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Frühstück bei Tiffany

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Die 18-jährige Holly Golightly lässt sich in New York vom Strom des leichten Lebens treiben. Mit unverschämtem Charme und überraschendem Einfallsreichtum schlägt sie sich durch inmitten von Bohemiens, Playboys, Gin und Rosen und bliebt sich und ihrem Herzen dennoch immer treu. Und manchmal, wenn sie das 'rote Grausen', diese unbestimmte Furcht, packt, dann hilft Die 18-jährige Holly Golightly lässt sich in New York vom Strom des leichten Lebens treiben. Mit unverschämtem Charme und überraschendem Einfallsreichtum schlägt sie sich durch inmitten von Bohemiens, Playboys, Gin und Rosen und bliebt sich und ihrem Herzen dennoch immer treu. Und manchmal, wenn sie das 'rote Grausen', diese unbestimmte Furcht, packt, dann hilft nur eins: schleunigst zum Juweliergeschäft Tiffany an der Fifth Avenue zu gehen. Ungekürzte Lesung Spieldauer: 2 Stunden 44 Minuten


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Die 18-jährige Holly Golightly lässt sich in New York vom Strom des leichten Lebens treiben. Mit unverschämtem Charme und überraschendem Einfallsreichtum schlägt sie sich durch inmitten von Bohemiens, Playboys, Gin und Rosen und bliebt sich und ihrem Herzen dennoch immer treu. Und manchmal, wenn sie das 'rote Grausen', diese unbestimmte Furcht, packt, dann hilft Die 18-jährige Holly Golightly lässt sich in New York vom Strom des leichten Lebens treiben. Mit unverschämtem Charme und überraschendem Einfallsreichtum schlägt sie sich durch inmitten von Bohemiens, Playboys, Gin und Rosen und bliebt sich und ihrem Herzen dennoch immer treu. Und manchmal, wenn sie das 'rote Grausen', diese unbestimmte Furcht, packt, dann hilft nur eins: schleunigst zum Juweliergeschäft Tiffany an der Fifth Avenue zu gehen. Ungekürzte Lesung Spieldauer: 2 Stunden 44 Minuten

30 review for Frühstück bei Tiffany

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    Holiday Golightly. She’s quirky, comical, and glamorous. She’s fashionable, in-the-know, and in-the-now. She’s lonely, lost, and waiting to be rescued. You couldn’t resist her charm if you tried, and you can’t help but fall in love with her. Well, at least in the Hollywood film version. Capote’s original novella paints a darker portrait of Miss Golightly. Unlike Audrey Hepburn’s adorable Holly, who needs a knight in slightly-rusted armor to save her, Capote’s girl is a “wild thing” who cannot be Holiday Golightly. She’s quirky, comical, and glamorous. She’s fashionable, in-the-know, and in-the-now. She’s lonely, lost, and waiting to be rescued. You couldn’t resist her charm if you tried, and you can’t help but fall in love with her. Well, at least in the Hollywood film version. Capote’s original novella paints a darker portrait of Miss Golightly. Unlike Audrey Hepburn’s adorable Holly, who needs a knight in slightly-rusted armor to save her, Capote’s girl is a “wild thing” who cannot be caged, trained, or rescued. I can’t deny that the film is a classic and is one of my favorites. Audrey Hepburn may be the epitome of glamour and beauty, and Hollywood’s Holly can’t help but absorb Audrey’s charm. By the end of the film you find yourself rooting for “Fred” to save her from the nonsense of high society, reunite her with the cat, and wipe away her case of “the mean reds” forever. That is Hollywood, after all, and we would expect nothing less. But the real Holly, Capote’s Holly, can never be caged by convention. It would be hard to imagine her ever settling down and being content with Fred (regardless of the fact that he is an implied homosexual in the book. Hollywood seemed to have “overlooked” that). Don’t get me wrong, it’s not that the book’s Holly is a Bad Person; she’s just more layered and real. Think about it – how many people have you come across who create a new persona for themselves, based on what they perceive others to desire? People who feign interest in the popular styles/entertainment/notable people of the day, just to seem like a Very Important Person and garner adoration, fame, and possibly fortune. I could name a few. But we get to go deeper than Holly’s exterior and see the scared and lonely girl at the core. She is terrified of being a caged animal, but also tired of being alone. She wants to seem as though she’s making a holiday out of life, but struggles with the need for stability and the desire for freedom. The book I read also included three of Capote’s most famous stories, and I’d be remiss not to mention them as well: House of Flowers, A Diamond Guitar, and A Christmas Memory. The three short stories are amazingly intimate and touching, illuminating different sides of human emotion. I have not read Capote’s magnum opus, In Cold Blood, but after witnessing his detailed descriptions and haunting perceptions of human nature in these shorter forms, I have added his novel to my “to-read” list.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Masterson

    3 delicious hours of audio read by Mr. Michael C. Hall aka Dexter!!! What a wonderful performance of Truman Capote's novella! I saw the movie years ago but I've never read the book! I'm so happy to have listened to this edition of the audio! 5+++++Stars for the narrator! 5 Stars for the story! Highly highly recommended!!!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Lawyer

    Breakfast at Tiffany's: Truman Capote's Novella of Love or Something Like It "If she was in this city I'd have seen her. You take a man that likes to walk, a man like me, a man's been walking in the streets going on ten or twelve years, and all those years he's got his eye out for one person, and nobody's ever her, don't it stand to reason she's not there? I see pieces of her all the time, a flat litle bottom, any skinny girl that walks fast and straight--... It's just that I didn't know you'd been in love with herIt Breakfast at Tiffany's: Truman Capote's Novella of Love or Something Like It "If she was in this city I'd have seen her. You take a man that likes to walk, a man like me, a man's been walking in the streets going on ten or twelve years, and all those years he's got his eye out for one person, and nobody's ever her, don't it stand to reason she's not there? I see pieces of her all the time, a flat litle bottom, any skinny girl that walks fast and straight--... It's just that I didn't know you'd been in love with her. Not like that." So it is we know that Holly Golightly is gone, that she's been gone for years. And she had her effect on Joe Bell, the bartender at that little place down on Lexington Avenue in the Big Apple. Yeah, there's Joe's place. Look hard enough, it's one of those little places tucked away. You probably can't see it. One of those Yellow Cabs is hiding it. Yeah, Joe had it bad. Most men who knew her did, unless they just wanted to use her. There's always that niggling little thought on the nature of what love really is. That it is pure and natural or that it can be purchased. Anything is possible, after all, because everything is negotiable. Truman Capote first published Breakfast at Tiffany'sin the November, 1958 issue of Esquire Magazine. It was considered too obscene for Capote's usual sources for periodical publication, Harper's Baazar and Mademoiselle. After all, it's open to question as to whether Holly is a prostitute. And being a woman who speaks her mind, she wishes she could have a bull dyke for a roommate because they make such excellent housekeepers. Such language would never do, so it was off to Esquire. Random house followed suit, publishing "Tiffany's" as a novella. What man hasn't known and loved a Holly Golightly. I have. I lost her. She was hit and killed by a drunk driver--hit her on the wrong side of the road. It was head on. She never had a chance. She was driving home on a Sunday evening, after dinner with her parents, her adopted parents. She shared several characteristics with Holly Golightly. She didn't know her real parents. She enjoyed men. Her hair was that shining perfect blond with bands of white that made her always look as though the sun shone directly on her head and hers alone. She liked her men older, too, like Holly. Maybe it was being adopted, not knowing where she came from, not knowing where she truly belonged. But Holly Golightly had taken a new identity, running away from Tulip, Texas, married at the age of fourteen to Doc Barnes, a veterinarian. Her real name is Lula Mae Barnes, just as Capote's mother's name had been Lillie Mae Faulk before she took a more sophisticated name, Nina, after she married Cuban business man Joe Capote. I attended her funeral, one of so many, her male coterie. But it was when the minister pulled out a copy of The Velveteen Rabbit and began to read from it that I was stunned. For I gave her that book, in the hope, the dream that she would realize if you love anything enough it will become alive. She kept that book all the many years we were apart. Perhaps on some days she thought of me. I know that I still think of her and on some days, like Joe Bell, the bartender, I see bits and pieces of her as I walk the city streets, especially when the sun illuminates the gold, the white, the platinum of a feminine head of hair as if it showed on no other person on boulevard, no matter how bright the sun. Oh, you say Holly Golightly was a brunette--like Audrey Hepburn. Well, that was Blake Edwards' idea of what Holly Golightly looked like. But it wasn't Capote's idea who should play her. It was Marilyn Monroe. No question. It was that blonde hair, almost platinum. But Capote only sold the film rights. He maintained no control over the direction or production of the film. Capote was such a wonderful dancer. I can still remember photographs of him swirling Marilyn across the dance floor. But Lee Strausberg told Marilyn playing Holly Golightly, a prostitute, wouldn't be good for her career. Monroe turned down the role for "The Misfits." It would be her last film. But that's another story. History took its course. Henry Mancini composed "Moon River" for the score. George Peppard and Audrey Hepburn had chemistry. Following its release in 1961, Edwards' work became one of the iconic American films. However, it bears little resemblance to Capote's work, although Audrey Hepburn is stunning in that little black dress. It was not uncommon that movies made from Faulkner's books premiered in Oxford, Mississippi. One, to Faulkner's chagrin, bore so little comparison to his original work, when called to the stage to make opening remarks, Faulkner said, "Ladies and Gentlemen, the film you're about to see bears absolutely no resemblance to the book I wrote from which the title of this film was taken." He walked off stage and out of the theatre. I can't imagine Capote taking that approach, he was still connected to a famous film that led to further sales of his work. Perhaps it was that desire for fame that ultimately destroyed Capote. Of course, in the novella, the young writer is unpublished. Holly takes it upon herself to make him famous by introducing him to her Hollywood agent. In the movie, Peppard is a kept man, whose, shall we say, sponsor, is played by Patricia Neal, who is known to Holly as 2E, the lady's apartment number. And, of course, the movie ends happily ever after with George Peppard and Audrey Hepburn embracing in the rain and having found "Cat" whom Holly had kicked out of the taxi cab. But Capote tells Holly's view regarding love, or whatever feeling she is capable of describing as love. "Never love a wild thing, Mr. Bell," Holly advised him. "That was Doc's mistake. He was always lugging home wild things. A hawk with a hurt wing. One time it was a full-grown bobcat with a broken leg. But you can't give your heart to a wild thing: the more you do, the stronger they get. Until they're strong enough to run into the woods. Or fly into a tree. Then a taller tree. Then the sky. That's how you'll end up, Mr. Bell. If you let yourself love a wild thing. You'll end up looking at the sky." Truman Capote considered Holly Golightly his favorite character. I think he was right in his feelings. Of course, Capote, has said that the narrator of Breakfast at Tiffany's was gay. In fact, it has been repeatedly surmised that Holly Golightly is the literary embodiment of Christopher Isherwood's Sally Bowles. What divine decadence. The movie would never have ended the way it did, had Capote maintained creative control. Let's just say this one will always touch a nerve in me. This one is for all the Holly Golightlys in the world and the Joe Bells who have the sense to listen to them, and I offer it with all the heartfelt sympathy I can muster for those who can't understand what it means to love a wild thing.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Michael Finocchiaro

    Capote has a mesmerizing way with words. His description of the aptly named Holly Golightly is splendid and the character herself is a sort of blend of Daisy Buchanon and Madame Bovary. The friendship of the narrator Paul/"Fred" with Holly is beautifully and painfully described as are the parties and lovers that she entertains. I must see the film now...(see below) The atmosphere of the book is a sort of bohemian yet preppy post-Beat decadence but with a tragic sexism that poisons Holly's r Capote has a mesmerizing way with words. His description of the aptly named Holly Golightly is splendid and the character herself is a sort of blend of Daisy Buchanon and Madame Bovary. The friendship of the narrator Paul/"Fred" with Holly is beautifully and painfully described as are the parties and lovers that she entertains. I must see the film now...(see below) The atmosphere of the book is a sort of bohemian yet preppy post-Beat decadence but with a tragic sexism that poisons Holly's relationships with everyone except the narrator. She is both an actor and a victim of her status as a sex object - this is what transports this story from something banal to something more complex and enduring. The Diamond Guitar is a tender story of unrequited love as well, albeit homosexual love and longing and disappearance. House of Flowers is a vivid depiction of a Haitian whorehouse, the Champs-Elysées and the sadomasochistic love of Ollite for Royal that leads her to an indifferent fate at the House of Flowers. A Christmas Memory is a heartbreaking tale of camaraderie between a young boy and an older woman and their dreams of surpassing their humble existence. Each of these stories of love, loss, and hope against hope that avoid sentimentalism in their cold rendering of events. It is more the external elements (the weather in New York, the changing seasons at the farm, the bee prophecy and the wind respectively) that color the psychology of the characters and their ambiguous fates. I loved these stories and will read more of Truman Capote's work. I started watching the movie with the amazing Audrey Hepburn as Golightly and George Peppard as "Fred" and find it captures the essence of the relationship between these two characters. However, why did they have Mickey Rooney do that ridiculous (and perhaps racist) imitation of Yunioshi, why not just have a Japanese actor. The other annoying thing about the movie is the comic spin that it puts to the book which while at times somewhat humorous was for the most part darker and more layered than depicted by Blake Edwards.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Madeline

    This is getting shelved under "The Movie is Better" but honestly, I can't decide which version I prefer. Because I am indecisive, let's make lists. Reasons The Movie Is Better: -Audrey Hepburn plays a considerably less racist and foul-mouthed Holly, which is nice. But let's be honest: Holly could spend the entire movie snorting crack off a sidewalk and Audrey Hepburn would make it the most elegant and classy crack-snorting anyone had ever seen. -Holly actually sets foot inside Ti This is getting shelved under "The Movie is Better" but honestly, I can't decide which version I prefer. Because I am indecisive, let's make lists. Reasons The Movie Is Better: -Audrey Hepburn plays a considerably less racist and foul-mouthed Holly, which is nice. But let's be honest: Holly could spend the entire movie snorting crack off a sidewalk and Audrey Hepburn would make it the most elegant and classy crack-snorting anyone had ever seen. -Holly actually sets foot inside Tiffany's, instead of just talking about it. Also she is actually seen eating breakfast outside the store, instead of just mentioning it offhandedly. -The lines, "It's useful being top banana in the shock department" and "I don't want you to take me home until I'm very drunk. Very drunk indeed." -A happy, schmoopy, formulaic romantic ending in the rain that never fails to win me over. And they come back for Cat. -George Peppard. Reasons The Book Is Better: -Mag Wildwood, a mere caricature in the movie, gets more lines, personality, and scenes in the book. -Holly is eighteen at the beginning of the story, which makes her instantly more of a badass teen slut, which I admired her for. -Mr. Yunioshi actually has a sizable shred of dignity and is vital to the plot. This did wonders to undo the damage caused by the sight of a sweaty, overtanned, bucktoothed Mickey Rooney leaning over a banister and screeching, "Missa Gorightry! I musta plotest!" *shudder* Is Mickey Rooney dead? If not, could someone please find him and kill him for thinking he could successfully imitate a Japanese man without turning into a walking stereotype? Thank you. That's all I can think of at the moment. Bottom line: the book made me sad, and the movie does not.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    The most famous of Capote's novels, Breakfast at Tiffany’s charms the reader with wit and a lively storyline. Its subject is the short-lived friendship between a straight woman and a gay man living in New York during the early '40s, its theme the yearning for deep connection and a sense of belonging. In spite of Capote's ethereal prose and dazzling imagery, an excruciating sadness suffuses the novella: none of the self-destructive characters find what they long for by the end, and it seems unlik The most famous of Capote's novels, Breakfast at Tiffany’s charms the reader with wit and a lively storyline. Its subject is the short-lived friendship between a straight woman and a gay man living in New York during the early '40s, its theme the yearning for deep connection and a sense of belonging. In spite of Capote's ethereal prose and dazzling imagery, an excruciating sadness suffuses the novella: none of the self-destructive characters find what they long for by the end, and it seems unlikely that they ever will. What on the surface appears to be a wistful bit of fluff, then, is in fact far more sorrowful and complex.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Paul Bryant

    I’m struggling to figure out what makes this quite so great, it could be Truman’s beautiful limpid style which winds its sentences through your inner ear so that you might think that language itself had been melted and turned into vanilla frosting or it could be that this is the sweet sad little tale of a guy who met this creature and got stuck permanently in the friend zone, and kind of almost didn’t really mind because at least the friend zone was something and not nothing, that’s how entrance I’m struggling to figure out what makes this quite so great, it could be Truman’s beautiful limpid style which winds its sentences through your inner ear so that you might think that language itself had been melted and turned into vanilla frosting or it could be that this is the sweet sad little tale of a guy who met this creature and got stuck permanently in the friend zone, and kind of almost didn’t really mind because at least the friend zone was something and not nothing, that’s how entranced he was, or it could be that one of the major characters is a cat. It could be that it’s funny, and kind, and that Holly says some really surprising things (just to mention one, that she thinks people of the same sex should be allowed to get married – in 1958!). But this novelette is a small 100 page thing, a drifting fragrance, a single chord, a glint, a hello then goodbye too soon, too soon – ah yes, itself therefore being the perfect embodiment of the Holly Golightly experience. So, of course – that’s why.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Fabian

    A charming little anecdote about some ruby-rare bright young thing & ensuing crew--delightly-ful! To be read in a complete sitting in some secret well-lit garden with a basket of tea and crumpets. Necessary as stress relief and sweet as a caramel. Another plus for the already egotistical NYC, Holly Golightly is heavily embossed onto the overall structure, asphalt jungle, itself.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

    As someone who grew up in the 90s, this was in my head the whole time I read this: I have never seen the movie, so the only idea I had in my mind is this iconic image of Audrey Hepburn as Holly Golightly: But, what I actually got was this: As someone who grew up in the 90s, this was in my head the whole time I read this: I have never seen the movie, so the only idea I had in my mind is this iconic image of Audrey Hepburn as Holly Golightly: But, what I actually got was this: Holly is crass and obnoxious with really no redeeming qualities. She is rude to her enemies, and even worse to her friends. She smokes to excess, drinks to excess, is promiscuous to excess - she is just wild, crazy, and destructive. Reading this was like watching a train wreck - but I kind of liked it. I couldn't look away!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Brina

    Fred, our story's narrator, has been called by Joe Bell the proprietor of Hamburg Heaven because he has heard about Holly. So begins Truman Capote's classic Breakfast at Tiffany's, the tale of New York society girl Holly Golightly. As soon as Fred hears about Holly, the story flashes back to 1943 and we begin our story of Holly. Growing up I knew Aubrey Hepburn as Eliza Dolittle and Tiffany's as a diamond store, so I envisioned Breakfast at Tiffany's to be a tale of the upper crust of New York s Fred, our story's narrator, has been called by Joe Bell the proprietor of Hamburg Heaven because he has heard about Holly. So begins Truman Capote's classic Breakfast at Tiffany's, the tale of New York society girl Holly Golightly. As soon as Fred hears about Holly, the story flashes back to 1943 and we begin our story of Holly. Growing up I knew Aubrey Hepburn as Eliza Dolittle and Tiffany's as a diamond store, so I envisioned Breakfast at Tiffany's to be a tale of the upper crust of New York society dining at the Plaza Hotel. How wrong was in these thoughts. Our protagonists live in a brownstone apartment, not the Plaza. "Fred" named in honor of Holly's brother is a festering writer who seems to be Capote himself and his upstairs neighbor is a mysterious girl named Holly Golightly who adds traveling to her business cards. Until the two have any interactions, Holly remains an enigma, adding to her mystique. Throughout the book, Holly still remains an enigma even after she and "Fred" build on their friendly, platonic relationship. Who is Holly? Is she a Hollywood starlet or Arkansas hillbilly? A New York society girl or prostitute or a member of the mafia? Because the novella is only 100 pages in length, Capote tackles all of these ideas while really building up Holly's character. Even though I prefer epic novels, I also enjoy a shorter story that flushes out a character's personality and has me captivated from the first pages. Capote's novella does this and then some, allowing me to quickly read to the conclusion. Tiffany's does make an appearance in the novella although not the way I had thought it would. Holly in spite of all the glitz in her life, wants to be remembered the same when she has the money to eat breakfast at Tiffany's. Does this mean she will be down to earth or a multi-layered character? Will she keep the same company or dine with movie stars? Capote hints that Holly would prefer the former but never tells us, allowing for the reader to draw their own conclusions. Again, this device enabled me to read the novella in one sitting so I could find out whether or not Holly ever ate breakfast at Tiffany's. I would be remiss if I did not mention the three other stories included in this novella. All of them bring out Capote's prose and show us why he is highly regarded as a classic American writer. The collection ends on a high note with A Christmas Memory, allowing is some insight into Capote's family life growing up. I look forward to seeing Breakfast at Tiffany's on screen to compare the movie to the book and also reading his masterpiece In Cold Blood. A 5-star classic.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Lyn

    Delicious. Upon finishing Truman Capote’s 1958 brilliant short novel Breakfast at Tiffany’s my first thought was that Capote had been influenced heavily by F. Scott Fitzgerald’s 1925 Jazz Age masterpiece The Great Gatsby. I was intrigued further to find that several other reviewers had noticed the same similarities. Both involve and are centrally concerned with a charismatic and alluring socialite with humble beginnings and sketchy personal details and with a subtle naiveté hidden under a mask of societal cunning bor Delicious. Upon finishing Truman Capote’s 1958 brilliant short novel Breakfast at Tiffany’s my first thought was that Capote had been influenced heavily by F. Scott Fitzgerald’s 1925 Jazz Age masterpiece The Great Gatsby. I was intrigued further to find that several other reviewers had noticed the same similarities. Both involve and are centrally concerned with a charismatic and alluring socialite with humble beginnings and sketchy personal details and with a subtle naiveté hidden under a mask of societal cunning bordering on the streetwise. I would also draw a comparison between Holly and Vladimir Nabokov’s Dolores from his 1955 work Lolita. Both heroines exhibit a frank and earthy, almost playful sexuality that is intoxicating to the male characters, who pine and lust with barely contained libido. Finally, I see similarities between Capote’s themes and settings and Hemingway’s 1926 novel The Sun Also Rises, especially between the tense platonic relationship concerning Holly and the narrator and Hemingway’s Lady Brett and Jake. Both male narrators are sad caricatures of voyeuristic and doomed love, both pale also-rans to the Latin rivals. In Holly Golightly, Capote has created an archetypal American woman of the twentieth century, at once sexual and material, yet in a playful, teasing and fun way. He could have written another hundred pages of scenes with her and I would have been as captivated as the unnamed (except casually by Holly) narrator. Of course, Audrey Hepburn’s 1961 portrayal was so intoxicating as to become one with Capote’s vision. Capote has penned a dandy and, like the best chocolate, it is a guilty delight.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Cecily

    The theme that unites Breakfast at Tiffany's with the three much shorter stories in this volume is the powerful bond of friendship between unexpected people or in unusual circumstances. The title story is a male fantasy - so I wrote in 2010. Except that Capote was gay, so it's probably his idea of a typical straight man's fantasy. As Carmen says in a comment, she's what we'd now call a Manic Pixie Dream Girl. Holly The story isclass="gr-hostedUserImg">The The theme that unites Breakfast at Tiffany's with the three much shorter stories in this volume is the powerful bond of friendship between unexpected people or in unusual circumstances. The title story is a male fantasy - so I wrote in 2010. Except that Capote was gay, so it's probably his idea of a typical straight man's fantasy. As Carmen says in a comment, she's what we'd now call a Manic Pixie Dream Girl. Holly The story is of course about Holly Golightly, a charming but utterly self-absorbed, mysterious fantasist, full of intriguing contradictions. She has big ambitions and none at all, but she does want the security of having breakfast at Tiffany's. She is often flirtatious, but at other times she plays the total innocent (e.g. getting her neighbour to put sun oil on her). At times she is oblivious to what people around her know and think, but at others, she is remarkably perspicacious about the personality and motives of those around her. Knowing more about Holly only makes one realise how unknowable she is. When talking about her childhood, "it was elusive, nameless, placeless, an impressionistic recital". Fred At times, the narrator acts like a stalker of his attractive and enigmatic neighbour (examining her rubbish and investigating what she read at the library), yet he didn't alienate me. Perhaps one reason is the way that Holly uses men. As the men are happy to be used by her, where's the harm? Film It's written in such a visual way, that I'm not surprised it was turned into a film. (I hadn't seen the film when I read and wrote this, though I had seen pictures of Audrey Hepburn as Holly.) Quirky quote "A group of nuns who were trying on masks" (in a department store). Quirky "fact" Holly has a problem with Thursdays, much like Arthur Dent in The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy! The other, shorter stories in this volume House of Flowers This starts in a brothel in Port au Prince and the dialogue did not ring at all true to me (but I'm hardly an expert on Haitian prostitution). It explores the friendship between the working girls, and how love is hard to discern in such an environment. What is love like? "You feel as though pepper had been sprinkled on your heart, as though tiny fish are swimming in your veins". A Diamond Guitar About friendship in prison and the effect of long-term incarceration on the psyche. A Christmas Memory A beautiful story of the self-made traditions that form a loving bond between a young boy and an elderly relative. Note: I updated this review in April 2018, picking up on comments below - without rereading the book!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    “If you let yourself love a wild thing. You'll end up looking at the sky.” Told in a reflective and almost lyrical tone, this is the story of a writer, referred to as 'Fred', who reminisces about the neighbor he fell for back in 1943. The thing is, I’m not sure if we ever get a glimpse of the real Holly Golightly. An enigma of sorts; Holly’s not one to get attached or share much of anything about her past. She avoids the truth by putting a fun and often ridiculous spin on things and she’s ful “If you let yourself love a wild thing. You'll end up looking at the sky.” Told in a reflective and almost lyrical tone, this is the story of a writer, referred to as 'Fred', who reminisces about the neighbor he fell for back in 1943. The thing is, I’m not sure if we ever get a glimpse of the real Holly Golightly. An enigma of sorts; Holly’s not one to get attached or share much of anything about her past. She avoids the truth by putting a fun and often ridiculous spin on things and she’s full of biting comments. It’s hard to say who she really is under that facetious facade. From all outward appearances, she’s a nineteen-year-old woman who enjoys the company of many men and pretty things. A woman making her way, amidst the excitement and wonder of New York City. The few things she openly admits - the soft spot she has for her brother (the actual Fred) and her cure for the mean reds. She claims being surrounded by the quiet of Tiffany’s, although we don’t actually see any of that in the book, is enough to calm her soul. You can’t think of the movie, read this book, or in my case listen to the audio without picturing Audrey Hepburn as Holly. She’s become synonymous with Breakfast at Tiffany’s. So my question is - what happened to the trips to Tiffany’s and the ring? Having seen the movie several times before listening to the audio, it felt to me like a piece of the story was missing. With a very different ending, the book didn’t come across as the great love story the movie did. It almost makes me cringe to say this, but I actually enjoyed the movie a tad bit more than the book. The crazy cat lady in me has to mention how heartbroken I was that Holly left her “cat” behind, too. How could she? At least, he ended up with a home, I guess. And maybe even a name. If you’re a Dexter fan, like me, you’ll love this audio. Michael C. Hall is the narrator and his voice is pretty unique. There were a few times his voice for Holly made me laugh, but for the most part, his narration was heavenly. At just under three hours, I found this to be a quick but wholly enjoyable listen.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Perry

    "It's better to look at the sky than live there; such an empty place, so vague, just a country where the thunder goes and things disappear" [I'd forgotten how absolutely gorgeous Audrey Hepburn was] Until a few years ago, I'd only seen the trailer for the film version. The phrase "Breakfast at Tiffany's" is iconic for that era. I'd not read the novel despite Truman Capote coming from the 2 states in which I've lived nearly allclass="gr-hostedUserImg">I'd "It's better to look at the sky than live there; such an empty place, so vague, just a country where the thunder goes and things disappear" [I'd forgotten how absolutely gorgeous Audrey Hepburn was] Until a few years ago, I'd only seen the trailer for the film version. The phrase "Breakfast at Tiffany's" is iconic for that era. I'd not read the novel despite Truman Capote coming from the 2 states in which I've lived nearly all my life: Alabama and Mississippi, both of which have indisputably earned their places as regular punching bags of all outside the South, especially the cognoscenti and other snobbish bastards who would rather point fingers in a direction than look at all the bigotry around them. I might be a little differently affected by this short novel than many others, especially those who grew up in a large metropolis. Before I explain what I mean, I'll say that I found Capote's short novel to masterfully display this young lady's complexities of character underlying the shallow facade of wealth. Capote shows how some of us are willing to do nearly anything to achieve a dream, no matter how grandiose or superficial others may find it. Holly Golightly was a dreamer extraordinaire or as Capote put it, a "lopsided romantic" whose trait of personality would never change. A poignant line which I think best captures a major theme of the novel is Holly's observation late in the novel that: "it's better to look at the sky than live there; such an empty place, so vague, just a country where the thunder goes and things disappear." Though I've lived all my life in the American South, I'm not a redneck. I recall the first time I went to New York City. I was in awe, which is more of a small town thing than Southern. I've been many times since and the sheer size of it never fails to amaze me. City people, particularly those in NYC, are disgusted by such provincialism--a contempt they cannot hide. Even though I'm straight, I think I can imagine how it must have been for an outcast sissy-boy from Monroeville, AL and Meridian, MS, trying to make his dreams come true in the Big Apple. Certainly, he would have been very sensitive and keenly observant of his environment in New York City, having grown up ostracized by his classmates. The fact that he was a gay man from down South up in the big city (suffering prejudices in NYC against not only his sexuality but much moreso against his Southern upbringing and drawl) probably served to further enhance his remarkable attention to detail in that society, at that time. These difficulties formed an integral part of the artist who so vividly painted one of the best ever outsiders looking in with longing.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    "Breakfast at Tiffany's", was a delightful film. I consider it a classic! As for the novel, well... I didn't know there was a novel! A novel by Truman Capote, whom I am not familiar with until Philip Seymour Hoffman won an Oscar for playing him. I was fortunate enough to discover this book in the library. "Breakfast at Tiffany's" is a little deceptive since it seems like a pretty easy read. It can be a bit funny, but I realized it has a more somber tone than the the film and there are some prett "Breakfast at Tiffany's", was a delightful film. I consider it a classic! As for the novel, well... I didn't know there was a novel! A novel by Truman Capote, whom I am not familiar with until Philip Seymour Hoffman won an Oscar for playing him. I was fortunate enough to discover this book in the library. "Breakfast at Tiffany's" is a little deceptive since it seems like a pretty easy read. It can be a bit funny, but I realized it has a more somber tone than the the film and there are some pretty serious issues throughout the course of the story. It also presents a heroine who you might not like very much (or at all), which presents another challenge. Capote's attitude toward Holly can be different than your reaction to her, and I think this is part of his talent. He actually presents a lot of reasons to dislike Holly, but he is also careful to temper that with some information that probably elicits a sympathetic reaction to other parts of her life.The story doesn't gloss over her negative qualities, but it does present details that complicate these downfalls. This gives a better idea of why she does whatever she must to survive. The tone is very different from the film, and there is no fairy-tale love in this story. Instead, you get a more realistic picture of love: complicated, messy, and sometimes extremely painful. The central theme seems to be more about looking forward to the future, and about the dreams, hopes, and plans we make for ourselves. In many ways these dreams sustain the characters, as they are propelled by the promise of something better than what the present can provide. But when these same hopes, and plans are shattered, it has devastating effects on the dreamers. Suddenly, they have to revise what they've been looking forward to, and this throws some characters into a tailspin as they're suddenly forced to reevaluate their lives. It was quite a different experience from the film and it's very thought provoking. After reading the story, I actually appreciated the title and find it more relevant. Although Holly actually mentions Tiffany's (and having breakfast there) just a few times, I think her reference to it tells you a lot about her character. It's true that Tiffany's is expensive and that the things in it are out of her reach, but it's the idea of Tiffany's and the perfection that she associates with the store that makes her feel better when she's scared, sad, or angry. It's the belief that only good things happen there that makes Tiffany's so appealing to her. The title means so much, and all the while seems pretty insignificant. The novel is a masterpiece in its own right.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Steven Godin

    Attempted to read in my teens, didn't do anything for me. Twenty-five years later, and now more literary adept, gave it another go. With much better results. Boy oh boy, could he write!. It's New York in the 1940s, where the martinis flow from cocktail hour till breakfast at Tiffany's. And nice girls don't, except, of course, Holly Golightly. Pursued by Mafia gangsters and playboy millionaires, Holly is a fragile eyeful of tawny hair and turned-up nose, a heart-breaker, a perplexer, a Attempted to read in my teens, didn't do anything for me. Twenty-five years later, and now more literary adept, gave it another go. With much better results. Boy oh boy, could he write!. It's New York in the 1940s, where the martinis flow from cocktail hour till breakfast at Tiffany's. And nice girls don't, except, of course, Holly Golightly. Pursued by Mafia gangsters and playboy millionaires, Holly is a fragile eyeful of tawny hair and turned-up nose, a heart-breaker, a perplexer, a traveller, a tease. She is irrepressibly 'top banana in the shock department', and one of the shining flowers of American fiction. Holly is a petite little bundle of scandal in World War II New York society. She works her way through various characters, and any other men who can pay her tab. The narrator, an aspiring Capote-like writer, is her neighbor in their trendy-ish NYC apartment building. He is witness to her parade of gentlemen callers, and as he befriends her and falls in and out of love with her, bears witness to her dramas and the slowly revealed facets of her character and history. The dialog in Breakfast at Tiffany's is snappy and moves along nicely, very much of the era, but it still sounds almost contemporary in tone if not in verbiage. Holly loves easily and leaves easily. She is easily angered and quick to forgive. She buys expensive gifts on a whim, expects to be treated to expensive things regularly. Eventually we find out where she's really from and how she became Manhattan's Girl About Town. Then she gets in some legal trouble and goes on the lam, leaving the narrator to pine wistfully over her postcards from Brazil or wherever she's fled to. It's a cute, almost whimsical novel, and was probably much more scandalous when it was written. Neither the author nor the narrator ever come out and say that Holly is a lady of the night, but it's heavily implied. At best, she lives a sugar daddy lifestyle. Today her behavior would barely raise an eyebrow in Manhattan, but in the 40s, when it was written, such a female protagonist was more shocking. Capote clearly wrote of his central characters with a big heart, of which there is also an echoing bittersweet sadness. It took little time at all to get into the story, which is sizewise of the short novel/lengthy novella mold. Doable in one or two sittings. A worthy read for sure. 4/5

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sidharth Vardhan

    "Anyway, home is where you feel at home. I'm still looking." Ok, I no longer believe in 'never Judge a book by its cover'. I read this one mainly because of it's cover. Have you ever feared being trapped by love and similar demons? It is basically about that fear. "You've got to be sensitive to appreciate her: a streak of the poet. But I'll tell you the truth. You can beat your brains out for her, and she'll hand you horseshit on a platter." There are some people who, in their easy going and wanting-to-/> "Anyway, home is where you feel at home. I'm still looking." Ok, I no longer believe in 'never Judge a book by its cover'. I read this one mainly because of it's cover. Have you ever feared being trapped by love and similar demons? It is basically about that fear. "You've got to be sensitive to appreciate her: a streak of the poet. But I'll tell you the truth. You can beat your brains out for her, and she'll hand you horseshit on a platter." There are some people who, in their easy going and wanting-to-include-everyone-in-their-joy ways become highly likeable to sensitive souls, the sensitive folks find themselves emotionally invested in them only getting indifference in return. The indifference is not always because of malice. Sometimes, these people, just as Holly was, are as sensitive as others but have decided that they won't let themselves caged down even by other' love. "Never love a wild thing, Mr. Bell," It is a kind of life that most people are often tempted to lead. We look at the birds flying in the sky and are envious of their so-called 'freedom': "Don't wanna sleep, don't wanna die, just wanna go a-travelin' through the pastures of the sky." but: "and believe me, dearest Doc -- it's better to look at the sky than live there. Such an empty place; so vague. Just a country where the thunder goes and things disappear." And so, Holly learned her lesson - freedom,as we wish to see it, is an illusion. The only real freedom we can have is freedom to choose our own cage - and, what we need is to find a cage where we can feel at home. Unfortunately, it was too late.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Ashleigh

    When I started reading this book, because I haven't seen the movie, I thought Audrey Hepburn's name was Tiffany. Through college I saw so many posters with her face and "Breakfast at Tiffany's" somewhere on the image and that is what stuck in my head and I still have a tough time thinking anything different. When I found out the real reason the title is what it is, I was disappointed that this book was an early version of product placement, but even with all of that said - Breakfast at Tiffany's When I started reading this book, because I haven't seen the movie, I thought Audrey Hepburn's name was Tiffany. Through college I saw so many posters with her face and "Breakfast at Tiffany's" somewhere on the image and that is what stuck in my head and I still have a tough time thinking anything different. When I found out the real reason the title is what it is, I was disappointed that this book was an early version of product placement, but even with all of that said - Breakfast at Tiffany's is a great book. I believe it is a take on the great American novel that focuses on feminine personality. I'll probably read it again, and I'm going to watch the movie as soon as possible.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca McNutt

    A magnificent, elegant and historic classic, Breakfast at Tiffany's is a short but unforgettable book featuring a mysterious woman and the misadventures of her daily life in the 1940's.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Vit Babenco

    Some persons live their life as if they’re just playing a game. And such is Holly Golightly – she doesn’t live, she’s travelling light… Exactly like her name may suggest. Her bedroom was consistent with her parlor: it perpetuated the same camping-out atmosphere; crates and suitcases, everything packed and ready to go, like the belongings of a criminal who feels the law not far behind. She doesn’t want to exist in reality, she doesn’t want to grow up, and her life goes on as though she lives in a doll/>Her Some persons live their life as if they’re just playing a game. And such is Holly Golightly – she doesn’t live, she’s travelling light… Exactly like her name may suggest. Her bedroom was consistent with her parlor: it perpetuated the same camping-out atmosphere; crates and suitcases, everything packed and ready to go, like the belongings of a criminal who feels the law not far behind. She doesn’t want to exist in reality, she doesn’t want to grow up, and her life goes on as though she lives in a dollhouse. “You’re wrong. She is a phony. But on the other hand you’re right. She isn’t a phony because she’s a real phony. She believes all this crap she believes. You can’t talk her out of it. I’ve tried with tears running down my cheeks.” She dreams her great American dream and in this way Breakfast at Tiffany's echoes The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald. Holly Golightly believes that there is a crock of gold hidden at the end of the rainbow… I don’t mean I’d mind being rich and famous. That’s very much on my schedule, and someday I’ll try to get around to it; but if it happens, I’d like to have my ego tagging along. I want to still be me when I wake up one fine morning and have breakfast at Tiffany’s. Dreams of a beautiful life have been the ruins of many a poor girl… And the story keeps repeating.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Lynda

    Marilyn or Audrey? Who do you think? When Audrey was cast, Truman Capote remarked: “Paramount double-crossed me in every way and cast Audrey.” In one of the most iconic scenes in film history, it would be impossible to think of anybody other than Audrey Hepburn wearing the “Little Black Dress” while looking into the window of Tiffany’s. Well, if it had been up to the author of the book on which the movie is based, Truman Capote, it would have been Marilyn Monroe. In fact, he wrote the book with her as the character in minremarked: Marilyn or Audrey? Who do you think? When Audrey was cast, Truman Capote remarked: “Paramount double-crossed me in every way and cast Audrey.” In one of the most iconic scenes in film history, it would be impossible to think of anybody other than Audrey Hepburn wearing the “Little Black Dress” while looking into the window of Tiffany’s. Well, if it had been up to the author of the book on which the movie is based, Truman Capote, it would have been Marilyn Monroe. In fact, he wrote the book with her as the character in mind. Even the movie’s screenwriter, George Axelrod, wrote the script tailored to her. Marilyn was actually talked out of taking the role by her acting coach, Lee Strasberg — he felt that playing the lead role would be bad for her image. The book Breakfast at Tiffany's, set in 1943, documents the friendship of a New York writer (whose name is never mentioned) with his neighbour Holiday (Holly) Golightly. Both live in a brownstone apartment building in Manhattan's Upper East Side. The story is presented as the writer's recollections of Holly many years after the conclusion of the friendship. Holly is a woman of mystery to everyone in her life. There is ambiguity surrounding her profession; she has no job and lives by socializing with wealthy men, who wine, dine, and give her gifts and money, together with the ocassional overnight stay. Was Holly Golightly a prostitute? In a 1968 interview in Playboy, Truman Capote addressed the question: Playboy: "Would you elaborate on your comment that Holly was the prototype of today's liberated female and representative of a "whole breed of girls who live off men but are not prostitutes. They're our version of the geisha girl."? Capote: "Holly Golightly was not precisely a callgirl. She had no job, but accompanied expense-account men to the best restaurants and night clubs, with the understanding that her escort was obligated to give her some sort of gift, perhaps jewelry or a check ... if she felt like it, she might take her escort home for the night. So these girls are the authentic American geishas, and they're much more prevalent now than in 1943 or 1944, which was Holly's era.."? Breakfast at Tiffany's excels in imagery, the prose lyrical. It has many layers to it. Abandonment, loneliness, the need to belong and yet not be chained at the same time, the delight in the unorthodox and not loving a wild thing. This was a sad book in lots of ways. We have Holly who is an odd mixture of childlike innocence and street smart sexuality, confused yet determined, who knows very well what she wants and will walk over others to get it. Then you have the other characters in her life who are obsessed by her, whose lives evolve around her, and no matter how bad she treats them, they come back for more. As a reader, it is difficult to like Holly. She is referred to as a phony as she hides herself behind interesting lies and an eccentric lifestyle. She wants no responsibility or ties to people or things. She keeps disconnected and unloving for the freedom of her feelings. I enjoyed the book more than the movie. Capote describes Holly in such a way that you get the sense he has moulded her on someone that he knew, someone who intrigued him and held an allure or aura of mysticism that left a deep impression. A gread read!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Brian Yahn

    How does one review something so good? Are there even words to do it? Here's my attempt: Holly Golightly is an interesting enough character to fill ten libraries. She crept into my thoughts regularly for months after reading the book, and I still think about her quite often to this day, like a long-lost lover, but more fondly. I've never quite enjoyed prose like this either. I mean, every single sentence I liked. There wasn't one in the whole book where I thought, "you know How does one review something so good? Are there even words to do it? Here's my attempt: Holly Golightly is an interesting enough character to fill ten libraries. She crept into my thoughts regularly for months after reading the book, and I still think about her quite often to this day, like a long-lost lover, but more fondly. I've never quite enjoyed prose like this either. I mean, every single sentence I liked. There wasn't one in the whole book where I thought, "you know, this one's the bad one." It's no wonder that I didn't put the book down until I finished it. Structurally, it's a masterpiece. The pacing is perfect. It's one of those books that you read, and when you finish it, you're a little sad, because you know you found THAT book, and you know you'll probably never find a book you like this much again. I want to say something bad about it, but I just can't think of anything.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Duane

    Holly Golightly, the heroine of Capote's 1958 novel, is one of the iconic characters in American literature. And Audrey Hepburn's portrayal in the movie three years later helped to assure Holly's immortality.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Margitte

    Well, what can one say about Holly Golightly. She was beautiful, she was mean, she was independent, sometimes cruel, sometimes caring. Holly was as free as a bird, but shackled by her birth. She was temptress and torturer. She was glue and glamorous. Holly was light and darkness. She conquered and crashed. She loved and loathed. Holly:"... good things only happen to you if you're good. Good? Honest is more what I mean. Not law-type honest -- I'd rob a grave, I'd steal two-bits off a dead man's eyes if I thought iHolly:"...loathed. Well, what can one say about Holly Golightly. She was beautiful, she was mean, she was independent, sometimes cruel, sometimes caring. Holly was as free as a bird, but shackled by her birth. She was temptress and torturer. She was glue and glamorous. Holly was light and darkness. She conquered and crashed. She loved and loathed. Holly:"... good things only happen to you if you're good. Good? Honest is more what I mean. Not law-type honest -- I'd rob a grave, I'd steal two-bits off a dead man's eyes if I thought it would contribute to the day's enjoyment -- but unto-thyself-type honest. Be anything but a coward, a pretender, an emotional crook, a whore: I'd rather have cancer than a dishonest heart. Which isn't being pious. Just practical. Cancer may cool you, but the other's sure to. Oh, screw it, cookie -- hand me my guitar, and I'll sing you a fada in the most perfect Portuguese." Her story is narrated by her upstairs neighbor, an aspiring writer, who befriended her, despite a downstairs neighbor, Madame Sapphia Spanella's outspoken wrath against Holly: "A crude exhibitionist, a time waster, an utter fake, somebody never to be spoken to again". But Holly was also 'pampered, calmly immaculate, as though she'd been attended by Cleopatra's maids'. Nineteen year old Holly was from Tulip, Texas, before she landed up in New York. Since the age of fourteen she was on her own, taking care of her brother Fred, who was in the army. He loved peanut butter, which she bought for him anywhere she could find it during the war times. "Fred's a soldier," said Holly. "But I doubt if he'll ever be a statue. Could be. They say the more stupid you are the braver. He's pretty stupid." "Fred's that boy upstairs? I didn't realize he was a soldier. But he does look stupid." "Yearning. Not stupid. He wants awfully to be on the inside staring out: anybody with their nose pressed against a glass is liable to look stupid. Anyhow, he's a different Fred. Fred's my brother." "You call your own f-f-flesh and b-b-blood stupid?" "If he is he is." This is a short novella, about a female character who deserved her place as one of the most outstanding literary characters of all times. What captured me the most is the way this young woman was presented to the world. Someone who could be loved; a young woman who could become a friend. She had heart and soul. She was warm and wonderful. But just as cold and calculating, since she did not quite trust the people's intentions towards her and therefore never really allowed herself to bond with anyone. "I like a man who sees the humor; most of them, they're all pant and puff." Her actions prevented people to come too near, even her friends stood aside. A tragic figure. A statistic for the cognoscenti, the people who despised the likes of her. The film adaptation of this novella was very different from the book. I suspect nobody wanted to play the lead role of Holly, since it was unacceptable for their careers. And to get Audrey Hepburn to be the star, the script had to be changed considerably. The most important difference was to portray Holly as an innocent young woman who did not prostitute herself in the movie. The male lead, played by George Peppard, became a romantic character instead of the gay writer who became her friend in the book(he fell in love with his childhood postman). In the movie he also became a toy-boy himself to a wealthy women (not part of the book). Although I enjoyed the movie, I loved the book much more. Truman Capote created a complex character in his iconic writing style. Nobody can forget Holly Golightly. The social realism of the 1940s-New York embraced this girl next door, and made her something very different than the normal portrayal of these social climbers. She became a person with a heart and soul. Someone to empathize with. A wonderful, soul-touching story. A classic must-read.

  25. 5 out of 5

    J.L. Sutton

    I didn't know what to expect from Truman Capote's Breakfast at Tiffany's, but I thoroughly enjoyed how Capote told his story. This backwards (at times almost nostalgic) glance at a life which had all but vanished from anything but memory (the whimsically kind and cruel and slightly tragic Holly Golightly) reminded me more of Willa Cather's My Antonia than Capote's other seminal work, In Cold Blood. Of course, Antonia and Holly Golightly have virtually nothing in common except in how they occupy I didn't know what to expect from Truman Capote's Breakfast at Tiffany's, but I thoroughly enjoyed how Capote told his story. This backwards (at times almost nostalgic) glance at a life which had all but vanished from anything but memory (the whimsically kind and cruel and slightly tragic Holly Golightly) reminded me more of Willa Cather's My Antonia than Capote's other seminal work, In Cold Blood. Of course, Antonia and Holly Golightly have virtually nothing in common except in how they occupy the center of the narrator's imagination. When Jim Burden explores Antonia's character, he discovers depth he didn't fully understand when he was a boy. The narrator of Breakfast at Tiffany's finds a disarmingly charming shallowness in Holly that hides complexity neither he (nor the reader) can fully understand. In the end, the Holly of Capote's novella doesn't match the charming portrayal of Audrey Hepburn in the movie, but Holly, I think, was meant to be a little darker, someone closer to tragedy than the stuff of dreams.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    My version of the classic novel included three other short stories written by Mr. Capote. I will give only a full review of Breakfast at Tiffany's though, because that story was my only interest. I almost didn't read the other short stories, because I simply didn't want to read them. But I read them, and I wasn't disappointed. I will give a brief summary of all three. The three other stories were called The House of Flowers, A Diamond Guitar, and A Christmas memory. They were all realistic stories, about a relationshi My version of the classic novel included three other short stories written by Mr. Capote. I will give only a full review of Breakfast at Tiffany's though, because that story was my only interest. I almost didn't read the other short stories, because I simply didn't want to read them. But I read them, and I wasn't disappointed. I will give a brief summary of all three. The three other stories were called The House of Flowers, A Diamond Guitar, and A Christmas memory. They were all realistic stories, about a relationship, either a friendship, a family bond, or marriage. Nothing really caught my eye, or had a message, but all seemed to be floating in reality. They were there, and they were gone. So, let’s get back to the main review. Breakfast at Tiffany’s is about a beautiful, young woman, Holly Golightly, living her life to the fullest no matter the cost. The story was narrated by her apartment neighbor and eventually "best friend" who Holly referred to as Fred. One: I never watched Audrey Hepburn’s 1961 film, Breakfast at Tiffany’s, or I might have watched bits of it because I know the ending. I can’t sit still watching movies. I am really a terrible movie goer. I LOVE Audrey Hepburn, and I am ashamed that I never watched this classic film. I wish it was on Netflix. She is a GORGEOUS, and I idolize her. Audrey is really the prettiest woman I have ever saw in my entire life. One time I was looking up pictures of her and decided to cut my bangs to her style. It was a horrible, horrible idea, because I don't cut hair. I blamed it on my husband for not stopping me. Two: Do you guys remember that 90s song called Breakfast at Tiffany's? It was sung by Deep Blue Something. Well that song kept replaying in my head while reading. I found it funny, but utterly annoying. I would be in the middle of a sentence and my brain would turn up it's speakers during the chorus. "And I said what about Breakfast at Tiffany's? She said I think I remember the film And as I recall I think, we both kind o' liked it" dodoododoodoooodoodooo. Needless to say the song will be stuck in my head for a few days. There are two things I really liked about the novel. I am giving it a 4 star because of Audrey, being a classic novel, Holly, and the symbolism. Holly Golightly in simple terms is a bitch. Even "Fred" said that at the end. She is the type of woman you despise, because she will lie, cheat, and steal from you. She lives to gain momentum, and she will do anything to get her way. She is callous, well she has one care, but she lives on her own terms. She want her freedom. Her head is in the clouds, which I can understand. It isn't a bad thing to live in the clouds. Her personality is horrible. Still I despise her, but I was entranced by her. Holly has that intoxicating feel, and you cannot just see her only one time. No, you have to watch, and see what will happen to her next. It was like watching a train wreck. Will she fall madly in love with any of her many suitors, and become caged? Will she finally be caught by the police? Will she love "Fred"? Read and find out. I really liked the symbolism. A few examples: An expensive cage was given to "Fred" by Holly for Christmas. She asked never to cage anything in her life. The cage is imprisonment, of course. A wild animal, like Holly (another symbolism), should never be caged. Taming a wild beast will never make that animal happy. Just like the Orcas at Seaworld, with their curved dorsal fins. This is how Holly felt about life. Of course the cat was the representation of herself, and they both loved each other at the end. Finally, when all Holly's belongings fell into the gutter, I thought it represented the end of Holly. I think I will try harder to find the movie. I know the endings are different, but I will see how well they match against each other. I will wait a bit before watching though. If I watch too soon I might get angry at the differences. Happy reading everyone! I might add more to my blog later. I had to speed this one through. I remember having more thoughts. Visit my blog here http://dancingbetweenthecovers.com/re.... It is brand new!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Lucy Langford

    4.0** had to bump this up to 4 stars after rereading. It's a delightful read and Holiday Golightly easily absorbs you into her life. "You can't give your heart to a wild thing: the more you do, the stronger they get.... if you let yourself love a wild thing. You'll end up looking at the sky." (Holiday Golightly). Holiday "Holly" Golightly is pursued by mafia gangsters and playboy millionaires. She is a heart-breaker, a traveller, a perplexer and a tease. She is mean and she 4.0** had to bump this up to 4 stars after rereading. It's a delightful read and Holiday Golightly easily absorbs you into her life. "You can't give your heart to a wild thing: the more you do, the stronger they get.... if you let yourself love a wild thing. You'll end up looking at the sky." (Holiday Golightly). Holiday "Holly" Golightly is pursued by mafia gangsters and playboy millionaires. She is a heart-breaker, a traveller, a perplexer and a tease. She is mean and she is kind, she is naive yet knowledgable, her character is contradictory. She lives in a dream and never settles into one place, ready to take flight. She's unique and she is an enigma, and this is what draws the narrator, "Fred" , in. This story is told from "Fred's" POV. He is looking at Holly's social circle from the outside in, trying to make way into the circle where martini parties, gramophone music and socialising take place. It follows how he thinks and feels about Holly, her turbulent lifestyle and how him and Holly meet and interact during their time spent together. Largely it faces how he is intrigued by her, and through this curiosity and wonder, he forms a love for her. Through their interactions together, "Fred" also meets a number of interesting characters intertwined with Holly's life. Truman Capote does a brilliant job of writing and describing these characters and their settings, that it is easy to imagine the scenes of the book. Through these interactions and the revealing and unravelling of characters, you begin to understand that Holly's life has had some very dark moments, despite her usual put-together appearances and fun lifestyle. Holly's character is definitely a tease and her life-style sounds so interesting. There's constant socialising, propositions and scandal- she never has a dull moment. Her life is especially interesting to imagine through the time period of 1940s New York. Her character is definitely the opposite to most people and this is what draws you in to her. She is an enigma and she is fascinating. This book also contained 3 short stories: "House of Flowers", "A diamond guitar" and "A Christmas Memory." All were very well written and lyrical in their prose. My favourite was "A Christmas Memory" which examines an important friendship between a young boy and his older cousin. It explores loneliness and friendship and you develop empathy for these characters. It was a short story and gripped me from the start. Overall a rather good modern classic and a very easy read ! ☺️

  28. 5 out of 5

    Carmen

    Those final weeks, spanning end of summer and the beginning of another autumn, are blurred in memory, perhaps because our understanding of each other had reached that sweet depth where two people communicate more often in silence than in words: an affectionate quietness replaces the tensions, the unrelaxed chatter and chasing about that produce a friendship's more showy, more, in the surface sense, dramatic moments. So. This is going to be a hard one to review. For one thing, the MC i Those final weeks, spanning end of summer and the beginning of another autumn, are blurred in memory, perhaps because our understanding of each other had reached that sweet depth where two people communicate more often in silence than in words: an affectionate quietness replaces the tensions, the unrelaxed chatter and chasing about that produce a friendship's more showy, more, in the surface sense, dramatic moments. So. This is going to be a hard one to review. For one thing, the MC is not in love with Holly nor pining after her nor wanting her as his wife/girlfriend. In fact, he is (IMO) a stand-in for Capote, who certainly had no interest in fucking women. Holly seems to see MC as a safe-space, someone she can trust because he is gay, and he reminds her of her brother (safe, brother) who is off at war. MC is unnamed in the book, but Holly insists on calling him "Fred," her brother's name - another way of establishing he is no threat and that they are of no sexual interest to each other. It's not only canceling out his own autonomy but it is a way for Capote to insert himself into the novel. Nameless MCs were/are very in vogue and considered an exciting literary technique in some circles. Very few authors, especially the unpublished, can resist an invitation to read aloud. An author who lives upstairs and has no interest in fucking Holly. Capote stand-in. Holiday Golightly is a woman who hangs around older, rich men and takes money from them to 'go to the powder room' and 'take a cab home.' She's 'trained herself' to 'only be excited by men over 42.' So, she's a prostitute. CARMEN: *sighs* *sips coffee* I mean,... sure. I feel like slapping a label on this is just another way of tearing people down and shaming them, but sure. She has sex with older, rich men for money, she cashes in on her looks and sexuality, and these are men she is not physically attracted to. I personally wouldn't call her a prostitute, because I'm not about that female-hate life, and also because she's not in a situation where she has a pimp or takes on all comers or does stuff she doesn't want to do. Instead, she realizes that her looks and personality are her currency and uses them to her best advantage to get men to give her money. She's tricking. I don't have a problem with this, just as I said in my review of Bunny Tales, I don't have a problem with women who are tricking nor do I have a problem with women who ruthlessly use their looks and sexuality to get what they want. Life is hard. *shrug* I am not pro-prostitution, I think being a prostitute is soul-crushing and soul-destroying, moreso when you have a pimp or madam to please, but even if you work for yourself. I'm a romantic. However, I'm a realist enough to know that life happens and it's absolutely against my nature to hate women or shame them for using their beauty or body to get ahead. I'm also not stupid enough to think that prostitution (in any of its forms) is going to magically disappear from society. The good thing about Holly is that she has no pimp, she answers to no one, and she doesn't have to fuck anyone she doesn't want to fuck and she doesn't have to engage in any sexual acts she doesn't want to engage in. Occasionally she runs into trouble, like the time she takes a man home and he bites her while in bed with her, she flees to (safe) "Fred's" place and sleeps in his bed. Again, because he has no sexual interest in her and is one of the few men in the novel who don't feel like they can own her, claim her, and control her. Holly has a deep, deep fear of and problem with being 'caged' - a running theme in the novel. She avoids the zoo. She (view spoiler)[gifts the MC with a beautiful birdcage he'd been lusting after but makes him promise he'll never put a living thing in it. She flees the country when faced with prison. (hide spoiler)] She'll never attach to one man or one place. She can't even commit to owning a cat, actually, the idea of pet ownership disgusts her. If an animal and a human choose to journey through life together, that's one thing, but she doesn't believe in owning animals. This is so shocking and revolutionary in a 1958 book, it's amazing how Capote has captured Holly and all her feelings in this way. While you are reading it it becomes clear exactly who Holly is and why, and her worldview is so exquisitely crafted by Capote that it's frankly genius. Holly's problem is that because she's so beautiful and charming, men want to possess her. Not just for one night, they want to marry her or claim her in some permanent way which would allow them to tell her what she can and cannot do and that is the anti-Holly. She'll go to great lengths to avoid this fate. Capote really illustrates this with teasing glimpses of her past, and we get an idea of where Holly came from and where she's going and why. It's brilliant and subtle on Capote's part. Another main highlight of the book and a reason to read it is the deep, philosophical conversations all the characters have with each other constantly and at the drop of a hat. Capote really unrealistically has people go on long, philosophical soliloquies which drop truth and explain feelings very well. He is unrealistic, as well, with his almost hilarious tendency to have everyone and their brother go up to the MC and start telling him their life stories. Unintentionally hilarious as everyone MC meets starts telling him long monologues about their lives. :D Cracked me up. RACISM I have to say something about the racism in this book. It's fucking disgusting and it was very disturbing to me. N-word this, n-word that. Latinos. Japanese. Slurs, slurs, slurs. And don't give me any of this "It was 1958!" shit. I don't give a fuck. It was really gross, mean-spirited, and not able to be ignored by this reader. Really damaged my enjoyment of the book and it was SO unnecessary. Fuck this shit. Ugh. Take this into account before you read this. Fair warning. WRITING Capote actually writes the shit out of this book. I had never read anything by Capote before, and I was surprised to find out he can actually write. Capote, the man, is such a figure, people talk about him all the time. He's kind of like Hemingway in that regard. People almost talk about Hemingway as a man more than they talk about his actual books. He's become a larger-than-life figure. But, both Hemingway and Capote can actually write, so there's a plus. I hate when an author is very hyped and then I read his/her work and am like, "Meh." Or "That was terrible." No, Capote is a classic for a reason, apparently. He's skilled as an author in more ways than one, and the book kept surprising me with its cleverness. Very well-written. THIS BOOK REMINDED ME OF: The Diary of a Teenage Girl: An Account in Words and Pictures Bunny Tales The Catcher in the Rye. Actually, Capote reminded me of Salinger quite a bit. TL;DR - I would say the biggest drawback of this book is the disgusting racism. Asking me to brush it aside is asking too much from me. On the plus side: amazing writing. Classic. Capote doesn't shy away from deep meaning or exploring the depths of human psyche or life. I'm glad I read it. READ WITH: Pantless Group. ;) The sky was red Friday night, it thundered, and Saturday, departing day, the city swayed in a squall-like downpour. Sharks might have swum through the air, though it seemed improbable a plane could penetrate it.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Esil

    I listened to Breakfast at Tiffany's as an audio, which is a perfect way to absorb this one. I'd never seen the movie and I've never read the book, but the characters and story felt very familiar. This is probably because the dance between the naive adoring narrator and the elusive Holly Golightly has become somewhat iconic. I love Capote's language. With very few words, he conveys very clearly what is going on between the characters. And the audio is lovely.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Florence (Lefty) MacIntosh

    It’s a brilliant character sketch, 150 pages you can polish off in a day. The story of a fascinating, seriously flawed young woman who moves to New York in the 40’s leaving Hicksville (view spoiler)[ along with her husband & his children (hide spoiler)] behind and reinvents herself as Holly Golightly, in the process losing all sense of who she is. A complex character, shifting between generosity and self-absorption, kindness & cruelty. Capote can write… you It’s a brilliant character sketch, 150 pages you can polish off in a day. The story of a fascinating, seriously flawed young woman who moves to New York in the 40’s leaving Hicksville (view spoiler)[ along with her husband & his children (hide spoiler)] behind and reinvents herself as Holly Golightly, in the process losing all sense of who she is. A complex character, shifting between generosity and self-absorption, kindness & cruelty. Capote can write… you almost hear the clicking of martini glasses and smell her perfume wafting from the pages. Agree with Norman Mailer who said he "would not have changed two words in Breakfast at Tiffany's" I’ve been thinking about Capote lately. Read To Kill a Mockingbird ,heard about the huge snit he was in over Harper Lee winning the Pulitzer; how despite all her help when he was struggling to write In Cold Blood he still ended a lifetime friendship over it. Then I read Rules of Civility and thought Amor, you sly devil - you've been watching “Breakfast at Tiffany’s” haven't you...I saw the film years ago, vaguely remembered so I thought I'd read the book. Surprise... It’s entirely different from the movie and FAR better. Audrey Hepburn the classic example of miscasting. Don’t get me wrong, I adore Audrey, her pearls, her little black dress – along with Grace Kelly she’s an icon of sophistication – what she is not is Holly Golightly. I've now discovered that Capote and I are in perfect agreement. 'The movie became a mawkish valentine to New York City,’ he said, 'and as a result was thin and pretty, whereas it should have been rich and ugly.’ Poor Truman, seems he couldn’t catch a break… Cons: To short, I wanted more. I usually pass on novellas for this reason. The other characters could have been more developed, Holly’s story felt unfinished. Agree with Mailer - he shouldn’t have changed 2 words, just think he needed to add a couple of thousand more. 3 ½ stars rounded to 4 “The answer is good things only happen to you if you're good. Good? Honest is more what I mean... Be anything but a coward, a pretender, an emotional crook, a whore: I'd rather have cancer than a dishonest heart.”

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