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At the Earth's Core

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Edgar Rice Burroughs was born in 1875 in Chicago, Illinois. Although Burroughs wrote in many genres he is best known for creating the jungle hero Tarzan. Burroughs began writing for pulp fiction magazines and in 1912 he published Tarzan of the Apes. At the earth's Core is the story of the inventor Perry. Perry has invented a burrowing prospector that runs out of control. H Edgar Rice Burroughs was born in 1875 in Chicago, Illinois. Although Burroughs wrote in many genres he is best known for creating the jungle hero Tarzan. Burroughs began writing for pulp fiction magazines and in 1912 he published Tarzan of the Apes. At the earth's Core is the story of the inventor Perry. Perry has invented a burrowing prospector that runs out of control. He and an assistant end up at the center of the earth. They discover a world a beauty and savagery. In this land humans are the slaves to reptiles and dinosaurs roam the land with other strange creatures.


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Edgar Rice Burroughs was born in 1875 in Chicago, Illinois. Although Burroughs wrote in many genres he is best known for creating the jungle hero Tarzan. Burroughs began writing for pulp fiction magazines and in 1912 he published Tarzan of the Apes. At the earth's Core is the story of the inventor Perry. Perry has invented a burrowing prospector that runs out of control. H Edgar Rice Burroughs was born in 1875 in Chicago, Illinois. Although Burroughs wrote in many genres he is best known for creating the jungle hero Tarzan. Burroughs began writing for pulp fiction magazines and in 1912 he published Tarzan of the Apes. At the earth's Core is the story of the inventor Perry. Perry has invented a burrowing prospector that runs out of control. He and an assistant end up at the center of the earth. They discover a world a beauty and savagery. In this land humans are the slaves to reptiles and dinosaurs roam the land with other strange creatures.

30 review for At the Earth's Core

  1. 5 out of 5

    Owlseyes inside Notre Dame, it's so strange a 15-hour blaze and...30-minutes wait to call the firemen...and

    Maybe I’ve been reading and listening too much from Bob Fletcher; about (secret) underground facilities* by the hundreds in the US and in other nations, meant for the wealthy, when catastrophe strikes; one like Nibiru planet (called Planet X?, that’s OK)… incoming….maybe this August or a few months later, into 2016, passing by, "close" to our planet. Maybe it was the memories of Jules Verne Journey to the center of the Earth that has drawn me to this book of Burroughs. The fact is, that I still Maybe I’ve been reading and listening too much from Bob Fletcher; about (secret) underground facilities* by the hundreds in the US and in other nations, meant for the wealthy, when catastrophe strikes; one like Nibiru planet (called Planet X?, that’s OK)… incoming….maybe this August or a few months later, into 2016, passing by, "close" to our planet. Maybe it was the memories of Jules Verne Journey to the center of the Earth that has drawn me to this book of Burroughs. The fact is, that I still found it original (for his time, 1914) conceiving a civilization living underground. Right, not totally original. B. Lytton had his book** also on the topic. Yet, you would agree, most science fiction would focus on outer space or other planets; away from earth; few dare looking inside the planet (too claustrophobic?) ,…. underneath their feet; underground. Or, on second, ...third,... whatever thoughts, it was due to the movie "Jurassic World". Or,...this? Maybe this*** At the Earth’s core is the story of a journey by two human beings, inside the planet. They (David Innes and Abner Perry) had devised a drilling machine; they call it the “iron mole”. Temperature is one of the key figures (as well as depth) they’re checking all the time. By 84 miles deep, temperature reached 153º F; yet by 240 miles of depth it is 10 º F , below zero. The one most affected by these changes is Perry who oftentimes prays; or sings. It is a 7 miles per hour ride, you may call it. And then by 400 miles deep, temperature is up again, marking 153º F. That’s good, “after 2 hours of intense cold”. Until they’re stopped, after a moment of lost consciousness, and ushered in a new world. It’s been 72 hours they’ve left the surface of the planet. "We've been carried back to the childhood of a planet" It’s Pellucidar: a 7,000 miles-diameter, lush-world, “weird and beautiful”, with plenty of light, in fact, a permanent noonday “sun”-light; yet with no horizon. The heat is torrid. Their sun is a “relatively tiny thing at the exact center of the earth”. Strange creatures abound. Wolf-dogs; and man-like creatures, with very dark skin: “they examine me”. They have perfect physiques, and they were a “noble appearing race” with “well-formed heads”. These speak a language rather analogous to the “pidgin-English of the Chinese coolie”. These are the Sagoths. But there are those living in sea-islands: they’re the Mezops, red-skinned, with their canoes. The Sagoths fear the Mezops. “I might believe that we were indeed come to the country beyond the Styx”. Despite all the natural beauty, Perry and David know they’re “in chains”; they’re prisoners. So is Dian the Beautiful, and others. They’re heading towards Phutra city ruled by reptiles, called the Mahars. The Mahars know a formula for egg fertilization by chemical means; they have no auditory apparatus and yet they have their music; females rule. Humans are slaves. The core role is focused on David who becomes the sort of athletic hero, yeah a sort of Tarzan of the underworld, in the battle against the Mahars and his attempts to save Dian the Beautiful, who despite her many “I hate you”…, at length, discloses on her love for David. There are other reptiles around, and other interesting species like the Thag (a huge tiger). The central role is ascribed, evidently, to the Mahars and their rituals using human flesh. By the end of the book the two friends are meant to return to the surface of the planet with Dian the Beautiful. But they got tricked by a character called Hooja: inside that bag was not Dian (wife now), but a reptile, they found inside the “prospector” while on the way back. Now, it’s been sometime David and Perry have “landed” in the Sahara desert. Their hope is to return to that Eden of sorts: Pellucidar. I’ve found it a fantastic tale. You end up reading it, longing for the return. You don’t have to be wealthy. Maybe a wealthy imagination will suffice. - *http://www.bobfletcherinvestigations.... **The Coming Race by Edward Bulwer-Lytton ***http://www.reptilianagenda.com/resear... LOST LAND OF THE LIZARD PEOPLE by Robert Stanley

  2. 4 out of 5

    Dave

    “At The Earth’s Core,” first published in 1914, is one of Edgar Rice Burrough’s most imaginative works. It is the first of seven books in the Pellucidar series and imagines a world inside the earth (five hundred miles beneath the surface) where the most advanced species is reptilian and the humans are still living in the stone age. As ludicrous as it sounds now, during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, there were many who believed in the possibility of a hollow earth world with entrances “At The Earth’s Core,” first published in 1914, is one of Edgar Rice Burrough’s most imaginative works. It is the first of seven books in the Pellucidar series and imagines a world inside the earth (five hundred miles beneath the surface) where the most advanced species is reptilian and the humans are still living in the stone age. As ludicrous as it sounds now, during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, there were many who believed in the possibility of a hollow earth world with entrances at the poles. Scientists proposed the idea of an inner world to explain anomalous compass readings and such things as the aurora borealis. Such inner worlds were theorized to have atmospheres and be possibly inhabited. Although Burroughs was not the first to contemplate such an inner world, there are none who have perhaps created it so magnificently. In “At the Earth’s Core,” David Innes and Perry Abner travel in a mighty metal prospector into the earth’s crust and break through into a world they never imagined with an eternal noon-day sun hanging in the heavens. Alongside the dinosaurs and cave people, one of the most interesting ideas explored by Burroughs in these books is the idea that time is man’s creation and, without the sun rising and setting, one loses track of time. Thus, one could go off and have incredible adventures and think weeks or even months have gone by while another who sits reading a book could think not much time has elapsed. It is an incredible idea because, without our guideposts of the sunrise and sunset and without clocks and technology, how do we really know how much time has gone by. On the surface, some might compare the world of Pellucidar to Burroughs’ worlds of Barsoom and Venus (although he wrote the Venus series decades later). After all, Innes, like John Carter, is nearly alone (except for Perry) in a savage world where he first offends, then romances a savage princess. And, like Carter, who overthrows the existing order in “The Gods of Mars,” Innes takes on the dreaded Mahars. However, here, the concepts are quite different. The reptiles are the smarter, more advanced species and they are not a human-like reptile species. Moreover, this is a more dangerous, savage world, peopled by primitive tribes and filled with dinosaurs and all manner of strange beasts that have developed quite differently from the evolution of the outer world. Burroughs’ writing in this novel is absolutely terrific and his descriptions of the prospector and the journey into the center of the earth, absolutely fascinating. This was written over one hundred years ago and is still one of the greatest adventure stories ever written.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jason Koivu

    Wow! I wasn't expecting to enjoy this as much as I did! Other Burroughs books I've read were okay or worse, imo. At the Earth's Core struck a chord with me. One reason I dug it was because we get into the story fairly quickly. Adventure books of the era, such as Conan Doyle's The Lost World, take FOREVER to get into the meat of the story. In this one, there's a little preamble, but generally speaking we hope right in with a pair of dudes delving into the depths of the earth. They discover a para Wow! I wasn't expecting to enjoy this as much as I did! Other Burroughs books I've read were okay or worse, imo. At the Earth's Core struck a chord with me. One reason I dug it was because we get into the story fairly quickly. Adventure books of the era, such as Conan Doyle's The Lost World, take FOREVER to get into the meat of the story. In this one, there's a little preamble, but generally speaking we hope right in with a pair of dudes delving into the depths of the earth. They discover a parallel world with various races at odds with one another. Another reason I got into this and liked it a lot more than A Princess of Mars is because the MC isn't super strong and totally awesome at everything he does, like John Carter. He's a more well-rounded average guy. There are some interesting speculative details going on here for its time. The scientific theories are entertaining, even when they don't hit the mark. The machismo and casual racism that mares some of these kinds of books for this period isn't too bad here. The action keeps up a steady pace throughout, the plot climaxes nicely, and almost everything's tied up in a tidy package. A string is left loose so the tale could stretch into a series. And it's a series I just might continue reading.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Stephen

    2.5 stars. Solidly between 2 stars (it's okay) and 3 stars (I like it), this classic pulp science fiction adventure is the first of the Pellucidar series about a hidden world (complete with a sun and a moon) located in the center of the Earth. I am a fan of Pulp SF and liked the idea behind the series and the general pace of the adventure. The only reason I didn't rate this higher was that I was not as fond of the main character as I have been of other pulp heroes (e.g., Eric John Stark by Leigh 2.5 stars. Solidly between 2 stars (it's okay) and 3 stars (I like it), this classic pulp science fiction adventure is the first of the Pellucidar series about a hidden world (complete with a sun and a moon) located in the center of the Earth. I am a fan of Pulp SF and liked the idea behind the series and the general pace of the adventure. The only reason I didn't rate this higher was that I was not as fond of the main character as I have been of other pulp heroes (e.g., Eric John Stark by Leigh Brackett and Conan by Robert Howard). Bottom-line, better than okay but not quite good.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Dfordoom

    At the Earth's Core, published in 1922, was the first of Edgar Rice Burroughs’ Pellucidar novels. I’ve always found his books to be highly entertaining and ingenious in their imagining of strange worlds and that’s certainly the case with this one. The book opens with a framing story, as the narrator encounters a solitary and rather disheveled European somewhere in the wastes of the Sahara Desert. The man is named David Innes and he has a strange story to tell. Professor Perry has invented a machi At the Earth's Core, published in 1922, was the first of Edgar Rice Burroughs’ Pellucidar novels. I’ve always found his books to be highly entertaining and ingenious in their imagining of strange worlds and that’s certainly the case with this one. The book opens with a framing story, as the narrator encounters a solitary and rather disheveled European somewhere in the wastes of the Sahara Desert. The man is named David Innes and he has a strange story to tell. Professor Perry has invented a machine called the Prospector, although he sometimes refers to it as the Iron Mole. It’s an enormous manned digging machine a hundred feet long designed to burrow deep below the surface of the Earth. David had been an ex-student of his and was a wealthy young man and he’d agreed to finance the professor’s project. When they take the Prospector for a test run things go horribly wrong. The machine gets out of control and takes them much much deeper into the Earth’s crust than they anticipated. As the temperatures rises alarmingly and their air supply nears exhaustion they prepare themselves for death but then the temperature plummets, rises again, and then plummets again. The machine then breaks through the Earth’s crust. They assume that they emerged somewhere on the surface, but in fact they are now in the strange inside-out world of Pellucidar. The Earth is hollow, and the world of Pellucidar occupies the inside surface of the planetary crust. Obviously there are major problems making such a world sound even vaguely plausible. Where would they get their sunlight from? Or indeed any light at all? How would gravity work in such a world? Burroughs comes up with some pretty nifty ideas for solving these problems. They’re all ridiculous of course, but they’re clever and once you accept the idea of an inside-out world they do have a certain crazy logic, and even certain elegance. There are people in Pellucidar, but they’re not the dominant race. The rulers of Pellucidar are the Mahars. They’re winged dinosaurs, rhamphorynchus in fact, although much bigger than the actual rhamphorynchus that once inhabited our outer world. They have no ears but are able to communicate with each other by some means that never becomes entirely clear to our intrepid inner-world explorers. They are intelligent and literate. They are served by the subject race of the Sagoths, a kind of apemen, less intelligent but useful as the Mahars’ foot-soldiers. Menial work is done by human slaves. Professor Perry and David are soon captured by the Sagoths, to be pressed into service as slave labourers. Among the other captives of the Sagoths David meets Dian the Beautiful. She is a princess of one of the human tribes, proud and beautiful. David’s attempts to befriend her come to grief when he accidentally offends her, princesses being fairly easy to offend. David eventually escapes but he will have to return to the Mahar city to rescue Professor Perry. He is also determined to find Dian again, and he is starting to form plans to liberate Pellucidar from the Mahars. There will be many hazards, Pellucidar being full of gigantic and extremely fierce animals, many of them long extinct on the upper world, and many much larger in size than the animals of our world. Combined it the menace of the Mahars and the Sagoths he is setting himself quite a task. It’s all outrageously entertaining and Pellucidar is a strange and fascinating world brought vividly to life (as is the case with Burroughs’ other imaginary worlds). It has beautiful princesses, savage monsters and a brave and noble hero. These are features that might be sneered at today but there’s a lot to be said for them. They work for me anyway. Burroughs died in 1950. His work remained popular for many years and experienced a revival in the 70s when the sword & sorcery genre was at the peak of its popularity. Sadly he’s been rather forgotten since then but the good news is that so many of his books are now once again available, mostly in print-on-demand form. He’s an under-appreciated writer whose influence on the science fiction and fantasy genres is seriously underrated. Definitely recommended

  6. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    A dreamy yet sometimes nightmarish excursion into the world beneath our world: Pelucidar! With ugly cavemen, beautiful cavewomen, armies of ape-men, a wide variety of dinosaurs, man eating reptile birds that rule the underworld, and giant mechanical mole machines, Burroughs packs a lot of oomph and pizzazz into this science romance. I'm looking forward to reading the rest of the series which also includes a Tarzan story!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Marvin

    Edgar Rice Burroughs could be called The God-father of cheesy fantasy adventure. He can boast of influencing many later fantasy writers from Robert E. Howard to even John Norman, but that is not exactly something you would want on your resume. I had a brief obsession with Tarzan when I was nine but, asides from that series, I've found Burroughs' pulp adventures to be trite and silly. At The Earth's Core is no exception. Except for a rather exciting beginning, in which our intrepid but boring her Edgar Rice Burroughs could be called The God-father of cheesy fantasy adventure. He can boast of influencing many later fantasy writers from Robert E. Howard to even John Norman, but that is not exactly something you would want on your resume. I had a brief obsession with Tarzan when I was nine but, asides from that series, I've found Burroughs' pulp adventures to be trite and silly. At The Earth's Core is no exception. Except for a rather exciting beginning, in which our intrepid but boring heroes are plunged into the depths of the earth by a giant drill, there is little to be interested in. Burroughs could use some lessons from Verne in describing alien surroundings. Burrough's main rule in making something exotic is simply give it a weird name you can't pronounce. The writings of Burroughs are meant for entertain pre-pubescent boys until they can handle real men like James Bond, Sam Spade and those studs who gets the girls in the Heavy Metal magazines. Burroughs made a good living running these books off like candy and the quality is what you except from assembly line writing. Can't grudge him that but please don't call this a classic. And by the way, I didn't like the book.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Holmlock

    Pure pulp adventure. An eccentric old inventor, Abner Perry, builds a giant “iron mole” vehicle which takes him and his friend David Innes on an unexpected expedition to the earth's unexplored core. They end up in an upside down world where time doesn't exist and the human inhabitants are the slaves and lab rats of a prehistoric race of pterosaurs (yes, you read that right). Humans are mercilessly stalked, captured, and herded by armies of ape-men. Dinosaurs and other prehistoric beasts are arou Pure pulp adventure. An eccentric old inventor, Abner Perry, builds a giant “iron mole” vehicle which takes him and his friend David Innes on an unexpected expedition to the earth's unexplored core. They end up in an upside down world where time doesn't exist and the human inhabitants are the slaves and lab rats of a prehistoric race of pterosaurs (yes, you read that right). Humans are mercilessly stalked, captured, and herded by armies of ape-men. Dinosaurs and other prehistoric beasts are around every corner. Land, sea, or air, no place is safe for our heroes. Action drives this story along at a ripcord pace. Will they escape this primeval hell? Read and find out. As a lover of the film 'The Planet of the Apes' (I've yet to read the book) I found the similarities in plot (wont spoil anything here) to be pleasantly surprising. Fans of ERB's 'John Carter' or 'Caspak' series will love this book, guaranteed. Really, anyone with a love of adventure should get a kick out this 100+ year old story of survival in an strange and dangerous world.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Leothefox

    How about this: hollow Earth, evil ape-men, hypnotic reptile overlords, cave-people, time madness, monsters, and a stolen scientific secret? You get all that and more in “At the Earth's Core”! David Innes, a muscular mine-owner backs his professor friend's drilling machine and wind up accidentally burrowing into the big hollow world in the center of the Earth: Pellucidar. This is first-wave Burroughs, so we get all the goodies: princesses, jungle survival, escape plots, traitors, the works! “At How about this: hollow Earth, evil ape-men, hypnotic reptile overlords, cave-people, time madness, monsters, and a stolen scientific secret? You get all that and more in “At the Earth's Core”! David Innes, a muscular mine-owner backs his professor friend's drilling machine and wind up accidentally burrowing into the big hollow world in the center of the Earth: Pellucidar. This is first-wave Burroughs, so we get all the goodies: princesses, jungle survival, escape plots, traitors, the works! “At the Earth's Core” even has the classic framing device, much like “A Princess of Mars” and “Pirates of Venus”, with a narrator on safari discovering our hero in the Sahara, eager to tell his fantastic story. The imaginative setting is inside planet Earth and has human beings, but they're primitive and they're slaves to other races. The result is basically more of the “sword and planet” genre, which is always great in my book. One of the interesting inventions of the book is the idea that since the internal world has a sun in the center of it (the actually burning core of the planet) that it's always noon and never dark, rendering time meaningless in a very actual sense. At one point David Innes is parted from the professor and gone off to an island for what might be days or more, but to the professor he returns within the space of five minutes. It's similar to something that was touched on briefly in “The Moon Maid” but never fully explored there. Like the other Burroughs adventures, “At the Earth's Core” has a romantic element, with cave princess “Dian the Beautiful” taking the role of lady-love. If that name sounds a tad cheesy, this was 1914 and the cave people's are supposed to be backward anyway. Other cave people get names like “The Hairy One” or “The Sly One”. Much like in “A Princess of Mars”, David's romance with Dian is complicated by a social faux pas and a kidnapping. This device keeps the damsel not merely in distress, but actually absent for most of the story. Since this is the story of two 20th century men arriving in a primitive world, our heroes also get the job of advancing Pellucidar's human race in order to beat the more evolved Mahars. One can see elements here that might have inspired Lovecraft and Howard, with the Mahars and their minions, the Sagoths. The Mahars are deaf and communicate by thought transmission, they are also all female, having discovered means of artificially fertilizing their eggs. Burroughs even has a chilling scene in a Mahar temple where the queen makes a zombie of a woman she is eating! “At the Earth's Core” was a good ride and it was unique enough not to be a throwaway (yes, it has 4 sequels, but so do a lot of books that should have been throwaways). The structure is strangely unlike other Burroughs works in some ways, and the addition of the professor actually changes things substantially. I'm all delighted and this has me excited for the four sequels (one of which is a Tarzan crossover).

  10. 4 out of 5

    Marts (Thinker)

    I enjoyed this Burrourghs title. At the Earth's Core is all about an inventor Abner Perry and a young wealthy gentleman David Innis. Perry invents a vehicle referred to as the 'iron mole' which has drilling properties so powerful it can drill into the earth's core. Innis goes with Perry on a test run and ends up reaching earth's core which amazingly, is hollow. At the hollow core is a world called Pellucidar with stange beings like Mahars and Sagoths. They make aquaintances with Ghak, Hooja and I enjoyed this Burrourghs title. At the Earth's Core is all about an inventor Abner Perry and a young wealthy gentleman David Innis. Perry invents a vehicle referred to as the 'iron mole' which has drilling properties so powerful it can drill into the earth's core. Innis goes with Perry on a test run and ends up reaching earth's core which amazingly, is hollow. At the hollow core is a world called Pellucidar with stange beings like Mahars and Sagoths. They make aquaintances with Ghak, Hooja and Dian, residents in this core world. By the way Innis falls in love with Dian. Well after various adventures, Innis returns to the surface, meets the narrator and via correspondence informs him that he intends to return to the core. The story is a rather exciting one, adventure lovers should read it!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Patrick Gibson

    Catching up on a book I should have read when I was a teen. Damn entertaining -- you know it is so.

  12. 5 out of 5

    J.Aleksandr Wootton

    Sensationalized mashup of early sci-fi progressivism, "Noble Savage" theory, humanism, florid prose, and era-typical prejudices and pop-paleontology in a Jules Verne setting. Simply destined to become a movie that Mystery Science Theater would (and did) lampoon; nothing special. Burrough's setting does introduce two somewhat-interesting ideas: (1) Gravity is an attraction towards planetary crust, not planetary core, such that a hollow world could support life on its inner surface as well as its o Sensationalized mashup of early sci-fi progressivism, "Noble Savage" theory, humanism, florid prose, and era-typical prejudices and pop-paleontology in a Jules Verne setting. Simply destined to become a movie that Mystery Science Theater would (and did) lampoon; nothing special. Burrough's setting does introduce two somewhat-interesting ideas: (1) Gravity is an attraction towards planetary crust, not planetary core, such that a hollow world could support life on its inner surface as well as its outer surface. (2) In the absence of regularly recurring celestial phenomena, human perception of time becomes a subjective function of effort expended and localized experience.

  13. 5 out of 5

    T.I.M. James

    Although a good part of my to read pile is there to be reread, there are a run of older books that I have never read before, and some of these are the Pellucidar series by Edgar Rice Burroughs. Burroughs is, of course better known for his preeminent creation, Tarzan but he had great success with some of his other creations including John Carter of Mars and this series. Pellucidar is another world, hidden beneath the surface of our own, miles and miles beneath our crust it exists, more primitive th Although a good part of my to read pile is there to be reread, there are a run of older books that I have never read before, and some of these are the Pellucidar series by Edgar Rice Burroughs. Burroughs is, of course better known for his preeminent creation, Tarzan but he had great success with some of his other creations including John Carter of Mars and this series. Pellucidar is another world, hidden beneath the surface of our own, miles and miles beneath our crust it exists, more primitive than our own, with animals and peoples that are analogues of our own from prehistoric times, with a few newer ones thrown into the mix. This, the first book in the series ‘At The Earth’s Core’ is a short read, detailing the adventures of two men, David Innes and his older friend Abner Perry who go exploring in a large machine that drills beneath the Earth’s surface. Through the inherent dangers and malfunctions in the device they at last arrive at the land of Pellucidar, a vast subterranean world, perpetually lit, and by landmass bigger than the surface world of which it is as oblivious of as we are of it. On the surface (if you’ll excuse the pun) the book is pure hokum, after all modern science tells us a lot more about what is beneath our feet than was even known 50 years ago, let alone when this story was first published 100 years ago. A lot has changed in that century, and what may be viewed here as casual racism or sexism was the way of life back then. On this front I did not think it was too bad. The odd word usage was archaic and borderline offensive, but not to any serious extent. Perhaps the way the main female character reacted could be considered a step back for feminism, but maybe we can excuse it, not only as the way women were viewed 100 years ago, but perhaps more so for the primitive society in which Dian the Beautiful was raised. Looking at the story as a work of fantastic creation then it deserves tremendous praise, Burroughs has pulled out all the stops. Pellucidar’s location must be considered preposterous, but the thought and energy that has gone into it is not. Not only has Burroughs created creatures that are based on our own prehistoric catalogue, he has given them different names, those used by the indigenous peoples. He has decided not only do the peoples of the Hollow Earth not speak Earth languages, but each tribe, region have their own language. The creatures that rule, the reptilian Mahar, are both monstrous and intelligent enough as to stand apart as something almost alien, and the way they communicate is one of two things that show that Burrough’s has really thought about things, trying to make things unique and different. The other is the description of time in Pellucidar. It flows differently than on the surface world. The suggestion is that the perception of time has an effect. In a world where the ‘sun’ always shines time has no real concept and that effects the way it passes for those who are aware of the idea. Perhaps in some ways naive, but only when viewed with modern eyes, and it deserves serious recognition of a prodigious imagination at work.

  14. 5 out of 5

    John

    A supremely enjoyable adventure novel marred by a few major flaws, AT THE EARTH'S CORE rehashes all the usual Edgar Rice Burroughs cliches but does so in superior fashion. For one thing, the mythology of Pellucidar is more clever and interesting than what we got from his BARSOOM or CASPAK novels. The "hollow world" plot device is, of course, patently absurd, but Burroughs does a surprisingly good job of selling it by providing enough pseudoscience to enable readers to suspend their disbelief to A supremely enjoyable adventure novel marred by a few major flaws, AT THE EARTH'S CORE rehashes all the usual Edgar Rice Burroughs cliches but does so in superior fashion. For one thing, the mythology of Pellucidar is more clever and interesting than what we got from his BARSOOM or CASPAK novels. The "hollow world" plot device is, of course, patently absurd, but Burroughs does a surprisingly good job of selling it by providing enough pseudoscience to enable readers to suspend their disbelief to a degree I wouldn't have thought possible. I also liked that the main character, David Innes, has a few personal flaws and, unlike John Carter or Tarzan, isn't the next-closest thing to human perfection. Innes may be handsome and possess an incredible physique, but he isn't the sharpest tool in the shed, nor is he much of a runner--a skill that is of tremendous benefit in a land populated by dinosaurs. And now for the problems with this book. Firstly, Burroughs has never shied away from relying on sheer coincidence as a plot-furthering device, and AT THE EARTH'S CORE is no exception. Hardly a chapter goes by in which David Innes doesn't completely luck out in some outrageous fashion. Secondly, the concept of language is always an issue. In order to maintain the pacing of his stories, Burroughs acts as though mastering a new language is something that takes about three or four days. And there are no baby steps...David Innes and his companion go from zero to Shakespearean without having to waste time on intermediate stages. Thirdly, Burroughs' racism pops up momentarily, when he once again implies that black people are further down on the evolutionary scale compared to other races. In Pellucidar, they even have tails and are presumably still in the process of coming down from the trees. Yuck. And lastly, Burroughs tries to suggest that time has no meaning in a place where it cannot be precisely measured. His idea is this: If the sun remains fixed in the sky, and you have no clocks to look at, you will have trouble distinguishing the passage of a month from the passage of an hour. Personally, I find that ridiculous. Even when visiting a Las Vegas casino (which go out of their way to make you lose track of time), I'm still able to gauge the difference between five hours and five minutes. It's this sort of silliness that leads many people to consider AT THE EARTH'S CORE a kid's book, though I would argue that one or two horrific scenes disqualify it as such. Only read it to your children before bed if you want to give them nightmares.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Rex Libris

    This is the first volume in Edgar Rice Burrough's Pellucidar series. Pellucidar is a "hollow earth" realm, existing on an inner portion of the earth. The earth is hollow, with a miniature sun at the core, and the concave surface of the inner globe is Pellucidar. Thus one can look up and see the other side of the world. in this aspect, it is a precursor to Ringworld and Rama. In this establishing story the protagonist and an inventor friend have created an automatic mining machine. It malfunction This is the first volume in Edgar Rice Burrough's Pellucidar series. Pellucidar is a "hollow earth" realm, existing on an inner portion of the earth. The earth is hollow, with a miniature sun at the core, and the concave surface of the inner globe is Pellucidar. Thus one can look up and see the other side of the world. in this aspect, it is a precursor to Ringworld and Rama. In this establishing story the protagonist and an inventor friend have created an automatic mining machine. It malfunctions and takes them to the inner world. There are stone age humans, dinosaurs, and other species of intelligent animals who have enslaved the humans. Using their modern knowledge, the protagonist and friend free the humans and plan to set up an empire. This is where the first story ends, and is taken up again in #2, Pellucidar.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Steven

    The first of the Pellucidar series, "At the Earth's Core" is typical Burroughs fare in the science-fantasy genre that includes the Barsoom and Venus series, among others. And like those others, it's Saturday afternoon TV in all its campy, eye-rolling so-bad-it's-embarrassing-to-be-caught-with-this stuff (the 1976 movie with Doug McClure, Peter Cushing, and Caroline Munro is a classic in this genre) best. The book is really 2.5 stars, but as usual, I rounded it up. The plot is as described and so The first of the Pellucidar series, "At the Earth's Core" is typical Burroughs fare in the science-fantasy genre that includes the Barsoom and Venus series, among others. And like those others, it's Saturday afternoon TV in all its campy, eye-rolling so-bad-it's-embarrassing-to-be-caught-with-this stuff (the 1976 movie with Doug McClure, Peter Cushing, and Caroline Munro is a classic in this genre) best. The book is really 2.5 stars, but as usual, I rounded it up. The plot is as described and so formulaic compared to the Barsoom and Venus series that little ever seems to change. David Innes and Abner Perry launch Perry's giant excavator, which then, mistakenly, bores to the center of the earth where it comes out in the world-within-a-world of Pellucidar, inhabited by prehistoric creatures and men. David becomes enamored of Dian the Beautiful (yes, really), offends her because of his outside world ways (insert John Carter or Carson Napier here), then spends the rest of the novel trying to regain her love and trust while eluding certain death and conquering the vast hordes with his superior, Earthly ways. And, in the end, a series of events takes David away from his love, to which he will return in the next book, complete with new monsters, traitorous foes, and harrowing escapes. Like most of the work of Burroughs, you can't take this as serious literature. In that vein, this works as campy reading material. Your heroes and villains are obvious, the situations are often ludicrous, and if you don't roll your eyes at least twice during the book, it's probably because you fell asleep reading it. There's also some subtle racism here, though not nearly as bad as some of Burroughs' other works. But it's mostly B-grade fun, and for that it gets its 3 stars. Like the Barsoom (John Carter) and Venus (Carson Napier) series (and most of the others too), if you're looking for great literature, keep moving because there's almost nothing to see here. But if you're looking for something simple and plain that would make a movie so bad it becomes a cult classic, this is it. But...you've been warned.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Vicky Hunt

    Burrough's Imagiscape Turned Inside Out Though I've been a long time fan of Burrough's fiction, this is my first book of the Pellucidar series. I've read most of the Tarzan series, and all of the Caspak Trilogy. I've read the first in the Princess of Mars series. It looks as though this one was written just a couple of years after Tarzan's first issue, early in his career. It is very scaled down... lots of action which the book jumps right into with an excellent frame narrative and combat that ma Burrough's Imagiscape Turned Inside Out Though I've been a long time fan of Burrough's fiction, this is my first book of the Pellucidar series. I've read most of the Tarzan series, and all of the Caspak Trilogy. I've read the first in the Princess of Mars series. It looks as though this one was written just a couple of years after Tarzan's first issue, early in his career. It is very scaled down... lots of action which the book jumps right into with an excellent frame narrative and combat that many Sci-fi fantasy books lack. Add to all that the fact that the concept is, well, pretty wild being inside the earth's crust, and you get a great read that just about anyone could enjoy. It's not too much of a Science lecture either, because ERB just lights the match and runs with it. I can't imagine how he did it. He is well loved as a writer for a reason. I plan to finish the series, but I really want to check out the Venus series first, so I will most likely jump around a bit exploring all his worlds.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Graham

    This one's a story I'm somewhat familiar with, thanks to the ultra-cheesy Amicus film adaptation of 1976 starring the late Peter Cushing and Caroline Munro. I found AT THE EARTH'S CORE to be a typical outing from Burroughs, not as strong as the Tarzan story I've read by him, and seemingly written for little children despite a couple of gory passages. This comes across as a light retelling of JOURNEY TO THE CENTRE OF THE EARTH, except our heroes find themselves in a fantastic, prehistoric-style w This one's a story I'm somewhat familiar with, thanks to the ultra-cheesy Amicus film adaptation of 1976 starring the late Peter Cushing and Caroline Munro. I found AT THE EARTH'S CORE to be a typical outing from Burroughs, not as strong as the Tarzan story I've read by him, and seemingly written for little children despite a couple of gory passages. This comes across as a light retelling of JOURNEY TO THE CENTRE OF THE EARTH, except our heroes find themselves in a fantastic, prehistoric-style world where they battle various reptilian monsters and survive treachery at the hands of enemies. It's basic level stuff, with particularly badly-handled dialogue and antediluvian attitudes towards women, but on the other hand there's a wealth of action and drama which makes it a fast read.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Yibbie

    Now that was fun, mind-bending, but fun. I had no expectations of anything beyond a kill-‘m caveman, giant purple monster story, but I was pleasantly surprised. Not in the characters, they were highly predictable, but the world was wonderfully imaginative. I really can’t wrap my mind around it yet, but it was fun trying. Maybe that was aggravated by the way he messed with time. I don’t want to give anything away so I really can’t say any more than, it gets more mind-bending the farther you read. Now that was fun, mind-bending, but fun. I had no expectations of anything beyond a kill-‘m caveman, giant purple monster story, but I was pleasantly surprised. Not in the characters, they were highly predictable, but the world was wonderfully imaginative. I really can’t wrap my mind around it yet, but it was fun trying. Maybe that was aggravated by the way he messed with time. I don’t want to give anything away so I really can’t say any more than, it gets more mind-bending the farther you read. Warning, it’s a cliff-hanger in the most dramatic pulp fashion possible. You will want to go get the sequel immediately.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Dylan McIntosh

    It’s amazing how ERB could create such a creative and fascinating world in a time that there was much to canabalize from for his world building. It was a bit outdated from a perspective of the treatment of woman, but overall an good read. Looking forward to the follow on stories.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Frank

    Not unlike the basic premise of The Princess of Mars, our hero here, David Innes, along with Dr. Abner Perry ride a massive drill he's invented deep into the earth, where they discover an underground civilization (Pellucidar) of primitive humans, flying monsters, and ape like creatures.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Williwaw

    A swashbuckling breeze of a book! Imagine a hollow earth, inhabited by strange beasts and stone-age humanoids. The hollow space is lit by a perpetual sun which floats at its center. A small moon rotates synchronously with the earth, so that it casts a permanent shadow over one region of the land called Pellucidar. Into this strange world crashes David Innes, with the help of Professor Perry and his mole-like vessel, the "Prospector." With their superior know-how, Innes and Perry are destined to A swashbuckling breeze of a book! Imagine a hollow earth, inhabited by strange beasts and stone-age humanoids. The hollow space is lit by a perpetual sun which floats at its center. A small moon rotates synchronously with the earth, so that it casts a permanent shadow over one region of the land called Pellucidar. Into this strange world crashes David Innes, with the help of Professor Perry and his mole-like vessel, the "Prospector." With their superior know-how, Innes and Perry are destined to rule this newly discovered world. But not until they break free of their bondage by the Mahars, a hideous lizard-like species which exercises dominion over Pellucidar. I first read this book when I was a teenager. I remember being particularly struck by the intensity of the romance between Innes and Dian the Beautiful, a princess of Pellucidar. Now that I have reached the half-century mark, Innes's and Dian's romance strikes me as so much less powerful: indeed, almost a let-down. It must be that my teenage incarnation was so thirsty for a romance of its own, that it focused inordinately on Burroughs's occasional love scenes. If anything, these scenes now strike me as somewhat sparse and understated. What I notice now are the techniques that Burroughs uses over and over. For example, how frequently he plants our heroes into an impossible predicament. They are about to be cornered by some horrible beast. There seems to be no way out. Then in a sort of deus ex machina way, the beast is shot by a third party or devoured by another beast, which gives our heroes a second chance! This pattern is repeated again and again, and there is always some interceding providence to keep the story going. But first, ERB must convince you that the situation is terminal: "There seemed nothing to do but stand supinely and await my end. **** And with these thoughts came a realization of how unimportant to the life and happiness of the world is the existence of any one of us. We may be snuffed out without an instant's warning, and for a brief day our friends speak of us with subdued voices. The following morning, while the first worm is busily engaged in testing the construction of our coffin, they are teeing up for the first hole to suffer more acute sorrow over a sliced ball than they did over our, to us, untimely demise." (Our existential hero's thoughts as he stands naked, with no place of refuge in sight, before a stalking labyrinthodon.) Or how about the endless parade of weird, menacing species? ERB can easily use up a page or so describing each one in loving detail. In this book, the Mahars get most of the attention. They are four-legged lizards with wings and massive jaws full of sharp teeth. They have hypnotic powers, which they use to enslave humans. And they like to feast upon fair maidens, one limb at a time. Apparently, men don't taste nearly as good, so they serve instead as subjects for brutal experiments that usually involve vivisection. Yes, ERB is good clean fun! And a prolific writer, indeed: author of the Tarzan series, the Barsoom series, the Carson of Venus series, and innumerable stand-alone books and stories. Most of his work is available for free online these days. Check out this site for access to the stories and lots of fabulous illustrations: tarzan.com

  23. 4 out of 5

    Dave

    After starting his Barsoom and Tarzan series of adventures, Edgar Rice Burroughs (September 1st, 1875 – March 19, 1950), wrote “At the Earth’s Core” which was published in 1914. This kicked off his Pellucidar series, which is based on the idea that the Earth is hollow and there are creatures from our prehistoric times still alive and active, as well as more than a few horrific creatures, both intelligent and non-intelligent. As with many of Burrough’s ideas, that of a hollow Earth would inspire After starting his Barsoom and Tarzan series of adventures, Edgar Rice Burroughs (September 1st, 1875 – March 19, 1950), wrote “At the Earth’s Core” which was published in 1914. This kicked off his Pellucidar series, which is based on the idea that the Earth is hollow and there are creatures from our prehistoric times still alive and active, as well as more than a few horrific creatures, both intelligent and non-intelligent. As with many of Burrough’s ideas, that of a hollow Earth would inspire many other writers to write stories on a similar theme. There are many similarities between this and Burrough’s Barsoom series, and as such it is fairly predictable, but there are some differences as well. Once again there is an introduction which makes the case that this is a real story. Instead of an unexplained transportation to Mars, the journey to Pellucidar is done via an invention, a “subterranean prospector” which works far better and also far worse than intended. The hero, David Innes and his friend Perry who invented the “subterranean prospector” find themselves in a hostile world; they are captured and captured again finding themselves enslaved by the dominant species of the planet, the Mahars. The hero also finds a beautiful woman who he is destined to be with. This novel isn’t nearly as good as the start to the Pellucidar series as “A Princess of Mars” was for the Barsoom series. There are some rather racist descriptions, and the language difficulties are overcome too easily, though one has to also give credit for the Mahars as a unique and horrible species, though there again they have an Achilles heel which is rather absurd. Another weakness is the flow of time, which sometimes results in contradictions in the plot. It is never quite clear just how Burrough’s saw this working, so while one can appreciate the attempt, the execution of the idea isn’t very well done. As one has come to expect from Burrough’s, the adventure is entertaining, the characters are a bit two-dimensional, and the plot is fairly predictable. Thus, if one is looking for an entertaining mindless escape, this may work to fill that goal, but then again one would be better served by reading the Barsoom series which is much better done. There are crossovers between the Barsoom series and this one, as well as between the Tarzan series and this one, which makes it of interest as well.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Liz

    Young David Innes' scientist friend, Abner Perry, has invented a wonderful new machine that he expects will revolutionize mining techniques. Dubbed "The Mole", it is capable of digging through the ground with incredible power. However, on the test run, something goes awry, and the digger carries Perry and David deep beneath the Earth's crust, where they expect to be vaporized by the intense heat of the molten core. Instead, when the machine finally stops, they find themselves in a strange world Young David Innes' scientist friend, Abner Perry, has invented a wonderful new machine that he expects will revolutionize mining techniques. Dubbed "The Mole", it is capable of digging through the ground with incredible power. However, on the test run, something goes awry, and the digger carries Perry and David deep beneath the Earth's crust, where they expect to be vaporized by the intense heat of the molten core. Instead, when the machine finally stops, they find themselves in a strange world within our world, the land known to its inhabitants as Pellucider. They are amazed to discover that Pellucider teems with prehistoric beasts that have become extinct on the surface. There are also humans, but they are enslaved by a vicious, reptilian race known as the Mahars, who are the most technologically advanced race in Pellucider. Soon, David and Perry, who are ignorant of the ways of this world, find themselves enslaved to the Mahars as well, being conveyed to their horrible underground city. In the chain gang, David meets a human girl named Dian the Beautiful, and immediately falls in love. It becomes David's quest to escape from the Mahars and to win the love of Dian, while at the same time trying to find a way to end the Mahars' reign of terror over the entire land of Pellucider. Ok, so this was really cheesy, but at the same time entertaining. But Edgar Rice Burroughs is an author you expect to be cheesy, so I was prepared for that. Though I cringed in a couple of places, I did for the most part like it. It was a good way to while away an afternoon at work with nothing to do, because the story was not something you actually had to think about. I do plan on reading the rest in the series, in between other "serious" books.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Stephen Gallup

    As I return in my dotage to reread some of the Burroughs tales that so captivated me many years ago, I continue to find them enjoyable. I do feel the need to acknowledge that this is pure escapism. There are points, at least in this book, where the prose is almost laughable, and generally speaking much of it could have been burnished to provide a more enjoyable reading experience. But none of that negates the sheer delight of Burroughs' imagination, and the impressive whole societies and worlds As I return in my dotage to reread some of the Burroughs tales that so captivated me many years ago, I continue to find them enjoyable. I do feel the need to acknowledge that this is pure escapism. There are points, at least in this book, where the prose is almost laughable, and generally speaking much of it could have been burnished to provide a more enjoyable reading experience. But none of that negates the sheer delight of Burroughs' imagination, and the impressive whole societies and worlds he constructs. My reaction this time through is to read quickly, almost skimming at times, in order to enjoy the latter without being overly distracted by the former. I noted a brief nod here toward the ideal of the noble savage that is prevalent elsewhere in his work: "They are a noble-looking race, these cave men of Pellucidar, and if our progenitors were as they, the human race of the outer crust has deteriorated rather than improved with the march of the ages. All they lack is opportunity. We have opportunity, and little else." I think that's about as close as Burroughs comes to commentary on the real world. Mostly he's concerned with following a surprised but willing representative of our world who ventures into ever more unlikely adventures and who also manages, with difficulty, to win the heart of an extraordinary woman. Great stuff, at least for its genre! Books such as this deserve as much credit as anything for having made me a lifelong lover of reading.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Robert

    I will admit, I saw the 1976 film version with Doug McClure and Peter Cushing,along with the alluring Carolyn Munroe, well before I read the book. Unlike modern or should I say postmodern cynics, I was not turned off by the cheesy acting and rubber dinosaurs, as I knew that the book was always better then the movie. That said, this was the first Edgar Rice Burroughs novel I ever read. Just like "The land that time forgot", the story opens with an unnamed narrator who just so happens to come acro I will admit, I saw the 1976 film version with Doug McClure and Peter Cushing,along with the alluring Carolyn Munroe, well before I read the book. Unlike modern or should I say postmodern cynics, I was not turned off by the cheesy acting and rubber dinosaurs, as I knew that the book was always better then the movie. That said, this was the first Edgar Rice Burroughs novel I ever read. Just like "The land that time forgot", the story opens with an unnamed narrator who just so happens to come across the protagonist of the tale, and who is in the mood to spin a yarn. David Innes tells a story of boring into the Earth with the help of an "iron mole" invented by the witty Professor Perry. They enter into a "hollow earth" called Pellucidar, a semi prehistoric world of dinosaurs, busty beauties and an intelligent reptilian race known as the Mahars. Much like any pulp novel, there is action, intrigue and romance. And just like any pulp tale of the era, do not expect a high brow literary affair. Someone had mentioned that the fantasy genre was in embryonic form in the early 20th century, and it shows in this pulp novel. Expect a rip roaring tale of pure fantasy, with an implausible yet still amazing world just under our feet. Burroughs wrote several more Pellucidar tales, including one involving his most famous creation, Tarzan, going into the earth's core. So pick up a copy of the hokey movie and the book, and just have fun!

  27. 4 out of 5

    R.G.

    I love how Burroughs tends to turn all the rules and knowledge of this world on it’s head… of course we know at the center of the earth is nothing but the molten core… then again maybe there is a Pellucidar… a world a few million years behind ours… because as it took longer for the core to cool, it took longer for life to emerge down there… and as in an essentially different world, being evolved differently… so even though the humans are intelligent here and have their culture and language… the I love how Burroughs tends to turn all the rules and knowledge of this world on it’s head… of course we know at the center of the earth is nothing but the molten core… then again maybe there is a Pellucidar… a world a few million years behind ours… because as it took longer for the core to cool, it took longer for life to emerge down there… and as in an essentially different world, being evolved differently… so even though the humans are intelligent here and have their culture and language… the Mahars got their faster and further… they’re described as pterodactyls and have telepathic powers but no hearing and so don’t know that the humans have speech and think of them as cattle… so once David and Perry get there it’s just one adventure after another… but I have to say my favorite part of this book is its look on time… because this world is perpetually daytime, for there is no horizon for the sun to set behind… they find that time may be more in the mind than they had realized… there is just so much to find intriguing in this whole series and looking at how the world evolves and how the slightest things can completely change your perception of it…. it’s just the best kind of science fiction there is…

  28. 5 out of 5

    Thom Swennes

    The young well-to-do David Innes is impressed with a prototype earth drill invented by the air-brain genius inventor Abner Perry (as I read, images of Dr. Emmett Lanthrop “Doc” Brown of Back to the Future notoriety came to mind). He invests in the project and the drill becomes uncontrollable during its first trials, plunging them down and through the Earth’s crust. Beneath the crust the Earth is hollow and another world thrives where the vastly reduced core serves as the only light. Because this The young well-to-do David Innes is impressed with a prototype earth drill invented by the air-brain genius inventor Abner Perry (as I read, images of Dr. Emmett Lanthrop “Doc” Brown of Back to the Future notoriety came to mind). He invests in the project and the drill becomes uncontrollable during its first trials, plunging them down and through the Earth’s crust. Beneath the crust the Earth is hollow and another world thrives where the vastly reduced core serves as the only light. Because this world’s sun is stationary, time (so it seems) doesn’t exist. It doesn’t seem to matter (story wise) weather the tale is on Mars or just under our feet as all of Burroughs’ fantasy spoofs remain basically the same. Innumerable trials and tribulations are faced to win the love, respect and freedom of a beautiful heroine. This book, published in 1914, is a prime example of a genre (fantasy) in its infancy. The author doesn’t try to make the story logical or even believable but lets the words flow in wild abandonment. If the reader is looking for a comprehensive, plausible and credible work of fiction, move ahead fifty years. This (and I dare say all of Burroughs’ fantasy works) takes the reader to the roots and genesis of a now well developed style.

  29. 5 out of 5

    An Odd1

    David Innes, 30 finds "white man" pg prologue Burroughs in Arab desert, narrates last ten years, passed in blink of an eye. He funded drill invented by Abner Perry, whose "relaxation" is "paleontology" p 3. Despite his youthful strength exercised by sports "boxing, football, and baseball" p 5, they cannot turn around, and go through the crust. Chases and fights are the fun parts. David battles dinosaurs, invented beasts, ape-men Sagoths, even humans, Hooja the Sly. He makes allies, takes Dian fo David Innes, 30 finds "white man" pg prologue Burroughs in Arab desert, narrates last ten years, passed in blink of an eye. He funded drill invented by Abner Perry, whose "relaxation" is "paleontology" p 3. Despite his youthful strength exercised by sports "boxing, football, and baseball" p 5, they cannot turn around, and go through the crust. Chases and fights are the fun parts. David battles dinosaurs, invented beasts, ape-men Sagoths, even humans, Hooja the Sly. He makes allies, takes Dian for wife, steals and hides mating secret from all-female Mahars. He intends to take Dian upward home, but Hooja replaces with a Mahar. Search is purpose for sequel. Yet all their meetings seem providential. Despite first of series, I read out of order, repeats theme of first person removed narrator rescues useless gorgeous female. She gnaws at raw red meat with "dainty white teeth" as civilized as a tea party society gathering. Skip over "white man" is only civilized standard. Looking forward to trying Leigh Brackett's dark-skin hero Eric John Stark, of course depicted blonde white in illustrations of the time. I will continue Burrough series, try Tarzan.

  30. 4 out of 5

    David B

    Another stalwart ERB hero travels to a lost world where he encounters dangerous men and even more dangerous beasts, this time at the center of the earth. It seems that Burroughs had a little more discipline in his world-building here than usual. Instead of setting his story on an alien planet inhabited by whatever crazy melange of monsters and superscience his fruitful imagination could produce, he created a pretty consistent Stone Age world that exists under the thumb of some telepathic holdover Another stalwart ERB hero travels to a lost world where he encounters dangerous men and even more dangerous beasts, this time at the center of the earth. It seems that Burroughs had a little more discipline in his world-building here than usual. Instead of setting his story on an alien planet inhabited by whatever crazy melange of monsters and superscience his fruitful imagination could produce, he created a pretty consistent Stone Age world that exists under the thumb of some telepathic holdovers from the age of dinosaurs. There’s also some imaginative pseudoscientific hokum to explain how a hollow earth with its own sun suspended at the core could exist. Perhaps the most interesting aspect of Pellucidar is how the presence of this never-waning source of illumination has resulted in a society that does not measure time, and Burroughs has a few interesting riffs on how time is merely a construct of the mind. But mostly, of course, it is pure escapist pulp fun. Very entertaining despite striking a sour note at the end when it requires some very contrived, unbelievable behavior from our hero in order to separate him from the woman he loves.

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