Hot Best Seller

The Giver: Graphic Novel

Availability: Ready to download

Now in graphic novel format, Lois Lowry’s Newbery Medal–winning classic story of a young boy discovering the dark secrets behind his seemingly ideal world is accompanied by renowned artist P.Craig Russell’s beautifully haunting illustrations. 


Compare

Now in graphic novel format, Lois Lowry’s Newbery Medal–winning classic story of a young boy discovering the dark secrets behind his seemingly ideal world is accompanied by renowned artist P.Craig Russell’s beautifully haunting illustrations. 

30 review for The Giver: Graphic Novel

  1. 5 out of 5

    David Schaafsma

    I won't summarize the story because there are by now thousands of reviews that do that, but I read this mainly because it is one of several new graphic adaptations of well-known and often taught books, illustrated by famous British illustrator Craig Russell. Russell was the main reason I picked this up--I love the way Russell introduces blue into his early black and white scheme, and then, appropriate to the story, introduces more color to it. His work is of course worth the look, whether you ha I won't summarize the story because there are by now thousands of reviews that do that, but I read this mainly because it is one of several new graphic adaptations of well-known and often taught books, illustrated by famous British illustrator Craig Russell. Russell was the main reason I picked this up--I love the way Russell introduces blue into his early black and white scheme, and then, appropriate to the story, introduces more color to it. His work is of course worth the look, whether you have read this or not before. This is a kind of allegory, a dystopian novel of which I was just personally never a huge fan, but it's a fine piece of work, 3.5-4.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Tucker

    Great graphic novel! It kept close to the original while being special at the same time. The art was amazing. Thanks, HMH!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Cece (ProblemsOfaBookNerd)

    Fascinating adaptation. I don’t think it brought anything particularly new to the story, hence the 4 stars instead of 5, but I loved experiencing The Giver again in a new way.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Brooke — brooklynnnnereads

    Surprisingly enough, this was my first introduction to "The Giver". In the midst of my childhood, this novel was hugely popular and became required reading for many classes. Somehow, I missed out on that experience and I have not yet seen the recent movie adaptation. This is an eerie dystopian that is made even more creepy by the fact that it's easy to see how this could become reality. In some ways, this fictional world seems so farfetched but at the same time, in our current political climate Surprisingly enough, this was my first introduction to "The Giver". In the midst of my childhood, this novel was hugely popular and became required reading for many classes. Somehow, I missed out on that experience and I have not yet seen the recent movie adaptation. This is an eerie dystopian that is made even more creepy by the fact that it's easy to see how this could become reality. In some ways, this fictional world seems so farfetched but at the same time, in our current political climate it makes me realize how close fiction can get to reality. In a world full of dystopian stories, I found this world unique in many ways whether it be the absence of colours or the details of a person's "release". After reading this graphic novel, I'm very interested in reading the original novel for more details. This graphic novel was an amazing adaptation, especially for those who are being introduced to the story through this format. I think it probably accurately represented the original novel and will have readers going to pick up that original novel for more. The ending has me perplexed. I feel like it could mean many things and may have been purposely left that way for the reader to make their own interpretation? Either way, whether left open for interpretation or concrete in its finale, I like how the ending felt final. It ended in a way that captured the full beauty of the story. ***Thank you to Raincoast Books for sending me an ARC of this graphic novel in exchange for an honest review***

  5. 4 out of 5

    JenacideByBibliophile

    Disclaimer: This book was sent to me by the publisher, via Edelweiss+, for an honest review. Opinion: I can picture it so clearly as if it were yesterday. I was sitting in class, a wee youngster at the time. A black book with an old man on the cover was dropped on my rickety desk; assigned reading for the semester. Audible groans and grumblings of “this looks boring” and “dude, come on. Something from this century, PLEASE” were heard throughout the room. The story of a young boy was given to us w Disclaimer: This book was sent to me by the publisher, via Edelweiss+, for an honest review. Opinion: I can picture it so clearly as if it were yesterday. I was sitting in class, a wee youngster at the time. A black book with an old man on the cover was dropped on my rickety desk; assigned reading for the semester. Audible groans and grumblings of “this looks boring” and “dude, come on. Something from this century, PLEASE” were heard throughout the room. The story of a young boy was given to us with a cover so wise beyond our years, with words so eloquently written, that it almost felt too much for our wandering minds to grasp. A book we appreciated and grew to love, but one that still left a dryness across our eyes. If ONLY we had been given this beautiful version. You all know the story of young Jonas and his path to becoming the Receiver of Memory. Living in a place where color does not exist, and the memory of it is not taught. But when he is given his Life Assignment, he is given a job unlike his friends. He is to be the Receiver of Memory, the one who holds all the memories of the world, including those with color. So ensues Jonas’s journey to learning about the world, one filled with happiness and pain, sadness and elation. This version of The Giver pulls in readers of all ages and gives them beautifully illustrated images of Jonas’ story. This graphic novel is AMAZING. I honestly didn’t know how much I needed a graphic novel version of The Giver, until now. These illustrations are BEAUTIFUL and perfectly portray this story. Not only is it a great version for all us who had read this in school or when we were kids, but it is a FANTASTIC way to get the younger audiences and newer generations interested! I feel SO lucky that we were given a movie, and now this! The story is the same, but naturally, not every word from the original was transcribed to this rendition. This form of The Giver is much more direct with its delivery of the story, thanks to the illustrations being able to shorten the originals descriptions of scenery. Instead of the reader having to imagine Jonas learning about colors and the world, they get to SEE it happening as they read. It’s a movie and a book in one! I think all ages can enjoy this adaptation of the classic novel by Lois Lowry, but I feel that it might end up targeting a younger audience overall. Due to the writing being shortened to accommodate the illustrations, it seems that some of the more dark and somber moments from this book are reduced. The reader can see the emotion from the illustrations, but it definitely doesn’t have that gut-wrenching effect that the original has. Some things from the original were shortened, like Jonas’s big escape with the baby and some of the moments with the current Receiver of Memory. I also found it interesting that the illustrations only portrayed moments of full color for Jonas when he was receiving a memory, or when he had left. I would have expected him to have full color before then, but really, I suppose it doesn’t matter! In comparison to the original form of The Giver, I found this graphic novel to be breathtaking and VERY enjoyable. As a long-time lover of this book, I was hit with a rush of nostalgia and happiness while reading. This version is truly a masterpiece and will be a great interpretation for younger audiences. I cannot WAIT to get this in a print version.

  6. 4 out of 5

    TJ

    What an incredibly faithful adaption of The Giver! The art was beautiful and creative. Kids in elementary, middle, and high school will be celebrating this "faster" read version of the novel they're forced to read in school -- only they don't realize it's basically the exact text, just enhanced with images! Still, the novel is worth a read, always! 5/5 stars.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Alicia

    Wow, I taught The Giver and loved The Giver reading it before I had to teach it but has it been too long that I need to go back and re-read it? I wonder because I did not like this adaptation in graphic novel format! And I'm sooo, sooo sad about it. The illustration choices do the story justice, so I won't take that away from the adaptation, but it the mood felt voyeuristic and downright creepy at times. I know the book is not sunshine and rainbows, but it changes the story when it feels the way Wow, I taught The Giver and loved The Giver reading it before I had to teach it but has it been too long that I need to go back and re-read it? I wonder because I did not like this adaptation in graphic novel format! And I'm sooo, sooo sad about it. The illustration choices do the story justice, so I won't take that away from the adaptation, but it the mood felt voyeuristic and downright creepy at times. I know the book is not sunshine and rainbows, but it changes the story when it feels the way it does in a visual format. There were some choices in story structure that I think also led to my dislike of the retelling-- emphasis on the wrong elements of the story. It's certainly an option, but in this case, the book will always be the go-to, not the graphic novel. Maybe they should have left well enough alone? Though I know a broader audience can be sought by having the graphic version.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Tara Schaafsma

    I enjoyed this. I guess I am a very visual person because it made some of the book make more sense to me. (I like the novel a lot, too).

  9. 5 out of 5

    Flavia

    I remember my first experience with The Giver. I was in grade 7 and I had just moved from Austria to Canada, and we were expected to read The Giver for class. Since it was the middle of term, the rest of the class was already almost done the book, so I felt really overwhelmed. English didn’t come easy to me yet, and I was so behind on the book that I didn’t understand anything that was going on. When the movie adaptation came out in 2014, I was hesitant to watch it because of my past experience, I remember my first experience with The Giver. I was in grade 7 and I had just moved from Austria to Canada, and we were expected to read The Giver for class. Since it was the middle of term, the rest of the class was already almost done the book, so I felt really overwhelmed. English didn’t come easy to me yet, and I was so behind on the book that I didn’t understand anything that was going on. When the movie adaptation came out in 2014, I was hesitant to watch it because of my past experience, but my boyfriend put it on the TV and I really found myself captivated by the story and what was going on! I still haven’t read the original novel, but when I found out that a graphic novel was coming out and that ARCs were available, I asked for one! The first impressions that I had with the graphic novel when I started reading it was that the ARC was in black and white, while the finished copy would be in full colour. And since colour plays a part in the story (I won’t spoil it by telling you how), I think that I can’t review that aspect of this book. The other thing I found was that the art style was not for me, but that it particularly suited the story of The Giver, so I could appreciate that they made a good choice in that. And the last thing was that there was a lot of text on each page, considering that it’s a graphic novel. But, I also understand that they needed to do that in order for the story to make complete sense. So, if you’re already a fan of The Giver, or think that this kind of story is for you (and you like the art on the cover), I recommend it.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie (aka WW)

    I love The Giver. I have read the book and seen the movie a couple of times, since my son was first assigned to read it in middle school. I agree with those who call it a classic and compare it to 1984 and Animal Farm. The graphic form works really well for the book, especially in the way colors are introduced. It’s true to the book in all ways. Recommended both to those who have and haven’t read the original.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Meghan

    The Giver is such a perfect book for a graphic novel. This had a wonderful use of color and it reminded me of how much I love the original book!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Carr

    I'm always a little nervous when a book or story I loved is turned into a graphic novel, but I was NOT disappointed by this book. Russell's illustrations are the perfect pairing for Lowry's text. If you loved, The Giver, and it's been a while, I highly recommend revisiting it with this graphic novel.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Christy

    If ever my house was burning down, the physical item I’d rush to save is my collected copy of The Giver Quartet. See, not only is it signed, but it’s the only book I’ve read multiple times. It’s a rare book that I can explain the whole story, have deep conversations about the imagery and allegory and politicalness contained within. I first read this book when I was 10 years old. My reading comprehension has significantly improved as an adult. How I functioned in gifted classes my whole life rema If ever my house was burning down, the physical item I’d rush to save is my collected copy of The Giver Quartet. See, not only is it signed, but it’s the only book I’ve read multiple times. It’s a rare book that I can explain the whole story, have deep conversations about the imagery and allegory and politicalness contained within. I first read this book when I was 10 years old. My reading comprehension has significantly improved as an adult. How I functioned in gifted classes my whole life remains a mystery. Actually, I think it’s because I spent a lot of time listening to others interpret books (it’s the one time I am silent, if you can believe that). I remember vividly reading this book (after reading The Incredible Journey) and I remember feeling very lost and naive. I didn’t have adults to discuss the themes of sameness and lack of choice. To discuss utopia and dystopia. I wish I had and I hope the next generation reading this story does. Every time I read this story, I find something new. Reading it in graphic novel form took that to a new level, even after seeing it played out in film. This is a very faithful adaptation, including a scene where Jonas bathes an elderly woman that is often missed in other visual adaptations. Today I caught the feeling of the Christmas scene, where Jonas learns of love for the first time. The scene was vividly portrayed and is now forever implanted in my mind, much like I have received the memory myself. The art is stunning, not presented in black and white but also utilizing blue in a way that adds to the story. The tone of the setting is neutral enough to live on. It’s clear the illustrator has skill in book adaptation (they’ve done Neil Gaiman, too). Oh, and in case you’re wondering how much I love this book? Every Kindle I’ve had (starting in 2010) has been named Jonas. My current paperwhite is named Jonas!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    One of my top ten favorite novels now in graphic format. I love the way the illustrator conveys the feeling of the story. First in black and white and then transforming to color as Jonah's memories come to life. The I read this story, the more meaning is has for me. Just as good as a graphic novel.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Christopher

    Bit more powerful than the book, which is really saying something. Love the story and I think I'll finally go off and read the other three in the series.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Read Between The Vines

    I already adored this story, but now I love how the artist/illustrator portrayed this. It really was like reading the the picture I saw in my head

  17. 5 out of 5

    Stefanie Kellum

    Excellent adaptation of one of my all-time favorite children's classics. 50 million times better than the movie.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kaylabookworm22 L

    I absolutely loved it! I love the original book and this graphic novel version too. It is such a unique story and very well written.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kim

    The GN version of the classic text. Highly worthy of its brilliant source material.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Shepard (Between-the-Shelves)

    Read my full review at between-the-shelves.com! The young adult classic, The Giver, has been adapted into a graphic novel format. When Jonas is selected to be the next Receiver, he doesn’t think much of it at first. After all, it’s just his placement. Who is he to argue with the committee? But they've been hiding a lot from the community, and it's up to Jonas to change that. I received an advanced copy of this book for review from Edelweiss and HMH Young Readers for review. As an avid reader of dy Read my full review at between-the-shelves.com! The young adult classic, The Giver, has been adapted into a graphic novel format. When Jonas is selected to be the next Receiver, he doesn’t think much of it at first. After all, it’s just his placement. Who is he to argue with the committee? But they've been hiding a lot from the community, and it's up to Jonas to change that. I received an advanced copy of this book for review from Edelweiss and HMH Young Readers for review. As an avid reader of dystopian lit, I was super excited to get approved for this book. Especially since The Giver is one of those books that has stuck with me ever since we read it in fifth grade. Plus, I used it as a basis for my Master’s thesis. The story itself lends itself well to a graphic novel format. While the version I read didn’t have the finished images, I can tell that they’ll have a positive impact on the story. Particularly, the use of color emphasizes Jonas’s journey toward knowledge. The more he learns, the more color we get in the book. The only aspect of the story that rubbed me the wrong way was the use of question marks and exclamation marks to show confusion characters. While I understand the point, and might be necessary for the target audience, I think there’s ways to show this in the illustrations instead. But this might be a fill in for the final draft as well; I’ll have to pick up a final copy when it comes out February 5th! This is a strong adaptation that will make a classic story more accessible for the generations to come. Follow me! Blog | Instagram | Twitter | Facebook ****** I thoroughly enjoyed this adaptation; a fuller review to come on Thursday!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ami

    As so many others, the first time I read The Giver, it was in middle school as required reading material. Since then, I blanked out most of it. When I picked up the graphic novel, I knew the story was about a dystopian world that included population control and I distinctly remembered a scene where (view spoiler)[there was a pair of twins born and one was killed to maintain their balance. (hide spoiler)] That was all I remembered. So I was really curious to see how true to the story this adaptati As so many others, the first time I read The Giver, it was in middle school as required reading material. Since then, I blanked out most of it. When I picked up the graphic novel, I knew the story was about a dystopian world that included population control and I distinctly remembered a scene where (view spoiler)[there was a pair of twins born and one was killed to maintain their balance. (hide spoiler)] That was all I remembered. So I was really curious to see how true to the story this adaptation was. But I found that the author didn't gloss over graphic moments to censor kids from what actually happens and I loved that. The illustrations were beautiful. This world is supposed to be in black and white and for an audience today, that's hard to do and hold someone's attention. Luckily, the illustrations have some gray-blue tones to them, so it wasn't just stark black and white, and then they slowly build up to colored images to show Jonas' character growth. The author also does a great job setting up the rules in this society by focusing on 2-3 character memories. I think it's a good book to read in general because kids get some perspective on how lucky they are. Everything is assigned to you in this world. And I mean everything. There's no choice in family, career, your spouse, what happens to you when you get old, your speech, etc. and while there's still some progress to be made in our world, it definitely beats this. Overall, it was a great adaptation and I would say less intimidating to read as a class assignment.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Amber Lefevre

    I'm not going to summarize this because by now you've all either read it or have heard about it. If you haven't read it then I highly recommend this series, even as an adult. I've reread it a half dozen times and the older I get the more I catch. As soon as this adaptation was released I needed to get my hands on it but I patiently waited for my library instead because graphic novels are expensive and I rarely reread them. I love the way the artist rendered everything. When reading the novel it I'm not going to summarize this because by now you've all either read it or have heard about it. If you haven't read it then I highly recommend this series, even as an adult. I've reread it a half dozen times and the older I get the more I catch. As soon as this adaptation was released I needed to get my hands on it but I patiently waited for my library instead because graphic novels are expensive and I rarely reread them. I love the way the artist rendered everything. When reading the novel it's easy to forget that Jonas is still a child but the imagery was a constant reminder of just how young he is. It was much more impactful and intense to see this 11 year old boy experience so much trauma and to be forced to carry the understanding of so much pain. Even though I knew how things ended I found myself sobbing towards the end when they experience starvation and cold and I just 💔💔💔 I really hope they make the entire series into graphic novels because it would be amazing to see the other characters from Russell's perspective. 5/5 ⭐️

  23. 4 out of 5

    Rana

    I first read The Giver 9 years ago with my 5th grade class. I hadn't been terribly interested in the book prior, but I also hadn't taken the time to understand what it would be about. Though there are some difficult scenes, it is a powerful dystopian novel before dystopians became popular. Ultimately, I was glad to have read it with my students so we could share our thoughts and feelings as we read. The graphic novel retelling elicits the same emotions which come with the first one, but the descr I first read The Giver 9 years ago with my 5th grade class. I hadn't been terribly interested in the book prior, but I also hadn't taken the time to understand what it would be about. Though there are some difficult scenes, it is a powerful dystopian novel before dystopians became popular. Ultimately, I was glad to have read it with my students so we could share our thoughts and feelings as we read. The graphic novel retelling elicits the same emotions which come with the first one, but the descriptions are now painted in pictures. The illustrator found a way to show the bland sameness of the setting without sticking to black and white. When the vivid punches of color begin to appear with Jonas's training, you get the same feeling of newness but disappointment that it is only experienced through memory.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Janis

    Ohh...nicely done! I adore Lowry's novel (and yes, I've read all of the books in the series!), and have heard her Newbery Award acceptance speech about the book. I have not wanted to see the movie at all--although perhaps I will now. I've only recently begun to appreciate graphic novels (thanks to my time on the Great Graphic Novels for Teens selection committee), so when this book came from Junior Library Guild, I decided to give it a try. I actually really love it! There is a lot of heart and sou Ohh...nicely done! I adore Lowry's novel (and yes, I've read all of the books in the series!), and have heard her Newbery Award acceptance speech about the book. I have not wanted to see the movie at all--although perhaps I will now. I've only recently begun to appreciate graphic novels (thanks to my time on the Great Graphic Novels for Teens selection committee), so when this book came from Junior Library Guild, I decided to give it a try. I actually really love it! There is a lot of heart and soul in this adaptation. It was fun to see beloved characters come to life, and be chilled by actions of characters from whom you wouldn't expect them (looking at you, Jonas' dad!). The discussions at the end with the authors (especially Russell's) are definitely worth a read, too.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Vince

    (4.5) I really really loved this adaptation; it's a little clunky at times when there's a lot of text in a panel but that's okay with me because it helps stay rigid to the plot of the book. P. Craig Russell's artwork is beautiful, the way he slowly blends in color as Jonas gains the ability to see it, his grays and grayish blues are haunting and set the tone for how bland and simplified the society is. I'm glad this exists and I hope it introduces new readers to this story wonderful and timeless (4.5) I really really loved this adaptation; it's a little clunky at times when there's a lot of text in a panel but that's okay with me because it helps stay rigid to the plot of the book. P. Craig Russell's artwork is beautiful, the way he slowly blends in color as Jonas gains the ability to see it, his grays and grayish blues are haunting and set the tone for how bland and simplified the society is. I'm glad this exists and I hope it introduces new readers to this story wonderful and timeless story.

  26. 5 out of 5

    stop_tolkien_and_read

    I think the appeal of The Giver for me has always been its reliance on the abstract, so I was apprehensive (precision of words) about reading a graphic novel adaptation. That being said, this novel was extremely true to the original story and visually presented the abstract ideas, like the transfer of memories and Jonas's arrival in Elsewhere, well. The reason I didn't give this a full five stars was because I do feel like the story lost some of its magic due to the concrete representation of ab I think the appeal of The Giver for me has always been its reliance on the abstract, so I was apprehensive (precision of words) about reading a graphic novel adaptation. That being said, this novel was extremely true to the original story and visually presented the abstract ideas, like the transfer of memories and Jonas's arrival in Elsewhere, well. The reason I didn't give this a full five stars was because I do feel like the story lost some of its magic due to the concrete representation of abstract ideas, which is not at all the fault of the author and lies completely in the nature of the source material. All in all, it's a beautiful adaptation of a poignant and nostalgic story!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    The Giver is one of my favorite books, and this was an excellent adaptation. The art does change the tone in the beginning so it starts off in a bleaker setting that I felt with the prose novel, but other than that, it felt extremely similar to the book. Art style was fantastic, and the only thing I don't really like is the cover, which I think would be a spoiler for anyone who hasn't read the novel.

  28. 5 out of 5

    katyjanereads

    1. The words went right along with the real book. 2. I wasn't really a fan of the illustrations. 3. I did like the color towards the back. 4. I thought the red of the apple ruined the mystery of what Jonas was "seeing beyond". 5. The Giver looked creepy. 6. If the night crew nurturers suck so bad, why don't they put them in a different position... 7. This is a good book for reluctant readers to step into the real book.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Bkrieth

    Russell's faithful adaptation effectively conveys the nuances of this well known story. Creative choices show Jonas's expanding world knowledge and the transmitting of memory from one character to another. Ideally placed in middle school or above classrooms, this book would make a great scaffold or book pairing with the original, or other contemporary dystopian novels. Due to the pictorial depictions, some themes feel even more mature in this version, for example the presence of and treatment fo Russell's faithful adaptation effectively conveys the nuances of this well known story. Creative choices show Jonas's expanding world knowledge and the transmitting of memory from one character to another. Ideally placed in middle school or above classrooms, this book would make a great scaffold or book pairing with the original, or other contemporary dystopian novels. Due to the pictorial depictions, some themes feel even more mature in this version, for example the presence of and treatment for the"stirrings" come across more explicitly. Don't miss the back matter interviews with Lowry and Russell. I particularly found Russell's description of his process of adaptation fascinating.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Tracey

    This adaptation felt like it was missing the heart of the original book. The story went well with the art and the art magnifies the plot. But I wasn't as engaged as I hoped I would be. I would love to read the rest of the quartet adapted as graphic novels. They might be more enjoyable with art to carry the novel.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.