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The Elf Queen of Shannara

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"Find the Elves and return them to the world of Men!" the shade of the Druid Allanon had ordered Wren. It was clearly an impossible task. The Elves had been gone from the Westland for more than a hundred years. There was not even a trace of their former city of Arborlon left to mark their passing. No one in the Esterland knew of them -- except, finally, the Addershag. The bl "Find the Elves and return them to the world of Men!" the shade of the Druid Allanon had ordered Wren. It was clearly an impossible task. The Elves had been gone from the Westland for more than a hundred years. There was not even a trace of their former city of Arborlon left to mark their passing. No one in the Esterland knew of them -- except, finally, the Addershag. The blind old woman had given instructions to find a place on the coast of the Blue Divide, build a fire, and keep it burning for three days. "One will come for you." Tiger Ty, the Wing Rider, had come on his giant Roc to carry Wren and her friend Garth to the only clear landing site on the island of Morrowindl, where, he said, the Elves might still exist, somewhere in the demon-haunted jungle. Now she stood within that jungle, remembering the warning of the Addershag: "Beward, Elf-girl. I see danger ahead for you . . . and evil beyond imagining." It had proved all too true. Wren stood with her single weapon of magic, listening as demons evil beyond all imagining gathered for attack. How long could she resist? And if, by some miracle, she reached the Elves and could convince them to return, how could they possibly retrace her perilous path to reach the one safe place on the coast?


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"Find the Elves and return them to the world of Men!" the shade of the Druid Allanon had ordered Wren. It was clearly an impossible task. The Elves had been gone from the Westland for more than a hundred years. There was not even a trace of their former city of Arborlon left to mark their passing. No one in the Esterland knew of them -- except, finally, the Addershag. The bl "Find the Elves and return them to the world of Men!" the shade of the Druid Allanon had ordered Wren. It was clearly an impossible task. The Elves had been gone from the Westland for more than a hundred years. There was not even a trace of their former city of Arborlon left to mark their passing. No one in the Esterland knew of them -- except, finally, the Addershag. The blind old woman had given instructions to find a place on the coast of the Blue Divide, build a fire, and keep it burning for three days. "One will come for you." Tiger Ty, the Wing Rider, had come on his giant Roc to carry Wren and her friend Garth to the only clear landing site on the island of Morrowindl, where, he said, the Elves might still exist, somewhere in the demon-haunted jungle. Now she stood within that jungle, remembering the warning of the Addershag: "Beward, Elf-girl. I see danger ahead for you . . . and evil beyond imagining." It had proved all too true. Wren stood with her single weapon of magic, listening as demons evil beyond all imagining gathered for attack. How long could she resist? And if, by some miracle, she reached the Elves and could convince them to return, how could they possibly retrace her perilous path to reach the one safe place on the coast?

30 review for The Elf Queen of Shannara

  1. 5 out of 5

    MC

    The Elf Queen of Shannara, book three of The Heritage of Shannara, is the story of Wren Ohmsford, and her journey to find the Elves and restore them to the Four Lands. This journey is a perilous one, and not just due to the physical dangers she must face to rescue the Elves. She is about to discover facts and truths about herself and the Elves. Truths that will temper her in such a way that either she will emerge stronger than ever before, or she will be emotionally and psychologically destroyed The Elf Queen of Shannara, book three of The Heritage of Shannara, is the story of Wren Ohmsford, and her journey to find the Elves and restore them to the Four Lands. This journey is a perilous one, and not just due to the physical dangers she must face to rescue the Elves. She is about to discover facts and truths about herself and the Elves. Truths that will temper her in such a way that either she will emerge stronger than ever before, or she will be emotionally and psychologically destroyed. As the book begins, Wren and her friend and guardian, Garth, are attempting to contact the Elves via the method they had learned about in the previous book. Eventually, they succeed, and the adventure truly begins. The long and deadly journey towards her heritage and her destiny. I know that I am speaking rather vaguely in how I describe the plot of the book, but that really can't be helped. The plot is straight-forward enough, though very important to the resolution of the conflict of the Heritage books as a whole. So there really isn't much room to describe the plot without giving everything away. So I'll just focus on a few technical merits of the story instead. The tale is a “questing” story, broken up into two main parts. A quest to find the Elves, and a quest to save the Elves. Indeed, in this delineation between two quests, it is similar to the plot of the earlier book, The Elfstones of Shannara. The more important plot is the second quest, just as in Elfstones, but just as in Elfstones, the earlier quest was important in planting the seeds for the ending of the book. One area of praise that Brooks deserves was how he masterfully moved forward the overall meta plot of the Heritage books. The pieces of the puzzle begin to fall into place and they make sense. The reader is puzzled and surprised by various revelations, just as Wren is. Though the attentive reader will figure out some of the details earlier than she did. The way the story was told was both exemplary and sloppy at the same time. On the one hand, Brooks really dragged certain bits out, which was unnecessary. He probably could have cut a good fifty pages or more of padding from the work, and the story would have made just as much sense. On the other hand, he did make even the more boring parts (as well as the heavier or more depressing parts) work better by interspersing them with various tidbits and glimpses of the other characters, to tell us what is happening to them. Not as good as The Druid of Shannara, but still a very enjoyable read.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Carl Alves

    Terry Brooks's Shannara books are usually of the highest quality as far as fantasy novels are concerned, and the Elf Queen is no different. The third novel in the Heritage of Shannara series features Wren Ohmsford as the feature character. Wren has been tasked to return the elves back to the four lands after they fled for some time. She is aided by Stresa, the splinterscat and her companion Garth. The plot in this novel is very well developed and thought it. It moves at a strong pace and is fille Terry Brooks's Shannara books are usually of the highest quality as far as fantasy novels are concerned, and the Elf Queen is no different. The third novel in the Heritage of Shannara series features Wren Ohmsford as the feature character. Wren has been tasked to return the elves back to the four lands after they fled for some time. She is aided by Stresa, the splinterscat and her companion Garth. The plot in this novel is very well developed and thought it. It moves at a strong pace and is filled with neat twists and strong action sequences. It also sets the stage for the finale of the series. Brooks is a very talented writer, which is quite evident in this novel. Wren is a strong female character, which is atypical of most epic fantasy novels and series. If you haven't read the first two novels in the series, you'll want to read them first to get the context of this novel, although it can stand alone. Another strong installment by Terry Brooks, one worth reading. Carl Alves - author of Blood Street

  3. 4 out of 5

    A. Dawes

    As derivative as it was, I really enjoyed The Sword of Shannara, and its less clichéd sequel The Elfstones of Shannara was also great. Kind of kept me reading at that stage of my life. Maybe I had outgrown Brooks by the time I read this one as it didn't resonate nearly as strongly with me. The other reviews here are quite celebratory, I was more at the other end of the spectrum. I didn't loathe it, but I certainly felt it was just an 'OK' read.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    Yes, I am reading this book #3 of the series before the first two. Why? Because my friend Jacques highly, highly recommended it to me, reassuring it works as a standalone, too. But I still have books #1 & 2 in the wings to go back to read. Then it'll just be a matter of tracking down #4... Review time!    Wren has been charged by the shade of Allanon to bring the Elves, missing these last 100 years, back to the Four Lands. Garth, her ever-present mentor and friend, journeys with her through for Yes, I am reading this book #3 of the series before the first two. Why? Because my friend Jacques highly, highly recommended it to me, reassuring it works as a standalone, too. But I still have books #1 & 2 in the wings to go back to read. Then it'll just be a matter of tracking down #4... Review time!    Wren has been charged by the shade of Allanon to bring the Elves, missing these last 100 years, back to the Four Lands. Garth, her ever-present mentor and friend, journeys with her through forests tranquil and menacing, over waters and down rivers, to seek out the lost Land Elves. Along the way they will meet friends and foes who stand testament to the passing through of the Elves, and Wren will have to make important decisions about what she is willing to do to carry out her charge. She will also have to accept the consequences these decisions bring about to her and those she meets, and accept the irrevocable changes they bring about for herself personally and for those she encounters along the way.    The world Brooks created comes alive around as you read, in vivid colors of close relationships and ever-changing mortal dangers. The vividness of the world and notably all of the Wren’s introspection that we are made privy to provide a steady base to understand this world, especially when (as for me) this is the first/only book you have read in Shannara. There is a lot of lore and history behind things, and I’d say that for someone familiar with what came before, it is more than enough information. But for those coming in blind, it’s about half-way to being enough to follow with confidence. I could tell how much there was behind the scenes, how much had happened before, and was able to piece together some of the history of things – but for me, a completionist and someone who loves getting the full story, it was a little thin. (Which honestly just means I’ll go back and start reading from the beginning of this quartet, and later going back to read the Shannara trilogy since I only have the first book of that handy and the first 3 of the books in the Heritage of Shannara quartet handy.)    The most noticeable spots where I felt lost were when we suddenly cut away to scenes of Cogline, Coll, Par, and Walker Boh. I had no idea who these people were, other than that their names had been mentioned as being known by Wren and having their own charges given them by Allanon. Yet, I felt for each of them – I wanted to know more, I was touched by their struggles and the danger they were facing, and they felt just as real as Wren and Garth and Tiger Ty and Stresa and the rest. Maybe part of that interest was because of the changes each of them were undergoing, more external/visible changes to the internal ones Wren was going through. The sort of external changes that they have little choice in, to become someone/thing different, whether or not they want or intend it.    Oddly enough, and probably because of these forced changes, Walker Boh, Coll, and them felt more solid and real to me than many of the Elves that Wren met and the connections she made with them. She felt such strong connections to each of them in so short a time, before even setting out to face dangers instead of talking about them, that I questioned how she could become so attached and so completely in so short a time. Especially as I would think that the nature of her lifestyle as a Rover with Garth would not incline itself to such strong, fast connections until being tested by the fire of fighting for their lives. For some I could find the justification (view spoiler)[(blood ties with her grandmother the Queen) (hide spoiler)] , but for others, they felt sudden and forced (view spoiler)[ namely, the spliced in love interest with Gavilan Elessedil, who is also her cousin - could have done without the romantic part of that emotional connection (hide spoiler)] . And I do not know how much of knowing the story of the first two books could help with that aspect.    Wren’s journey was engaging, and maybe it was because of coming in blind like this, but I felt a disconnect of the actual and perceived danger of the Shadowen and the beasts on Morrowindl. By the second half I had a better grasp of just how dangerous the creatures were, though I was still unprepared for just how deadly it would become for everyone involved.    However, this does not mean that I did not enjoy it – I did, and the scenes of (view spoiler)[Garth’s death (hide spoiler)] brought a tear to my eye, largely because of the long history we were witness to in the lead up to that moment. It is a rich world, full of danger and complicated cultures/societies/politics, and I want to know more. But deeper than the politics and the physical danger is the questions it poses about destiny and fate, about choice and when a choice is really no choice at all. And, of course, about who we are – who we want to be, and who we find ourselves becoming through events beyond our control when a choice is really no choice at all, and learning to accept that person, that destiny, that charge with all it entails. Favorite quotes:     “We are given our destiny in life by something we can neither understand nor control, and it binds us to our future as surely as any magic.” [said Eowen] page 136     “[…] We are both victims of circumstances set in motion three hundred years ago, and we would neither of us be so if we had the choice. But we don’t. And it does no good to rail against what has been done to us. (view spoiler)[So, Walker, do something to turn things to your advantage. Do as you are fated, become what you must, and then act in whatever ways you perceive to be right.” [Cogline said.] – page 173    How had they let it all come to this, these people with so many years of experience in using the magic, these faerie folk brought into the new world out of the devastation of the old by lessons they could not have failed to learn? Surely they must have had some small inkling of the dangers they would encounter when they began to make nature over in their own ill-conceived image. Surely they must have realized something was wrong. Yet time’s passage had rendered the Elves as human as the other Races, changed them from faerie creatures to mortals, and altered their perceptions and their knowledge. Why shouldn’t they be as prone to make mistakes as anyone else—as anyone else had, in fact, from Druids to Men? – page 232 (hide spoiler)]    Responsibility did not begin and end with personal needs—Garth had taught her that much. She was a part of everything about her, and not only survival but the measure of her life was directly related to whether she accepted that truth. She could not back away from the unpleasantness of the world; she could not forget its pain. – page 232    There was an ache in her heart on such perfect days, a longing that they could last forever stitched against the knowledge that tomorrow would be different, that in life few promises were given. – page 351 Typos: The demons sleep when its hottest. – page 88 – should be “it’s” …at the screen of Vog, and at the dark… -- page 235 – “Vog” should not be capitalized (“vog”)

  5. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    Best in the cycle up to this point, probably my favorite Shannara book yet. Lots of continuous action, good dramatic tension, nice character development. And Wren is cool.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Rick

    Having been given three separate quests from the The Heritage of Shannara 4-part story line divides the books up to a focus on each one of those parties. In The Elf Queen of Shannar (the 3rd book in The Heritage of Shannara) each quest is talked about, but Wren Ohmsford's trek to find the lost Elves of Arborlon is given the most space in this book. Throughout the story the reader will be introduced to interesting gains and losses where characters are concerned as well as the occasional interesti Having been given three separate quests from the The Heritage of Shannara 4-part story line divides the books up to a focus on each one of those parties. In The Elf Queen of Shannar (the 3rd book in The Heritage of Shannara) each quest is talked about, but Wren Ohmsford's trek to find the lost Elves of Arborlon is given the most space in this book. Throughout the story the reader will be introduced to interesting gains and losses where characters are concerned as well as the occasional interesting plot twist. Brooks holds to his tried and true formula for fantasy writing introducing characters that, once again, are full of self-doubt and insecurities that fill many a page. He also introduces characters that are somewhat the comic relief, but usually in either extremely carefree and stupid ways or in ways that drip sarcasm or some sort passive/aggressive-ness. Now that I am firmly entrenched in the Sword of Shannara series I am beginning to find this oft repeated formula a little tiring....but Brooks does have a way of keeping you from getting bored...formula though it may be. I am hoping that by the series' end he changes things up a bit and revisits some of the creative plots and developments he explored and wrote about in the prequel books to the original trilogy.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Fredrick Danysh

    Wren Oldsman is sent on a quest to find the missing elves who have disappeared from the Four Lands. Accompanied on her quest by her faithful mentor, Wren encounters many dangers and monsters. Along the way she will learn much about the magic of the elfstones.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kristen Lancia

    Just so, so good!!! The best in the Shannara series up to this point. I read it too quickly, but I could not put it down.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jasmyn

    I've been looking forward to Wren's story for awhile now. I love her character and I love elves - so it was a great combo. Her quest to find the long lost elves takes quite a few twists and turns until she finds her lucky break - the hag that finally has many of the answers she's looking for, but it only gets more dangerous and exciting from there. When she finds the island the elves have retreated to, it isn't anything she expected. Taken over by demons, she is forced to discover some very hard I've been looking forward to Wren's story for awhile now. I love her character and I love elves - so it was a great combo. Her quest to find the long lost elves takes quite a few twists and turns until she finds her lucky break - the hag that finally has many of the answers she's looking for, but it only gets more dangerous and exciting from there. When she finds the island the elves have retreated to, it isn't anything she expected. Taken over by demons, she is forced to discover some very hard truths to find her way there safely. She meets some really great creatures along the way and I loved learning about them and what they were and how they came about being there. Each has it's only very important part to play in her quest - even if their parts aren't entirely clear at first. The elves themselves have quite a few secrets to hide - none of which are good. As Wren discovers the truth of why they left and what they have done since, she's faced with a crisis of conscience about helping them return to their old world. Brilliantly written, I was on the edge of my seat as it all unfolded. There's a lot of great epic moments of heroism from just about every person in the story. Terry Brooks isn't afraid to let Wren's friends steal the spotlight for their moment in the sun and a chance to save the day. There were some sad moments and a few of the characters I've grown to love do not make it through the book - but that only made me love those characters even more. Again, the only downfall was that I wish I could see what the other main characters from the previous books were up to while Wren was on her quest. We get bits and pieces, but I feel like their stories could have been merged a bit more so they weren't "forgotten" when their story wasn't being told. - See more at: http://hotofftheshelves.blogspot.com/...

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jon Borah

    SUMMARY: "Find the Elves and return them to the world of Men!" the shade of the Druid Allanon had ordered Wren.It was clearly an impossible task. The Elves had been gone from the Westland for more than a hundred years. There was not even a trace of their former city of Arborlon left to mark their passing. No one in the Esterland knew of them -- except, finally, the Addershag.The blind old woman had given instructions to find a place on the coast of the Blue Divide, build a fire, and keep it burni SUMMARY: "Find the Elves and return them to the world of Men!" the shade of the Druid Allanon had ordered Wren.It was clearly an impossible task. The Elves had been gone from the Westland for more than a hundred years. There was not even a trace of their former city of Arborlon left to mark their passing. No one in the Esterland knew of them -- except, finally, the Addershag.The blind old woman had given instructions to find a place on the coast of the Blue Divide, build a fire, and keep it burning for three days. "One will come for you."Tiger Ty, the Wing Rider, had come on his giant Roc to carry Wren and her friend Garth to the only clear landing site on the island of Morrowindl, where, he said, the Elves might still exist, somewhere in the demon-haunted jungle.Now she stood within that jungle, remembering the warning of the Addershag: "Beward, Elf-girl. I see danger ahead for you . . . and evil beyond imagining." It had proved all too true.Wren stood with her single weapon of magic, listening as demons evil beyond all imagining gathered for attack. How long could she resist?And if, by some miracle, she reached the Elves and could convince them to return, how could they possibly retrace her perilous path to reach the one safe place on the coast?

  11. 5 out of 5

    Dark-Draco

    This is the 3rd book in the second series set in Shannara! Wren Ohmsford has been tasked with finding the Elves, who disappeared generatiosn ago, and bringing them back to the present world. Although reluctant to do so, she finds the puzzle curious, and soon she is travelling to the coast on the words of an old Seer. With her friend, Garth, she makes the perrilous journey to the island of Morrowindl, which is a nightmare of deep jungle, barren wasteland and rocky shores. The whole is haunted by This is the 3rd book in the second series set in Shannara! Wren Ohmsford has been tasked with finding the Elves, who disappeared generatiosn ago, and bringing them back to the present world. Although reluctant to do so, she finds the puzzle curious, and soon she is travelling to the coast on the words of an old Seer. With her friend, Garth, she makes the perrilous journey to the island of Morrowindl, which is a nightmare of deep jungle, barren wasteland and rocky shores. The whole is haunted by demons and no-one who has landed there before has made it back alive. Somewhere, Wren must find a trace of the Elves and learn about her heritage...and her future. Another fantastic Shannara book. This is such an amazing world and I love revisiting it again and again. Like most fantasies, Wren is a reluctant heroine, but her 'journey' is portrayed as being more 'realistic' than your normal hero. It is so sad in places too, but each character is beautifully drawn by the author and their fates appropriate to each. The last few chapters are a whirlwind, really fast-paced and drawing you on to read to the end. I can't wait to read the last in the series to find out how Wren, and the other Scions, fare in the war against the Shadowen.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Squire

    Book #16/29 on my Epic Shannara Quest. This is one of those books that tells a similar story that has already been told (though to be fair, this one was published first). The story of the Loden Elfstone and how it once saved the Elves was also related in The Elves of Cintra, which was book #5 in my quest due to it's chronological placement in the Shannara series. For me, the best parts of this book dealt with Par Ohmsford and Walker Boh (and they came in the last quarter of the book.) The main st Book #16/29 on my Epic Shannara Quest. This is one of those books that tells a similar story that has already been told (though to be fair, this one was published first). The story of the Loden Elfstone and how it once saved the Elves was also related in The Elves of Cintra, which was book #5 in my quest due to it's chronological placement in the Shannara series. For me, the best parts of this book dealt with Par Ohmsford and Walker Boh (and they came in the last quarter of the book.) The main storyline of Elf Queen was passable, though it did not really come to life for me. And the secrets revealed were what I suspected all along and not much of a surprise. But the potential for a great finale to this series exists and I'm looking forward to the next installment.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ian yarington

    I've been very impressed with the direction of the series and even though I've enjoyed the fact that each book before followed a different set of Ohmsford's it was nice to have this run follow the same set of characters. I love each of them equally and Wren is a great addition to the Ohmsford's as well as a much needed strong female character. Excited for the conclusion of this part of the books and to see where Brooks takes the next set.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Allen Garvin

    Easily the best book of the second Shannara series, with Wren being sent on a journey to bring the elves back to Shannara, from wherever they vanished to. This contains a tight plot and some very harrowing scenes, the scariest since Elfstones. Unfortunately, it breaks off every now and then to tell the stories of the other characters on their separate quests. Unless you're reading the whole series, just skip those parts altogether. This would have made a very good stand-alone novel, instead of a Easily the best book of the second Shannara series, with Wren being sent on a journey to bring the elves back to Shannara, from wherever they vanished to. This contains a tight plot and some very harrowing scenes, the scariest since Elfstones. Unfortunately, it breaks off every now and then to tell the stories of the other characters on their separate quests. Unless you're reading the whole series, just skip those parts altogether. This would have made a very good stand-alone novel, instead of a gem among lumps of coal.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Hone Haapu

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. A refreshingly decent book in the series. The action turns to Wren and Garth, and their "charge" to bring the Elves back to the world of men. As in his previous books, things seem to happen a little too conveniently and quickly for my liking in this series, and at times it feels like I am reading an abridged version. This book also plays host to a plethora of characters, and it works. Even to the point of slowly killing them all off toward the end. Overall I enjoyed Wren's decent into the jaws o A refreshingly decent book in the series. The action turns to Wren and Garth, and their "charge" to bring the Elves back to the world of men. As in his previous books, things seem to happen a little too conveniently and quickly for my liking in this series, and at times it feels like I am reading an abridged version. This book also plays host to a plethora of characters, and it works. Even to the point of slowly killing them all off toward the end. Overall I enjoyed Wren's decent into the jaws of hell and back again. A nice fantasy jaunt.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jennie

    I really wanted to like this one, since I liked the first three books very much. However, the second set started out weak and by the time I got to Elf Queen, I had the distinct impression that Terry Brooks was as eager to get it over with as I was. I saw none of the care he took in Sword, Elfstones, or Wishsong, and felt he took too much time with trivial details and not enough time in making me believe the characters. A huge disappointment for me.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Elar

    It looks like TB has something going on here as this book was full of captivating adventure and kept up the pace. I have to point out that characters are too insecure and book has same repeating patterns used previously in series, but plot twists compensated if quite nicely.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    Fun and interesting story. Great imagery and visualization. A bit predictable in many parts, but overall a fun read which is what the Shannara books are all about.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy Michael Gallen

    The third and penultimate entry of author Terry Brooks’ Heritage of Shannara tetralogy opens with the eponymous character (who is not the protagonist), Ellenroh Elessedil, the Queen of the Elves, watching the active volcano Killeshan appear ominous. Wren Ohmsford serves as the chief heroine of the story, meeting the Addershag and learning that the caves of the Rocs hold the answer to whether Elves still exist in Shannara. She and her companion Garth eventually see of the legendary avians, during The third and penultimate entry of author Terry Brooks’ Heritage of Shannara tetralogy opens with the eponymous character (who is not the protagonist), Ellenroh Elessedil, the Queen of the Elves, watching the active volcano Killeshan appear ominous. Wren Ohmsford serves as the chief heroine of the story, meeting the Addershag and learning that the caves of the Rocs hold the answer to whether Elves still exist in Shannara. She and her companion Garth eventually see of the legendary avians, during which lupine Shadowen that had been pursuing them attack. They quickly meet the Wing Rider Tiger Ty, who joins the two travelers. Their next destination is the island Morrowindl, with another companion, the Splinterscat Stresa, soon accompanying them, and leading them through the jungle In Ju. Yet another companion joins their party, a Tree Squeak ultimately named Faun, and the Elf Aurin Striate, or Owl, escorts them to the Elven city of Arborlon, where they meet the Queen. Demons eventually attack, the Eleven High Council is convened, and Wren receives the mission of transporting the city back to the Westland via a method known as the Loden. The other characters previously introduced in the tetralogy, don’t receive chapters until late into the novel, with Coil Ohmsford, for instance, still incarcerated by Rimmer Dall. A conflict with the spider-like Wisteron concludes the third installment, which is generally enjoyable, with plenty of action and mythos to go around, and generally being a straightforward fantasy novel, although as usual, some may find Brooks’ name choices for the characters, and occasionally the places, to be odd. That the series occurs in our world in a distant post-doomsday future is also generally an afterthought, with little reference given to this backstory. Regardless, those who appreciated the prior two entries of the tetralogy will most likely enjoy the third, and I very much look forward to reading the concluding story.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Maria Rose

    At least in this book, our author didn't repeat himself as he did in the first two books of this series. The main part of this story deals mainly with Wren finding the Elves and bring them back to the Four Lands, helped along the way by her learning to use the Elfstones and the help from her faithful teacher Garth, who gave her a final lesson on his death about the poison of the Shadowen. She made the travel to find the Elves who moved themselves using magic via the Loden stone from Arborlon to At least in this book, our author didn't repeat himself as he did in the first two books of this series. The main part of this story deals mainly with Wren finding the Elves and bring them back to the Four Lands, helped along the way by her learning to use the Elfstones and the help from her faithful teacher Garth, who gave her a final lesson on his death about the poison of the Shadowen. She made the travel to find the Elves who moved themselves using magic via the Loden stone from Arborlon to the island called Morrowindl. But the use of the magic has a price because you need to understand and control the use. Just like with the Druids, uncontrolled use of the magic by the Elves created a hell environment outside their magical wall of protection. Wren had to pass through this environment of creatures to reach the Elves aided by two creatures Stresa, a Splinterscat and Faun, a Tree Squeak. She gains entry into the city of Elves to find out that she, Wren, is the granddaughter of the Queen of the Elessedil line. The magic use of the Loden stone was explained to Wren, to explain how the Elves moved to Moorwindl and how they would go back to the Four lands carried by a group of nine, including the Tree Squeak and the Splintercat. By the time they reach the beach area of the island to be rescued, only Wren, Triss the captain of the Home Guard and the two creatures are left to be rescued by Tiger Ty a Wing Elf with his Roc, Spirit. We know that Par has the Sword of Shannara, given him by Rimmel Dall, chief Shadowen, even though he has figured out the magic of it yet. Morgan has been given back his Sword of Leah and Walker Boh has entered the Halls of Paranor and figured out how to pass the test of becoming the last Druid. Now all that is left is how to combine the talismans together to battle the Shadowen.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Chip Hunter

    I've been reading all of the Shannara books in order, and up until this one, they have been getting better and better. Not so with The Elf Queen of Shannara. For some reason that I can't quite put my finger on, this book just didn't pull me in the same way the others did. I think this mostly stems from the heroine's frustrating mental battles with her identity and purpose/fate. Wren Ohmsford just never really came to life for me as the other Shannara children have, with her constant self-pity an I've been reading all of the Shannara books in order, and up until this one, they have been getting better and better. Not so with The Elf Queen of Shannara. For some reason that I can't quite put my finger on, this book just didn't pull me in the same way the others did. I think this mostly stems from the heroine's frustrating mental battles with her identity and purpose/fate. Wren Ohmsford just never really came to life for me as the other Shannara children have, with her constant self-pity and annoying confusion as to what she wants in life. I think that Terry actually realized this problem and spent a good deal of time and energy trying (and failing) to make Wren understandable. The book is frustrating to read as nearly every page contains repetitious attempts to explain Wren's feelings. It is my belief that Brooks himself never really knew or liked his main character for this book, and its a shame too because Wren had a lot of potential and the plot of this book could have been worked into a very exciting tale. Also, the other characters in this book are for the most part more typical of Brooks' books, being determined, honorable, and cool (in other words, fun to read about). Hopefully the Heritage and Shannara will pick up the pace and focus on more likable characters. If so, the series will be redeemed and I'd recommend it to anyone.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan D

    *Re-read I have mixed feelings on this one. On the one hand, when I read this book the first time, I loved it and it really propelled me into the fourth and final book of the series. However, this time around I found it boring. I will provide my thoughts from both times but my rating will relfect the first time I read it. While learning about Wren and Garth and their journey to restore the elves is interesting, it was really boring. Brooks really spreads out a story that could have been told in a *Re-read I have mixed feelings on this one. On the one hand, when I read this book the first time, I loved it and it really propelled me into the fourth and final book of the series. However, this time around I found it boring. I will provide my thoughts from both times but my rating will relfect the first time I read it. While learning about Wren and Garth and their journey to restore the elves is interesting, it was really boring. Brooks really spreads out a story that could have been told in a novella format. Personally, I think he should have mushed this book together with "The Druid of Shannara" and the back and forth action and the cuts therein would make it a better read. However, the book is still good. The one-by-one lossess of the group of 9 was great and the scenes with Walker and Cogline were awesome. Despite my trouble rereading it, I still feel excited to read The Talismans of Shannara again. For more of my review, you can check out The Knights Roundtable Podcast on Podbean. Overall, ok book, but not Brooks' best. Definitely in his bottom half. 5.7 out of 10.(Sorry Brooks, still love ya).

  23. 5 out of 5

    Sean McBride

    Once again Terry Brooks comes up with a unique storyline, for a unique world, but ends up boring the reader to death with minutia. The previous book, The Druid of Shannara, had the same issue as this one. The fourth book cannot happen, unless Wren succeeds on her quest. So this entire book has basically been rendered useless with the way Brooks has set the series up. There are small surprises here and there, and there is actually quite a death toll in this one, but every death that could mean so Once again Terry Brooks comes up with a unique storyline, for a unique world, but ends up boring the reader to death with minutia. The previous book, The Druid of Shannara, had the same issue as this one. The fourth book cannot happen, unless Wren succeeds on her quest. So this entire book has basically been rendered useless with the way Brooks has set the series up. There are small surprises here and there, and there is actually quite a death toll in this one, but every death that could mean something is basically just glazed over to focus on fears about the quest itself. We have spent far too many pages in "The Heritage of Shannara" hemming and hawing with the characters over what to do, when we could just be focusing on other things. I'm hoping the last book in the series brings back some of the brightness that the original series had and the first book in this series started us out with.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jade Aspinall

    *4.5/5 Stars* I really enjoyed this one. It has you gripped from the moment Wren enters Morrowindl. I think I prefer this one to the others, but then that just might be because it's been months since I read the second book of this series. I also like how this one ties much better with the rest of the Heritage series - from what I remember, the second one had its own completely new story, whereas this one tied in with the Demons on Morrowindl and the Shadowen in the Four Lands. I've missed this wor *4.5/5 Stars* I really enjoyed this one. It has you gripped from the moment Wren enters Morrowindl. I think I prefer this one to the others, but then that just might be because it's been months since I read the second book of this series. I also like how this one ties much better with the rest of the Heritage series - from what I remember, the second one had its own completely new story, whereas this one tied in with the Demons on Morrowindl and the Shadowen in the Four Lands. I've missed this world, and I love TB's world-building, so it's straight on to the next one.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Grismund

    It was fine. Like all the books in this series, it could have been 2/3 the size and better. Brooks should have made this series 3 part. Every book has these long periods of redundant introspection by the main characters. It goes: Action sequence Moment of rest Main character thinks about what just happened. Main character thinks about how far they've come. Main character doubts they can move forward. Repeat. Lots of introspective filler that didn't further the characters. Other than that, the story It was fine. Like all the books in this series, it could have been 2/3 the size and better. Brooks should have made this series 3 part. Every book has these long periods of redundant introspection by the main characters. It goes: Action sequence Moment of rest Main character thinks about what just happened. Main character thinks about how far they've come. Main character doubts they can move forward. Repeat. Lots of introspective filler that didn't further the characters. Other than that, the story was fine.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Gary Parker

    Terry Brooks' Shannara series is solid, classic fantasy and I have thoroughly enjoyed the journey he's taken me on. But I've always found Brooks' writing lacking in important ways, leaving me unable to rank his work with the truly great writers. This book finally rises to that level and I am happy to give it a full five star rating and a hearty recommendation. The journey has been well worth the payoff in The Elf Queen of Shannara, and I look forward to reading the final chapter of the Heritage Terry Brooks' Shannara series is solid, classic fantasy and I have thoroughly enjoyed the journey he's taken me on. But I've always found Brooks' writing lacking in important ways, leaving me unable to rank his work with the truly great writers. This book finally rises to that level and I am happy to give it a full five star rating and a hearty recommendation. The journey has been well worth the payoff in The Elf Queen of Shannara, and I look forward to reading the final chapter of the Heritage series soon.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Joey

    A challenging read, not because it's poorly written but because the protagonist's journey is so emotionally grueling, and Brooks tracks and catalogs it so thoroughly and skillfully. As frightening events scrape away the innocence and confidence of the main characters, the reader finds themselves experiencing similar discomfort. It can be almost challenging to turn another page because you find yourself wondering how much more tragedy you can handle. This strong and deep character development has A challenging read, not because it's poorly written but because the protagonist's journey is so emotionally grueling, and Brooks tracks and catalogs it so thoroughly and skillfully. As frightening events scrape away the innocence and confidence of the main characters, the reader finds themselves experiencing similar discomfort. It can be almost challenging to turn another page because you find yourself wondering how much more tragedy you can handle. This strong and deep character development has become Brooks' forte, and the Elf Queen of Shannara is a strong continuation of his talents.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Bill Meehan

    Wren is a great character, in this, the 3rd of the Heritage series. While most of the heroes til this point have been wishy washy as far as taking on their quests and using their magical skills, Wren is a woman who takes charge and once her path is set, goes all in. Adding to the list of strong women, along with Quickening and Damson in the Heritage series. Walker Boh's story is continued also, as he a changes greatly as he tries to restore the Druids. Par and Coll's story is advanced very little Wren is a great character, in this, the 3rd of the Heritage series. While most of the heroes til this point have been wishy washy as far as taking on their quests and using their magical skills, Wren is a woman who takes charge and once her path is set, goes all in. Adding to the list of strong women, along with Quickening and Damson in the Heritage series. Walker Boh's story is continued also, as he a changes greatly as he tries to restore the Druids. Par and Coll's story is advanced very little in this edition.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Rick (from Another Book Vlog)

    Okay, I'm finally punting on this series. Re-reading it as an adult (after reading it for the first time in my late teens). It's just awful. So awful that I made it through 3 books in a 4-book series and I'm giving up. I don't care what happens anymore. It's all so boring, so needlessly drawn out. I can't stand Brooks' writing style anymore (recapping everything constantly, withholding information just to create suspense when it serves no narrative purpose, etc.). I'm done. I might be selling my Okay, I'm finally punting on this series. Re-reading it as an adult (after reading it for the first time in my late teens). It's just awful. So awful that I made it through 3 books in a 4-book series and I'm giving up. I don't care what happens anymore. It's all so boring, so needlessly drawn out. I can't stand Brooks' writing style anymore (recapping everything constantly, withholding information just to create suspense when it serves no narrative purpose, etc.). I'm done. I might be selling my Brooks collection after this. There are just so many better books out there. Why this?

  30. 4 out of 5

    Henna-Juulia

    In my opinion this book was better than the Scion's of Shannara but not as good as the Druid of Shannara. Like the first book many of the characters and the relationships between them felt underdeveloped and the plot was predictable at times. However the scenary was new and inspiring and I got more invested with Vren and her new furry friends than I did with Par in the first book. Also the follow up chapters about Valker were fascinating. I am intrigued to find out what will happen with the char In my opinion this book was better than the Scion's of Shannara but not as good as the Druid of Shannara. Like the first book many of the characters and the relationships between them felt underdeveloped and the plot was predictable at times. However the scenary was new and inspiring and I got more invested with Vren and her new furry friends than I did with Par in the first book. Also the follow up chapters about Valker were fascinating. I am intrigued to find out what will happen with the characters in the last book.

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