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The Girl Who Takes an Eye for an Eye

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From the author of the #1 international best seller The Girl in the Spider's Web: the new book in the Millennium series, which began with Stieg Larsson's The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo Lisbeth Salander - the girl with the dragon tattoo, the brilliant hacker, the obstinate outsider, the volatile seeker of justice for herself and others - has never been able to uncover the From the author of the #1 international best seller The Girl in the Spider's Web: the new book in the Millennium series, which began with Stieg Larsson's The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo Lisbeth Salander - the girl with the dragon tattoo, the brilliant hacker, the obstinate outsider, the volatile seeker of justice for herself and others - has never been able to uncover the most telling facts of her traumatic childhood, the secrets that might finally, fully explain her to herself. Now, when she sees a chance to uncover them once and for all, she enlists the help of Mikael Blomkvist, the editor of the muckraking, investigative journal Millennium. And nothing will stop her - not the anti-Muslim gang she enrages by rescuing a young woman from their brutality; not the deadly reach from inside the Russian mafia of her long-lost twin sister, Camilla; and not the people who will do anything to keep buried knowledge of a sinister pseudo-scientific experiment known only as The Registry. Once again, Lisbeth Salander and Mikael Blomkvist, together, are the fierce heart of a thrilling full-tilt novel that takes on some of the most insidious problems facing the world at this very moment.


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From the author of the #1 international best seller The Girl in the Spider's Web: the new book in the Millennium series, which began with Stieg Larsson's The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo Lisbeth Salander - the girl with the dragon tattoo, the brilliant hacker, the obstinate outsider, the volatile seeker of justice for herself and others - has never been able to uncover the From the author of the #1 international best seller The Girl in the Spider's Web: the new book in the Millennium series, which began with Stieg Larsson's The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo Lisbeth Salander - the girl with the dragon tattoo, the brilliant hacker, the obstinate outsider, the volatile seeker of justice for herself and others - has never been able to uncover the most telling facts of her traumatic childhood, the secrets that might finally, fully explain her to herself. Now, when she sees a chance to uncover them once and for all, she enlists the help of Mikael Blomkvist, the editor of the muckraking, investigative journal Millennium. And nothing will stop her - not the anti-Muslim gang she enrages by rescuing a young woman from their brutality; not the deadly reach from inside the Russian mafia of her long-lost twin sister, Camilla; and not the people who will do anything to keep buried knowledge of a sinister pseudo-scientific experiment known only as The Registry. Once again, Lisbeth Salander and Mikael Blomkvist, together, are the fierce heart of a thrilling full-tilt novel that takes on some of the most insidious problems facing the world at this very moment.

30 review for The Girl Who Takes an Eye for an Eye

  1. 4 out of 5

    James Elliot Leighton

    Absolutely pathetic. Clumsy, dull, slow. It has unbelievable characters, improbable situations, implausible plotting. Lagercrantz is nothing like Stieg Larsson, he is destroying a franchise that was popular world-wide. He has Lisbeth as a Wonder Woman who can beat the crap out of six foot two, physically fit men, drop them and dislocate a shoulder with a couple of punches. Ludicrous. He has not the faintest clue about computer hacking, nor many other areas of modern technology. A waste of time. Absolutely pathetic. Clumsy, dull, slow. It has unbelievable characters, improbable situations, implausible plotting. Lagercrantz is nothing like Stieg Larsson, he is destroying a franchise that was popular world-wide. He has Lisbeth as a Wonder Woman who can beat the crap out of six foot two, physically fit men, drop them and dislocate a shoulder with a couple of punches. Ludicrous. He has not the faintest clue about computer hacking, nor many other areas of modern technology. A waste of time. I returned my copy to Amazon after only a few chapters. It wasn't just poorly written, it was aggravating. Lagercrantz is an example of Mary Sue on steroids. He also has not heard the axiom "Show don't tell" or if he has, he ignores the advice.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jeffrey Keeten

    “First you find out the truth. then you take revenge.” There are just times when the laws of the land get things wrong. Our uber hip, ominously dangerous heroine, Miss Lisbeth Salander, is in Flodberga prison for two months because, in the course of saving an autistic child from his abuser, she got…too aggressive. She did. I was there. I saw it with my reader’s eye. She beat the shit out of that low life, steaming pile of excrement. Knowing Lisbeth as I do, this is my fifth book experience with he “First you find out the truth. then you take revenge.” There are just times when the laws of the land get things wrong. Our uber hip, ominously dangerous heroine, Miss Lisbeth Salander, is in Flodberga prison for two months because, in the course of saving an autistic child from his abuser, she got…too aggressive. She did. I was there. I saw it with my reader’s eye. She beat the shit out of that low life, steaming pile of excrement. Knowing Lisbeth as I do, this is my fifth book experience with her, I know she sat in that courtroom in brooding silence and offered no defense. Her code is that she shouldn’t have to defend herself in the face of such hypocrisy. She barely recognizes the court’s right to incarcerate her, but she did just order a bunch of books, a bit of light reading, on Quantum Field Theory, and maybe a few months in a quiet cell will allow her to finally work out the final wiggles in her quantum mechanical calculations. I knew a writer, Pico Iyer, who would routinely check himself into the monastery at Big Sur to finish books. It would be similar to being in a prison, but the enclosed atmosphere always restarted his creative juices. If I were incarcerated, for say redistributing wealth, I would insist (plea) on being sent to the prison with the best library system. I would ask for solitary confinement, take my meals in my cell, and expect new books to be distributed to me every few days. If need be, I’d open a vein and sketch out my book reviews in blood with a rat’s tooth on toilet paper and have them snuck out of the prison, hopefully by the man who delivers my books because I’ve threatened to eviscerate him in every story I write for the rest of my life if he doesn’t help me. I would get a lot of reading done. Not that I’ve given this any thought. Of course, the problem is Salander is not given the peace and quiet she craves. The beautiful, petite Faria Kazi, incarcerated for killing her brother after he killed her boyfriend in an Islamic fueled blood feud, is the favorite target of a woman who calls herself Benito. ”She was originally called Beatrice, and later took the name of a certain Italian fascist. These days she had a swastika tattooed on her throat, a crew cut and an unhealthy, pallid complexion.” Obviously, her parents did not pay enough attention to her as a child. Salander has zero tolerance for abuse. She sustained enough of it while she was growing up. She has made herself into a deadly weapon, and as tough as Benito is, I’m putting my money on Lisbeth every day of the week and twice on Sunday. Now what is interesting, in the fight scene it shows the difference between the two authors. Stieg Larsson would have given us detailed descriptions of the fight scene, where with David Lagercrantz, the fight begins and then a shutter comes down on the action and then shutter lifts to show someone on the ground gasping for breath. Maybe Lisbeth just moves too fast for Lagercrantz. Not a big complaint, but just a noticeable difference in styles of writing. Mikael Blomkivst, Mr. Expose from the magazine Millenneum, who has helped Salander as best he can since the beginning of this series, is back once again. He goes to see Salander once a week, which is rarely satisfying because Lisbeth isn’t much for chit chat. She does give him a lead that she wants him to follow up on regarding the Registry, which has been an organization she has been trying to bring down ever since she found out her and her twin sister were forced into that program. This organization like to study identical twins growing up in vastly different environments. They were demented people on an insidious mission, hidden beneath the guise of scientific research. Lisbeth does remember one person specifically attached to the program. ”’There was a woman who used to stop by to see you, wasn’t there? It’s coming back to me now. She had some kind of birthmark.’ ‘It looked like a burn on her throat.’ ‘As if a dragon had breathed fire on her.’” Lagercrantz also reveals more about the origin of Lisbeth Salander’s sexy dragon tattoo. There is some great backstory on our post-truth society and using ”lies as weapons,” as well. I’ve been increasingly concerned about the lack of interest in truth if it doesn’t jive with people’s own beliefs, so those passages resonate with me. Furthermore, Blomkvist is investigating the effects of a recent hacking of the stock market that caused panic. ”’Doubt on a small scale is what makes the stock market possible,’ Mannheimer replied. ‘Every day, millions of people out there doubt and hope and analyze. That’s what sets share prices. What I’m talking about is deep, existential doubt---lack of faith in growth and future returns. Nothing is more dangerous for a highly valued market. That level of fear can cause a crash and plunge the world into a depression. We could even start to question the whole idea, the imaginary construct. This will sound like a provocation to some of you, and I apologize for that. But the financial market is not something that exists like you or I, Karin, or this bottle of water on the table. The moment we stop believing in it, it ceases to exist.’” I love it when a writer expresses something I believe... in such a simple well defined way. I do, I confess, have some of my portfolio in the stock market, but it is a relatively small amount of my retirement. I’ve plunged most of my money into things more tangible like real estate. I can see it. I don’t have to imagine it. I feel the stock market is all just a rigged game for rich people to become richer, while the middle class dreamers who invest in the market thinking they will be rich, often see their life savings evaporate into thin air, like it never existed. Blomkvist and Salander join forces once again to try and bring down the forces of the Registry. Sometimes it feels like one step forward and two steps back, but they continue to circle closer to the black heart that guides the rest. David Lagercrantz is not Stieg Larsson. (I’m so glad he isn’t trying to wear a dead man's clothes.) Some may miss Larsson’s unique writing style. Lagercrantz may be different, but he is keeping Larsson’s characters alive and writing thrilling stories that I continue to enjoy. If you wish to see more of my most recent book and movie reviews, visit http://www.jeffreykeeten.com I also have a Facebook blogger page at: https://www.facebook.com/JeffreyKeeten

  3. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

    I think I am kind of jaded by this series at this point. Honestly, I did enjoy the second two books of the original trilogy, but I was not a huge fan of the original novel and, with these two that have come out by a different author, I am skeptical, but I want to give them a chance. I did enjoy this book, even more than the last one, but I think if it was not connected to this series, I might have enjoyed it more. First thing, in general, I enjoyed the story. Also, the returning characters were i I think I am kind of jaded by this series at this point. Honestly, I did enjoy the second two books of the original trilogy, but I was not a huge fan of the original novel and, with these two that have come out by a different author, I am skeptical, but I want to give them a chance. I did enjoy this book, even more than the last one, but I think if it was not connected to this series, I might have enjoyed it more. First thing, in general, I enjoyed the story. Also, the returning characters were interesting and some of the new ones are fascinating. I definitely think getting to know the people in it and watching them do the crazy things they do is my favorite part. One thing that has bothered me - even in the original trilogy - is the tendency for the story to be going along just fine and making perfect sense and suddenly it goes off on a really crazy tangent and I have no clue what is happening. Then, just as I am starting to wonder how this all ties in, it goes back to making sense. It kind of makes reading the books in this series a bit uncomfortable. The front of this book says it is a Lisbith Salander book. That is kind of like saying Rogue One is a Darth Vader movie. I mean, yeah she is in it and definitely plays a part, but I found her to be involved much less than expected. So, if you are a fan or a completist, give it a shot, but I cannot say for sure if you will enjoy it or not.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Bibi

    This book is Chaotic and pretty much without a plot, not to mention it was written in such a stilted manner. Is Lagercrantz intent on destroying Larsson's legacy?

  5. 4 out of 5

    Liz

    I've enjoyed this series immensely, even the last book written by Lagercrantz. But this book just lacked something. It seemed to spend the first meandering around without truly setting up a definitive plot line. As you would expect, there remain lots of moving pieces throughout the book with lots of very current themes- hacking of the financial markets, fentanyl, Muslim fanatics. Despite the multiple themes, it's often far too easy to see where the storyline is going. There are lots of charact I've enjoyed this series immensely, even the last book written by Lagercrantz. But this book just lacked something. It seemed to spend the first ⅓ meandering around without truly setting up a definitive plot line. As you would expect, there remain lots of moving pieces throughout the book with lots of very current themes- hacking of the financial markets, fentanyl, Muslim fanatics. Despite the multiple themes, it's often far too easy to see where the storyline is going. There are lots of characters and it's sometimes difficult to keep track of all the names. Lizbeth is not a major player in this book and she seems different. More ninja warrior, able to physically fight off her enemies no matter how beaten up. Broken ribs, no problem. She no longer seemed like a real character, more comic book hero. This is the weakest of all the books. Still entertaining, but not enthralling.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Erin

    When I read and reviewed The Girl in the Spider's Web, I really was of the opinion that Lagercrantz's version of Lisbeth Salander was a shadow of the woman that Stieg Larsson had made a household name. In this latest installment of the series, I feel that author and character are becoming more comfortable with each other. I also felt that Salander and Blomkvist' s relationship was written so much better and I loved the continued exploration of their strange alliance. But I still have my issues, When I read and reviewed The Girl in the Spider's Web, I really was of the opinion that Lagercrantz's version of Lisbeth Salander was a shadow of the woman that Stieg Larsson had made a household name. In this latest installment of the series, I feel that author and character are becoming more comfortable with each other. I also felt that Salander and Blomkvist' s relationship was written so much better and I loved the continued exploration of their strange alliance. But I still have my issues, mainly that there appears to be more emphasis on just writing up a detective thriller. Something I know a few of my reader buddies feel is great, but I find myself missing all the information on Swedish history and politics and newsmaking. Yes, I even really enjoyed all the journalism woes! From the beginning, this type of information really set the series apart for me. I felt that there was too much awareness of the international reading audience, plenty of North American cultural references- Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall, jazz music AND a lot of censorship on the rawness and brutality that served as a vehicle in the first three books. From my viewpoint, I felt that Larsson was willing to say "Here is the cruelty that exists in our world and I am not going to shy away from it." Lagercrantz is a bit more " Yeah, but how about if I tug at your heartstrings a bit first by giving Lisbeth an autistic child or a wrongly accused immigrant woman to save?" Then again, if DL is going to finish the prophecy of the original creator and carry this series to 10 books, I guess a few changes must occur to give longevity and momentum to the books. That's just how I see it, but I am just ONE reader among the thousands. Heck I had originally placed this book at a 2 star because the first 80 pages were ROUGH.. After further consideration, in which, I realized I planned to go to bed early and now notice it is midnight tells me that I enjoyed this READ more than I originally thought. I will also admit that I really loved the continued look at Lisbeth's back story and how closely related the investigation was into her own experiences as a child. So, what do you think? Should the Millenium series continue or is it time for all of us to move on?

  7. 4 out of 5

    Paromjit

    Lagercrantz returns with his second offering in the Lisbeth Salander series focusing on the personal history of Lisbeth as a child that she can barely remember or understand. Lisbeth has been unjustly imprisoned at Flodberga women's prison, which Lisbeth is indifferent to her position as she focuses on her interest in science. She is not, however, going to let the bullying and abuse of Bangladeshi Faria Kazi by psychopath, Benito, a woman that everyone is afraid of, including the prison warden, Lagercrantz returns with his second offering in the Lisbeth Salander series focusing on the personal history of Lisbeth as a child that she can barely remember or understand. Lisbeth has been unjustly imprisoned at Flodberga women's prison, which Lisbeth is indifferent to her position as she focuses on her interest in science. She is not, however, going to let the bullying and abuse of Bangladeshi Faria Kazi by psychopath, Benito, a woman that everyone is afraid of, including the prison warden, pass by without intervening. Kazi's boyfriend, Jamal Chowdry, a political activist under a fatwa issued by extremist Islamists, seemingly committed suicide. Kazi refuses to talk about the fall of her brother from their family home, and this has landed her in prison. Mikael continues to see Lisbeth, agreeing to look into a Leo Mannheimer at her request, without understanding why. Salander's beloved former guardian, the elderly Holger Palmgren has received papers on Lisbeth's history as a child, and decides to look more closely at the details despite them appearing to be saying little that is new. This has the past raising its ugly head, with forces determined to keep their malign and amoral secrets at all costs. Blomkvist and Salander learn of The Registry for the Study of Genetics and Social Environment despite information being hard to get at, and their work on twins in the nature vs nurture debate. Lisbeth's intervention to save Kazi leads to a seriously injured Benito, who vows to make her pay. She makes an enemy of Bashir, Kazi's brother, as she looks into the death of Chowdry. As unsavoury facts emerge, Salander is to find herself in danger because she will not let injustice pass without redress. It is the plot that drives the narrative in this thriller. Lagercrantz's characterisation is weak and he is guilty of not developing the familiar characters. His writing at best can be described as basic and workman like and he demonstrates little skill in the subtle and the nuanced. I did enjoy reading this book, but once I had finished, it felt like junk food, great whilst reading but leaving me empty once I had finished, knowing it will leave no long lasting impression. So by all means read this, just don't expect depth and enjoy it for the short lived superficial thrill ride.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    Commissioned to continue the Millenium series, David Lagercrantz seeks to carve out his own niche while remaining true to Stieg Larsson’s foundation. Here, the reader remembers some of the issues that faced Lisbeth Salander, now sitting in prison for the computer crimes she committed. While on the inside, Salander shows her highly aggressive side as she protects a vulnerable Muslim prisoner who is accused of a murder, but espouses her innocence. When the prison gang leader learns that Salander w Commissioned to continue the Millenium series, David Lagercrantz seeks to carve out his own niche while remaining true to Stieg Larsson’s foundation. Here, the reader remembers some of the issues that faced Lisbeth Salander, now sitting in prison for the computer crimes she committed. While on the inside, Salander shows her highly aggressive side as she protects a vulnerable Muslim prisoner who is accused of a murder, but espouses her innocence. When the prison gang leader learns that Salander will not back down, brutality seems the only option. That said, no one can tell when Salander will blow her lid and the damage that she’ll bring about thereafter, which leaves this leader rushed to the infirmary on at least one occasion. Salander has been doing some research into her past, tied to something called The Registry, an organization she remembers worked alongside her mother years ago. Turning to investigative journalist Mikael Blomkvist, Salander points him in the direction of an elderly lawyer who may possess a vast number of documents tied to her time with The Registry. When Blomkvist locates the lawyer, it is too late, as someone’s come to kill the man before he can reveal much of anything. When Salander is released from prison, she has numerous groups looking to exact revenge on her, from a devout Islamic community through to those who ran The Registry and cannot allow their secret to come out. Will Salander and Blomkvist learn enough to provide answers and discover just how deep The Registry goes and how many others might be suffering the consequences? Lagercrantz weaves not only a highly educational piece about genetics and human behaviour, but returns to Larsson’s intense style as the story morphs in wonderful twists that provide just enough angst to sustain the series’ trademark style. Series fans can breathe a sigh of relief that everyone is back on track and those who have an interest in the series can pick this one up to whet their appetites. I will be the first to admit, I was in the minority when it came to people who was displeased with David Lagercrantz taking over the series. I have had bad experiences when authors take the reins from an author who is either deceased or has chosen to fade away. Larsson’s work is on a pedestal for a reason and when Lagercrantz sought to spin it his own way, I could not help but be upset. I was tentative in choosing to continue with the series, but held my breath after seeing so many positive reviews. I am glad that I did, for Lagercrantz has done a wonderful job working through threads in the series (namely Salander and Blomkvist), as well as injecting some interesting tangents in this novel, primarily building on Lisbeth’s twin sister Camilla. I will venture not to speak too much about the scientific or experimental aspects of the story, for fear some will scream ‘SPOILER ALERT’, but can say that I was quite curious to learn all about these studies from the past number of decades. The characters in the story are wonderfully crafted and quite unique, tapping into many aspects of the story. Lagercrantz keeps Lisbeth Salander and Mikael Blomkvist as central, though many of the periphery characters also enrich the larger story. Salander receives some long-awaited aspects to her backstory, including discussion of her curious tattoo, which is finally addressed at length. Speaking of the narrative, it flows nicely, hampered at times with some translation issues that appear to slow the momentum, but there is an overall high quality to the story and its direction rarely wanes. Lagercrantz has some wonderful ideas that he weaves into the narrative and does not let up until the very end, permitting the reader to feel a strong connection to the overall themes the series has to offer. Readers looking for high quality writing need look no further, as Lagercrantz has compiled strong pieces from the Stieg Larsson playbook to deliver a knockout punch. Kudos, Mr. Lagercrantz, for this powerful piece of writing. You’ve saved yourself in my eyes and I can relax that the following five novels in the series (if the original ten promised by Larsson remains the plan) shall blossom under your guidance. Like/hate the review? An ever-growing collection of others appears at: http://pecheyponderings.wordpress.com/ A Book for All Seasons, a different sort of Book Challenge: https://www.goodreads.com/group/show/...

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Kuhn

    This is the fifth book in the Millennium Series. I enjoyed this story almost as much as I enjoyed Stieg Larsson’s earlier books starting with “The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo”. I know there are many who feel that David Lagercrantz does not stand up to Larsson’s writing, but I think it comes close enough. I’m not saying it’s better than the first three, just that it holds up to the series. The main appeal for me is always the kickass Lisabeth Salander character and Lagercrantz understands that an This is the fifth book in the Millennium Series. I enjoyed this story almost as much as I enjoyed Stieg Larsson’s earlier books starting with “The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo”. I know there are many who feel that David Lagercrantz does not stand up to Larsson’s writing, but I think it comes close enough. I’m not saying it’s better than the first three, just that it holds up to the series. The main appeal for me is always the kickass Lisabeth Salander character and Lagercrantz understands that and doesn’t try to move her too much from Larsson’s original motivation and personality. This story begins where the last one left off, with Salander in prison. As I would expect, prison is no problem for Salander and she is able to dole out a bit of justice there before she is released after her sentence ends. She is a complex character and is not infallible in this story which makes her realistic. There were a few small issues I had with her role in the ending, but I don’t want to leave any spoilers. I enjoyed Lagercrantz’s views on the financial markets and genes verses environment. Those storylines made for some interesting thinking in the middle of the book that was a nice change of pace from the action. The story was complex and although I did guess a few of the twists early on, I was still turning pages with interest all the way to the end. If I have any complaint about these books, it’s the Mikael Blomkvist character. He’s a magazine editor, investigator extraordinaire, and apparent every women’s sexual dream. I don’t know why that bothers me, I guess it’s that he’s a bit of a James Bond character, but while Salander does all the tricky thinking and the necessary violence, he still get’s the cocktail and the girl in every book. Despite that nagging annoyance, I enjoyed this book. I don’t expect earthshattering revelations in these books, just some good twists, turns and a health dose of Lisabeth Salander outsmarting and overpowering her evil adversaries. And that’s what I got.

  10. 5 out of 5

    James

    My reading style is eclectic, and I'd probably use the same term to describe this series and book. I first picked up the 'Millennium' series when I saw all the hype and read the description of the published novels. I particularly love genealogical mysteries, and when you toss in some thrills and suspense, it's likely a good fit for my reading preferences. I absolutely adored and rated The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo in my top books of all time. I read the next two in the series and was saddened My reading style is eclectic, and I'd probably use the same term to describe this series and book. I first picked up the 'Millennium' series when I saw all the hype and read the description of the published novels. I particularly love genealogical mysteries, and when you toss in some thrills and suspense, it's likely a good fit for my reading preferences. I absolutely adored and rated The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo in my top books of all time. I read the next two in the series and was saddened over the author's death but excited to see another writer's take on the characters and setting. Lagercrantz is a worthy successor, and someday, I will read one of his prior books too. I'm troubled when reviewers complain about the choice of a new author to to continue writing a series because all they do is compare the two and start out with a pessimistic attitude. I prefer to have some sense of an open mind and look for the positive in a new take on an old favorite. I'm also an optimist and respect an author's efforts and talent and find it difficult to give something a poor rating unless it was absolutely ridden with errors and issues. Hence... for Lagercrantz's versions, I enjoy the style, writing quality, different views, and continuation of a fantastic concept. The Girl Who Takes an Eye for an Eye is the second of his in this series that I've read, and while it was a good read, there were a few items that didn't work in totality for me. I ended up at a 3.5 rating, comfortably rounding upward to account for all the effort that goes into a series and taking over another author's work. One of my favorite aspects was the revisit to Lisbeth's childhood when abuse formulated her outlook on life. In an earlier book, when we learned the extent to which she'd been attacked and damaged, I felt horrific sorrow for her. Seeing what else happened, via this book, I'm even more devastated. Initially, I thought... wait, is this a history rewrite? I didn't go back to compare the timelines and actions, as I'm sure the editors and author's did their justice... but I did find myself wondering how this aligned with Zala's influence on his daughter, Lisbeth. I'm kinda hoping to get a book dedicated to Agneta, Lisbeth's mother, as there is a bigger story there - I'm certain! For me, these characters are so flawed, yet so lovable (not in a cozy way, but in an 'I want to help you' way). Learning what they went through and what forced them to become the people they are today... that is excellent character development. Possibly over-the-top in a few places (not unlike the whole series... just a bit more in this book), I put aside my 'hmmm...' attitude and focused on what bond must exist between Mikael and Lisbeth to support each other through these tragedies. These are two friends we should all have. I particularly enjoyed the Muslim-focused story-line, and I was irate over the way these men treated their sister (and in general how certain attitudes still prevail). The translation (actually, was it translated? The originals were, but I'm honestly not sure about these ones. Did the author write originally in his own language? I checked and the Swedish and English versions came out on the same day.) was good and offered new vocabulary for me to learn. I found some of the individual scenes a bit repetitive, but they moved the story forward. The end was satisfying in terms of catching the bad guys (sort of), but I wanted it to be more of a showdown. The sixth book in the series comes out later this year, and I'm going to try to read it relatively quickly close to this one, as I suspect some of the ending components will continue into it. What did everyone else think of this book?

  11. 5 out of 5

    Katie B

    3.5 stars This is a tough book to review because even though I liked it for the most part, it just felt slightly off when comparing it to the first four books of the series. Part of the problem for me was there was little Millennium newsroom storyline which I didn't realize until now I actually needed in these books. Couple that and Lisbeth in prison, and everything just felt different in this one. I know other people had a problems with the fourth book but I honestly thought it was a fairly good 3.5 stars This is a tough book to review because even though I liked it for the most part, it just felt slightly off when comparing it to the first four books of the series. Part of the problem for me was there was little Millennium newsroom storyline which I didn't realize until now I actually needed in these books. Couple that and Lisbeth in prison, and everything just felt different in this one. I know other people had a problems with the fourth book but I honestly thought it was a fairly good attempt and I did feel like I had stepped back comfortably into Blomkvist and Salander's world. I don't think the author captured that feeling as well with the fifth book. In some ways though, this book was better than the fourth. While the action switched back and forth between different characters, it didn't feel as overwhelming and hard to follow as with the last book. Many of the characters will be familiar to readers as they have been featured in other books. The story line was also easier to follow as it didn't get into weird technology and NSA type stuff. Overall, I did enjoy the book even though I had problems with it. If you liked the previous book, I think this one is a safe bet if you don't go into it with super high expectations. While this one might be the weakest in the series, it still makes for a good thriller.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Skip

    Please read the following review in the context of my overarching belief that Lisbeth Salander is an iconic figure in contemporary fiction. Lisbeth is in a maximum security prison, serving time for her overly aggressive methods to rescue an autistic child in Lagercrantz's first book. The prison ward is run by a psychotic inmate, who has adopted the name Benito, who is abusing a young Arab women, who has been wrongfully jailed in connection with family honor issues. Lisbeth cannot abide injustice: Please read the following review in the context of my overarching belief that Lisbeth Salander is an iconic figure in contemporary fiction. Lisbeth is in a maximum security prison, serving time for her overly aggressive methods to rescue an autistic child in Lagercrantz's first book. The prison ward is run by a psychotic inmate, who has adopted the name Benito, who is abusing a young Arab women, who has been wrongfully jailed in connection with family honor issues. Lisbeth cannot abide injustice: either the inmates running the prison nor the abuse of this gentle soul so she uses all of her resources to help Faria Kazi. Meanwhile, some old files are given to Lisbeth's former guardian, Holger Palmgren, about the people who experimented on Lisbeth when she was a child, starting investigative reporter Mikael Blomkvist on a twisted trail to find those responsible for her situation as well as others, including the son of a major financial power figure in Sweden. Upon her release from prison, Lisbeth seeks to punish them, and finds herself in deep trouble. It's still not Stieg Larsson, but who is? I look forward to Book #6 anyway.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Ninoska Goris

    Español - English Si no tienes mucho tiempo para leer, no comiences este libro. Dejarás todo de lado y no harás más nada, solo leer hasta terminarlo. Es cierto que al principio es un poco lento en lo que nos dan los detalles, pero luego va todo a la carrera. Es desde diferentes puntos de vista lo que enriquece la historia y siempre queda en suspenso y no sabes si leer más rápido o saltarte páginas y saber qué pasa. En esta oportunidad Lisbeth está presa por defender a un niño autista de su abusad Español - English Si no tienes mucho tiempo para leer, no comiences este libro. Dejarás todo de lado y no harás más nada, solo leer hasta terminarlo. Es cierto que al principio es un poco lento en lo que nos dan los detalles, pero luego va todo a la carrera. Es desde diferentes puntos de vista lo que enriquece la historia y siempre queda en suspenso y no sabes si leer más rápido o saltarte páginas y saber qué pasa. En esta oportunidad Lisbeth está presa por defender a un niño autista de su abusador y si la conocemos bien sabremos cómo fue la defensa, no importándole ir a prision. Le da igual dónde esté. Se da cuenta de lo mal que tratan a la presa de la celda de al lado y se involucra en su defensa. Mientras recibe una visita de su antiguo tutor y amigo Holger Palmgren, quien le dice que recibió unos documentos con nueva información de sus años de infancia y click! todo es más emocionante con cada nueva página leída. Y el final es fantástico! Lisbeth Salander es un personaje como pocos y me entristece mucho saber que solo nos queda un libro en esta serie. ✨✨✨ If you don't have a lot of time to read, don't start this book. You will leave everything aside and you will not do anything else, just read until finished. It is true that at the beginning it is a little slow while we know the details, but then everything goes the speed of light. It is from different points of view what enriches the story and always remains in suspense and you do not know if read faster or skip pages and know what happens. In this opportunity Lisbeth is imprisoned for defending an autistic child from his abuser and if we know her we will know how the defense was, not mind going to prison. She doesn't care where she stays. She realizes how badly they treat the prisoner in the cell next door and gets involved in her defense. While receiving a visit from his former tutor and friend Holger Palmgren, who tells her that he received some documents with new information from her childhood years and click! everything is more exciting with each new page read. And the ending is fantastic! Lisbeth Salander is a character like few others and it saddens me to know that we only have one book left in this series.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Marléne

    Not even good if you see it as a fan-fic, not connected to great works of Stieg Larsson. I would much rather rate it a 0 but as it is impossible. Save your money. This story is not about Lisbeth Salander. Sure, it mentions her every now and then, but it's not about her. Read only if you wish to see how David Lagercrantz butcher the characters completely, stips them of their principles and well established quirks. Nothing is good about this book. Nothing. It makes me cry inside to think that he i Not even good if you see it as a fan-fic, not connected to great works of Stieg Larsson. I would much rather rate it a 0 but as it is impossible. Save your money. This story is not about Lisbeth Salander. Sure, it mentions her every now and then, but it's not about her. Read only if you wish to see how David Lagercrantz butcher the characters completely, stips them of their principles and well established quirks. Nothing is good about this book. Nothing. It makes me cry inside to think that he is allowed to write a 3rd installment.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Tanja Berg

    A totally superfluous addition to the "Millenium" universe. I should have known better than to read this. It's a travesty how the legacy of Stieg Larsson is being used. It's a wonder he doesn't turn in his grave and rise from the dead to haunt the culprits. I finished though, and I don't know what that says about me. Probably less than having bought this in the first place. The beginning is enticing enough for me to be drawn in, and the plot is interesting enough. However, the language - the ori A totally superfluous addition to the "Millenium" universe. I should have known better than to read this. It's a travesty how the legacy of Stieg Larsson is being used. It's a wonder he doesn't turn in his grave and rise from the dead to haunt the culprits. I finished though, and I don't know what that says about me. Probably less than having bought this in the first place. The beginning is enticing enough for me to be drawn in, and the plot is interesting enough. However, the language - the original Swedish - grates my nerves. It's ten years since I read the original trilogy, but Larsson definitely expressed himself more elegantly than this. Lisbeth Salander is in prison because of a minor incident with the law. While in prison she makes a powerful enemy with the gangster Benito. For some reason I forget, she puts the journalist Michael Blomqvist on the trail of a Leo Mannerheim. Leo and Lisbeth where both part of a controversial and secret twin study. I just know there will be more. Lisbeth is a cash cow. She would not be pleased if she knew how she was being used. I just hope I have the sense to stay away. Lisbeth Salander is one of the greatest literary heroines to ever grace the page and I do not approve of what Lagercrantz does to her.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Tooter

    What a disappointing end to one of my favorite series! It was a mess...too long, too much unnecessary detail and an unsatisfying ending.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    Fans of the 'Millenium Series' know that Stieg Larrson, the original author, passed away after writing the third book. Subsequent stories have been written by David Lagercrantz, who hits his stride with this book (IMO). ******** As this fifth book in the 'Millenium Series' opens, Lisbeth Salander is in Flodberga Prison - sentenced to two months for refusing to cooperate with the (compromised) police while protecting an endangered autistic boy (in book four). Salander is indifferent to her surroun Fans of the 'Millenium Series' know that Stieg Larrson, the original author, passed away after writing the third book. Subsequent stories have been written by David Lagercrantz, who hits his stride with this book (IMO). ******** As this fifth book in the 'Millenium Series' opens, Lisbeth Salander is in Flodberga Prison - sentenced to two months for refusing to cooperate with the (compromised) police while protecting an endangered autistic boy (in book four). Salander is indifferent to her surroundings, though, because she has her math books in her cell, and spends her time working on quantum physics equations. Moreover, jailhouse food is better than the the junk she usually eats. One thing does bother Salander though. Her maximum security cell block is under the thumb of a sadistic prisoner named Benito (formerly Beatrice) Anderson, who frightens almost everyone - including fellow prisoners, guards, and even the warden. Salander isn't intimidated by Benito, but the swastika-tattooed thug is abusing a beautiful Bangladeshi inmate named Faria Kazi. Salander isn't about to let this pass, and takes matters into her own hands - making a mortal enemy of Benito. Meanwhile, Salander's former guardian - elderly, infirm Holger Palmgren - comes into possession of confidential documents that detail cruel experiments Salander was subjected to as a child. With great difficulty, wheelchair-bound Palmgren makes his way to Flodberga Prison, to inform Salander about these new discoveries. Afterwards, Salander 'persuades' (blackmails) the warden into letting her use his computer to look into these decades-old events. Salander also asks her friend, journalist Mikael Blomkvist, to gather information about a man called Leo Mannheimer. When he's back home, Palmgren continues to pore over the secret papers, and sees the name of someone he's met - Professor Martin Steinberg. When Palmgren calls Steinberg and alludes to the clandestine experiments, the professor freaks out. He calls his fellow perpetrator, Dr. Rakel Greitz, who's now an old woman suffering from cancer. Greitz isn't about to let her reputation be sullied, and will do ANYTHING to prevent this. Greitz is one of the worst villains in the book....and that's all I'll say about her. As the story unfolds, Salander is released from prison, continues to look into her past, and plans her revenge. (This is one chick you don't want to get on the wrong side of!!) For his part, Blomkvist gathers information about Leo Mannheimer and shares his findings with Salander. The journalist also plans an exposé for Millenium Magazine.....about the child experiments. As usual, Blomkvist also romances an attractive woman. LOL A sub-plot in the novel tells the story of the Bangladeshi prisoner, Faria Kazi, who's in jail for killing her brother. Before going to prison, Faria was severely oppressed by her strict Muslim family, who planned to marry her off to a rich old fart in the home country. When Faria fell in love with a handsome Bangladeshi boy in Sweden, her family wasn't having it....and all hell broke loose. Salander is sympathetic to Faria, and arranges for Blomkvist's sister - lawyer Annika Giannini - to represent the Muslim woman.....with an eye to springing her out of jail. The book's intricate plot is well-constructed and compelling, and I enjoyed catching up with Salander and Blomkvist. The major villains in the story are suitably evil (if a little cartoonish), and I hoped they'd get their comeuppance. The story's secondary characters - including selfish liars, violent thugs, cold-hearted experimenters, self-serving murderers, and attractive ladies - also add interest to the novel. All in all, a very good addition to the Millenium Series, highly recommended. The book could be read as a standalone, but - for maximum enjoyment - it's best to start with book one of the series and read them in order. You can follow my reviews at https://reviewsbybarbsaffer.blogspot....

  18. 5 out of 5

    Stacey

    David Lagercrantz continues the Millennium series and does a fine job. The character of Lisbeth Salander continues to be the bad ass girl I crave to read more about. Lisbeth finds herself in prison and while there she continues to create trouble for herself, but for all the right reasons. I don't know what this says about me, but I like the prison scenes. On a slightly different track, Leo's past unfolds and it is good! When Lisbeth is released she learns a few truths and this girl doesn't get m David Lagercrantz continues the Millennium series and does a fine job. The character of Lisbeth Salander continues to be the bad ass girl I crave to read more about. Lisbeth finds herself in prison and while there she continues to create trouble for herself, but for all the right reasons. I don't know what this says about me, but I like the prison scenes. On a slightly different track, Leo's past unfolds and it is good! When Lisbeth is released she learns a few truths and this girl doesn't get mad...she gets even. Another great read as Lagercrantz takes over.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Rita

    The latest action packed addition to the Millennium saga. Once again Lisbeth Salander comes out on top despite overwhelming odds. As usual there is enough action to please followers of this series. Nothing can come close to the first in this series, The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, but Lisbeth Salander and Mikhail Blomkvist still make for great entertainment. Lisbeth almost seems superhuman but she has suffered so much at the hands of the evil cold blooded people who just looked at her as part o The latest action packed addition to the Millennium saga. Once again Lisbeth Salander comes out on top despite overwhelming odds. As usual there is enough action to please followers of this series. Nothing can come close to the first in this series, The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, but Lisbeth Salander and Mikhail Blomkvist still make for great entertainment. Lisbeth almost seems superhuman but she has suffered so much at the hands of the evil cold blooded people who just looked at her as part of a scientific experiment, that I doubt if she really noticed the pain anymore. She is always ready to fight for those who can't. Meanwhile Mikhail Blomkvist is doing what he does best, digging up the facts that others had hoped were buried, and also climbing in and out of bed with various women. He has dug deeply and uncovered a nasty program sanctioned at the time by the Swedish government. It took twins from poor families or orphans and most of them gifted, and gave them to be raised separately, in extremely different circumstances. The main example brought out in the book is the case of the gifted gypsy twins, Leo and Dan. Leo was raised in the lap of luxury, while Dan was raised in extreme poverty. It was done in the name of science and was eventually closed and the Swedish government or at least those who even knew about it tried very hard to bury it as deep as possible so no one would know it was ever done However, not everyone in the program wanted it discontinued. They had committed so many unspeakable horrors in the name of science that they had to make sure that none of the children discovered what had been done to them. Lisbeth and her twin sister, Camilla, were part of the program but Lisbeth was considered a failure and was turned over to an unscrupulous psychiatrist to use as the subject of his tortuous experiments. Camilla was originally categorized as sweet and relatively untouched by the circumstances in which she was raised, until they dug deeper into her psyche. This book gives us more insight into Lisbeth Salander, uncovering bits of her past that she had no memory of. She was torn away from a mother she loved and, in her way, her mother loved her also. I get the impression that they may have killed her mother or at least expedited her death. The Girl Who Takes an Eye for an Eye actually focuses on the girl, for a change. There are many "scientific experiments"coming under scrutiny for the harm they did in the name of science. I enjoyed listening to this book courtesy of Overdrive. This is the 5th book in the series and the last as far as I know. I hope you enjoy it as much as I did.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Barbara Bryan

    Insufficient words to properly express how truly bad this book is. The writing is infantile, at first I attributed it to the translation but that's not the case. The story line is impossible to follow and I have to finally let one of my favorite literary characters go. Goodbye to Lisbeth Salander and I mourn Stieg Larsson again. Read 80 pages, DNF.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Mel

    So I touch upon the fact that I hate David Lagercrantz as the person who continued this series down below, but I will actually review the book here. I found this, as a book, holds up really well. I enjoyed the plot and I liked the characters. I do not think this book holds up in the series at all. I really enjoyed the mystery, I liked the government conspiracy aspect, along with the side characters involved in the mystery, but I didn't like how this continued the series. I didn't like where Lisbe So I touch upon the fact that I hate David Lagercrantz as the person who continued this series down below, but I will actually review the book here. I found this, as a book, holds up really well. I enjoyed the plot and I liked the characters. I do not think this book holds up in the series at all. I really enjoyed the mystery, I liked the government conspiracy aspect, along with the side characters involved in the mystery, but I didn't like how this continued the series. I didn't like where Lisbeth started the book and I don't think it fit in with the rest of the book at all. I don't have much else to say, so I leave you with the reason I think Lagercrantz is running this series into the ground. ------------------------------------------------ I hated the third book. I absolutely hated it. I think Blomkvist was one of the worst characters and his character development fell apart. I hated his romantic relationship and how the relationship between Salander and Blomkvist progressed. I just overall didn't like the conclusion to the characters story. So when David Lagercrantz came and gave me a story that fixed all the relationship and character aspects, as well as gave me an interesting plot, I was in. But this book has made me see a lot that makes me realize that Lagercrantz is actually ruining what this series is about. This series is first and foremost about Blomkvist, the journalist, finding stories for his newspaper. There is absolutely none of that in these 2 continuation novels. The newspaper is rarely mentioned and it's always in passing, the characters from the newspapers, such as Berger, aren't even in the story. It's clear that Lagercrantz did not like Blomkvist's relationship with Berger and chose to remove it. He has removed the heart of the story, the thing that made the mysteries so important, and turned this into a political government mystery. Blomkvist has been on 10 out of the 225 pages I've read so far, he is slowly getting left behind and that infuriates me. (edit: he was the focus of the last 120 pages or so, but still) It's clear he wants to take Salander into the future of the series and leave Blomkvist behind. But it makes me mad that the way it's going he's just going to keep writing and never stop. I think Lagercrantz was absolutely the worst decision and worst possible person to continue this story and I am so disappointed.

  22. 4 out of 5

    debra

    Around 3*s. IMO, Simon Vance is an exceptional narrator, and as soon as I heard his familiar voice- I was-"Ooh, I'm going to love this." I didn't. I did enjoy the parts where "the beyond kickass" Lisbeth was on the scene, and wish there were many, many more of them. There were several twisted plotlines, but few surprises. I recently told someone that when "I cook-it looks real, but tastes like someone washed it." This book gave me that same feeling. Plus, the book felt like it "sorta stretched o Around 3*s. IMO, Simon Vance is an exceptional narrator, and as soon as I heard his familiar voice- I was-"Ooh, I'm going to love this." I didn't. I did enjoy the parts where "the beyond kickass" Lisbeth was on the scene, and wish there were many, many more of them. There were several twisted plotlines, but few surprises. I recently told someone that when "I cook-it looks real, but tastes like someone washed it." This book gave me that same feeling. Plus, the book felt like it "sorta stretched out in the wash" too. It was not my intention to be disrespectful, it was just the analogy that kept coming to mind.

  23. 4 out of 5

    L.A. Starks

    An excellent continuation of the series. Part of chapter 24 feels tacked-on, like Revelations in the Bible--not a fit with the rest. Blomkvist feels a bit insufferable and smug; Lisbeth is well-written and brave, as always. Also, there's a bit too much research download. I understand the impulse.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Tim

    An incredible story with multiple plot lines that must be read or listened to intently to appreciate the great depths of author Lagercrantz' imagination. 10 of 10 stars

  25. 5 out of 5

    Doug Bradshaw

    I think of the original meandering story-telling of the GWTDT and how it illistrates how different cultures approach writing and stories. This felt more like Larsson than the his other book with all of the little side stories and then the trivia detail of the stories, much of which would have been edited out by our story editors. We need concise, no wasted words. Any yet, this was one of the things I really enjoyed about this story. It is a bit convoluted and over the top in some ways. This autho I think of the original meandering story-telling of the GWTDT and how it illistrates how different cultures approach writing and stories. This felt more like Larsson than the his other book with all of the little side stories and then the trivia detail of the stories, much of which would have been edited out by our story editors. We need concise, no wasted words. Any yet, this was one of the things I really enjoyed about this story. It is a bit convoluted and over the top in some ways. This author isn't as sexually oriented, a bit tamer than Larsson. But what we're all here wanting, is more of Lisbeth and we get it. I still love her, her totally logical ways, her ability to assess the situation and usually come out the winner. The backstory of what happened to Lisbeth is greatly expanded in this book and it talks about another case where identical mirror image twins were separated at birth to study the difference between genetics and traits learned in the environment. And, of course, there were some very greedy horrible people that have gotten away with way too much. I really enjoyed the story of the two boys and found it to be fascinating. Someone said that this is the last of the series. Is that true? I rounded up to 4 stars because I loved the original series so much and this took me back into that world in an entertaining way.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Bradley

    This fifth book of Lizbeth Salander, two not written by the original writer, is fun enough to keep on reading without any reservation, but not deep enough or creative enough to break any new ground. Indeed, a lot of the plot elements are DIRECT REPEATS of the first three books. Not that I'm complaining. Much. They do, after all, solidify and remind us of exactly what kind of person Lizbeth is. Minus the duct tape. But add even more revenge against abusers. For that, I am just fine. In fact, these This fifth book of Lizbeth Salander, two not written by the original writer, is fun enough to keep on reading without any reservation, but not deep enough or creative enough to break any new ground. Indeed, a lot of the plot elements are DIRECT REPEATS of the first three books. Not that I'm complaining. Much. They do, after all, solidify and remind us of exactly what kind of person Lizbeth is. Minus the duct tape. But add even more revenge against abusers. For that, I am just fine. In fact, these laid-back observations, theoretically relaxing check-ins to a prison system to catch up on quantum loop theory is kinda awesome. Woe to anyone actively abusing a broken woman in the cells nearby! There's just a TAD reveal about Lizbeth in this one. She's not really the star of the show, believe it or not. This novel could almost do without Lizbeth. The best part of the novel is pretty much the new characters. And that's perhaps how it ought to be. I like the twins. :) So, yes, I had fun. That's my main concern. This isn't utterly derivative but it does straddle the line. If it wasn't for all the new peeps, I might have felt as let down as the previous novel after I got over the initial rush. Not so, here. :)

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ana

    Lisbeth Salander is my favourite character in contemporary literature. Not one of… but the very favourite! She’s as intelligent and self-contained as she is a no-tolerance-to-bullying & crime-fighting badass, a multi-layered strong-willed yet vulnerable character, with a gripping past, helped by equally intriguing characters. I will read any Millenium book David Lagercrantz will put out there, because however much fun rereading the trilogy is, I would like to know what she’s been up to and u Lisbeth Salander is my favourite character in contemporary literature. Not one of… but the very favourite! She’s as intelligent and self-contained as she is a no-tolerance-to-bullying & crime-fighting badass, a multi-layered strong-willed yet vulnerable character, with a gripping past, helped by equally intriguing characters. I will read any Millenium book David Lagercrantz will put out there, because however much fun rereading the trilogy is, I would like to know what she’s been up to and up against since. “The Girl Who Takes an Eye for an Eye” takes us further into Listeth’s past and the history behind her famous dragon tattoo but also shows us the consequences of all the crazy actions she undertook to protect the amazing autistic boy, August, in the previous novel. It’s practically a story about the “search for origins” and you get the feeling that while looking into her own troubled past Lisbeth is no longer “the girl” we met in Stieg Larsson’s first book. But a lot has happened to her, and that perhaps changed her a lot more than she realizes. This was even better than “The Girl in the Spider's Web,” although I also gave that one 5*. I couldn’t help it! The progress of the second half of the book reminded me of the enthralling atmosphere created in Larsson’s own voice. It was good. Really good. There are some loose ends, especially those regarding Camilla, Lisbeth’s evil twin. So I’ll be waiting patiently for a continuation… “Lies as a way of creating chaos and confusion. Lies as an alternative to violence.” “[Palmgren] belonged to a generation that had no understanding of tattooing as an art form. Why embellish yourself with something that never goes away, when we constantly change and evolve?”

  28. 4 out of 5

    Crime by the Book

    Review to come!! I had the fantastic opportunity to interview David Lagercrantz on the newest Millennium novel - read that interview here: http://crimebythebook.com/blog/2017/9...

  29. 4 out of 5

    Bettie

    https://www.thelocal.se/20170511/lisb...

  30. 5 out of 5

    Carolyn

    3.5 stars. I find this a difficult book to review and rate. On the positive side, the suspense was there. I read it in one day and well into the night, barely stopping for anything else. I cannot say that for many recent thrillers. The author's style is quite different from Larsson's but am happy to have Lisbet back. However, I miss the vulnerable Lisbet who was barely functional in interpersonal relations. She is now one mean, tough fighting machine. There are many themes and injustices addre 3.5 stars. I find this a difficult book to review and rate. On the positive side, the suspense was there. I read it in one day and well into the night, barely stopping for anything else. I cannot say that for many recent thrillers. The author's style is quite different from Larsson's but am happy to have Lisbet back. However, I miss the vulnerable Lisbet who was barely functional in interpersonal relations. She is now one mean, tough fighting machine. There are many themes and injustices addressed: cybercrime involving financial markets, honor killing within a fundamentalist Islam family, racial and class prejudice, the effects of unethical experiments on human victims, violence with the prison system, nature versus nurture. Lagercrantz lists characters from the past books who are either present or mentioned in this story and briefly describes who they are. I wish this was done in more series. He also introduces new characters essential to the plot. Interesting to me we're the two musicians and I hope we will see more of them in the future. With so many people interacting in this story, there is only room for Lisbet to play a smaller role, but she remains the focus. There is very little dialogue or interaction between Lisbet and Blomkvist which was disappointing. I thought Lisbet's twin was to be included in the plot, but was there by mention only. How the author intends to draw so many strands together is problematic but it works in the end. I felt it was better than the previous book.

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