Hot Best Seller

Кэрри (Стивен Кинг – Сочинения #1)

Availability: Ready to download

Права на настоящее издание приобретены редакцией журнала «Огонек» у Стивена Кинга через литературное агентство Эндрю Нюрнберга.


Compare

Права на настоящее издание приобретены редакцией журнала «Огонек» у Стивена Кинга через литературное агентство Эндрю Нюрнберга.

30 review for Кэрри (Стивен Кинг – Сочинения #1)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    I want to start a shelf of "books-that-traumatized-me-as-a-child-with-stories-of-girls-who-just-could-not-stop-gushing-blood-Down-There," but I can't think of any others besides this and Bell Jar. I know in Are You There God, It's Me Margaret they just couldn't stop TALKING about it, but I think that was different, more just perplexing and annoying than actually traumatic. Any suggestions? Um, BTW, this book is AMAZING. I should give it more than three stars. There! Done. Four! This is one of thos I want to start a shelf of "books-that-traumatized-me-as-a-child-with-stories-of-girls-who-just-could-not-stop-gushing-blood-Down-There," but I can't think of any others besides this and Bell Jar. I know in Are You There God, It's Me Margaret they just couldn't stop TALKING about it, but I think that was different, more just perplexing and annoying than actually traumatic. Any suggestions? Um, BTW, this book is AMAZING. I should give it more than three stars. There! Done. Four! This is one of those books where you're just like, DUDE, how did you even come UP with these THOUGHTS? I mean, I think we take it all for granted now but honestly, this book is amazing. I mean, there's just so MUCH, from the scary religious fanatic mom to the pig's blood to the downed telephone wires to the..... I haven't read this in a hundred years, but I remember many scenes in it so vividly, and not just because of the movie (which is, of course, also great). I really think this took a lot of guts to write. I mean, the girls' locker room scene, come ON, I mean, who did he think he WAS when he WROTE that? I think he was still drinking then. He must have been. How much guts would that take, to be like, "I'm this guy and I'm going to write this completely balls-out preposterous scene of what I imagine it could be like inside a high school girls' locker room, even though I obviously have NO IDEA. Oh, yeah, and this unpopular naked teenage girl's going to be in there getting her period for the first time, and it's going to be INSANE. Insanely bloody, that's what it's gonna be! Yeah, that's right, blood EVERYWHERE. It's a horror novel! I'm gonna start out with gore! What could possibly be more disgusting and disturbing than bleeding out of one's most private orifice? Well, I'm sure I have no idea what that's like, really can't imagine it, the whole idea sounds totally crazy to me, that such a gross thing would happen to anyone... but being inside a girls' locker room, wow, well that really sounds intense too. Though come to think of it, I have no idea what THAT would realistically be like either! So yeah, but I'm gonna write this scene anyway, gushing blood and mean naked high school girls and it's going to be COMPETELY @#*%ing CRAZY." And he did. And it was. But it WORKED. This novel was insane and fearless and obviously written by someone who had this story in him that needed to gush out like Carrie's menstrual blood and crazy telekinetic angst. This is one of the books I think of when I get depressed about the idea of workshopped writing and the internal observing critic and all the rest of that limiting quality-control type stuff. Sometimes people need to tell the nasally fact-checkers in their fevered brains to sit down and shut up, and drown out the voices of reason and temperance so they can let the wild stuff come out, and when they do, that's when they write Carrie. Is this the Classic of Western Literature? No, not by most people's standards, and definitely not by mine. But it is a damn good story, and I'm glad he told it!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Luca Ambrosino

    English (Carrie)/ Italiano «News item from the Westover (Me) Weekly Enterprise, August 19, 1966: RAIN OF STONES REPORTED It was reliably reported by several persons that a rain of stones fell from a clear blue sky on Carlin Street in the town of Chamberlin on 17th August. The stones feel principally on the home of Mrs Margaret White, damaging the roof extensively and ruining two gutters and a downspout valued at $25. Mrs White, a widow, lives with her three year old daughter, Carrieta»Carrie is a t English (Carrie)/ Italiano «News item from the Westover (Me) Weekly Enterprise, August 19, 1966: RAIN OF STONES REPORTED It was reliably reported by several persons that a rain of stones fell from a clear blue sky on Carlin Street in the town of Chamberlin on 17th August. The stones feel principally on the home of Mrs Margaret White, damaging the roof extensively and ruining two gutters and a downspout valued at $25. Mrs White, a widow, lives with her three year old daughter, Carrieta»Carrie is a teenager chasing an ordinary life, never able to catch it. This is not due to her telekinetic powers, the problem has far more to do with her mother, a person that we will define religious zealot, to say the least. Consequence: Carrie is definitely fringe at school, she is constantly bullied. And unfortunately Carrie is about to reach her breaking point...A history of bullying, a topic that the author describes so well also in many other pages, in my opinion. Object of the abuse each time is a character who, in the eyes of many, seems weird. The beautiful paradox of this novel is that, to other kids, Carrie's weird thing is not telekinesis. She always managed to bury this talent. Carrie's marginalisation simply results from her mum's fundamentalism, her real nemesis. It's not an horror novel: it's a drama, plain and simple.I was expecting a bit green work, something testifying this is the first published novel of one of the most prolific author I know (and one of my favorites). But no. Carrie is a beautiful piece of art not because filled with that rough beauty typical of early works, revealing a blooming talent. No. This novel is a beautiful piece of art, that's all.Vote: 8,5 «Notizia di cronaca riportata dal settimanale Enterprise di Westover (Maine) il 19 agosto 1966: PIOGGIA DI PIETRE. Ci viene riferito che una pioggia di pietre è caduta da un cielo perfettamente sereno su Carlin Street, nella città di Chamberlain, il 17 agosto. Diverse persone sarebbero state testimoni. Le pietre sono cadute sulla casa della signora Margaret White, rovinando gravemente il tetto e sfondando due grondaie e un tubo di scolo per un danno di circa 25 dollari. La signora White, vedova, abita nella casa di Grin Street con la figlioletta di tre anni, Carrie»Carrie è una ragazzina che insegue una vita normale, senza mai raggiungerla. E questo non perché dotata di poteri telecinetici, ma perché si ritrova per madre una persona che a volerla definire fanatica per il suo modo di interpretare la religione cattolica significa farle un complimento. Conseguenza: Carrie a scuola è un'emarginata, viene costantemente bullizzata. E purtroppo, Carrie sta per raggiungere il limite di sopportazione...Torna uno dei temi secondo me più cari all'autore, presente spesso in molte sue pagine: il bullismo. Oggetto delle prevaricazioni altrui è ogni volta un personaggio che agli occhi di molti appare strano, diverso. Il bellissimo paradosso di questo romanzo è che per gli altri ragazzi la stranezza di Carrie non sta nella telecinesi. Questo talento è sempre riuscita a tenerlo nascosto. L'emarginazione di Carrie deriva più semplicemente dal fondamentalismo della madre, la sua vera nemesi. Più che horror, questo è un dramma bello e buono.Mi aspettavo un'opera un po' acerba, che testimoniasse insomma di essere il primo romanzo ad essere pubblicato da uno degli autori più prolifici che io conosca (nonché uno dei miei preferiti). E invece no. Carrie è un'opera bella non perché dotata di quella bellezza grezza delle opere prime, che lasciano intravedere un talento che sta per esplodere. No. Questo romanzo è bello e basta.Voto: 8.5

  3. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

    I have decided to go back and reread all the Stephen King books as audiobooks this time. Ones I have read recently or that I have already reread I may not do. I am starting at the very beginning with Carrie which I originally read on Kindle in 2014. You might be saying, ”But, Matthew, that was his first book! You didn’t read it for the first time until 2014!?” There are a couple of reasons for that: 1. Carrie is referenced a lot in pop culture. Growing up in the 80s and 90s you really didn’t need I have decided to go back and reread all the Stephen King books as audiobooks this time. Ones I have read recently or that I have already reread I may not do. I am starting at the very beginning with Carrie which I originally read on Kindle in 2014. You might be saying, ”But, Matthew, that was his first book! You didn’t read it for the first time until 2014!?” There are a couple of reasons for that: 1. Carrie is referenced a lot in pop culture. Growing up in the 80s and 90s you really didn’t need to read Carrie to know the story. 2. I did have a paperback copy once (mid 90s or so). It fell apart when I was part way through. I didn’t get back to it until 2014. I know, I know . . . serious procrastination! Well, I have now read it twice and it really is quite an amazing book. Lots of suspense and terrifying scenes crammed into a small package. In the intro, King said that he was working on this as a short story when it expanded into a novel – and I can see that. He was mainly a short story guy at the time, but a bit more started pouring out and he just couldn’t stop! It’s amazing to think the same guy that started with short stories and short novels ended up writing books like The Stand and It! One thing that I think people who do not read King but who only know him as the master of horror through movies and hearsay are missing a lot. He is not just horror. Certainly there are many horrific scenarios in Carrie, but there is so much in there about humanity; how we treat each other and how our actions toward others may have a wider effect than expected. In a world where we are starting to treat other people more poorly than ever, Carrie could serve as a cautionary tale if you don’t just look at it as a creepy horror novel. King started here, so should you? Carrie is not usually a book I recommend to people wanting to try King for the first time. I am not sure why this is, but I usually recommend The Dead Zone or Pet Sematary. After my second time through, I stand by this. I think that Carrie is something to try out after you have given a few of his other books a try. But, you can try it first, too, probably doesn’t matter – it is just my gut feeling that you should wait!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Dita

    Poor Carrie, all she wants is to be normal. Instead, she has telekinesis, a balls-on nuts mom, and a school full of bullies to deal with daily. Her peers are hideous; particularly Tommy, who I picture as a douchebag who wears sunglasses inside, refers to girls as "bitties", and has his wallet attached to his pants by a chain he bought at Hot Topic. We all know the type. His girlfriend sucks too but she seems more a product of horrible parenting and peer pressure. I don't know, maybe I am going to Poor Carrie, all she wants is to be normal. Instead, she has telekinesis, a balls-on nuts mom, and a school full of bullies to deal with daily. Her peers are hideous; particularly Tommy, who I picture as a douchebag who wears sunglasses inside, refers to girls as "bitties", and has his wallet attached to his pants by a chain he bought at Hot Topic. We all know the type. His girlfriend sucks too but she seems more a product of horrible parenting and peer pressure. I don't know, maybe I am going too easy on her...Carrie doesn't. : ) Anyway, Carrie has had enough and flexes her new power in the Stephen Kingyest of ways. It's brilliant....every time I read it. This time I had the pleasure of Sissy Spacek reading it to me as I ran around for the last two days.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Alejandro

    Everybody is invited to the Prom Dance! THAT ENDING THAT YOU'RE EXPECTING... It's very interesting to read Carrie finally. I have watched the Brian de Palma's adaptation, so I wasn't unfamiliar with what would happen. However, the way as Stephen King wrote this book was in such great way that the novel is still engaging not matter if you already know the main highlights. There are some books that if you knew what will happen...kaput! All the fun was spoiled and you won't get interested on readin Everybody is invited to the Prom Dance! THAT ENDING THAT YOU'RE EXPECTING... It's very interesting to read Carrie finally. I have watched the Brian de Palma's adaptation, so I wasn't unfamiliar with what would happen. However, the way as Stephen King wrote this book was in such great way that the novel is still engaging not matter if you already know the main highlights. There are some books that if you knew what will happen...kaput! All the fun was spoiled and you won't get interested on reading the book. BUT in here, Stephen King gave you the highlights right away. You haven't advanced even few pages and you already know that Carrie White has Telekinetic powers and something really bad happened in the Prom Night. THE BOOK WHICH STARTED STEPHEN KING'S CAREER I think that it's the best testimony to Stephen King's genius in this, his very first novel (the first to be published but in reality the fourth that he wrote). He wasn't able to know then that the book will became a success and a staple book in the horror genre, however thinking that that will happen, it is clever not waiting long in the narrative to give the main highlights. Since if before, you still have to get spoiled of key events in stories,... ...nowadays with internet, social networks, online news, chatting forums, etc... it's really REALLY HARD to avoid getting spoiled when something that became so successful. But with Stephen King's debut published novel? No sweat, you can read almost 40 years later the novel, knowing ahead the story, and still you get engaged into the book due the great management of the author on the presentation of the story. UNUSUAL BUT BRILLIANT NARRATIVE STYLE Maybe, nowadays, it could be a pretty standard way to tell the story, but 40 years ago? Visionary style! The narrative plays with "current" events in the story with excerpts of supposed books and documents written in the "future" of the story. Even you have to take in account that the very novel is kinda an alternate history story due that it's set in "1979" but the publication was on 1974, and there are many references on the supposed investigative books there with dates even more in the future. Other powerful element on Carrie is that its main topic is still as relevant now than in 1974, since that topic is BULLLYING. The bullying is main trigger in the story and you can't deny that it's a topic that, sadly, is the same as important now (if not more) than in 1974. Because of that, Carrie didn't age and it didn't lose its appealing to new readers. I think that main storyline and plot are well set and developed. GETTING INTO THEIR SKINS My only complains would be in the character developing area, and/or the justification of some actions. I say this that while the "evil" characters like Chris Hargensen and Billy Nolan are satisfying developed and with really interesting reactions of both. In the case of Miss Dejardin and Sue Snell, I think that they could use a better setting of their motivations to help Carrie White and not a sudden impulse of being good samaritans. More interaction between Carrie White and her mother could be appreciated. Changing to other subjects... I think that it's a general misconception that Carrie White went insane, crazy, etc... Oh, no, no, my friends. She wasn't crazy. A crazy person don't think in a clear way and it's obvious that Carry once she unleashed her rage, she took steps to protect her work that a crazy person wouldn't do. Of course, I am not saying that Carrie was a "sane" person. Definitely she was a psychopathic person that it's waaaaay different than a "crazy person". Even some events in her confrontation with her mother and later her encounter with Sue Snell, leave clear evidence that Carrie White was thinking in a certain level of "rational logic", maybe irrational for you but when you try to think what could mean to be Carrie White... ...you can realize why some "odd" events, have all the logic in the odd world of Carrie. Changing the subject again. (Please, indulge me, I promise that's the last time) The novel even leave a certain open frame for a potential sequel. Forty years later, you could think that that would never happens, BUT seeing a recently published sequel for The Shining,... ...so anything can happens.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Laz

    “People don't get better, they just get smarter. When you get smarter you don't stop pulling the wings off flies, you just think of better reasons for doing it.” This is pizza, the freaky flavor. I loved how intertwined with religion it was. Not churches and stuff like that. I mean hardcore stuff about the point where religion stops being religion and transforms into fanaticism and how a person can drive themselves crazy with it, especially if you already have the tendency towards the crazy. And “People don't get better, they just get smarter. When you get smarter you don't stop pulling the wings off flies, you just think of better reasons for doing it.” This is pizza, the freaky flavor. I loved how intertwined with religion it was. Not churches and stuff like that. I mean hardcore stuff about the point where religion stops being religion and transforms into fanaticism and how a person can drive themselves crazy with it, especially if you already have the tendency towards the crazy. And Margaret White definitely had the tendency towards craziness. She’s a prejudiced, maniacal, insane person who believes that women are constantly living in sin because of their gender. Sex is poison, sexual pleasure is a sin. When she got pregnant she tried to kill the baby. Now, after 17 years she self-harms herself to stop her daughter from disobeying her like a nice little sheep. Carrie is the kind of girl who gets period and thinks she’s bleeding to death. Yes, that’s what happens when you have no friends, or people to stand by you or a mother who’s supportive and can guide you through stuff like this. Every time, Carrie commits a sin, she’s forced by Margaret to get locked inside a closet until she’s repented for her sins by asking for forgiveness. If you’ve seen the movie – or better yet, the movies – then you’re all too familiar with the plot and what happens. What’s worth the mention though, it’s the fact that while, I, too, was familiar with the plot I felt like reading something new, something I’d never heard or seen before and that’s the magic of Mr. King’s writing. The way he combines the past with the present and horror seems all too real. It’s mouth-watering and it leaves you wanting more and more of that horror and terror. It’s a small enough novel, it’ll take you no time at all to read it. So, if you’ve seen the movies then don’t be hesitant about it. Just do it. You won’t regret it.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    “Jesus watches from the wall, But his face is cold as stone, And if he loves me As she tells me Why do I feel so all alone?” I remember watching the movie when I was very little, I was pretty much petrified by it. The image of a poor girl covered in pig blood, going on a killing spree haunted me, and here I am today reading it for the first time awfully distraught and yet incredibly mesmerized by King's writing. No wonder he is where he is today. A true genius!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Dan Schwent

    Outcast Carrie White has a secret. She's telekinetic. When a popular girl's boyfriend invites her to prom as atonement, she accepts, completely unaware of the horrors lurking on the horizon... Carrie is Stephen King's first novel and has been part of our cultural landscape since it was made into a movie in the late 1970s. Somehow, I've escaped reading it or seeing the movie until now. I knew (or thought I knew) most of the wrinkles of the plot going in, due to sai King's On Writing: A Memoir of t Outcast Carrie White has a secret. She's telekinetic. When a popular girl's boyfriend invites her to prom as atonement, she accepts, completely unaware of the horrors lurking on the horizon... Carrie is Stephen King's first novel and has been part of our cultural landscape since it was made into a movie in the late 1970s. Somehow, I've escaped reading it or seeing the movie until now. I knew (or thought I knew) most of the wrinkles of the plot going in, due to sai King's On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft and numerous cultural references over the years. Carrie is told using an interesting structure, alternating passages from Carrie's timeline as it unfolds and excepts from accounts of what happened at the prom in the far future. The structure reminded me of Not Comin' Home to You at times. I think Block did it better. The story itself is pretty good. It's a story of rejection, acceptance, betrayal, and bloody, horrible vengeance. It very much feels like a first novel, over written in places, but there's still a certain Kingliness to it. While I wouldn't say I disliked the story, I wasn't in love with it. It feels like a novellette that was padded to bring up to novel length to me. Maybe it's because I already knew where the story was headed, both because of the structure and because it's been part of our pop culture for so long, I just wasn't hooked by it. The ending was much more horrific than I thought it would be, though. The rampage was by far the best part of the book. Possible connection with another Stephen King story: Teddy DuChamp, owner of Teddy's Amoco, is mentioned as having died in 1968 but his son still locks up the gas pumps. The age doesn't seem right for Teddy DuChamp of The Body, though. I'm glad Stephen King broke into the business with Carrie but it just wasn't my bucket of pigs' blood. Two out of five stars.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Erin

    Carrie is Stephen King's debut novel and you can tell. That's not "shade" because Carrie is still fucking great but as a "Constant Reader" I could see how his writing has improved over the years. I first read Carrie when I was 13 or 14 years old and it was my first King book. Back then I would've giving it 10 Stars because I absolutely loved it. I watched the movie (the original) and I raided my sister's (she's a huge King fan) King collection and while everyone else my age was reading Harry Pot Carrie is Stephen King's debut novel and you can tell. That's not "shade" because Carrie is still fucking great but as a "Constant Reader" I could see how his writing has improved over the years. I first read Carrie when I was 13 or 14 years old and it was my first King book. Back then I would've giving it 10 Stars because I absolutely loved it. I watched the movie (the original) and I raided my sister's (she's a huge King fan) King collection and while everyone else my age was reading Harry Potter I was reading The Shining & The Stand. Carrie is about a weird teenage girl who's mother is obviously severely mentally ill and who at school is constantly bullied. Carrie has a special "gift"? She has Telekinetic powers. Carrie is a horror novel with Sci Fi mixed in but I consider this one of Uncle Stevie's more realistic novels. Substitute telekinesis for a gun and Carrie is just as horrifying if not more because every week a kid takes a gun to school and violence follows. Carrie has a hellish family life and she's bullied non-stop at school, Carrie is a ticking time bomb. Stephen King is so good at writing stories about bullied or mistreated people. In the forward to this book he talks about the 2 girls he went to school with that inspired Carrie. These girls were weird and shy and because of that they were bullied. Uncle Stevie laments the fact that while he wasn't a bully he also never stood up for them. So he wrote Carrie as a way of sort of giving them their revenge. Carrie isn't in my opinion Stephen King's best novel but I think its a good gateway novel to get you started on your King addiction.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Scarlet

    Don’t let the brevity of this book fool you. Carrie may be one of King’s less thick books but right from the scandalous opening scene to the very last page, it’s a relentlessly harrowing read. King pieces together Carrie's story through a series of reports and articles concerning a telekinetic catastrophe in Maine. I knew how terrible the end would be before it even happened, so reading the book was an excruciating experience - the dread just kept building page after page, I could see what everyt Don’t let the brevity of this book fool you. Carrie may be one of King’s less thick books but right from the scandalous opening scene to the very last page, it’s a relentlessly harrowing read. King pieces together Carrie's story through a series of reports and articles concerning a telekinetic catastrophe in Maine. I knew how terrible the end would be before it even happened, so reading the book was an excruciating experience - the dread just kept building page after page, I could see what everything was leading to, I knew how easily avoidable it was, but there was nothing I could do except watch the dominoes fall one after the other. And once the horror of it wore off, the tragedy of it sunk in. Yes, tragedy. Because more than anything, Carrie is a very sad story of bullying gone too far. Carrie's life is miserable - whether at home, where she's oppressed by her religion-obsessed mother, or at school, where she's relentlessly bullied by her peers. I was scared, not of Carrie but for Carrie. My heart went out to her and in the end, when the finale played out, a tiny part of me may even have rooted for her. Carrie won't give me nightmares, but it's left me emotionally drained and heartbroken - not something I expect from a genre like horror. Quite an impressive start to my foray into SK territory, I must say.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    Carrie, Stephen King Carrie is a novel by American author Stephen King. It was his first published novel, released on April 5, 1974. It revolves around the eponymous Carrie White, an unpopular friendless misfit and bullied high school girl who uses her newly discovered telekinetic powers to exact revenge on those who torment her. While in this process, she causes one of the worst local disasters the town has ever had. King has commented that he finds the work to be "raw" and "with a surprising po Carrie, Stephen King Carrie is a novel by American author Stephen King. It was his first published novel, released on April 5, 1974. It revolves around the eponymous Carrie White, an unpopular friendless misfit and bullied high school girl who uses her newly discovered telekinetic powers to exact revenge on those who torment her. While in this process, she causes one of the worst local disasters the town has ever had. King has commented that he finds the work to be "raw" and "with a surprising power to hurt and horrify." It is one of the most frequently banned books in United States schools. Much of the book uses newspaper clippings, magazine articles, letters, and excerpts from books to tell how Carrie destroyed the fictional town of Chamberlain, Maine while exacting revenge on her sadistic classmates and her own mother Margaret. تاریخ نخستین خوانش: روز بیست و هشتم ماه ژانویه سال 2014 میلادی عنوان: کری؛ نویسنده: استیون کینگ؛ مترجم: بهاره ملازم؛ تهران، افراز، 1390؛ ئدر 280 ص؛ شابک: 9789642435821؛ موضوع: داستانهای ترسناک از نویسندگان امریکایی - سده 20 م داستان بلوغ و قدرت‌های فرابشری «کری وایت» است، کری وایت، دختر خجالتی و کمروی مدرسه، به شدت از سوی دوستانش مورد تمسخر قرار میگیرد. او در خانه هم با مادری به شدت مذهبی و پریشان، زندگی میکند، که به کری اجازه ی ارتباط با دیگران را نمیدهد. روزی که دخترِ شلوغ و شرّ مدرسه، کریس، که از کری متنفر است، تصمیم میگیرد بلایی سرِ او بیاورد، روزی ست که خشمِ فراطبیعیِ کری را به دنبال دارد. از این داستان دو فیلم زیر نیز اقتباس و ساخته و پرداخته شده است نام فیلم: کری؛ کارگردان: برایان دی پالما؛ نویسنده: استیون کینگ؛ بازیگران: سیسی اسپیسک؛ جان تراولتا؛ پایپر لوری؛ پاملا جین سولز؛ موسیقی: پینو دوناجو؛ تدوین: پال هرش؛ توزیع‌ کننده: یونایتد آرتیستس؛ تاریخ‌های انتشار: 3 نوامبر 1976؛ مدت زمان: 98 دقیقه؛ کشور: ایالات متحده؛ زبان: انگلیسی؛ هزینهٔ فیلم: یک میلیون و هشتصد هزار دلار؛ فروش گیشه: 33 میلیون و هشتصد هزار دلار نام فیلم: کری؛ کارگردان: کیمبرلی پرس؛ تهیه‌ کننده: کوین میشر؛ فیلم‌نامه‌ نویس: روبرتو آگیر-سکزا؛ بر پایه داستان کری اثر: استیون کینگ؛ بازیگران: کلویی مورتز؛ جولیان مور؛ جودی گریر؛ گابریلا وایلد؛ پورتیا دوبلدی؛ درک مک‌گرث؛ بری شاباکا هنلی؛ موسیقی: مارکو بلترامی؛ فیلم‌برداری: استیو یدلین؛ تدوین: لی پرسی؛ شرکت تولید: میشر فیلمز؛ توزیع‌ کننده: مترو گلدوین مایر؛ اسکرین جمز؛ تاریخ (های) انتشار: 18 اکتبر 2013 میلادی؛ مدت: 99 دقیقه؛ کشور: آمریکا؛ زبان: انگلیسی؛ بودجه: 30 میلیون دلار؛ گیشه: 84790678 دلار؛ ا. شربیانی

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jason Koivu

    My brain is a torment of RAGE with which I wish to rain vengeance down upon the later half of this book! Everything progressed along as it should in the first half. The story moved at a good pace and the writing - though not moving - was adequate. Then the climatic scene happened soon after the halfway mark. I'll rephrase that. The climax happened in the middle…the middle! "An odd place for a climatic scene," I remember thinking. Nonetheless, I pushed on...and on and on through a rising tide of d My brain is a torment of RAGE with which I wish to rain vengeance down upon the later half of this book! Everything progressed along as it should in the first half. The story moved at a good pace and the writing - though not moving - was adequate. Then the climatic scene happened soon after the halfway mark. I'll rephrase that. The climax happened in the middle…the middle! "An odd place for a climatic scene," I remember thinking. Nonetheless, I pushed on...and on and on through a rising tide of detail-cheating adverbs. "Oh mama, no!" I cried when, without warning/without notice/like lightning/like a flash/in the blink of an eye/in a heartbeat/quick and without cause, every action began happening "suddenly". I think King may have actually used suddenly twice in one sentence! What happened? Why did the editing stop midway through? Why did the story drag on after it was essentially over? In the end, this is a 2 star book that gets 3 for the interesting story and the strong start. Everything else is anticlimax.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Lyn

    Was Carrie White a literary active shooter? Let’s break it down: from an abusive, negligent home life with dark theological and religious hobgoblins; she is picked on and teased at school, relentlessly, by other girls and the bullying is allowed (somewhat) by the school administration. She feels alone and without any relief and she is finally subjected to a humiliation that breaks a wall, crosses a line and then she crosses a line and people die. Stephen King crashes the writing party with a bold Was Carrie White a literary active shooter? Let’s break it down: from an abusive, negligent home life with dark theological and religious hobgoblins; she is picked on and teased at school, relentlessly, by other girls and the bullying is allowed (somewhat) by the school administration. She feels alone and without any relief and she is finally subjected to a humiliation that breaks a wall, crosses a line and then she crosses a line and people die. Stephen King crashes the writing party with a bold statement, declaring that he belongs and will be around for a while. Readers in 1974 when this was first published probably noticed the talent and maybe thought here was a young writer who had some more in the tank for down the road. Little did they know then that this HELLACIOUS kick ass, grudge match throw down of a first book was just the opening salvo in a long, genre defining career that is still scaring the heebie jeebies out of paying customers worldwide. So back to the active shooter idea. Scary as King made the 70s, he had no idea how scary we would be a few years later. Before Columbine, before all the sad, sad CNN breaking news reports since, King showed us what could happen when the bullied, terrorized, terrifying, disenfranchised, chased up a tree and backed into a corner fat kid, picked last for the game and been on the receiving end of a laughing, pointing finger can do if she thinks about it too hard. Carrie’s powers become an allegory for an assault weapon with duffle bags full of ammo clips. We see the scene from the perspective of the bully, the bullied, and the spectrum of third parties who look on and allow it to happen. Readers can relate because it is likely that kids were cruel to one another in caves. King’s great talent is to find the extraordinary in the everyday and King gives to Carrie White the kind of power that those who are laughed at and not with have dreamed about. Later, in his novella Apt Pupil, King will return to this idea, exploring the active shooter concept in a way more conventional to our desensitized senses, but here with Carrie he has dug down deep and uncovered the same black roots. With her telekinetic powers and her unstable psyche, Carrie embodies and personifies a dark truth that King has turned a light on, that the ability to be hurt and hurt back is something inherent in us and that we can see in the classrooms, in the post office and in the mirror.

  14. 4 out of 5

    seak

    To begin, I want to tell a quick story about my introduction to Stephen King. I came really late to the party when it comes to the King. I'll not bore you with the same ol' story about my first read, but to make a long story short, I read The Stand and was not a fan right away...to say the least. For some reason, and after numerous recommendations, I started The Dark Tower series and I wasn't even that impressed with the first book, The Gunslinger. I didn't hate it, but it wasn't nearly what eve To begin, I want to tell a quick story about my introduction to Stephen King. I came really late to the party when it comes to the King. I'll not bore you with the same ol' story about my first read, but to make a long story short, I read The Stand and was not a fan right away...to say the least. For some reason, and after numerous recommendations, I started The Dark Tower series and I wasn't even that impressed with the first book, The Gunslinger. I didn't hate it, but it wasn't nearly what everyone was saying. O for 2. And yet, for some crazy reason that I still don't really understand, I pushed along, reading book two in The Dark Tower, The Drawing of the Three. I've fallen for authors before and maybe it was all the prior disappointment, but I fell really hard with that book. Instant fan here...erm...after three books. Thereafter my collection of King books has slowly been increasing starting with The Dark Tower series (of course) and moving on to others (I think I'm at around 25 or so). I have even read a couple more since I guess that's what you're supposed to do with books, at least someone told me that once. Every single one has been great and that also explains my current read (rereading the one I hated and enjoying it more than most other books). So we're talking about Carrie here right? Right. Carrie. King's first published book. I gotta say, this is quite an impressive book. Published when he was 26, I guess some people are just born to do certain things and King was born to write. This also makes me feel like I've wasted my life. First of all, this audiobook was read by Sissy Spacek. If you've been living under a rock, she's the one who played Carrie in the classic film based on this book. She's a great actress, although I've not seen this film, and she's perfect for the reading of this book. On that note, both this book and its movie are inseparable from pop culture. Having never seen the movie or read the book until now, I still knew (or thought I knew) everything about this book. And who doesn't know about that infamous prom scene? Just the people in that Geico commercial, as referred to above. I thought for sure that knowledge would ruin the book for me, but it turns out that's not a problem. The way the book is set up, you already know about that scene almost right up front. Each chapter starts with a snippet of a news story or biography that tells of the occurrence at the high school and Carrie. This scene actually happens way earlier in the book than I thought it would and the rest of the book deals with the aftermath. I had a hard time with this book, though, and I think it's for a couple reasons. One of those reasons is that I don't think the set up really worked for me. There really wasn't much to this book, it was just the same events told in different ways and even though the book's only around 200 pages, it still seemed long. The main reason this book was difficult for me, however, was that I was predominantly listening to this book while helping my twin daughters go to sleep. Bad call if there ever were one. High school is just a terrible place or can be. It's one of the worst times in many a person's life and it's only magnified in and through Carrie. She's the worst type of tortured teenager and all I could think was that I never wanted my daughters to grow up and go through it. Through the insecurities, the immaturity, and downright meanness of those who tend to have the most insecurities. Even through these agonizing moments, I WAS able to see King's genius. At the end of the book, it really did seem like this was a real historical event. It was well-documented and the T.K. gene seemed almost like it could exist. The characters were also just as real as any other of King's characters - which is as real as they come. While the master is there, I can't say I loved this book. It's a tough, sad read that just made me miserable. That in and of itself is indicative of King's ability, but I don't think I'll ever be rereading this, I don't even really have the desire to see either the new or old movie. I respect this book a lot, but it was way too depressing for me. 3 out of 5 Stars (Recommended with Reservations)

  15. 4 out of 5

    Dannii Elle

    I've read quite a few King title but have decided to start again, reading them all in chronological order to better understand the prowess of this master story-teller. This is his first full-length publication. Ultimately, Carrie is both the namesake, protagonist and antagonist of this story. And despite the many sides to her disturbed character she is also one the reader can not help but side with. My edition begun with an author's note that told of another bullied girl, much like Carrie. This gi I've read quite a few King title but have decided to start again, reading them all in chronological order to better understand the prowess of this master story-teller. This is his first full-length publication. Ultimately, Carrie is both the namesake, protagonist and antagonist of this story. And despite the many sides to her disturbed character she is also one the reader can not help but side with. My edition begun with an author's note that told of another bullied girl, much like Carrie. This girl he once knew took her own life and this tale serves the partial purpose of rewriting her story, and that of so many others. Here he gives power to the downtrodden. He gives them a way to realise their potential, through Carrie's character. She enacts their vengeance. However, she also burns herself along the way. This also serves as a reminder for how common Carrie's story is. How many other teenagers receive such high-school treatment and how many either internalise their hurt and self-destruct or lash out with devastating consequences? The answer is too many. Far too many.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Christy

    Alright... I finally decided to go back to the beginning of Stephen King's catalogue, and read in chronological order everything I have either not read, or did not get enough out of because I had missed so much of the King-verse building along the way. I highly recommend reading his books this way for any true King fan, because in so many ways they build upon each other, and there are several recurrent characters and themes. I am convinced that many of his books absolutely cannot be enjoyed to th Alright... I finally decided to go back to the beginning of Stephen King's catalogue, and read in chronological order everything I have either not read, or did not get enough out of because I had missed so much of the King-verse building along the way. I highly recommend reading his books this way for any true King fan, because in so many ways they build upon each other, and there are several recurrent characters and themes. I am convinced that many of his books absolutely cannot be enjoyed to their fullest by pulling them willy-nilly off the shelf. I'm on Cujo now, so my leap into the Dark Tower series is just days away. Being introduced to King about 6 years ago (other than the movies), that's when I began reading his new releases as they were released...and often read at random whatever I could find in the library. I thought that the novels were not actual serials, it was a perfectly okay way to read them. I am now convinced that many (most) of his books I have read would have made much more sense, not to mention be more enjoyable, if I had not read them that way....so many things went straight over my head, and I was completely left out of finding the "easter eggs" along the way. I started and stopped Insomnia, becoming aware that I needed to get some Dark Tower in first. Rose Madder and Lisey's Story are a few that needed background there as well to fully appreciate. So after reading about 30 or more of his books I'm starting over. Carrie was Kings first published novel. It was originally meant to be a short story for Cavalier magazine. Up until Carrie, King had published several short stories, many of them available in the collection Night Shift, which is an excellent collection of short stories. He started this "short story" only to become frustrated with it and throw it away. At that time his wife Tabitha, who has had great influence in his writing and, I believe helped him become the author he is today, took them out of the trash and placed him again in front of her typewriter. It was her advice to turn it into a novel, and he dedicated the book to her. He got the idea to write a very female based novel because some woman insinuated that he knew nothing of women. The first pages he wrote for the trash can were the shower scene....he "hated it." It is a pretty ugly opening scene for his first novel ever published (WOW...risky).... it definitely left me feeling disgusted, but Tabitha saw something there, and I'm glad she did. Bravo Tabitha I think we all owe you some gratitude. She continued her wonderful input through the years-- Behind a great man....as the saying goes... It happens to be one of the most frequently banned books in American schools, and I'm not sure how I feel about that...it can't be the menstruation...Are You There God? It's Me, Margaret has plenty of that, as well as health classes. It shouldn't be the bullying, because that needs to be addressed as much as possible in schools. I think it must be the End....the total destruction of the school, and killing of classmates that have been horrible to Carrie for many years. Just like the one scene in The Basketball Diaries that inspired the Columbine massacre. To give the story the feel of credibility (and to fill in any missing pieces), King chose to fill the book with newspaper clippings about the events, A college paper (By Sue Snell...one of the most decent human beings within the pages), and interviews with people who had witnessed Carrie's telekinetic powers, etc. I understood why he chose to do this, but I began to dread these epistolary "interruptions"....I suppose it's not a type of story telling that I enjoy. At least in this case. I did find some small inconsistencies; for example, in the shower seen, her body was described as almost ape-like, and (excuse me)....her nipples pointed toward the floor, only to have her breasts described as "perky" later in the novel, etc. No big deal, except reading an adult man describing teenagers bodies was perhaps one of the most disturbing things (for me) in the whole book.... (this reminded me of the most disturbing part of It for me as well)....anyway, I've decided to deal with it because he is such a talented writer. Overall, I found Carrie to be an extremely sad and emotional book. King describes it as "raw, and I wouldn't disagree. It strips the outer layers of the characters off and leaves you feeling like a wounded, cheated, abused girl who missed out on any happiness in life. Final thought (one more time):reading these books in order is a necessity for any fangirl or boy IMHO! Oh yeah....the movies, while good on their own if you haven't read the description King paints, NEVER get the casting right. I guess hollywood insists Carrie must be pretty...and very thin. It's maddening. That isn't Carrie..a chubby, pimply girl...at all. And they never have the right ending...which is truly heartbreaking.....wandering the street at night with a knife stuck in her.....a horribly sad ending to a terribly horrific life--for once I would like to see them follow the book.

  17. 4 out of 5

    R.K. Gold

    I’m sitting here still digesting this book and the only word that comes to me is disturbed. If the purpose of fiction is to conjure emotion—even just a single emotion then find book has it in the spades yet I still can’t bring myself to rank it any higher than 3 stars. At its most relatable it felt like a degrading episode and at its worst it felt like Tarantino directed the 700 club. Carrie wasn’t a monster she was just the equal and opposite reaction of her mother and her peers. The only momen I’m sitting here still digesting this book and the only word that comes to me is disturbed. If the purpose of fiction is to conjure emotion—even just a single emotion then find book has it in the spades yet I still can’t bring myself to rank it any higher than 3 stars. At its most relatable it felt like a degrading episode and at its worst it felt like Tarantino directed the 700 club. Carrie wasn’t a monster she was just the equal and opposite reaction of her mother and her peers. The only moments that tickled a different emotion was a flash when Carrie was 3 and talking to her neighbor and the early moments at the prom—they were the only scenes Carrie felt human. Maybe I would’ve liked this book more if the glimmer of hope lasted longer, if I could believe for at least a second Carrie would graduate and go on to live a normal life. I didn’t hate this book—it just felt more like a paper puppet show, the story moved left and right like a 2D Street fighter video game until everyone died.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Helene Jeppesen

    This was really good and scary - just what I was hoping for. The pacing of the book was just right because of the various accounts and perspectives we get on the “black prom” and what exactly happened, and the scary scenes WERE scary. However, I especially appreciate how this is a book that tackles bullying and what that can do to a person’s mental health. Carrie is fragile after years of meanness and bullying, and what happens at prom night pushes her over the edge. Only, the difference between This was really good and scary - just what I was hoping for. The pacing of the book was just right because of the various accounts and perspectives we get on the “black prom” and what exactly happened, and the scary scenes WERE scary. However, I especially appreciate how this is a book that tackles bullying and what that can do to a person’s mental health. Carrie is fragile after years of meanness and bullying, and what happens at prom night pushes her over the edge. Only, the difference between Carrie and everyone else who is unfortunately bullied, is that Carrie is telekinetic! The focus on the prom night was a bit too long in my opinion, but other than that this was so creepy and electrifying (pun intended!), and now I’m very much inclined to rewatch the movie and compare it to the book.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie *Extremely Stable Genius*

    Poor Carrie, I feel your pain. This book was interesting in that it presented facts on scientific phenomena called Psychokinesis, Something I have had personal experience with and I’ll tell you about it at the end of this review as long as you all promise not to call me a freak…..but think that I’m a freak all you want. Carrie didn’t have it easy in high school. Being raised by an over protective, abusive, and ultra religious mother and no father, she didn’t have the tools to fit in with the crow Poor Carrie, I feel your pain. This book was interesting in that it presented facts on scientific phenomena called Psychokinesis, Something I have had personal experience with and I’ll tell you about it at the end of this review as long as you all promise not to call me a freak…..but think that I’m a freak all you want. Carrie didn’t have it easy in high school. Being raised by an over protective, abusive, and ultra religious mother and no father, she didn’t have the tools to fit in with the crowd….any crowd. So, as you know, in high school ‘if one of these things is not like the other’ then that thing does not belong. But something else was different about Carrie that really made her stand out. At puberty, and at the onset of her first period (famous shower scene….don’t be too icked out fellas) which was very late, things started moving around and going generally haywire around her when she was stressed. At first she didn’t realize that it was her that caused the disruptions. Back to the shower scene, when this happened to her she was in the school shower and had no idea what was happening to her, mamma neglected to tell her about it, and Carrie was convinced she was dying. The other girls started taunting her……. They really shouldn’t have done that. One of the offenders, Susan Snell, regretted her role in the incident and decided to do something nice for Carrie by asking her boy friend to take Carrie to the prom in her place. She really shouldn’t have done that. Okay. This phenomena has been reported numerous times and it has been well documented. It’s a thing. It’s normally mistaken for a poltergeist, which is supposed to be some prankster type of spirit, but what it really is is (most likely) electrochemical and happens around hormonal female adolescences. This is what happened in my household when I was a tween…..I shit you not….this stuff really happened. Back in the day, my mom smoked. I didn’t like it and would pester her to stop regularly (boy, did she love that). One evening when we were the only two in the house my mom couldn’t find her cigarettes. She was pacing back and forth in her upstairs bedroom tearing the room apart, all the time yelling at me to tell her what I did with them. I yelled back from downstairs that “I didn’t do anything with them”. She didn’t believe me and kept ranting. When things got to critical mass (meaning she was completely losing it) she turned around and the pack of cigarettes were in the middle of the floor, neatly sitting straight up on its end…..the same floor she just paced across many times. Immediately she blamed me for doing it, I yelled back that I couldn’t have done it because “I’m downstairs and have been here the whole time”. To this day she maintains I did it. Maybe I did, unconventionally. The second most memorable incident (the one that really sticks in my head) happened just after I finished doing the dishes and cleaning up after super. I went into the other room with my mom, we were the only two in the house again, and I’m sure we were fighting about something. All of a sudden it sounded like every dish and glass in the kitchen crashed and broke on the floor. My first thought was “crap, I must have put something in the cupboard all wonky and it fell out and took everything else with it.” We ran into the kitchen and not a dish was out of place, but in the middle of the kitchen floor there was the glass top to the glass salad dressing carafe balanced on its small end!! WTF?? And we didn’t have salad that night…. So, there’s that. Science. Oh, and now I have the urge to take up sewing……weird.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Char

    5.30.18 Third re-read review. I finished my third read of Carrie on Sunday. I wanted my thoughts on it to be fresh for an in-person book group meeting at the end of this month. (It is prom season after all!) I still love this style of story-telling which includes snippets from newspaper articles, different (fictional) books and journals, and several eye-witness accounts. I still find myself feeling for Carrie, and mostly those feelings consist of pity and sadness. I think every American schoolkid 5.30.18 Third re-read review. I finished my third read of Carrie on Sunday. I wanted my thoughts on it to be fresh for an in-person book group meeting at the end of this month. (It is prom season after all!) I still love this style of story-telling which includes snippets from newspaper articles, different (fictional) books and journals, and several eye-witness accounts. I still find myself feeling for Carrie, and mostly those feelings consist of pity and sadness. I think every American schoolkid has been where she was. I wonder if Carrie would be a school shooter these days instead of a telekinetic time bomb? That may be a crazy thought, but having just re-read RAGE last month, (not to mention seeing the daily news here in America), I think it's natural for such a thing to cross my mind. Lastly, reading this book while also reading King's latest, THE OUTSIDER, presented the chance for comparison. King was lean and mean in writing Carrie, in fact, I wished for more. THE OUTSIDER, while good, is a bit bloated and not as focused. Is that just his writing style changing over the years? Is it the fact that editing guidelines were different, and tighter back in the day? Whatever it is, there's a definite difference between the two, and despite King's tendency to ramble on? I think some of his largest books will still remain among my favorites of all time. -- 8.21.2012:I just finished a re-read of this book. It was a bit different than I remembered. I think I took a lot more away from it this time than I did the first. Perhaps it's in light of the current problems regarding bullying amongst teenagers, or perhaps it's just that more than 20 years have passed since I last read it, and I am viewing it from a different perspective. Whichever it is, I enjoyed revisiting the town of Chamberlain and all its residents. I also enjoyed (very much) how the story was related. Little bits from the White Commission (the investigatory body formed to discern the truth about what happened in Chamberlain), fake AP news articles, and tidbits from books later written about the Carrie White case. The only thing I would've have liked would be a little more meat to the story. Not something I would normally say in regards to Mr. King! : ) All in all, I'm very glad I re-read this book.

  21. 5 out of 5

    ALet

    ★★★★/ 5 It was a fantastic read! I already read it once, but sadly then I wasn‘t a huge fan, but second time around I really liked it. I found the storytelling fascinating, it just felt like I was reading about real events. Story wasn‘t boring, it captured my attention and because of that it was easy to read. In addition characters were interesting and I felt like I actually knew them.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Diane Wallace

    Jumpy read! riveting,good narrative and hauntingly good storyline with also incredible writing (paperback!)

  23. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Reads Ravenously

    3.5 stars This book made me appreciate my mother. First off, I want to reiterate that a 3 stars from me does not equate to a negative review. It means I liked/enjoyed the book, but did not really like it or love it. So please, don’t tell me sorry it didn’t work out. Thank you. Carrie is Stephen’s King first novel, the novel that started the legend. I’ve read other novels by King, but wanted to start at the beginning and make my way from there, that way I have a list to follow. I’ve seen the origi 3.5 stars This book made me appreciate my mother. First off, I want to reiterate that a 3 stars from me does not equate to a negative review. It means I liked/enjoyed the book, but did not really like it or love it. So please, don’t tell me sorry it didn’t work out. Thank you. Carrie is Stephen’s King first novel, the novel that started the legend. I’ve read other novels by King, but wanted to start at the beginning and make my way from there, that way I have a list to follow. I’ve seen the original movie starring Sissy Spacek, so I pretty much knew what would happen. I think knowing everything, it was easier for me to look at this book from the outside and gain more insight than I would have. This book is about the teenage girl of a religious fanatic, opening on the day when Carrie gets her first period, and knowing nothing about menstruation she thinks she’s dying. Instead of helping, the girls in her gym class ridicule and traumatize her. Later, one of the girls sees her wrong doing, and attempts to make amends and be kind to Carrie. But a prank from other classmates is looming, and has dire consequences. There are so many themes present in this book, but what stood out to me was “no good deed goes unpunished”. If Sue Snell hadn’t tried to help Carrie, none of those horrible things would have happened. The cruelty of mankind was another, from a crazy mother, to spiteful fellow students, we saw the dark side of humanity and that to me was terrifying. You can’t help but feel so bad for Carrie the entire book. So many what if’s? And that’s what makes King an amazing writer, he makes the reader think beyond what’s between the pages. The writing style and I didn’t click very well, by that I mean the random plug ins of studies and books about what happened, instead of letting the story flow. It was almost like he was analyzing what he was writing as the story went on. On top of that, the insertions of parenthesis as thoughts messed with the flow of the novel. Also, I feel like people kept slapping each other left and right the entire book. What's up with that?? It’s easy to see why this is a classic, to me it wasn’t terrifying or scary. Mostly what I got out of it was the sad story of a girl who was never loved properly, and how the cruelty of others ruined her life. Follow me on ♥ Facebook ♥ Blog ♥ Instagram ♥ Twitter ♥

  24. 4 out of 5

    Karina

    What fast and captivating read. I was a little skeptical about what horrors might come up in a King novel because I had never read anything by him, but it was fine. Defintely intense but absolutely manageable. A really good book and I'm glad it was my first King

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sadie Hartmann Mother Horror

    In 2019 I'm going to go back and review the King books I love and cherished but never fully reviewed for Goodreads because Goodreads wasn't a thing when I was reading King's work in the 90s. You can follow along on Instagram #ReviewKing2019 I remember exactly where I was and what I was doing when I read CARRIE for the first time. I was at my best friend Katie’s house who lived in an old farmhouse off some back roads parallel to the highway. Katie’s bedroom was in the converted part of the attic sp In 2019 I'm going to go back and review the King books I love and cherished but never fully reviewed for Goodreads because Goodreads wasn't a thing when I was reading King's work in the 90s. You can follow along on Instagram #ReviewKing2019 I remember exactly where I was and what I was doing when I read CARRIE for the first time. I was at my best friend Katie’s house who lived in an old farmhouse off some back roads parallel to the highway. Katie’s bedroom was in the converted part of the attic space-her bed tucked into one of the dormer windows. I was staying overnight and we were waiting for her parents to go to bed so we could come downstairs and watch Sixteen Candles again. To kill time, we were reading out loud to each other in bed. It was the summer between our eighth grade year so we were fourteen/fifteen years old. Katie had an older sister named Jennifer, who was at a friend’s house for the weekend so we crept into her room and browsed her bookshelf for something small we could read. We chose CARRIE because I was already a Stephen King fan and the cover was gross (a girl’s face with blood running down it in streaks). “Carrie White eats shit.” I read outloud. Katie was horrified. “There’s cussing in this book?” I rolled my eyes and kept reading. After a few chapters, Katie bailed on the book and she went downstairs because I wouldn’t stop reading. I’m guessing the bits about blood running down Carrie’s leg in the shower and the bullying made her feel uncomfortable. I think she went downstairs and helped her mother make dinner or did her chores or something. All I know is nobody bothered me while I flew through the pages for about an hour or more. To this day, it astounds me that this is a debut novel--it’s incredibly compelling. I’m also impressed that Stephen King, being a young man, could slide up inside the mind of an awkward teenage girl so effortlessly. The opening scene with Carrie White in the school locker room--the showering--just flawless in its relatability and authenticity. I personally loathed P.E. and dressing down for gym. I was a very skinny girl, underdeveloped for my age and it was just brutal to have to be practically naked in front of girls who already had need of a bra or were starting to wear “sexy underwear” instead of the store bought undies my mom was buying for me. And then the sensitive topic of starting your period when you’re that age is just over-the-top hush-hush secret stuff even your best friend might not know about! For King to take all this teenage culture and bring it to life so brilliantly was just about the most engaging piece of fiction I had ever read at the time. When the book takes a turn into horror with the introduction of Carrie White’s mother, OH MAN! And then to get all these clues that Carrie has a supernatural ability--well, I was hooked. I also remember feeling like maybe I shouldn’t be reading a book this mature. I put a bookmark where I left off and then stuck the book in my overnight bag. Later that night, after dinner and watching movies--Katie and I went to bed and I asked her if I could borrow her sister’s book so I could finish it. She didn’t care one bit! (I think she was glad to have it out of the house now that I think about it) I’ve read the book a few times now and I watched the old movie adaptation and I’m annoyed with the movie, actually. They didn’t get Carrie right. She wasn’t stick thin--she was overweight and had social anxiety from being raised by a total psycho. The book handled all of the tension with the news article interludes--but the movie sort of blew everything out of proportion and scaled the tension too quickly. It’s actually genius storytelling on King’s part. One of his best in my opinion. At only 300+ pages, it’s concise and controlled. No fluff or filler--not like some of his newer releases (SLEEPING BEAUTIES and the OUTSIDER) which are a little bloated and overwrought. CARRIE is a damn good debut horror novel; transcending the era in which it was written. It’s just as appropriate today as a tale of cruelty and bullying as it was then, if not more. The angst and revenge Carrie White feels could be the anthem behind some of America’s most savage school shootings. A terrifying story because it rides so close to the truth.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Catherine

    Okay let’s just all agree that Stephen King should stick to what he’s good at—writing horror—and stay far away from writing about how he thinks female anatomy works. I don’t know if it was supposed to be realistic or not, but I contemplated putting this down after the first scene where Carrie gets her period in the shower because it was so painfully exaggerated and far from anything remotely plausible that I cringed through it. Anyways, after the cringefest was over, I actually really enjoyed th Okay let’s just all agree that Stephen King should stick to what he’s good at—writing horror—and stay far away from writing about how he thinks female anatomy works. I don’t know if it was supposed to be realistic or not, but I contemplated putting this down after the first scene where Carrie gets her period in the shower because it was so painfully exaggerated and far from anything remotely plausible that I cringed through it. Anyways, after the cringefest was over, I actually really enjoyed this. Carrie White is an outcast; she is often the target when it comes to ridicule and bullying at school. To make matters worse, her mother is a scary religious fanatic who believes Carrie is her punishment for sinning when she had her. As a result, she abuses and sexually represses Carrie to the point where you really start to feel awful for her. Not only does Carrie have no friends, but she doesn’t really have a family either. However, she does have telekinesis powers that kick in when she’s angry so that’s pretty cool. Her luck seems to be turning around, however, when a boy asks her to the prom, but as this is a popular story, I’m sure most people already know that there unfortunately is no happy ending. What Carrie did in the end was terrifying, but I felt like I was almost rooting for her to destroy everyone who did her wrong. Stephen King did an excellent job of making you sympathize for this girl—so much so that you almost justified it by thinking they all had it coming. I loved how King employed fictional newspaper reports, court transcripts, and personal memoirs to show multiple viewpoints of what happened, but sometimes it felt so all over the place. Just when I would be getting into one of the scenes from prom night, out of nowhere there would be a court transcript from a random person who was not really connected to the main story at all. Even though these things supplemented the story well, it became a lot less effective when they kept being thrown in there every couple pages by people who I either didn’t care to hear from or heard way too much from already. This was my first Stephen King book, and it won’t be my last. I went into this expecting to be terrified, and although I wasn’t, it was still very thrilling and brought upon a lot of other emotions that I didn’t expect to feel. Carrie is a scary reminder to be kinder to other people. After all, you never really know what they are capable of.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Edward Lorn

    Spoilers throughout. There are thousands of reviews of this book without spoilers. Find one. I enjoyed this reread (#4, I believe, but I think I've lost count) far more than any of the other times I have read this book. I remember one read being as low as two stars for me. I detested this book. It bored me to death. But, this go around, I loved it. If I didn't know any better, I would think that books change over time, or is that the reader? I still don't like the ending. Meaning, the last few Spoilers throughout. There are thousands of reviews of this book without spoilers. Find one. I enjoyed this reread (#4, I believe, but I think I've lost count) far more than any of the other times I have read this book. I remember one read being as low as two stars for me. I detested this book. It bored me to death. But, this go around, I loved it. If I didn't know any better, I would think that books change over time, or is that the reader? I still don't like the ending. Meaning, the last few pages of the book. I feel that King should have stopped after Carrie died, and left the fate of the town to our imaginations, but that's my own opinion. Carrie's demise is so emotional that the final few pages of the book pale in comparison. We go from strong feelings of sadness to an author's attempt to wrap things up with a bow. Fuck that. If I'm to cry, leave me in tears. I still have a fierce hatred for all the film adaptations of this book. None of them get the character of Carrie right (Carrie and her mother were BIG women, not the skinny wraiths that Hollywood demands), nor do they drive home the crushing tragedy of the narrative. Why hasn't anyone made a Carrie movie wherein Sue finds Carrie outside of the Cavalier? Why must the movies always finish in the White home? Whatever. Moving on. This time, I noted several names that pop up with regularity throughout the King-verse, and one character from one of King's novellas. It's probably the best part about reading Stephen King's for me. He writes nearly constantly about small towns, and having all these Easter eggs hidden throughout his work makes it feel as if you're part of one of these small towns. Like everyone is a friend or neighbor. I dig that very much. Notable names: Hanscom (It) Trelawney (Mr. Mercedes) Mears ('Salem's Lot) The Black Man (aka the Crimson King) Notable characters: Teddy Duchamps (The Body) In summation: One down and thrity-three novels to go. Next up is 'Salem's Lot, which I am completely excited for. It's one of my all-time favorite King books, and it never fails to terrify.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    I think part of what makes this book so amazing is that even though it is a horror book - it stems from something very basic and very real to so many people. The need to be loved. The need for acceptance. The need to be nurtured by a parent. Sadly - as is so often the case in real life as well - these things are held out of reach for Carrie. Her mother is crazy. The kids at school are HORRIBLE. She has no friends - no life. She is isolated and miserable. She is an outsider who can see that peopl I think part of what makes this book so amazing is that even though it is a horror book - it stems from something very basic and very real to so many people. The need to be loved. The need for acceptance. The need to be nurtured by a parent. Sadly - as is so often the case in real life as well - these things are held out of reach for Carrie. Her mother is crazy. The kids at school are HORRIBLE. She has no friends - no life. She is isolated and miserable. She is an outsider who can see that people have loving families and homes and friends but is trapped in a parody of that existence and it is seemingly untouchable. So really the cruelest thing you could do is to offer her a chance at this world and then snatch it away from her. Offer her hope and then throw it on the rocks. Just the concept itself is crushing - the actualization of it for Carrie was horrific. And all the more so because we KNOW how cruel kids in school are. We know they could erupt into a chorus of Kill the Pig! Bash him in at any moment. (Was this book a retelling of Lord of the Flies in a way? hmmmmm. Something to ponder.) So like any masterfully told campfire story - this book is so frightening because it is such a small degree off of what is reality and has a touch of supernatural. It's really genius when you think about it.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Bark

    This was the first Stephen King novel I read. I remember grabbing it from my dad’s nightstand and claiming it as my own. I was eleven. Eleven. It is the book that fueled my desire and lifelong love of reading. But eleven?! Reading it now I’m a little horrified that I read it at such a young age. It has quite a bit of sex and disturbing scenes but I turned out relatively normal so I guess no damage was done ;) This is your classic bully revenge tale and it is as relevant today as it was back in t This was the first Stephen King novel I read. I remember grabbing it from my dad’s nightstand and claiming it as my own. I was eleven. Eleven. It is the book that fueled my desire and lifelong love of reading. But eleven?! Reading it now I’m a little horrified that I read it at such a young age. It has quite a bit of sex and disturbing scenes but I turned out relatively normal so I guess no damage was done ;) This is your classic bully revenge tale and it is as relevant today as it was back in the day. Carrie White was drawn with such painful vulnerability that it’ll make you ache for her and cringe at many of the scenes. Carrie’s an innocent, abused by her religious wingnut of a mother who never consoles but is quick to mete out punishment for the most ridiculous of offenses (such as talking to a neighbor). “Go to your closet and pray!” When Carrie doesn’t want to eat her pie. “It makes me have pimples, Momma. “Your pimples are the Lord’s way of chastising you. Now eat your pie.” Can you imagine growing up with a mother like this? How can you not feel for Carrie? Anyway, there isn’t much for me to say here. I remembered it being a straight-forward tale told by Carrie but I think that’s because I’ve seen so many of the movie versions between the book and now. It wasn't written that way at all. I enjoyed the flashbacks, news reports, victim on the spot interviews and such that composed the story and I’m glad I finally got around to rereading it. It held up incredibly well and the audio version that I listened to was skillfully read by Sissy Spacek who really knows the part.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Celeste

    You can find this review and more at Novel Notions. In a sense, Carrie is the book that launched a thousand nightmares. This was King’s first ever novel and, while not his scariest, we would have never been exposed to the tales that have terrified millions without it. I feel that Carrie deserves respect for that reason alone, but I confess that I was hesitant to pick it up. Often, when you find an author you love later in their career, going back to their first published forays into their craft You can find this review and more at Novel Notions. In a sense, Carrie is the book that launched a thousand nightmares. This was King’s first ever novel and, while not his scariest, we would have never been exposed to the tales that have terrified millions without it. I feel that Carrie deserves respect for that reason alone, but I confess that I was hesitant to pick it up. Often, when you find an author you love later in their career, going back to their first published forays into their craft can be a bit disappointing as their writing abilities have improved or at least changed over the course of that career. I needn’t have worried. Every page completely entranced me, and I was engaged through the very last page. One of the things that makes this book so compelling is the fact that you are told from the very beginning that things are going to end badly. King alternates telling the story in a linear method and interspersing that with pieces of newspaper columns and medical journal articles and interviews from after the Prom Night Massacre. So we know from the first few pages that prom night is going to end in slaughter, and we know that Carrie White is supposedly responsible. This foreknowledge adds a tension to the story that I found fascinating. I should have been less invested because I knew the outcome, but instead I was on the edge of my proverbial seat as I watched events unfolding, speeding toward their inevitable and grisly conclusion. I was honestly surprised by how well King was able to get inside the mind of an unpopular teenage girl with a terrible home life. I know he was a high school teacher at the time this book was written, so he saw kids being horrible to kids everyday. But he’s not nor has he ever been a teenage girl, and yet I found the inner minds of his three main teenage girl perspectives convincing, especially that of his titular character. Carrie is pitiful, but not always pitiable. She has been warped and nearly broken by her insane zealot of a mother and her fellow classmates, who have never seen her as anything but an easy target. The events at and leading up to prom night are merely the final straws that snapped her mind. The opening scene, involving Carrie starting her first period while in the locker room and being ridiculed by her classmates and pelted with tampons, is an image that has embedded itself into our collective cultural psyche. What I find most disturbing about this scene besides the obvious mob mentality is that Carrie had somehow made it to sixteen without knowing anything about menstration. I can vividly see myself in her shoes, in pain and bleeding without understanding why or what was happening, while everyone around me saw me at my weakest and most vulnerable and merely mocked me, as though no one cared that I felt like I was dying. It’s absolutely horrendous and King did a very good job representing that. I also think that King’s decision to tie Carrie’s fully awakened power to the start of her menstration cycle was an interesting choice. She had biologically transitioned from girl to woman, and that transition bore with it immense pain and bloodshed, as well as furthering the distain her classmates felt toward her and the hatred regarding her that had been building inside her mother since Carrie’s birth. There was no possible way to make this transition more tragic or rage inspiring from Carrie. The character I found truly terrifying in this book wasn’t Carrie herself or one of her more wicked classmates, but her mother. Margaret White is everything mankind is terrified of and horrified by in regards to religion. She is a zealot who has twisted Scripture and the idea of Jesus into something utterly unrecognizable. Her religion is of her own making, and it more closely resembles a cult that actual Christianity. Her views of every aspect of life and disturbingly skewed, but the worst of her misguided zeal is aimed at her daughter. Margaret uses religion as a weapon, and has bludgeoned all of the life and hope and personality from Carrie with it. The fact that there was enough of Carrie left to rise up and fight back is impressive. But she had already been abused to such an extent that, when faced with another humiliation, she saw the total destruction of her every perceived enemy as her only option. I can totally see why Carrie has become a cultural phenomenon, one that we as a society reference without having ever read it or watched it. Carrie is a poster child of what happens when society pushes a teen too far, when we see an outcast and shove them further into their loneliness instead of reaching out our hands in an effort to pull them out of it. Being a teenager is hard enough without us making it harder. Kindness can go a long way toward helping high schoolers escape their teenage years alive. I want to end this review with a quote from Tabitha King, Stephen’s wife, who wrote an introduction to this novel upon reprinting. I think it sums up adolescence perfectly. “An educator one remarked to me that no one ever died of adolescence. Knock, knock—anybody home, teach? Kids die of it all the time. Suicide is one of the most common causes of adolescent death. In large U.S. Cities, adolescents are currently murdering each other at a ghastly, scandalous rate… Another common adolescent tragedy is the drunk driving death, in which you can take your friends with you; one for all, all for one… You can endure adolescence, you can survive it, but it can and often does affect the course of your life in dramatic ways. And it can sure as hell kill you.” Whether you’re new to King or have read dozens of his other titles, I heartily recommend this book. In my opinion, it completely holds its own with his later novels. Were there cringe-worthy moments? Absolutely, but that’s the norm for King, right? Stephen King became famous for a reason. Carrie is that reason.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.