involved, but the book somehow leads us to believe that what this man did was honourable. I don't care who you are, or what your intentions were, but child molesting and mutilation is not ok. It's a sad story, full of horrible, unsympathetic people and men with questionable intentions. But it's also one that is haunting, chilling and beautiful one as Judith slowly develops strength and confidence (and perhaps even love) to overcome her speech challenges and become acknowledged as a person again. Overall, an interesting debut with interesting prose and direction, but although the novel is dark, raw and doesn't hold anything back. If you have the patience for unusual prose and second person narration, it's definitely worth reading for how different and beautiful it is. Thank you to HarperCollins Australia for the opportunity to provide an honest review of All The Truth That's In Me.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Allisa White

    Second time was even better! Such a beautiful, heart-wrenching, uplifting story! *** Oh. My. Word. I can't stop thinking about this book. That wonderful tingling after reading something AMAZING is there. I don't want it to ever stop. Julie Berry is truly a genius. I've read her two others for youth, The Amaranth Enchantment and The Secondhand Charm. I loved them both, but not like this. This is my favorite. There was so much energy and feeling and mystery inside of it that I'm left feeling raw. I Second time was even better! Such a beautiful, heart-wrenching, uplifting story! *** Oh. My. Word. I can't stop thinking about this book. That wonderful tingling after reading something AMAZING is there. I don't want it to ever stop. Julie Berry is truly a genius. I've read her two others for youth, The Amaranth Enchantment and The Secondhand Charm. I loved them both, but not like this. This is my favorite. There was so much energy and feeling and mystery inside of it that I'm left feeling raw. I started crying after I finished this book. That has never happened before. But this book is so good I can't wait to see what people think when it arrives on the shelves of bookstores everywhere. September 26, 2013. Four years ago, Judith and her friend Lottie disappeared. Lottie turned up dead and Judith was found two years later with half her tongue cut out. She can't speak, and doesn't try. Her mother doesn't call her by name and everyone fears her. No one knows what happens for she can't speak. This is a story of growth on Judith's part and the growth of others. You get to see friendship, love, tragedy, all bundled up in one. It's one giant suspenseful murder story/love story that just couldn't be put down. I was up half the night reading this. Judith is definitely on my official top female protagonists list. She has a major flaw, she can't speak. She's so observant and knows what others think of her. Yet, the trials she faces are so realistic and draws you inside the story even more. I cried for her, laughed for her, was appalled with her. Every emotion she felt, I felt. Judith is such a sweetheart. I love every character (or hated the others who needed to be hated) in this book. They all had a part, whether to make me mad, appalled, or make me extremely happy. The character development in this book is extreme. Now before sending you off, I'll give you a little heads up (no spoilers :D). This book has a very interesting style. First of all, the POV is written in a mix of 1st and 2nd person. Yes, 2ND PERSON. You don't get that at all these days. It really caught me off guard and it took some time to adjust to the mix of POV. Despite that, it worked! I really enjoyed it! This book actually feels more like a letter format more than anything because of the POV. Judith is speaking to Lucas, her love. It took me a tad bit to realize this, but her emotion and pure love toward him is real and quite substantial. Judith switches in between memories and present time pretty often, which can be a little disorienting, but it was easy to decipher. If you get confused, just read the passage again and you will figure it out. I can't give Julie Berry enough praise for this book. Happy readings everyone! :D

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