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The Son of Tarzan

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The story of Tarzan and Jane has delighted fans for a century. Their romantic/adventure stories are as much fun to read now as they were when they were first written. Edgar Rice Burroughs was born in 1875 in Chicago, Illinois. Although Burroughs wrote in many genres he is best known for creating the jungle hero Tarzan. Burroughs began writing for pulp fiction magazines and The story of Tarzan and Jane has delighted fans for a century. Their romantic/adventure stories are as much fun to read now as they were when they were first written. Edgar Rice Burroughs was born in 1875 in Chicago, Illinois. Although Burroughs wrote in many genres he is best known for creating the jungle hero Tarzan. Burroughs began writing for pulp fiction magazines and in 1912 he published Tarzan of the Apes. Burroughs went against the advice of men in his field and made Tarzan a marketing success though comic strips, movies and commercial products. There are 26 novels in the Tarzan series. In Son of Tarzan Korak is lured away from London by Tarzan's archenemy Paulvitch. Tarzan's young son escapes to the savage African jungles where he becomes known as Korak the killer, a fighter almost as mighty as his father.


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The story of Tarzan and Jane has delighted fans for a century. Their romantic/adventure stories are as much fun to read now as they were when they were first written. Edgar Rice Burroughs was born in 1875 in Chicago, Illinois. Although Burroughs wrote in many genres he is best known for creating the jungle hero Tarzan. Burroughs began writing for pulp fiction magazines and The story of Tarzan and Jane has delighted fans for a century. Their romantic/adventure stories are as much fun to read now as they were when they were first written. Edgar Rice Burroughs was born in 1875 in Chicago, Illinois. Although Burroughs wrote in many genres he is best known for creating the jungle hero Tarzan. Burroughs began writing for pulp fiction magazines and in 1912 he published Tarzan of the Apes. Burroughs went against the advice of men in his field and made Tarzan a marketing success though comic strips, movies and commercial products. There are 26 novels in the Tarzan series. In Son of Tarzan Korak is lured away from London by Tarzan's archenemy Paulvitch. Tarzan's young son escapes to the savage African jungles where he becomes known as Korak the killer, a fighter almost as mighty as his father.

30 review for The Son of Tarzan

  1. 5 out of 5

    Henry Avila

    Opening scene: A small boat, is floating leisurely .On a stream in West Africa.The crew, in the vessel on the Ugambi River.Are tired, after struggling going up.They can relax, coming down. And letting the current take them. To their ship. The Marjorie W,anchored on the nearby,coast. Of the Atlantic Ocean.They were seeking valuable products. In the area.You can imagine. How startled the seamen are. Seeing a white man, emerging from the jungle.More skeleton than flesh and blood.Alexis Paulvitch, i Opening scene: A small boat, is floating leisurely .On a stream in West Africa.The crew, in the vessel on the Ugambi River.Are tired, after struggling going up.They can relax, coming down. And letting the current take them. To their ship. The Marjorie W,anchored on the nearby,coast. Of the Atlantic Ocean.They were seeking valuable products. In the area.You can imagine. How startled the seamen are. Seeing a white man, emerging from the jungle.More skeleton than flesh and blood.Alexis Paulvitch, is,after ten torturous years lost there. But that's not the name he gives. To the amazed sailors, of course.Being an evil man. Both in the past, and the coming future, too.The criminal, has to give an alias.. .Taken to London, along with a big ape. Ajax,real name Akut(a friend of Tarzan). Who strangely takes a liking, to Paulvitch.I mean Michael Sabrov.Revenge he seeks against Tarzan.The respectable English Lord, Greystoke.John Clayton,everyone has different names, in this book.The Russian hates Tarzan, for preventing him and his friend Rokoff. From succeeding in their wicked plans.Paulvitch puts Ajax in a show. And customers flock to view the intelligent ape. Do his tricks.So does Tarzan's curious son John,"Jack".Sneaking out, without his parent's permission.They wanted to keep the sub teenager. Away from jungle things!Still blood is blood and the smell of adventure .Lures the boy.The happy simian recognizes Jack, during the performance. But the suspicious Russian. Learns the identity of the kid.An idea developes,in the sick mind .Of Paulvitch,kill the son of Tarzan.Luckily Jack is saved by Ajax/Akut. The boy has to flee, to distant Africa(Junior can't explain the mess).Eventually entering the rain forest.When his money is lost(stolen), and a crook .Tries to harm him. The big ape prevented it, again. And accompanies Jack, as a loyal and great friend.An 800 pound gorilla .Nice!Trying to stay alive and get back to England, but how? Thinks the kid.Trouble follows the boy. Wherever he arrives(like flies to manure).It will not be any different. In the interior of the continent.Quickly learning to swing from a tree. And other uncivilized.But necessary skills. Jack(Korak,his African name). Becomes an uncouth savage(kill or be killed). Cruel villains,dangerous apes,hungry lions,and even hungrier cannibals,crocodiles and elephants.Constantly threatening baboons.Kidnappers,the land has it all.And maybe even a girl(for Korak ?).Too much, in fact for comfort.If you want adventure in the safety of your home.This is it.No heavy messages,relax and read. The Son of Tarzan.Imitate his famous father.I did...And enjoyed it, very much.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Quentin Wallace

    This one was a mixed bag. All of the Tarzan books require some suspension of disbelief, but this one kept pushing it. I have a feeling if a child was really tossed into the jungle, they would more than likely die pretty quickly. In these books, they instead learn how to talk with all of the animals and move through the trees like a monkey and fight like the greatest warriors on Earth. I didn't have as much of a problem with it in the first book, but then to have a repeat of it kinda stretches th This one was a mixed bag. All of the Tarzan books require some suspension of disbelief, but this one kept pushing it. I have a feeling if a child was really tossed into the jungle, they would more than likely die pretty quickly. In these books, they instead learn how to talk with all of the animals and move through the trees like a monkey and fight like the greatest warriors on Earth. I didn't have as much of a problem with it in the first book, but then to have a repeat of it kinda stretches things. That being said, it's still a good jungle adventure. The title is spot on, because Tarzan himself only has a small supporting role and the majority of the book focuses on Korak, the son of Tarzan. He finds himself lost in the jungle for years (seems like everything takes years in these books too) but ends up being a King of the Jungle very much like his father. Even though he was raised in London for his early childhood. There's also a kidnapped female who Korak takes under his wing, and lo and behold, she ends up becoming almost like a female Tarzan. So when Grandpa always said kids were different back in his day, boy were they. Let's toss a few modern kids (or adults for that matter) out into the jungle with no iphones or wifi and see how they do. Well, maybe not. Also, if there's one thing I've learned so far from the Tarzan series, if you are a refined gentleman in a love triangle with Tarzan or his son and a lovely lady, then you are going to die. Just seems to be the pattern to get rid of the pesky love triangles. All the flaws aside, I do really enjoy the Tarzan books, and if you liked the others, you'll probably enjoy this one as well. If you think the whole idea of a human raised by apes is ridiculous, then skip this one because it doesn't exactly inject realism into the storyline.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    to: ERB re: THE SON OF TARZAN Dear ERB Nope. Sorry. This fourth book of the Tarzan series didn't work for me. The plot was absurd (as always) -- but this time it was on the side of absurdness where I don't feel comfortable. Inventing convenient plot devices en passant is not the way to go, Mr. ERB! I wish you did some more planning. Really. You could do better than that!? An elephantus ex machina saves the day? Multiple times?? Come on! And what about these abductions of the same girl over and over aga to: ERB re: THE SON OF TARZAN Dear ERB Nope. Sorry. This fourth book of the Tarzan series didn't work for me. The plot was absurd (as always) -- but this time it was on the side of absurdness where I don't feel comfortable. Inventing convenient plot devices en passant is not the way to go, Mr. ERB! I wish you did some more planning. Really. You could do better than that!? An elephantus ex machina saves the day? Multiple times?? Come on! And what about these abductions of the same girl over and over again by different villians? I lost count and I lost track, and frankly, I lost interest fairly soon as well. And while we're at it: Please, stop letting villians drag abducted woman to their tents (as in this volume and the one before) in order to proceed with the unspeakable and then let the woman glance at or even grab the "butt of the man's pistol". This joke wasn't funny the first time. And what about the big mystery of who the "Bwana" might be that's only solved in the very last chapter? You don't really believe anyone with any sense would spend more than the fraction of a second to find out, do you? I could go on, but why bother. I doubt you'll ever read this, given the fact you are dead now for 68 years. No hard feelings! Matt PS. I just realize the book was published during WWI, shortly before the USA entered the war. This might account for the book's "rush" as your thoughts were most likely somewhere else at the time. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Scott Rhee

    “The Son of Tarzan”, Edgar Rice Burroughs’s fourth book in his popular series featuring the famous loin-cloth-clad-ape-man-who-discovers-he-is-a-wealthy-English-lord-but-still-likes-to-play-with-his-monkeys-in-the-jungle-with-his-woman-Jane, is a slight departure from the previous novels in that Tarzan himself only appears in about one-eighth of the story. Most of the story is devoted to Tarzan’s tween-age son, Jack. In the book, via a crazy and unbelievable series of events (which is par for the “The Son of Tarzan”, Edgar Rice Burroughs’s fourth book in his popular series featuring the famous loin-cloth-clad-ape-man-who-discovers-he-is-a-wealthy-English-lord-but-still-likes-to-play-with-his-monkeys-in-the-jungle-with-his-woman-Jane, is a slight departure from the previous novels in that Tarzan himself only appears in about one-eighth of the story. Most of the story is devoted to Tarzan’s tween-age son, Jack. In the book, via a crazy and unbelievable series of events (which is par for the course for these books), Jack finds himself on the run in London with an ape, hopping a boat to Africa, running naked in the jungle, becoming the new king of the jungle, rescuing a kidnapped Arabic girl that he takes under his wing and trains to be his queen of the jungle, angering an evil villain simply called the Sheikh, riding around on the back of an elephant, battling nefarious Swedes, and falling in love. If any of that sounds infinitely better than the crap you can find on Netflix or Hulu, then you should definitely start reading these books, which are wonderfully silly and ridiculous good action/adventure yarns that were written over a century ago. Seriously, they’re awesome, and I want to read the rest of the books in the series, all 20 of them.

  5. 4 out of 5

    East Bay J

    The fourth installment in Burrough’s Tarzan series finds young Jack Greystoke in the jungles of Africa via an attempt to return his father’s friend, Akut the ape, to his homeland. I’d say it’s every bit as good as its predecessors, even if the story has a remarkable resemblance to Tarzan Of The Apes. Burroughs has well perfected keeping an action yarn exciting and gripping and revels in descriptions of man, beast and nature. His theories on the hereditary nature of savagery are interesting and t The fourth installment in Burrough’s Tarzan series finds young Jack Greystoke in the jungles of Africa via an attempt to return his father’s friend, Akut the ape, to his homeland. I’d say it’s every bit as good as its predecessors, even if the story has a remarkable resemblance to Tarzan Of The Apes. Burroughs has well perfected keeping an action yarn exciting and gripping and revels in descriptions of man, beast and nature. His theories on the hereditary nature of savagery are interesting and telling on the times. A really fun read.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kristen Thorley

    MY Favorite, more than the first, I think because of the little jungle man and the fact that there is a little jungle woman

  7. 4 out of 5

    Joe Santoro

    I'd been holding on to this for a while waiting to get a chance to read the DC Korak comics, and then I forgot I had it until the awesome Neal Adams cover jumped out at me from the to-read pile. When I first discovered ERB and read the John Carter books, I kinda scoffed at Tarzan.. the various and sundry TV adaptations are all pretty silly, after all. I've since come around on him... Tarzan is a far more interesting under his creator's pen than any adapations, and it turns out to be the same cast I'd been holding on to this for a while waiting to get a chance to read the DC Korak comics, and then I forgot I had it until the awesome Neal Adams cover jumped out at me from the to-read pile. When I first discovered ERB and read the John Carter books, I kinda scoffed at Tarzan.. the various and sundry TV adaptations are all pretty silly, after all. I've since come around on him... Tarzan is a far more interesting under his creator's pen than any adapations, and it turns out to be the same cast with Korak and Meriem. Of course, if you're not a fan of the ERB adventure story model of manly men and weasely villains, then this isn't going to change your mind. It is a great installment in the series though, even if there are a few too many coincidences, and you'd have to be really, really unfamiliar with the genre (or literature in general) to not see the 'surprise' ending... it's a great read if you're in the mood for men's adventure.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Joy

    I can imagine Burroughs’ original pulp audience waiting anxiously for each new installment of the Tarzan saga. It’s always exciting when the next generation of characters comes along, and Jack, the son of Jane and Tarzan, and his friend Meriem are lovable from their introductions. They have adventures worthy of their lineages and will be fun to follow as the series continues.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Dave

    As with the previous books in the series, “The Son of Tarzan” by Edgar Rice Burroughs is an improvement over the installments which came before. Originally published as a 6-part serial between December 4th, 1915 and January 8th, 1916, “The Son of Tarzan” introduces Tarzan’s son Jack (a.k.a. Korak) as a major character, as well as his wife Meriem. The improvements are obvious over the earlier books, the plot is less transparent and more involved, and the dangers facing our heroes are a wider vari As with the previous books in the series, “The Son of Tarzan” by Edgar Rice Burroughs is an improvement over the installments which came before. Originally published as a 6-part serial between December 4th, 1915 and January 8th, 1916, “The Son of Tarzan” introduces Tarzan’s son Jack (a.k.a. Korak) as a major character, as well as his wife Meriem. The improvements are obvious over the earlier books, the plot is less transparent and more involved, and the dangers facing our heroes are a wider variety and thus there is much less repetition in the story. The weaknesses are still significant though as the unbelievable coincidences still occur much too often, and when Jack disappears the reaction of Tarzan and Jane is absent, and thus the reunion later on lacks any kind of feeling as the reader never is made aware of any steps made by the parents to find their son. Burroughs for once doesn’t use a single main villain throughout the story, and this is another significant improvement in the story. Instead Alexis Paulvitch starts as the foil, but he is out of the story relatively early as many other factors come into play, which lead the story in the direction it takes, and the characters one faces are not quite as two-dimensional as they are in the previous books in the series, though they still are not fully-defined. Despite its problems, the Tarzan series remains an entertaining one, especially those who enjoy action and adventure. “The Son of Tarzan” in my opinion is the best in the series up to this point, though it does create some problems later with the timeline of other stories, and I would also say that the Barsoom series after its first four novels was the better of the two series. Clearly, though, Tarzan triumphs as far as history is concerned, as he is an iconic figure in fiction while John Carter is remembered only by Burroughs’ fans.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Bonnie

    Through a series of strange events Tarzan's son, Jack, ends up back in the jungle alone with only an ape companion. The story is kind of Tarzan in reverse. Although raised as an Englishman Jack has no trouble surviving in the jungle seeming to have inherited all of his father's prowess, strength and agility and learning the language of the apes as easily as Tarzan taught himself to read and write English. However, his reversal to the wild apeman and his behavior that leads him to earn the name o Through a series of strange events Tarzan's son, Jack, ends up back in the jungle alone with only an ape companion. The story is kind of Tarzan in reverse. Although raised as an Englishman Jack has no trouble surviving in the jungle seeming to have inherited all of his father's prowess, strength and agility and learning the language of the apes as easily as Tarzan taught himself to read and write English. However, his reversal to the wild apeman and his behavior that leads him to earn the name of 'Korak the Killer' didn't seem logical to me. On the whole Korak is not as likeable or interesting as Tarzan. Much of the book deals with Miriam, Korak's jungle girlfriend. She is a stereotypical damsel in distress. I lost track of the number of times she was on the verge of losing her virtue to some lecherous villian only to be rescued in the nick of time. In spite of my criticism of the book I still enjoyed reading it. There's just something so compelling about the way Edgar Rice Burroughs tells a story. It sucked me in and even with all it's ridiculous and silly twists and turns I couldn't put it down.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Mitchell

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This is another terrific guilty pleasure. One of the books I shouldn't like. It has more evidence of Burroughs, Edgar Rice infatuation with 'culture Tarzan the noble savage has a son. A son who must also develop the muscle and jungle strength of his father. He inherited it in some way but it must be developed. He must fall in love, but it couldn't possibly be with anything less than a French Princess. But I've got to say the romance in this one for a naive 13 year old was awesome, and I loved it This is another terrific guilty pleasure. One of the books I shouldn't like. It has more evidence of Burroughs, Edgar Rice infatuation with 'culture Tarzan the noble savage has a son. A son who must also develop the muscle and jungle strength of his father. He inherited it in some way but it must be developed. He must fall in love, but it couldn't possibly be with anything less than a French Princess. But I've got to say the romance in this one for a naive 13 year old was awesome, and I loved it just as much this most recent time.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Sandy

    At the conclusion of the third Tarzan novel, 1914's "The Beasts of Tarzan," the Ape Man's archenemy, Nikolas Rokoff, lies dead (and 3/4 eaten!) beneath the fangs of Tarzan's panther ally, Sheeta. But Rokoff's lieutenant, the equally dastardly Alexis Paulvitch, manages to flee into the African wilderness to escape. Needing to know more, this reader wasted little time diving into book #4, "The Son of Tarzan." As it had been with the first two Tarzan sequels, "Son" initially appeared serially in ma At the conclusion of the third Tarzan novel, 1914's "The Beasts of Tarzan," the Ape Man's archenemy, Nikolas Rokoff, lies dead (and 3/4 eaten!) beneath the fangs of Tarzan's panther ally, Sheeta. But Rokoff's lieutenant, the equally dastardly Alexis Paulvitch, manages to flee into the African wilderness to escape. Needing to know more, this reader wasted little time diving into book #4, "The Son of Tarzan." As it had been with the first two Tarzan sequels, "Son" initially appeared serially in magazine form, in this case as a six-parter in the pulp periodical "All-Story Weekly," from December 1915 - January 1916. It would have to wait another 14 months before being released in hardcover book form. The novel begins a full decade after the events of book #3, as we see Paulvitch, now a wreck of his former self after 10 years in the African jungle, finally being rescued by the crew of an English ship. By an astounding coincidence (and author Edgar Rice Burroughs' works are just riddled with these kinds of chance occurrences), before being returned to England, Paulvitch manages to encounter--and tame--the giant anthropoid Akut, who had played such a central role in book #3 as another of Tarzan's allies. Back in London, Paulvitch displays the giant ape before entranced crowds, and that is where Jack Clayton--the 11-year-old son of Tarzan--first discovers him. Thirsting for adventure, Jack decides to not only run away from home, but to bring Akut back to Africa, also (talk about spunky kids!). But once there, events conspire to make it next to impossible for Jack to return. Thus, like his dad before him, the lad goes native, and is soon seen swinging through the treetops, eating raw animal steaks and making enemies of the local tribes. It is a lonely existence for Jack (now called Korak, or The Killer, by his simian friends), until he chances to discover a little 10-year-old girl, Meriem, who had been kidnapped (as Jack had been in book #3) from her French parents three years before and is now a slave of sorts in an Arab village. And as it turns out, this is just the beginning of Korak's adventures with his new jungle companion, in a runaway saga that is to last over five years.... As for Paulvitch, author Burroughs deals summarily with him in the book's first three chapters, and the Russian villain's ultimate fate is a satisfying one. Tarzan himself is absent for at least 2/3 of the book's length, only appearing in the opening chapters and then disappearing completely until the novel's second half. The book rather focuses on "Tarzan, Jr.," his efforts to adjust to jungle life and his relationship with Meriem. Burroughs stuffs so much incident and plot convolutions into this entry that it is almost impossible to synopsize, but suffice it to say that the action never lags. As usual, the pacing is somewhat frenetic, the chapters always seem to end with a cliffhanger, and the reader is completely swept along; these books are true page-turners. Whereas book #3 had featured two nasty villains, this time around, we are presented with no less than four: Paulvitch, of course; the Sheik Amor ben Khatour, the kidnapper and abuser of little Meriem; and the Swedish hunters Carl Jenssen and Sven Malbihn. Malbihn is a particularly loathsome creation, especially when he takes a hot-blooded fancy for the teenage Meriem; he is almost comparable to one of the love-starved wretches in the H. Rider Haggard pantheon, only with far fewer scruples. As had book #3, "Son" goes far in disproving the charge of racism that has been leveled against Burroughs' work. In one telling passage, Korak regards a local tribe, and the author writes, "What if these were naked savages? What if their skins were black? Were they not creatures fashioned in the mold of their Maker, as was he?" (Too bad, then, that Korak becomes the enemy of this tribe, after being rebuffed by its members!) Burroughs' writing at this point, it must be said, seems subtly improved since book #1, "Tarzan of the Apes" (which is celebrating its centennial this month, by the way, having been first issued in October 1912). Though no great shakes as a prose stylist, Burroughs was a natural storyteller, and his facility with pacing and sweep are much in evidence here. Book #4 contains some humorous asides as well, as when it is inferred that Sherlock Holmes (like Tarzan, one of the most popular and famous literary creations of all time) actually exists and is a person one can turn to for assistance! Typically, Burroughs invents some of his own words (such as "garmenture") and is guilty of an inconsistency here and there (such as when Jack recalls how Paulvitch had once had him tied up and Akut had successfully untied him; unfortunately, it never actually happened this way in the book). The bottom line is that "The Son of Tarzan" might not be anyone's idea of "great literature," but it sure is some thrilling, gripping stuff; a book that dishes out memorable action set pieces and that might even bring a tear to susceptible readers as it draws near to its conclusion. On a personal note, I might add that having just read the first four Tarzan novels to celebrate the big guy's centennial (out of a series that reached, ultimately, to some two dozen), I find that I now need to take a break. Lately, I have begun to entertain a hankering for raw lion steaks....

  13. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Woodworth

    Is it good? No. Is it believable? No, Burroughs seems--and may actually have been, given his statements--to be one-upping his own risiculousness. Was it fun? Well...yes.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kailey (BooksforMKs)

    This story follows Jack, the son of Tarzan, who is dissatisfied with his life in England's public schools, and longs to be living in the jungle. When circumstances push him to Africa, young Jack rises to the adventure and goes racing around the jungle as his father did before him. But will Jack ever find his parents again or even bother to return to civilization? This book is exciting and fun to read! The action is non-stop and there's always some wild battle going on, or devious kidnappers thre This story follows Jack, the son of Tarzan, who is dissatisfied with his life in England's public schools, and longs to be living in the jungle. When circumstances push him to Africa, young Jack rises to the adventure and goes racing around the jungle as his father did before him. But will Jack ever find his parents again or even bother to return to civilization? This book is exciting and fun to read! The action is non-stop and there's always some wild battle going on, or devious kidnappers threatening to hold everyone for ransom, or a group of evil cutthroats murdering and plundering, and of course there's always the threat of lions and panthers and savage tribes. It's never dull, that's for certain! My only complaint is that the plot is a little over-the-top drama, to the point where it's not quite believable. When they fall into the clutches of the exact SAME kidnappers for the THIRD time, I start to roll my eyes. It's also a tiny bit predictable in some areas, since I easily guessed the secret identity of the Big Bwana. I love the main characters, Tarzan and Jane, and of course the youthful Jack. They have so much energy and courage and resourcefulness. I cheered them on through the whole book! Jack really grows from a reckless, sort of idiotic young person, into a thinking man, who learns a lot of wisdom and common sense. At first, he revels in killing at the hunt simply because he can, and that really bothered me. "Law of the Jungle" might work for animals, but men should have more of a moral compass than to go around murdering tribes-people and stealing their goods. But later on, he gains some wisdom, learns the true value of what he has, and chooses a more noble path. We are also introduced to a little kidnapped girl, Miriam, who is surprisingly resilient and strong. Her jungle journey to freedom was the real highlight of the book. I like Jack, but Miriam is the real star of the show, I think. She's growing up little by little, discovering the world in so many different areas, finding her place in jungle society and then in civilized society. She's utterly innocent and sweet, ready to learn and grow. Her story line was what truly brought the rest of the book together. Morrison Banes is an "honorable" young English gentleman who appears on the scene in Africa, and he has a lot of moral enigmas to work through. His redemption story really kept my attention, and I thought Morrison's internal dialogue was wonderfully written. You could really see his thinking process as he sinned, and tried to justify his sin, then repented, changed his heart, and accepted the consequences of his actions. A beautifully complex character, even though he's only a supporting character! I wish there was more of Tarzan and Jane in this book, especially their journey to find their lost son. And I wish there was less of the apes in the story, because those parts weren't that interesting to me. Can't wait to read more of the Tarzan series!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl

    After reading books 2 and 3, I find myself asking if perhaps Burroughs had someone helping him write book 4. The tone of the book feels different. The book is a good deal longer than the other two and the narrator sometimes insinuates himself into the story--which doesn't happen in books 2 and 3--like...I could tell you, but you'll find out soon enough, or I haven't seen him in a while but I'm sure he is just as big now. Several times I found myself wondering who was telling the story. Again, we After reading books 2 and 3, I find myself asking if perhaps Burroughs had someone helping him write book 4. The tone of the book feels different. The book is a good deal longer than the other two and the narrator sometimes insinuates himself into the story--which doesn't happen in books 2 and 3--like...I could tell you, but you'll find out soon enough, or I haven't seen him in a while but I'm sure he is just as big now. Several times I found myself wondering who was telling the story. Again, we are exploring human psychology.....nature versus nurture. Jane wants their son, Jack shielded from all reference to his father's lifetime as "Tarzan, King of the Apes" for fear that he will revert to his father's barbaric way of life. All this ignores the fact that Tarzan was not born to the "King of Apes" lifestyle either. He was in fact, well born--it was never intended for him to be raised by apes. As a second study we have little Meriem, born to a gentle life style, but kidnapped and cruelly treated by Arab tribesmen. (Spoiler Alert) She is eventually freed and comes to live with Jack or Korak the Killer, as he is now known. While with him she lives the life of a wild ape. The question "nature versus nurture" isn't answered--Burroughs probably never intended to answer it. He knew his audience was interested in such studies, so he plopped it out there and used it to sell his successful franchise. Meriem goes from gentle born young child to wild ape girl to then back to modest young lady when she is returned to society. But just as easily reverts to her ape days when threatened and in danger. Jack, a boy born to privilege, turns quite quickly to the violent lifestyle of the jungle--though he really had not been any more "born to it" than had his father. So what is the lesson? What is the answer? Is Burroughs telling us perhaps that all humans have a wild side that will reveal itself in difficult circumstances? That evolution has provided us with just enough "ape" to see us through danger? I also felt as though the cinematic Tarzan is based more on Korak the Killer, in this book than on Tarzan, King of the Apes from books 2 and 3. Young Jack/Korak seems much more the "Me Tarzan, you Jane" character.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Margot

    This fourth installment in the Tarzan series follows Jack, the now teenage son of Tarzan and Jane, as he secretly travels back to the African jungle home of Akut the ape, gets stranded there, and becomes--like father, like son--a wild man of the jungle, known as Korak the Killer. While raiding a jungle village, he comes upon the young girl Meriem and rescues her from her abusive situation. She too adapts well to life in the jungle and it seems that Jack and Meriem are becoming the perfect match This fourth installment in the Tarzan series follows Jack, the now teenage son of Tarzan and Jane, as he secretly travels back to the African jungle home of Akut the ape, gets stranded there, and becomes--like father, like son--a wild man of the jungle, known as Korak the Killer. While raiding a jungle village, he comes upon the young girl Meriem and rescues her from her abusive situation. She too adapts well to life in the jungle and it seems that Jack and Meriem are becoming the perfect match for each other before Meriem's secret history and unknown true identity come back to disturb their simple life together, separating them so that neither, perhaps, will ever know happiness or love again. I enjoyed this Tarzan installment much more than the previous two, as The Son of Tarzan involves a refreshing new set of characters and some emotional depth beyond killing bad guys and running from kidnappers. There is an excellent twist near the end, (view spoiler)[having to do with one of the character's true identities (hide spoiler)] , that I saw coming but then Burroughs did such a good job of leading me astray that I was pleasantly surprised when my initial guess turned out to be true. My only issues with this novel were, first, my confusion over Jack's age. For some reason, I thought he was only ten years old when he started out on his adventure. But that is clearly not accurate. I'm guessing he was somewhere around fifteen years old. But this was never made clear (that I caught) in the text. Second was Burrough's confidence that we would dismiss and forgive Jack/Korak's brutish behavior just as we had previously with Tarzan himself. Tarzan's bestial violence and occasional acts of murder were understandable because he was raised by animals and, until he first met another human (and gained morals, I might add), didn't know any better. But Jack did know better. Yet, in the jungle, he murdered other men for a trifle. This moral discrepancy makes the son infinitely less likable than the father.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Mark Hodder

    I’ve noticed that what there is of character development in the Tarzan series (it’s not a lot) seems to occur between the novels rather than in them. So here we find Tarzan and Jane living in London, apparently having been there for a decade since THE BEASTS OF TARZAN, and the jungle lord is much more the gentleman than we’ve ever witnessed before. Not that we witness a great deal of it here, because Tarzan has little more than a walk on part in this one. His son, Jack—who becomes Korak—is the p I’ve noticed that what there is of character development in the Tarzan series (it’s not a lot) seems to occur between the novels rather than in them. So here we find Tarzan and Jane living in London, apparently having been there for a decade since THE BEASTS OF TARZAN, and the jungle lord is much more the gentleman than we’ve ever witnessed before. Not that we witness a great deal of it here, because Tarzan has little more than a walk on part in this one. His son, Jack—who becomes Korak—is the primary protagonist in a tale that more or less replays the first volume but with greater style and at a faster pace. It’s pretty good—one of the best in the series—but, of course and as always, you need to find a way to deal with Burroughs’ preposterous plot, unbelievable coincidences, cardboard cut-out characters, nonsensical assumptions, and casual racism and sexism if you’re to appreciate his work. That’s a lot to get around, but if you regard his output (and the Tarzan series in particular) as mythology of the early 20th century, it becomes a little easier to steer through the unpalatable stuff. After all, if we were to censor everything based on current morality and ethics, then the Greek classics would have to be shredded for their matricide, patricide, fratricide, and pedophiliac content. Burroughs was never a zealous racist, anyway—he was simply a product of the period, a man who unquestioningly accepted prevalent attitudes with little realisation that they were vile and utterly wrong. So, yes, you need to do some contextual work to navigate through wince-inducing statements and get the best out of this, but if you can manage that, then you’re in for a treat, because there’s a generous serving of fun here.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Sandra Visser

    Unfortunately this book is mostly a rehash of the first novel with many of the same incidents. It might have thrilled readers with no familiarity with Africa but as someone who lives on the continent I found it quite tedious to read more of the same. I suppose Burroughs' readers expect jungle tales from a Tarzan book so he gave them what they wanted, but I was hoping for a bit of variety, as with The Return of Tarzan. I missed the growth Tarzan had gone through and was disappointed to be back wi Unfortunately this book is mostly a rehash of the first novel with many of the same incidents. It might have thrilled readers with no familiarity with Africa but as someone who lives on the continent I found it quite tedious to read more of the same. I suppose Burroughs' readers expect jungle tales from a Tarzan book so he gave them what they wanted, but I was hoping for a bit of variety, as with The Return of Tarzan. I missed the growth Tarzan had gone through and was disappointed to be back with a young savage who had unlearnt all his morality. The savagery is sometimes hard to take and just when you breathe a sigh of relief at an enlightened passage about equality there's another bit of casual racism. It was also difficult to figure out whether Burroughs admires "savages" more than civilisation. What I did enjoy was the story of Meriem and how she's described as Korak's equal. She's just as agile, fearless and tough, which I found quite enlightened for the time. She even rescues herself a few times! I don't know if I'll continue with this series. I expected more variety and it seems to be mostly variations on the same theme.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin Thomas

    This is the 4th installment of the Tarzan series and was originally published as a 6-part serial in 1915-1916. I tend to be a Burroughs fan in general having read all of the Barsoom series, and the lesser know Venus series and Pellucidar series back in my teens. And now, as an old dude, I like to revisit his material from time to time. Of course I tend to read it with an eye towards forgiveness and overlook all of the amazing coincidences and plot contrivances the Burroughs employs. I think you This is the 4th installment of the Tarzan series and was originally published as a 6-part serial in 1915-1916. I tend to be a Burroughs fan in general having read all of the Barsoom series, and the lesser know Venus series and Pellucidar series back in my teens. And now, as an old dude, I like to revisit his material from time to time. Of course I tend to read it with an eye towards forgiveness and overlook all of the amazing coincidences and plot contrivances the Burroughs employs. I think you have to read these books that way and just enjoy the adventure, or else don't even pick them up. As for this novel, I think it is the best so far in the series. As the title implies, the focus here is on the younger Lord Greystoke (Jack) as he makes the transition to becoming a major character in the form of Korak, a younger version of Tarzan himself. It's easy to see that the book was published in 6 installments as there are definite and distinctive subplots that would work well in serial form. A nice overall adventure story as long as you take it for what it is. I'll keep reading them. Note: These books are free in e-book form as they are all in the public domain.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Becky

    Next to the original two volumes, this is far and away the best book in the Tarzan series. I love Korak and Meriem, especially Meriem who is a very strong character for the author's time. She isn't a wilting flower (I'm looking at you, Jane) but a tough little sprite who holds her own pretty well. She's no amazon or Tomb Raider archetype, but she is amazing for the time in which she was written. To be fair, none of this book makes much sense, especially the idea that Korak could evolve from Jack Next to the original two volumes, this is far and away the best book in the Tarzan series. I love Korak and Meriem, especially Meriem who is a very strong character for the author's time. She isn't a wilting flower (I'm looking at you, Jane) but a tough little sprite who holds her own pretty well. She's no amazon or Tomb Raider archetype, but she is amazing for the time in which she was written. To be fair, none of this book makes much sense, especially the idea that Korak could evolve from Jack in such a short time and without the early training that Tarzan had, but reality has nothing to do with Tarzan, so I'm cool with that. I always read ERB with the idea that his books belong to an alternate universe with rules very different from our own. In that context, all of it makes sense. In ERB's magical universe, normal science doesn't apply.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Tyler

    This one was okay, although as I read more and more Tarzan I start to recognize the tropes of Burroughs's novels, and it's starting to wear on me, especially the way he does his cliffhangers. As a novel by itself, it's pretty good, no surprises in the prose or story. Not to be too spoiler-y, but halfway through the book Burroughs tries to disguise the identity of two people, but you can see who they are from a mile away. There's not a lot more to say honestly, once I get through the first 8 book This one was okay, although as I read more and more Tarzan I start to recognize the tropes of Burroughs's novels, and it's starting to wear on me, especially the way he does his cliffhangers. As a novel by itself, it's pretty good, no surprises in the prose or story. Not to be too spoiler-y, but halfway through the book Burroughs tries to disguise the identity of two people, but you can see who they are from a mile away. There's not a lot more to say honestly, once I get through the first 8 books I probably won't pick up the rest, for a while anyway.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Greg

    The third of my three favorites of the Tarzan novels by Edgar Rice Burroughs. Korak, the son of Tarzan, finds himself transported to Africa alone with one of the great apes, where he grows to manhood. Many adventures ensue, and he becomes the equal of his famous father, and is eventually reunited with his parents, Tarzan and Jane.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Domi103

    Tarzan and Jane continue their legacy through their son. Will he survive the jungle or not? Not quite as compelling as the first two books, and yet I have read it at least 5 times! Burroughs writing is so unique that you get stuck on having books that are written with this kind of structure.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Rick Mackley

    Of all the Tarzan books this is by far my favorite. Just the interactions between Korak (Tarzan's Son) and Akut are fabulous. And the story is something that holds you spellbound in every page.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Rosemary

    I own all the Tarzan books but this is the only one that I have three separate editions. My favorite is an early reprint with J. Allen St. John's black-and-white illustrations.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Aaron Rendahl

    This one was _really_ similar to the first one, except -- wait for it -- it's Tarzan's son having adventures now! I think I'm done reading Tarzan for a while.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Timothy Boyd

    Even though the Tarzan stories are over 60 years old they remain timeless. These books are fantastic reading. These books make all the movies and cartoons seem meaningless. Highly recommended

  28. 5 out of 5

    David Korinetz

    This one is the best of the series. I read it twice when I was a teenager.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Charles

    I have the Ballantine version of this. It's about Tarzan's son, who becomes Korak the Killer.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Emalee

    UGHHHH. Okay, this is a tough one. Caution: Spoiler Alert, read with care. Most of the way through this book I was so incredibly frustrated and aggravated that I almost quit reading it. Thank goodness I didn’t. The last 30 pages saved this entire novel, no the entire series, for me. The Son of Tarzan is so different from the first three tarzan books (which I love so much I may just re-read to get my tarzan fix...or go buy the next ones and pray they are better than this one.)  Obviously going i UGHHHH. Okay, this is a tough one. Caution: Spoiler Alert, read with care. Most of the way through this book I was so incredibly frustrated and aggravated that I almost quit reading it. Thank goodness I didn’t. The last 30 pages saved this entire novel, no the entire series, for me. The Son of Tarzan is so different from the first three tarzan books (which I love so much I may just re-read to get my tarzan fix...or go buy the next ones and pray they are better than this one.)  Obviously going into it I expected the story to be about Jack, Tarzan and Jane’s son who is kidnapped in The Beasts of Tarzan and sends Tarzan and Jane on an adventure back to Africa (because they just can’t stay away from the jungle). This story picks up roughly a decade after the last one, with the one and only russian scumbag Alexis Paulvitch, being rescued in Africa and meeting Akut, loyal ape-friend of Lord Greystoke. (spoiler alert: Paulvitch get’s what is coming for him a few chapters in, finally!) Paulvitch takes Akut back to London, where the Lord and Lady Greystoke live. He does this circus act which attracts a lot of attention. Jack, taking after his wild father, wants to see the ape. Jane, fearing her son will inherit her husband's ‘wild side’ (because you know, he was raised by apes) forbids it. Jack, as the noble rebellious youth he is disobeys. He goes to see Akut, who is fascinated by the similar appearance to his previous king, Tarzan. This leads to a long, quite predictable strand of events. Paulvitch, who apparently doesn’t physically resemble his past self (a decade in the jungle turned him into an old man, and John didn’t recognize him) and tries to abduct Jack, which leads to his ( Paulvitch’s) death. Then Jack and Akut escape to Africa.Seriously, this rascal just got on a boat to africa. No biggie. (Jack was obviously on too loose of a leash, but that’s not Jane’s fault, I feel like it’s kind of John’s fault, he should've seen that coming.)My instant thought here was “Okay, Tarzan is going to come, they will have a father son bonding moment, probably kill some tigers and lions and become king over some animals, or humans, or both, and then they will go back to London.”I have never been so wrong. Nor have I been so frustrated.  After an accident Jack and Akut flee to the Jungle. Akut kind of rears Jack and gives him the name Korak, which means “the Killer”. (Tarzan’s name meant white ape... Why does this punk get a cooler name than Tarzan when Tarzan is hand’s down 10000 times cooler.) ugh, and my frustration continues. I enjoyed the storyline for some of this part, but I kept expecting intervention of some kind from someone. Or, for Jack to go back to London. I didn’t think he would actually make it in the jungle, and I definitely didn’t think he would rival Tarzan in his adaptability. but, this wasn’t the thing that boiled my blood about this book.Meriem.  I don’t like her. I mean, I do like her, but not enough for HALF THE FREAKING BOOK TO BE ABOUT HER. It should have been called The son of Tarzan’s Girl because she was definitely the main character for a good half of the story. She is this flighty, almost ignorant character who is abused by her father figure before being saved by Korak. I get the desire for a love interest, Korak is a teenage boy, whatever... but, Jane never got that kind of writing. Honestly, I feel like my biggest issue with this book was that Jane and Tarzan have been through SO MUCH CRAP. Like honestly every time they are in Africa, or London, or Paris, or the middle of the freaking ocean, they are constantly in danger. And it’s very frustrating when characters with chemistry (Tarzan and Jane are my OTP so will I fight for this one.) don’t get proper representation. If this had been a story about Tarzan and Jane I would have loved it. But I have a hard time falling for this character who has just waltzed in and with her feminine physique captured the heart of Jack Clayton (Who in the long run, seriously could not have done better, but still.)All this aside I was beginning to dread reading this book. It took me a good two weeks (a combination of my recent schedule and disinterest in reading it) but the last 60 pages changed my opinion. The last 30 pages completely redeemed this book in my eyes.Why?PLOT TWIST TARZAN AND JANE HAVE BEEN IN THE BOOK THE WHOLE TIME.I cried. Internally and slightly externally.  I had contemplated this several times, wondering if maybe Tarzan and Jane had returned to Africa and they were the ones who had saved Meriem but then I thought that surely it couldn't be that much of a happy ending.  IT WAS! Tarzan gets a glory moment, in which as per usual he is stark naked (I think... he may of had pants on I can’t remember) and rescues his son. There is a beautiful bonding and reuniting moment (Jack being very ashamed of himself. WHICH HE SHOULD BE!) and they all return to London (Meriem included. Jack and Meriem get married and then it's revealed that she was a kidnapped princess... which made no sense... But Jane and Tarzan were safe and happy so I was happy.  So in the end I think I am giving this book 4 stars (3 and a half really... I am being generous.) Also, because this series has honestly hooked me and I really hope the next books are more on the level of the first three... I guess we will see.

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