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Unfu*k Yourself: Get Out of Your Head and Into Your Life

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Have you ever felt like a hamster on a wheel, furiously churning your way through life but somehow going nowhere? It seems like there’s a barrage of information surrounding us in our everyday lives with the keys to this thing or that thing, be it wealth, success, happiness or purpose. The truth is, most of it fails to capture what it truly takes to overcome our greatest ba Have you ever felt like a hamster on a wheel, furiously churning your way through life but somehow going nowhere? It seems like there’s a barrage of information surrounding us in our everyday lives with the keys to this thing or that thing, be it wealth, success, happiness or purpose. The truth is, most of it fails to capture what it truly takes to overcome our greatest barrier to a greater life…ourselves. What if everything you ever wanted resided in you like a well of potential, waiting to be expressed? Unfu*k Yourself is the handbook for the resigned and defeated, a manifesto for real life change and unleashing your own greatness.


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Have you ever felt like a hamster on a wheel, furiously churning your way through life but somehow going nowhere? It seems like there’s a barrage of information surrounding us in our everyday lives with the keys to this thing or that thing, be it wealth, success, happiness or purpose. The truth is, most of it fails to capture what it truly takes to overcome our greatest ba Have you ever felt like a hamster on a wheel, furiously churning your way through life but somehow going nowhere? It seems like there’s a barrage of information surrounding us in our everyday lives with the keys to this thing or that thing, be it wealth, success, happiness or purpose. The truth is, most of it fails to capture what it truly takes to overcome our greatest barrier to a greater life…ourselves. What if everything you ever wanted resided in you like a well of potential, waiting to be expressed? Unfu*k Yourself is the handbook for the resigned and defeated, a manifesto for real life change and unleashing your own greatness.

30 review for Unfu*k Yourself: Get Out of Your Head and Into Your Life

  1. 5 out of 5

    Skyler Autumn

    3.5 Stars Should I read into the fact my mom gifted me with this book? Gary John Bishop embraces his Scottish decent in his no nonsense, get your shit together diatribe in the astutely titled self help book UnF*ck Yourself. The book is broken into seven personal assertions that are labelled and then thoroughly broken down and explained in repetitive detail. I am willing I am wired to win I got this I embrace uncertainty I am not my thoughts: I am what I do I am relentless I expect nothing and accept 3.5 Stars Should I read into the fact my mom gifted me with this book? Gary John Bishop embraces his Scottish decent in his no nonsense, get your shit together diatribe in the astutely titled self help book UnF*ck Yourself. The book is broken into seven personal assertions that are labelled and then thoroughly broken down and explained in repetitive detail. I am willing I am wired to win I got this I embrace uncertainty I am not my thoughts: I am what I do I am relentless I expect nothing and accept everything Like most self help books Gary John Bishop isn't reinventing the wheel but to me most self help books aren't informing you of anything you didn't already know, they are simply reminding you with gusto and enthusiasm that you are responsible for your own life. No one is going to help you get that better job, lose the weight, get your soul mate that is always in the end going to come down to you. It is all stuff we as human's are aware of at the bottom of our excuse ridden hearts, but sometimes you need that little reminder that it's time to make some actual change. The chapter that most resonated with me was, I am not my thoughts: I am what I do. This chapter plays against the running theme in most self help books these days where you are told to put out positive energy and you will be rewarded with positivity, make that dream board and the universe will provide you with your dreams. This book takes that hippie dippie nonsense and puts it plainly thought without action does jack shit for your life. Although being a positive person might be a nice comfort at the end of the day if you're ultimate goal is to marry your dream guy but spend your days in bed watching Netflix don't expect those thoughts to snuggle you at night. Some of the most successful people in the world have depression, anxiety, and addiction they are far from the epitome of happiness because at the end of the days it's going to be that day-to-day grind that will ultimately change your life and not that happy thought you put out into the universe once in a blue moon. You can't wait for mental contentment to help you get in the mood to go to the gym, it's those that go when they are sick, sad or lazy that will have your dream body. So stop just thinking and start actually doing. All and all I enjoyed this read it is short and definitely not sweet but I think we are babied and coddled too much and it's nice to have a realist come in, give you a mental slap and say get your shit together!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Fernando Gros

    Despite an eye-catching title and the promise of edgy, life-changing advice, this little self-help book really doesn't deliver. Recycled ideas we've heard before, like imagine the life you want the set steps to get there, or lower your expectations to live happily in the moment aren't even the worst of it. This book assumes the reader is wealthy and has total agency in their life. If you are disabled, ill, or have experienced abuse, or institutional marginalisation this book has nothing for you. Despite an eye-catching title and the promise of edgy, life-changing advice, this little self-help book really doesn't deliver. Recycled ideas we've heard before, like imagine the life you want the set steps to get there, or lower your expectations to live happily in the moment aren't even the worst of it. This book assumes the reader is wealthy and has total agency in their life. If you are disabled, ill, or have experienced abuse, or institutional marginalisation this book has nothing for you. And, if you can't remember the time you landed your dream job, or had a family holiday in the Caribbean, then you will probably read the examples and wonder, what am I doing here?

  3. 5 out of 5

    Emma Sea

    Quite liked this. Straight talking, no bullshit, easy language, and a fast read. Bishop details seven "personal assertions" to live your life by: I am willing I am wired to win I got this I embrace uncertainty I am not my thoughts: I am what I do I am relentless I expect nothing and accept everything Laying it out like this make it sound like it's new-agey affirmation, staring into the mirror and repeating "I got this," but it really isn't. Rather it's Bishop telling you to pull your fucking finger out Quite liked this. Straight talking, no bullshit, easy language, and a fast read. Bishop details seven "personal assertions" to live your life by: I am willing I am wired to win I got this I embrace uncertainty I am not my thoughts: I am what I do I am relentless I expect nothing and accept everything Laying it out like this make it sound like it's new-agey affirmation, staring into the mirror and repeating "I got this," but it really isn't. Rather it's Bishop telling you to pull your fucking finger out and DO THE THING. Of all the assertions, the most important is I am not my thoughts: I am what I do. Bishop insists we act, even if/when we don't feel like it. If we don't act, then we need to face the fact we're not willing. I like this approach, but I can see it would be alienating for some people. So, say, for example, you have executive function disorders, Bishop would say being willing means learning and practicing strategies to overcome or work with these. You don't get to say "I want to but I can't." You brain might be telling you you can't, but your brain's thoughts are not you. Hence this book would slot in well with a meditation practice. You will know if you find this approach helpful or annoying.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Edward Lorn

    If you struggle to get out of bed in the morning not because you're disabled but because your own thoughts are keeping you down, try this. It won't help everyone, but it helped me.

  5. 5 out of 5

    ScienceOfSuccess

    Gary's book is short and simple. If you are looking for a change in your life, you will love it! Check my animated review here: >> bit.ly/UnfkYourself <<

  6. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    I listened to this on Audible, where Gary John Bishop's Scottish accent adds priceless enthusiasm and flavor to the material. The material for that matter, is nothing new, just basic self-empowerment tenants. But something about having basic tenants spoken to you in an aggressive Scottish accent is inspiring. It's not a life changing book, but at under 3.5 hours as an audiobook, it did help me change my attitude in a few distinct instances throughout the day. And I can attribute some good days to I listened to this on Audible, where Gary John Bishop's Scottish accent adds priceless enthusiasm and flavor to the material. The material for that matter, is nothing new, just basic self-empowerment tenants. But something about having basic tenants spoken to you in an aggressive Scottish accent is inspiring. It's not a life changing book, but at under 3.5 hours as an audiobook, it did help me change my attitude in a few distinct instances throughout the day. And I can attribute some good days to the good attitude that this book gave me, so I'd say it's worthwhile.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

    As a psychologist I often like to read self-help books my clients might read or my students might encounter. Sometimes I use them to drive home points or offer them as resources. I like to see what is out there. This book is actually pretty good at illustrating basic Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and REBT principles. For that, I would have given it a solid 4 stars! I think it drives home the very very very basics of CBT in a "average citizen" sort of way. However, if you have ANY exposure to ther As a psychologist I often like to read self-help books my clients might read or my students might encounter. Sometimes I use them to drive home points or offer them as resources. I like to see what is out there. This book is actually pretty good at illustrating basic Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and REBT principles. For that, I would have given it a solid 4 stars! I think it drives home the very very very basics of CBT in a "average citizen" sort of way. However, if you have ANY exposure to therapy or CBT or self help then this book is probably nothing new. Additionally, it really doesn't offer any actionable steps or advice on what to do. It tended to be very general. Minus a few stars for that--I could see that being VERY frustrating for people. All in all, it is an excellent first step for many but it is going to be repetitive for those who are at least a little experienced in this genre.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Spencer Borup

    **EDIT** I'm bumping this down from two stars to one, because a paragraph that infuriated me just popped back into my head: toward the end, the author, Gary John Bishop, actually says that medication isn't helpful and is just a crutch, and that if you're depressed then you need to just "get off your ass." That's incredibly harmful advice, and at no point does he give that "I'm not a medical professional" spiel. Fuck that. **EDIT** Meh. If you picked this book based on its title, look elsewhere at **EDIT** I'm bumping this down from two stars to one, because a paragraph that infuriated me just popped back into my head: toward the end, the author, Gary John Bishop, actually says that medication isn't helpful and is just a crutch, and that if you're depressed then you need to just "get off your ass." That's incredibly harmful advice, and at no point does he give that "I'm not a medical professional" spiel. Fuck that. **EDIT** Meh. If you picked this book based on its title, look elsewhere at other irreverent titles like The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck. This book doesn't offer up much new information—though I did love the ideas of neuroplasticity and cognitive restructuring—and seemed to contradict itself quite a bit. The first half: words and what you tell yourself are crucially important; the second half: what you think doesn't matter, just do! The first half: this may be the best self-help book you ever pick up; the second half: self-help books are bullshit! If you do read this, I suggest staying away from the audiobook. The last half hour is the author basically screaming at you in an incredibly annoying whine.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Cindy

    I quite like this book. It's a different approach and a kick in the butt to get you out of a rut. One of the most important bits to take away is that we are not our thoughts but we are what we do. Bishop insists that we need to act, even if we don't feel like it. When we choose not to act, we need to face the fact that we're not willing. Inaction is, in effect, action and can be debilitating and have a domino effect. If you just want a hug and to be told nothing is your fault, well, this probabl I quite like this book. It's a different approach and a kick in the butt to get you out of a rut. One of the most important bits to take away is that we are not our thoughts but we are what we do. Bishop insists that we need to act, even if we don't feel like it. When we choose not to act, we need to face the fact that we're not willing. Inaction is, in effect, action and can be debilitating and have a domino effect. If you just want a hug and to be told nothing is your fault, well, this probably isn't for you. If you want to put your big girl or boy pants on and get on with it and make things happen, then this is a good place to start. Would also be a good gift for a friend or family member who might need a not so subtle kick in the arse. Yep. Definitely recommend.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Catherine

    Not the worst self-help book I’ve read, but not the most memorable either. I do have to say though that Gary John Bishop was very motivating – I liked the 7 personal assertions he broke each chapter down by: 1. I am willing 2. I am wired to win 3. I got this 4. I embrace uncertainty 5. I am not my thoughts; I am what I do 6. I am relentless 7. I expect nothing and accept everything The main idea this book presents is that you can’t just sit around waiting for life to hand you things or for you to be ‘r Not the worst self-help book I’ve read, but not the most memorable either. I do have to say though that Gary John Bishop was very motivating – I liked the 7 personal assertions he broke each chapter down by: 1. I am willing 2. I am wired to win 3. I got this 4. I embrace uncertainty 5. I am not my thoughts; I am what I do 6. I am relentless 7. I expect nothing and accept everything The main idea this book presents is that you can’t just sit around waiting for life to hand you things or for you to be ‘ready’ to face certain challenges that come with making positive changes. Although the message is a good one, the manner in which the author conveys it does come off as a little bit aggressive at times, and I could see how one could be turned off by that. Usually with these types of books, there is an ‘aha moment’ for me, and even though some of his insight was important and something I needed to hear, I just didn’t feel that. For this reason, I have given it a 2, however, if I really think about it, it was probably closer to a 3 as I did enjoy it for the most part – I just didn’t feel as strongly about it as I would have liked. Don't let your mind control you any longer. Stop letting it hold you back with its excuses and distractions and worries. You are not your thoughts. You are your actions. You are what you do. And your actions are the only thing separating you from where you are and where you want to be. This isn't just about seizing the day; this is about seizing the moment, the hour, the week, the month. This is abut seizing your fucking life and staking a claim for yourself as though your life depends on it. Because, the reality is, it does.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Amy Bruestle

    I listened to this in audiobook form. I didn’t finish it because I knew most of the contents already. The information provided, and the way the narrator explains the text, is just right! I like the “REAL” approach that the author takes. This is probably the most honest, down-to-earth self-help book that I have ever read. And I have read quite a few considering my major is in Social Work, specializing in Trauma therapy and Substance Abuse therapy specifically. Great book. Highly recommend!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Darwin8u

    "This is a conversational slap from the universe to wake you up to your true potential, to unfuck yourself, and get spectacularly into your life." - Gary John Bishop, Unfu*k Yourself Gary John Bishop has written a short, interesting, and rather novel self-help book. Well, the title isn't novel. It seems to flow into a rather popular subcategory of self-help book dedicated to "unfu*king, not giving a f*ck, or f*ck feeling". What he's basically doing, I guess, is now referred to as urban philosophy. "This is a conversational slap from the universe to wake you up to your true potential, to unfuck yourself, and get spectacularly into your life." - Gary John Bishop, Unfu*k Yourself Gary John Bishop has written a short, interesting, and rather novel self-help book. Well, the title isn't novel. It seems to flow into a rather popular subcategory of self-help book dedicated to "unfu*king, not giving a f*ck, or f*ck feeling". What he's basically doing, I guess, is now referred to as urban philosophy. Perhaps that means philosophy done while wearing a tee-shirt, or tagged on walls, or making Heidegger, Gadamer, Epicectetus, Seneca, etc., feel like they are hip, modern, and wearing tight, stone-washed jeans. Things sell better when they feel like they are up-to-date. Rebooting stocism works. We've even seen it with mega-churches where the pastors are tattooed and wear Gucci sneakers. The message is sometimes the medium. Still, I did enjoy it. And, it only took a single bath to eat, digest, and accept: 1. "I am willing." 2. "I am wired to win." 3. "I got this." 4. "I embrace uncertainty." 5. "I am not my thoughts, I am what I do." 6. "I am relentless." 7. "I expect nothing and accept everything."

  13. 4 out of 5

    Krista Danis

    I think Bishop is going for the direct, "tough love" type approach with this book, which presumes that the reader is perpetually miserable, lazy, fat, and unsatisfied. These assumptions restrict his meandering diatribe to exactly that which he claims to loathe--a basic mantra-driven self-help trope that lazily posits, "Just do it!," as its main thesis. If that commanding cheer was enough to rip people from the grips of paralyzing fear (of change, unpredictability, the unknown, or even basic disc I think Bishop is going for the direct, "tough love" type approach with this book, which presumes that the reader is perpetually miserable, lazy, fat, and unsatisfied. These assumptions restrict his meandering diatribe to exactly that which he claims to loathe--a basic mantra-driven self-help trope that lazily posits, "Just do it!," as its main thesis. If that commanding cheer was enough to rip people from the grips of paralyzing fear (of change, unpredictability, the unknown, or even basic discomfort), than the first hundreds of books published just like this would have completely erased the market for books just like this. In short, Bishop offers nothing psychologically, philosophically, or socially insightful to the conversation around why we often do things that are self-destructive and misaligned with our ultimate goals. There is potential here, though, as an introductory self-help text if you have literally never read one before.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    It's hard to leave a negative review of this book without falling into one of the many traps we find ourselves falling into as human beings or, as the author puts it, the ways we fu*k ourselves. Fortunately, I don't have to. As a tool for turning one's life around, it could possibly be the most effective book of all time in this regard. Such a statement perplexes me then as to why some people would leave negative reviews such as, "there's nothing new here" or "there's no new information" or "it' It's hard to leave a negative review of this book without falling into one of the many traps we find ourselves falling into as human beings or, as the author puts it, the ways we fu*k ourselves. Fortunately, I don't have to. As a tool for turning one's life around, it could possibly be the most effective book of all time in this regard. Such a statement perplexes me then as to why some people would leave negative reviews such as, "there's nothing new here" or "there's no new information" or "it's too simplistic" etc. But frankly, they're missing the entire point of the book and that is to break down the barriers of those who would not usually consider personal-development books with brute force, the kind of advice you would usually get from a fervent family member. This is the book for people who have a cynical view of the personal-development industry — a cynicism that needs to be rooted out if you are to achieve anything in your life. So if you're somebody who has read a whole bunch of these books as if it's a sport, then perhaps you've fallen into the trap of being overly analytical and figuring things out in your mind rather than reaching out to people who could help you. And I say this because it would be absolutely tragic for someone who genuinely needs help, who genuinely wants to improve their situation, to have their cynicism validated and compounded by some of the negative and unhelpful reviews I've read here. I can't highly recommend this book enough and if you're the slightest bit motivated to improve your life then look no further.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Rodney C.

    Bishop offers nothing new in this book. I'd heard all of it before. Maybe it's the fact that mine was the audio book and he's Scottish. Maybe it's the title. Maybe it's his use of expletives within the book. Not sure. But it gave me just the kick in the groin I needed to put common personal development themes in play... to act. So the sub-title is really on point. Bishop also presents "detachment from outcome" more succinctly than anyone I've read thus far. I had understood it, but found it diffi Bishop offers nothing new in this book. I'd heard all of it before. Maybe it's the fact that mine was the audio book and he's Scottish. Maybe it's the title. Maybe it's his use of expletives within the book. Not sure. But it gave me just the kick in the groin I needed to put common personal development themes in play... to act. So the sub-title is really on point. Bishop also presents "detachment from outcome" more succinctly than anyone I've read thus far. I had understood it, but found it difficult to put into practice in the way it had been presented to me before. By pointing out the difference between formulated goals, and the path to them in the real world, it all came together in a more practical way. Can't say whether or not the dead-tree version would have impacted me this way, but I'd highly recommend this book on anyone's commute. I'm probably going to be revisiting it many more times.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Andy

    The advice is basic stuff about breaking negative thought loops. So the question here is whether someone using F*CK as a bad word and yelling at you in a Scottish accent is particularly helpful to you for getting the message across. For me, not so much. P.S. Got this free from the library.

  17. 4 out of 5

    TheGeekyBlogger

    Read for Review (Edelweiss) Overall Rating: 3.75 Quick Thoughts: While there wasn't anything new in this book, I did like the presentation. This was about self-talk. How to do it, what we are doing wrong, and how you get in your own way. He reminds you to talk in present tense (future tense gives you a way out) and make sure to be kind/inspiring to yourself. He also talks about the self-talk we do about others and that impacts us. He was right on about that! What and how we think of others impacts Read for Review (Edelweiss) Overall Rating: 3.75 Quick Thoughts: While there wasn't anything new in this book, I did like the presentation. This was about self-talk. How to do it, what we are doing wrong, and how you get in your own way. He reminds you to talk in present tense (future tense gives you a way out) and make sure to be kind/inspiring to yourself. He also talks about the self-talk we do about others and that impacts us. He was right on about that! What and how we think of others impacts our attitudes. Overall this is one of the better self-talk books out there and I recommend it! Part of my Read It, Rate It, File It, DONE! Reviews

  18. 4 out of 5

    Liza Fireman

    I'm not a huge fan of self help kind of books, and most of the time also not a fan of books where the author seems to be shouting at the readers. This book really annoyed me at the beginning, but then it got to me. And I think that was something that I needed a reminder of lately. The book consists of short chapters, the names speak for themselves. “I am willing”, “I am wired to win”, “I got this”, “I embrace the uncertainty” , “I am not my thoughts; I am what I do” , “I am relentless”, “I expect I'm not a huge fan of self help kind of books, and most of the time also not a fan of books where the author seems to be shouting at the readers. This book really annoyed me at the beginning, but then it got to me. And I think that was something that I needed a reminder of lately. The book consists of short chapters, the names speak for themselves. “I am willing”, “I am wired to win”, “I got this”, “I embrace the uncertainty” , “I am not my thoughts; I am what I do” , “I am relentless”, “I expect nothing and accept everything”. Gary reminds us to stop when we are on the hamster's wheel. And not to talk badly about ourselves. To stop the self-defeating monolog. Have you ever felt like a hamster on a wheel, furiously churning your way through life but somehow going nowhere? All the while you’re caught in a loop of constant internal chatter and judgement that never stops, a little voice telling you that you’re lazy or stupid or not good enough. You won’t even notice the degree to which you believe it or are drained by it, you’ll just be spending your day working to overcome the stresses and strains, trying to live your life and at various points facing the resignation that if you can’t get your ass off this damned wheel maybe you are never going to get to where you want in life – maybe that happiness you’re after or that weight you want to lose or that career or relationship you crave will remain just out of reach. These pages are dedicated to those that experience that self-defeating monolog. We do talk to ourselves, most of our conversations are with ourselves. Now I am not a huge fan of the think positive mantra, even though I am a huge fan of thinking positive, I don't think that telling people that again and again is actually going to help. But I do agree here with Gary about a few things. The first, is that it is important to not disempower yourself even on the small things: You see, it’s not always dramatic self-talk, sometimes it’s subtle but equally disempowering. If you’re working on something, you might think, “This is so hard. What if I don’t finish in time?” The second, which is well known, is that if we give up or not quite sure that we have a chance, we will probably not succeed. If you’re sometimes talking about how “unfair” life is, you’ll start to act according to that view, perceiving slights where none exist or, as studies have shown, putting less effort into your work because you’ve already determined it won’t accomplish anything. The unfair view will quickly become your reality. That is also true for our teachers, I hope that everyone is aware of the "gifted" fourth graders experiment, and how they were more successful when their teachers were told that they were gifted, even though they were struggling students. The third was declaring unwillingness, which is not different than declaring willingness. Maybe you are in fact, unwilling. In many cases, that may actually be the best answer you can give. Sometimes declaring your unwillingness can be just as powerful as declaring willingness. Are you willing to live with a body that’s And the thing I liked the most was changing the "I will" to "I am" when we want to do something.Assertive self-talk is when you stake a claim for this moment of time, right here and now. When you start to talk in terms of “I am…” or “I embrace…” or “I accept…” or “I assert…”, all of which are powerful and commanding uses of language rather than the narrative of “I will…” or “I’m going to…” The physiological and psychological impact of using in-the-moment, assertive language is not only powerful, it has a very real in-the-moment effect. So take charge of your life. “Stop blaming luck. Stop blaming other people. Stop pointing to outside influences or circumstances.” Take a step back and look at the bigger picture, zoom out and see more clearly. Face your problems as they come, one by one. We are more resilient than we sometimes think or feel:Your boat hasn’t and won’t sink so easily. There may be some waves, you might go through some storms, and you’ll probably end up seasick from time to time, but your journey across that ocean we call life will continue. But just like a captain facing a major squall, you can’t just let yourself be tossed about. You have to step up and steer your life back in the direction you want it to go. So your journey wasn’t as smooth as you wanted it to be. Does that mean you’re just going to let yourself get blown off course? I didn’t think so. And you definitely shouldn’t let what happens in one area of life affect your outlook on the whole. You just can’t afford to allow your struggles at work make you miserable at home or let your relationship troubles affect your mood at the office. Before your new adventure or resolution read this book quickly. Embrace uncertainty because this is where new happens. Remember that every successful person that you know doubted themselves and their path, they just didn't let uncertainty stop them, and the inner voice to scare them. They did it anyway, and we should do it anyway too. Almost 4 stars.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Marvin Franke

    You've heard all these ideas before in different forms. That is possibly true for the majority of the books that promise to improve your life. However, from time to time there is a book that strikes exactly the right tone, finds exactly the right words for you, so it has a real impact on your way of thinking. This book did this for me. I loved its no-bullshit approach, and I can recommend it to anyone who likes a mental slap in the face.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Mehrsa

    Anyone who follows my reviews (all three of you) know that I have a weak spot for dumb self-help books and I have to read one like every month. This one was a good one. It's short, helpful, and a nice reminder to get your expectations in check. Nothing revelatory here, but it's an easy read and I think he's basically right and the advice is sound.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Neffertiti Lee

    Read it with book club. It was a basic self-help book. The message was straightforward and did not have any deep or meaningful insights. While it was warm and fuzzy it did not provide any life or mind altering ideas that were impactful. I was not excited to finish it at all.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jerrie (redwritinghood)

    There is nothing here that is new, but it’s laid out in a very clear way and with an engaging, no nonsense style. If you’ve ever done yoga or meditation, you will probably already know that everyone has negative thoughts and those thoughts are meaningless. Action in spite of negative thought leads to real gains and improvements. That is the gist of this book - if you want to accomplish something, ignore your monkey-mind and just do it.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Bibliovoracious

    I'm not into shouty boot strap boosterism. As though, if you say something louder, with swear words, it's more inspiring. A shallow dabble in well-known (other people's) success strategies- completely forgettable. Luckily, it's only the length of a pamphlet.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sasha

    It was a bit too repetitive for me. It was good at the beginning to be honest but then after repeating the same things over and over again I lost interest. I still listened to the end but yep

  25. 4 out of 5

    Leah Nadeau

    It was okay... Super short read... Not much I'm really taking away from it, but I know of other people who would benefit from it. I mean yea he makes good valid points and everything but they're primitive in the self development world. Also he's pretty repetitive saying the same things over and over again to rally drill it into your head i guess. This made it feel like he was coaching instead of teaching. I did enjoy his humor though and he can be entertaining sometimes. More f bombs than Tony R It was okay... Super short read... Not much I'm really taking away from it, but I know of other people who would benefit from it. I mean yea he makes good valid points and everything but they're primitive in the self development world. Also he's pretty repetitive saying the same things over and over again to rally drill it into your head i guess. This made it feel like he was coaching instead of teaching. I did enjoy his humor though and he can be entertaining sometimes. More f bombs than Tony Robbins lol Some notes: - You talk to yourself a lot even now. The kind of thought impacts your life greatly positive or negative. Positive thoughts are a key aspect to a happy life . - Separate what you’re willing to do and not willing to do and decide - Are you really willing to do what needs to be done to get to what those things you want? Once you decide there will be less guilt resentment - No excuses, time is now, stop procrastinating, replace bad habits with good ones, stop binge watching Netflix stop buying take out on the way home get off the couch

  26. 5 out of 5

    Joseph

    This was a pretty good book designed to teach how to get out of the particular ruts we put ourselves in by telling ourselves we're not good enough or our problems are too large, etc. Practical for sure, and good to put this on paper and read it sometimes. I think this was a self-published book, and had a few grammatical and typographical errors that were a nuisance but shouldn't distract from the overall message. Fast read, worth checking out.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Natalie Park

    The perfect book at the perfect time!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Shabnamroya

    So many said this book reminds you all the things that you already know. I want to say it is true, despite I hate repeated things and advises, this book helped me with it's tough love and frank language. It showed me the truth that I have always known but tried to neglect. I really recommend this book to whomever are in a state of turmoil and distraction in their lives. It is written simple and right into the point.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Mykolas

    I'm not a huge fan of self help books, simply because I've got a pretty good life going that I'm happy about, but more importantly I don't believe there is a book that will change your life for the better, it's actually entirely up to you. But I've recently read "Vertical Mind" (random pick as it's pretty much the only book on audible about improving climbing performance) and realized that there are areas to improve and that I do have some problems to solve not only in climbing, but also in my li I'm not a huge fan of self help books, simply because I've got a pretty good life going that I'm happy about, but more importantly I don't believe there is a book that will change your life for the better, it's actually entirely up to you. But I've recently read "Vertical Mind" (random pick as it's pretty much the only book on audible about improving climbing performance) and realized that there are areas to improve and that I do have some problems to solve not only in climbing, but also in my life. So I've picked the first book on the topic and it happens to be "Unfuck Yourself". Nothing groundbreaking here, but it did some thought provoking for me. Perhaps I did get too comfortable in my life, to the point of anxiety to lose that comfort. I am struggling to save money to buy myself new apartment, and even to keep my apartment as clean as I would like it to be. However in terms of learning something new there isn't much, most of the stuff was obvious even if I haven't read any self help books up until now. But the narration is phenomenal. It will get you hyped and it will make you reflect on your life, take a good look at where you're are, especially if you're like me: average person who got too comfortable and sucked in into a daily routine. No, it did not convince me to drastically change my life (after all, I am rather happy with how it goes), but there are certainly small things that need improvement and I'm glad this book brought my attention to it and motivation to do something about it.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Brittany

    Not as "offensive" as it tries to make itself out to be. Some good advice but there's a lot of fluff. A lot of the book could be cut and the points would still make sense. Some takeaways I appreciated: - You could change your life overnight if you gave up the notion that other peoples' opinions matter. Be willing to be judged by others and not let it get to you. - No one can read your mind. Say what's on it. Share your plans and ideas. That thing that's pissing you off might not be on their radar. Not as "offensive" as it tries to make itself out to be. Some good advice but there's a lot of fluff. A lot of the book could be cut and the points would still make sense. Some takeaways I appreciated: - You could change your life overnight if you gave up the notion that other peoples' opinions matter. Be willing to be judged by others and not let it get to you. - No one can read your mind. Say what's on it. Share your plans and ideas. That thing that's pissing you off might not be on their radar. They could be completely oblivious. - You are not your thoughts; you are, and are defined by, what do you. - Cognitive restructuring - We create our own reality with our minds. Don't let outside events have so much power. - You have the life you are willing to put up with. - Uncertainty is where things happen; it's your personal pathway to growth. - Even when you don't see anything happening, it is. Even when you're not quite hitting the mark, you're making progress. - If you're getting brought down by something not meeting your expectations, try to accept things as they are and deal with them rather than wasting energy lamenting your unmet

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