Hot Best Seller

Antigone: Illustrated Platinum Edition

Availability: Ready to download

How is this book unique? 15 Illustrations are included Short Biography is also included Original & Unabridged Edition Tablet and e-reader formatted Best fiction books of all time One of the best books to read Classic historical fiction books Bestselling Fiction Antigone (/ænˈtɪɡəniː/ an-tig-ə-nee; Ancient Greek: Ἀντιγόνη) is a tragedy by Sophocles written in o How is this book unique? 15 Illustrations are included Short Biography is also included Original & Unabridged Edition Tablet and e-reader formatted Best fiction books of all time One of the best books to read Classic historical fiction books Bestselling Fiction Antigone (/ænˈtɪɡəniː/ an-tig-ə-nee; Ancient Greek: Ἀντιγόνη) is a tragedy by Sophocles written in or before 441 BC. It is the third of the three Theban plays but was the first written, chronologically. The play expands on the Theban legend that predated it and picks up where Aeschylus' Seven Against Thebes ends.


Compare

How is this book unique? 15 Illustrations are included Short Biography is also included Original & Unabridged Edition Tablet and e-reader formatted Best fiction books of all time One of the best books to read Classic historical fiction books Bestselling Fiction Antigone (/ænˈtɪɡəniː/ an-tig-ə-nee; Ancient Greek: Ἀντιγόνη) is a tragedy by Sophocles written in o How is this book unique? 15 Illustrations are included Short Biography is also included Original & Unabridged Edition Tablet and e-reader formatted Best fiction books of all time One of the best books to read Classic historical fiction books Bestselling Fiction Antigone (/ænˈtɪɡəniː/ an-tig-ə-nee; Ancient Greek: Ἀντιγόνη) is a tragedy by Sophocles written in or before 441 BC. It is the third of the three Theban plays but was the first written, chronologically. The play expands on the Theban legend that predated it and picks up where Aeschylus' Seven Against Thebes ends.

30 review for Antigone: Illustrated Platinum Edition

  1. 5 out of 5

    Peggy

    Suck on that, Creon. They named the play after her.

  2. 4 out of 5

    İntellecta

    This drama highlights the differences between state and divine law. Especially interesting is the language. Sophocles has done very well to portray this conflict. Even after 2500 years still a worth reading, profound text.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    Ἀντιγόνη = Antigone, Sophocles Antigone is a tragedy by Sophocles written in or before 441 BC. It is the third of the three Theban plays chronologically, but was the first written. The play expands on the Theban legend that predated it and picks up where Aeschylus' Seven Against Thebes ends. In the beginning of the play, two brothers leading opposite sides in Thebes' civil war died fighting each other for the throne. Creon, the new ruler of Thebes, has decided that Eteocles will be honored and Po Ἀντιγόνη = Antigone, Sophocles Antigone is a tragedy by Sophocles written in or before 441 BC. It is the third of the three Theban plays chronologically, but was the first written. The play expands on the Theban legend that predated it and picks up where Aeschylus' Seven Against Thebes ends. In the beginning of the play, two brothers leading opposite sides in Thebes' civil war died fighting each other for the throne. Creon, the new ruler of Thebes, has decided that Eteocles will be honored and Polyneices will be in public shame. The rebel brother's body will not be sanctified by holy rites, and will lie unburied on the battlefield, prey for carrion animals like worms and vultures, the harshest punishment at the time. Antigone and Ismene are the sisters of the dead Polyneices and Eteocles. In the opening of the play, Antigone brings Ismene outside the palace gates late at night for a secret meeting: Antigone wants to bury Polyneices' body, in defiance of Creon's edict. Ismene refuses to help her, not believing that it will actually be possible to bury their brother, who is under guard, but she is unable to stop Antigone from going to bury her brother herself. Creon enters, along with the Chorus of Theban Elders. He seeks their support in the days to come, and in particular wants them to back his edict regarding the disposal of Polyneices' body. The Leader of the Chorus pledges his support out of deference to Creon. A Sentry enters, fearfully reporting that the body has been given funeral rites and a symbolic burial with a thin covering of earth, though no one saw who had actually committed the crime. Creon, furious, orders the Sentry to find the culprit or face death himself. The Sentry leaves and the Chorus sings about honouring the gods, but after a short absence he returns, bringing Antigone with him. The Sentry explains that the watchmen uncovered Polyneices' body, and then caught Antigone as she did the funeral rituals. Creon questions her after sending the Sentry away, and she does not deny what she has done. She argues unflinchingly with Creon about the morality of the edict and the morality of her actions. Creon becomes furious, and, thinking Ismene must have known of Antigone's plan, seeing her upset, summons the girl. Ismene tries to confess falsely to the crime, wishing to die alongside her sister, but Antigone will not have it. Creon orders that the two women be temporarily imprisoned. Haemon, Creon's son, enters to pledge allegiance to his father, even though he is engaged to Antigone. He initially seems willing to forsake Antigone, but when Haemon gently tries to persuade his father to spare Antigone, claiming that 'under cover of darkness the city mourns for the girl', the discussion deteriorates and the two men are soon bitterly insulting each other. When Creon threatens to execute Antigone in front of his son, Haemon leaves, vowing never to see Creon again. Creon decides to spare Ismene and to bury Antigone alive in a cave. By not killing her directly, he hopes to pay the minimal respects to the gods. She is brought out of the house, and this time, she is sorrowful instead of defiant. She expresses her regrets at not having married and dying for following the laws of the gods. She is taken away to her living tomb, with the Leader of the Chorus expressing great sorrow for what is going to happen to her. Tiresias, the blind prophet, enters. Tiresias warns Creon that Polyneices should now be urgently buried because the gods are displeased, refusing to accept any sacrifices or prayers from Thebes. Creon accuses Tiresias of being corrupt. Tiresias responds that because of Creon's mistakes, he will lose "a son of [his] own loins"[2] for the crimes of leaving Polyneices unburied and putting Antigone into the earth (he does not say that Antigone should not be condemned to death, only that it is improper to keep a living body underneath the earth). All of Greece will despise Creon, and the sacrificial offerings of Thebes will not be accepted by the gods. The Leader of the Chorus, terrified, asks Creon to take Tiresias' advice to free Antigone and bury Polyneices. Creon assents, leaving with a retinue of men. The Chorus delivers a choral ode to the god Dionysus (god of wine and of the theater; this part is the offering to their patron god). A Messenger enters to tell the Leader of the Chorus that Antigone has killed herself. Eurydice, Creon's wife and Haemon's mother, enters and asks the Messenger to tell her everything. The Messenger reports that Creon saw to the burial of Polyneices. When Creon arrives at Antigone's cave, he found Haemon lamenting over Antigone, who had hanged herself. After unsuccessfully attempting to stab Creon, Haemon stabs himself. Having listened to the Messenger's account, Eurydice disappears into the palace. Creon enters, carrying Haemon's body. He understands that his own actions have caused these events and blames himself. A Second Messenger arrives to tell Creon and the Chorus that Eurydice has killed herself. With her last breath, she cursed her husband. Creon blames himself for everything that has happened, and, a broken man, he asks his servants to help him inside. The order he valued so much has been protected, and he is still the king, but he has acted against the gods and lost his children and his wife as a result. After Creon condemns himself, the Leader of the Chorus closes by saying that although the gods punish the proud, punishment brings wisdom. تاریخ نخستین خوانش: در ماه آگوست سال 2004 میلادی عنوان: آنتیگونه (آنتیگون)؛ اثر: سوفکلس؛ ترجمه: نجف دریابندری؛ مشخصات نشر: تهران، آگه، 1391، در 148 ص، شابک: 9789643292775؛ موضوع: نمایشنامه های یونانی از سال 496 تا 406 پیش از میلاد؛ این کتاب در سالهای مختلف توسط ناشرین و مترجمهای دیگر نیز منتشر شده است آنتیگون، در اسطوره های یونانی، دختر «ادیپ (شاه تبس)»، و «یوکاسته (مادر و همسر همان شاه تبس)» است. برادرانش: «پولونیکوس»، و «اتئوکلس»، در جنگ همدیگر را میکشند. «کرئون» دائی «آنتیگون»، و آن دو برادر است، که پس از «ادیپ»، پادشاه «تبس» میشود. او تدفین «پولونیکس» را، به جرم خیانت قدغن میکند. اما «آنتیگون»، از فرمان شاه سرپیچی، و به او می‌گوید: «تنها از قلب خویش ست، که فرمان می‌برد». «آنتیگون» برادرش را، به خاک می‌سپارد، و خود به دستور «کرئون»، زنده به گور می‌رود. ... از دوستی یونانی، چند سال پیش شنیده، و هنوز سخن ایشان را فراموش نکرده ام، که: «واژه های همین تراژدی کهن را، هرگز کس نمیتواند، با همان زیبایی، که در زبان یونانی ست، به زبانهای دیگر برگرداند.»، انگار یاد حضرت حافظ شیراز ما نیز افتاده بودند. ا. شربیانی

  4. 5 out of 5

    Sean Barrs the Bookdragon

    Antigone is a real heroine; she stands up for what she believes in. She was faced with a strong dilemma. The law of man, the word of her uncle the king, demands that her brother's body remains unburied in the open with no funeral rights, to be savaged by animals. For King Creon, this is a symbolic justice for a traitor and a rebel, but the laws of the God’s, and the ruling of Antigone’s own mind, demands that she gives him libations (death rights) that all men deserve. She buries the body and fa Antigone is a real heroine; she stands up for what she believes in. She was faced with a strong dilemma. The law of man, the word of her uncle the king, demands that her brother's body remains unburied in the open with no funeral rights, to be savaged by animals. For King Creon, this is a symbolic justice for a traitor and a rebel, but the laws of the God’s, and the ruling of Antigone’s own mind, demands that she gives him libations (death rights) that all men deserve. She buries the body and faces the consequences of the crime. Creon: And still you had the gall to break this law? Antigone: Of course I did. It wasn't Zeus, not in the least, who made this proclamation-not to me Nor did that justice, dwelling with the gods beneath the earth, ordain such laws for men. Nor did I think your edict had such force that you, a mere mortal, could override the gods. So, like I said she’s a heroine, for standing up against tyranny, but she isn’t the play’s tragic hero: it’s clearly King Creon. Who has the right of this situation? It is easy to brand Creon a tyrant, though to do so overlooks the reasoning behind his actions. In punishing Antigone’s dead brother, her rebellious dead brother, he is sending a political message to those that threaten the peace of Thebes. In reality he is being an effective, albeit harsh, ruler. When his niece breaks his law, he has no choice but to punish her as he would any man. He couldn’t allow her to be an exception to the rule, to do so would be to undermine the law of the land and his politics: it would be to make him a hypocrite. But, to sentence her to death, that’s a little extreme. Thus, Sophocles presents a beautifully conflicted situation. There is no longer a discernible sense of right or wrong, only a thin line of morality that separates a tyrant from a man of justice. And his conviction only gets worse; he refuses to hear what his son and the city (the chorus) think about the situation. He only sees his narrow-minded sense of justice, and ignores the effects it will have on his loved ones. He has no doubts about his actions, and demonstrates the questionable nature of a cold approach to kingship. The laws of man are not always right. Something Creon simply cannot perceive. To his mind, he is morally right, a man of good character and a king of honour. Is this not the most dangerous of leaders? Creon: I will take her down some wild, desolate path never trod by men, and wall her up alive in a rocky vault, and set out short rations, just the measure piety demands to keep the entire city free of defilement. There let her pray to the one god she worships: Death—who knows?—may just reprieveher from death. Or she may learn at last, better late than never, what a waste of breath it is to worship Death. And this is what makes him the play’s tragic hero. His hamartia, his tragic flaw in Aristotle terms, is his severe lack of judgement, and his inability to perceive the wrongness of his decree. The reversal, recognition and suffering come in the form of the priest Tiresias, an old wise man who speaks to the Gods. He tells Creon what will happen if he persists down his current path, and after much resistance, Creon finally relents his folly. But it is far too late. The blood has already been shed. Tragedy has already struck, death has already struck: Creon is left in tatters. It is the hardest of lessons to learn. So what do we learn from this? Greek tragedy was didactical in purpose; it was used as a learning tool, a means of imparting wisdom to the audience. What is Sophocles message? For me it’s quite simple: open your eyes and your heart. Never presume that you are right and an absolute morale authority. For Creon, his realisation came too late. The result was a sacrifice he will never forget, Antigone's death, and the one most readers seem to sympathise with. But I implore you to look further into the play, and consider the full role of Creon. To overlook him is to overlook the point of the work: “All men make mistakes, but a good man yields when he knows his course is wrong, and repairs the evil. The only crime is pride.” This play is a spectacular piece of work. I need more Greek tragedy in my reading diet. Penguin Little Black Classic- 55 The Little Black Classic Collection by penguin looks like it contains lots of hidden gems. I couldn’t help it; they looked so good that I went and bought them all. I shall post a short review after reading each one. No doubt it will take me several months to get through all of them! Hopefully I will find some classic authors, from across the ages, that I may not have come across had I not bought this collection.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kenny

    "Your soul is blowing apart." The chorus in Anne Carson's translation of Sophocles ANTIGONE I love Antigone. I think it is one of the very best of the Greek tragedies ~~ no one of the very best of all tragedies ever written. Random thought ~~ I suspect there is a play that is part of this cycle that is missing ~~ a play that focuses on the brothers. This review will not focus on the play itself, but on the wonderful translation by Anne Carson. Anne Carson is a poet. She is a wordsmith in the highest "Your soul is blowing apart." The chorus in Anne Carson's translation of Sophocles ANTIGONE I love Antigone. I think it is one of the very best of the Greek tragedies ~~ no one of the very best of all tragedies ever written. Random thought ~~ I suspect there is a play that is part of this cycle that is missing ~~ a play that focuses on the brothers. This review will not focus on the play itself, but on the wonderful translation by Anne Carson. Anne Carson is a poet. She is a wordsmith in the highest sense of the word. She has an ear for modern language that makes this translation fresh and contemporary while honoring Sophocles true intention. Carson's translation is full of dry, dark humor and avoids the pitfalls of those dour, humorless translations that are of one note and written to emulate a funeral dirge. But more importantly, Carson shows that Kreon, not Antigone, is the true tragic character of the work. He refuses to heed the wisdom of others, when Kreon relents at the last, only to find his family dead and his city in despair. The residue of those boring, stuffy late 19th / early 20th century translations that attempted to emulate Elizabethan English and place Antigone in the realm of a Shakespearean tragedy have been cast off by Carson. But, ultimately, I think it would be best to call this an adaptation rather than a translation. ANTIGONE: WE BEGIN IN THE DARK AND THE BIRTH OF DEATH IS US ISMENE: WHO SAID THAT ANTIGONE: HEGEL ISMENE: SOUNDS MORE LIKE BECKETT ANTIGONE: HE WAS PARAPHRASING HEGEL The chorus in Anne Carson's translation of Sophocles ANTIGONE Anne Carson means to have a good time with Antigone, and thankfully she invites us along to the party.

  6. 4 out of 5

    David Schaafsma

    Seeing a Middle School Production of Antigone in Munich: The Sophie Scholl Story and Reflecting on How to Foster Youth Resistance in Meaningful Ways: A Meditation “I am not afraid of the danger. If it means death, it will not be the worst of deaths--death without honor”--Antigone Antigone: We begin in the dark and birth is the death of us. Ismene: Who said that? Antigone: Hegel. Ismene: Sounds more like Beckett. Antigone: He was paraphrasing Hegel--The chorus in Anne Carson's translation of Sophocles’ Seeing a Middle School Production of Antigone in Munich: The Sophie Scholl Story and Reflecting on How to Foster Youth Resistance in Meaningful Ways: A Meditation “I am not afraid of the danger. If it means death, it will not be the worst of deaths--death without honor”--Antigone Antigone: We begin in the dark and birth is the death of us. Ismene: Who said that? Antigone: Hegel. Ismene: Sounds more like Beckett. Antigone: He was paraphrasing Hegel--The chorus in Anne Carson's translation of Sophocles’ Antigone, to make the point that many writers and thinkers across time were and still are paraphrasing Sophocles I just saw a middle school production of a play of which I had never heard, Antigone in Munich: The Sophie Scholl Story, by Claudia Haas, about a high school girl, Sophie, who follows her college philosophy student brother Hans in getting involved in a German student resistance organization, The White Rose Society, that courageously opposed Hitler. My daughter was in the crew for the production (stage left props), as I once was for a production of Antigone when I was in college decades ago. Like Antigone, Sophie was a teenager who defended her brother honorably, following in their activist footsteps, doing the right thing in the face of a patriarchal authority who, like King Lear, raged with demands of loyalty. “All men make mistakes, but a good man yields when he knows his course is wrong, and repairs the evil. The only crime is pride”--Antigone I thought the play was ambitious for a middle school, as it circled back from Nazi resistance to Sophocles’ play about the daughter of Oedipus and Jocasta who insisted on defying King Creon’s order to bury her brother Polynices. Creon’s law forbidding the public mourning and burial of a member of one’s own family, even one seen as resistant to the state, punishable by death, is inhuman, it’s immoral. I listened to a translation of the original play and also read some of Anne Carson’s adaptation of the play, and of course saw (and read) Claudia Haas’ play. Philosophy professor Hans Huber, who guided The White Rose Society, was executed for resistance to the Nazi state: "And thou shalt act as if On thee and on thy deed Depended the fate of all Germany, And thou alone must answer for it." The Nazi regime also executed Huber’s student Hans and his sister Sophie Scholl on February 22, 1943. I admired my daughter’s drama department’s ambition to stoke student activism through the production. The student body of my daughter’s school had staged a walkout this year protesting political inaction on school shootings. They made signs, wrote and signed petitions, and some of them were interviewed by the media. When I was in high school we shut down the school on a couple occasions, insisting that the curriculum reflect growing concerns with the Vietnam War, racism, the environment. We made signs, we wrote pamphlets, we created sit-down strikes, and we got some concessions and curricular changes. I lived to tell my tale, but four students were killed for protesting the Vietnam War at Kent State during my time in school: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TRE9v... Here’s some recent Chicago student climate change protesters: https://www.chicagotribune.com/news/c... “Do not fear for me. Make straight your own path to destiny”―Antigone

  7. 4 out of 5

    James

    Book Review 4 out of 5 stars to Antigone, the third in a trilogy of Theban plays written around 441 BC (yes, almost 2500 years ago) by Sophocles. In my junior year of high school, our Advanced Placement English teacher assigned all three Theban plays. This is a mini-review on the final one, Antigone, which was my second favorite -- Oedipus Rex was of course, my favorite. In this Greek tragedy, Antigone, Oedipus Rex's daughter, fights to have a proper burial for her brother. She is strong-will Book Review 4 out of 5 stars to Antigone, the third in a trilogy of Theban plays written around 441 BC (yes, almost 2500 years ago) by Sophocles. In my junior year of high school, our Advanced Placement English teacher assigned all three Theban plays. This is a mini-review on the final one, Antigone, which was my second favorite -- Oedipus Rex was of course, my favorite. In this Greek tragedy, Antigone, Oedipus Rex's daughter, fights to have a proper burial for her brother. She is strong-willed, determined and forceful, yet respectful and fair in her arguments. What I love about these plays is that ability for the characters to call on your emotions, logic and your intelligence. The plots are incredibly complex and shocking, but the players are what help you fall in love with Sophocles as a writer. Given its 2500 years old, and a translation, there are a number of areas where might not fully understand, especially if you aren't familiar with your Greek Gods and Goddesses. The words themselves are beautiful. The images you see are intense. It's a fantastic read. But read them in order. And think of Antigone as your very own Wonder Woman. About Me For those new to me or my reviews... here's the scoop: I read A LOT. I write A LOT. And now I blog A LOT. First the book review goes on Goodreads, and then I send it on over to my WordPress blog at https://thisismytruthnow.com, where you'll also find TV & Film reviews, the revealing and introspective 365 Daily Challenge and lots of blogging about places I've visited all over the world. And you can find all my social media profiles to get the details on the who/what/when/where and my pictures. Leave a comment and let me know what you think. Vote in the poll and ratings. Thanks for stopping by.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    Antigone is a strong contender in the Plays That Keep You Awake at Night competition. The background of the story reads, no surprise, like a Greek tragedy: Antigone is the orphaned daughter of Jocasta and Oedipus (the mother and father/brother team from Oedipus Rex) who has now lost both her brothers as well — they killed each other fighting over who got to rule Thebes. Uncle Creon, the new king, decreed that the “traitor” brother is to go unburied. The conflict is that Antigone plans to ignore Antigone is a strong contender in the Plays That Keep You Awake at Night competition. The background of the story reads, no surprise, like a Greek tragedy: Antigone is the orphaned daughter of Jocasta and Oedipus (the mother and father/brother team from Oedipus Rex) who has now lost both her brothers as well — they killed each other fighting over who got to rule Thebes. Uncle Creon, the new king, decreed that the “traitor” brother is to go unburied. The conflict is that Antigone plans to ignore Creon’s decree and bury her brother anyway, while Creon says if she does, he’ll have her killed. While the conflict seems simple enough, it involves two competing arenas, political and religious. Politically, Antigone represents the aristos, the old ruling families, who aren’t as loyal to law as they are to their own families, and Creon represents the demos, or the voting masses, whose primary focus is the interest of the state and the rule of law. In the religious arena, Antigone wants to honor the gods’ laws by burying her brother, while Creon ignores the gods’ laws in favor of his own decrees. So who’s right? What is the balance of power between individuals and the state? The laws of man and the laws of gods? Governing with firmness and listening with reason? The good news is that Sophocles gives each character a leg to stand on, but only one. Antigone is right to honor the gods’ laws but wrong to disobey the king’s decree, and Creon is wrong to disregard the gods’ laws but right to expect the laws of the land to supplant individual wishes. I’m guessing Sophocles would argue that the play’s success comes from the tension between these ideas as played out by two flawed characters. On the one hand, Antigone is a strident vigilante who doesn’t care that she’s breaking the law. And on the other hand, Creon is an insecure blowhard who doesn’t care that he’s breaking custom and the will of the gods by leaving his nephew’s corpse to be eaten by birds. Neither character is easy to side with, but each has a point. However, the bad news is that Sophocles clearly sides with Creon — through the airtime he gives Creon (far more than he gives Antigone), through the chorus’s support (who are supposed to state the opinion of the audience), and through the plot itself, which gives Creon the realization of his mistakes and the cathartic “Woe is me” ending. Creon, not Antigone, follows the tragic hero trajectory. Antigone’s real tragedy is simply that she’s a member of a spectacularly dysfunctional family. While the plot vindicates Antigone’s position, Sophocles undermines her character at every turn, and for some reason this drives me bonkers. Obviously nobody would read Pride and Prejudice and **SPOILER ALERT** say, “Poor Wickham got short shrift! Jane Austen was clearly in the bag for Darcy. How unfair!” because those characters exist only as the author created them. Wickham is a scoundrel because Jane Austen created a scoundrel. However, the characters in this play existed before Sophocles and therefore outside Sophocles, so I don’t think I’m a lunatic for being irritated that Sophocles was manipulative in his treatment of them. In his real-life zeal to promote the interest of the polis, Sophocles weakens Antigone’s position by characterizing her as imbalanced and unnatural, which makes the didactic focus of the story political. That was his point, and in keeping with Greek tragedy of the 5th century BC, but it still irks me.

  9. 5 out of 5

    David Sarkies

    The family or the state 6 May 2012 This is probably the closest of all of the Greek tragedies to a Shakespearian tragedy. This is due to the end of the play having a huge bodycount and the action of the play is driven by one person's fatal flaw (not that I actually believe in the fatal flaw argument, but that is beside the point). However it is not Antigone who has the fatal flaw in this play but rather Creon, the king of Thebes. Unfortunately we cannot really look to Oedipus at Colonus to see th The family or the state 6 May 2012 This is probably the closest of all of the Greek tragedies to a Shakespearian tragedy. This is due to the end of the play having a huge bodycount and the action of the play is driven by one person's fatal flaw (not that I actually believe in the fatal flaw argument, but that is beside the point). However it is not Antigone who has the fatal flaw in this play but rather Creon, the king of Thebes. Unfortunately we cannot really look to Oedipus at Colonus to see the beginning of Creon's downfall because this play is not the final part of a trilogy, at least in the Aeschylan sense of a trilogy, though it is noticeable that when the copyists chose seven plays of Sophocles to preserve for posterity three of the Theban plays were kept which in a sense formed a trilogy, and in this trilogy we see Creon go from being a loyal servant of Oedipus to a ruthless tyrant that believes that he is the state and that his words are not to be disobeyed. First I will discuss the term Harmatia, which is Aristotelian in origin, at least from his text on drama (The Poetics). I shall also look at the action of the play and finish off by discussing the main theme, which is the struggle between loyalty to one's family and loyalty to one's state. Well, no, I will finish off by looking at Creon's character, and how his actions bring about such a sticky end. The concept of Harmatia is regularly found in the Bible where it has been translated into our word sin. Now, as I think about the concept of Harmatia I am somewhat torn between suggesting that Harmatia and sin are two different ideas, or that our modern understanding of sin does not exactly weigh with how the modern church translates and preaches it. The modern church preaches sin as being rebellion against God (of which we are all guilty), and then goes on to bombard us with what constitutes sin. However, to the Greeks, or at least to Aristotle, Harmatia is a fatal character flaw. Now that concept does not alienate sin because sin, in an of itself, is a fatal character flaw that we have inherited from Adam and Eve. This fatal character flaw of ours is our desire to live independently, and we see this more and more as we meet with people and associate with them. I also see it rampant throughout the church as people try to push God into a box and tell him what sin is rather than letting him demonstrate sin to them. I say this because the list of sins seems to get longer and longer and we, as humans and those of us who call ourselves Christian, seem to think that sin is made up of our actions as opposed to our desire to rule ourselves. I guess the best explanation is that our actions, especially our selfish actions, are merely a symptom of this character flaw of ours. The Bible is correct when it says that the wages of sin is death, because as we see, especially in Antigone, that Creon's Harmatia leaves him desolate and alone, and as he says from his own lips, it is as if he were dead. Now, the Greek concept of death, the absence of life, and the removal of ourselves from this world, is somewhat different to the Biblical concept of death. In fact our modern understanding of death is more in line with the Grecian view. However the biblical view is that death is more to do with the break down of our relationships, particularly our relationship with God, than it is with the absence of life. To the Bible life is defined by relationships, and when we drive our relationships apart we are little more than dead. In fact it has been suggested that higher suicide rates occur among truly lonely people than it does among people who are surrounded by friends. That, though, is only speculation. However, consider this: even when we are surrounded by friends we can still be alone, especially if these so called friends of ours only seek us out for company and, in their self centred view of the world, seek to only have us by their side to make them feel good and important than really doing anything that is remotely friendly. Now, the play itself is set after the Theban war, where Etocles and Polyneices killed each other after Polyneices attacked Thebes with his army to remove his brother and set himself up as king. Creon, by default, becomes king and his first order of business is to give Etocles a state funeral while leaving the body of Polyneices exposed. To be exposed was the worst thing that you could do to a corpse in the Ancient Greek world. A proper burial meant that you would at least have a half decent afterlife, while being exposed suggests that you would be left wondering the earth as a ghost, and a tormented one at that. Antigone, the sister of Polyneices, is horrified at this and seeks to bury him, much to Creon's displeasure, so he orders her executed. However the play is not as simple as that because Creon's son is in love with Antigone, and when he finds her dead, he kills himself, and in a fit of grief over the death of her son, Creon's wife also kills herself. Now one of the main themes that comes out of this play is the struggle between one's loyalty to the state and one's loyalty to one's family and the dilemma that one will face when the state passes a law of which you do not approve. The question that is raised is: do you dishonour the state by breaking the law and honouring your family, or do you dishonour your family by upholding the law even when the law is unjust. In a way, there was nothing wrong with Creon's law, since Polyneices was a traitor, and treachery is seen as one of the worst crimes to commit (even today, though the definition of treason has become very ambiguous in the globalised, interconnected world). However, he was still family, and not only that, Etocles' ascension to the throne was dubious at best. The entire war was not so much about a deposed monarch seeking reinstatement, but rather a family quarrel between two brothers. We still face these dilemmas today, though not to the same extent. The question of whether the drug laws are just is one of them (and I do believe that they are, even though they can be considered to be an outworking of the Nanny State). While it is true that people should be left to make their own decisions, we demonstrate time and time again that we are actually not capable of doing so, therefore the state actually does need to step in to protect us from ourselves. Then there is the war that the state embarks on that many members of the state disapprove of, and as a loyal soldier to the state, do you obey the state by embarking on a quasi-legal adventure, or do you uphold your morals by refusing, and face punishment or even gaol. Creon mentions a number of times that he, as the king, is the state, and thus his laws are to be obeyed. However, ironically enough, the Chorus objects to this. Now the Chorus does play an important role in Greek tragedy, and usually represents what the Greeks call the 'Oklos', or the crowd. Crowd is actually a rather bad translation as my understanding of the Oklos is that it is a crowd that acts as a single entity and has a single mindset. Now, this is not always the case in Greek tragedy as at times the Chorus will split and then argue with itself, in a way representing division amongst the people. It is a shame that we do not actually see Choruses in plays any more (or not playing a major role as they did in Greek drama). Now Creon, having become king, has pretty much become corrupted by power. Yet I am not entirely convinced that it is corruption at such an early stage of his reign. In a way, he is the new king, and he wants to stamp his authority on the city, or, as the Greeks called it, the Polis (I won't go into details of the meaning of this word as I have already spent too much time translating Oklos). For him to be disobeyed will suggest that he does not actually have the character to be a king. A king that is not obeyed and not respected is not actually a king because he has no authority. As such Creon wants to make sure that his authority sticks so when this law is broken he is forced to act. However, he is not caught in a dilemma deciding whether it is right to punish Antigone or not - he has already made up his mind, set the path that he wants to travel, and travels down it. However, it ends very, very badly for him, and this is emphasised at the conclusion when the prophet Tiresieus arrives and passes on the message from the gods. He has acted against the proper way and is now to be punished and there is no way to escape from it. I recently watch a production of this play and have written blog post on some of the ideas that came out of this production.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Luís C.

    The last part of the Oedipus plays by Sophocles, Antigone, centers around the events which have occurred after the death of Oedipus in Colonus. Back in Thebes, Eteocles and Polyneices, the sons of Oedipus, have killed each other through their battle over the thrown. Eteocles, the chosen king, had fought with his usurping brother Polyneices and their uncle, Creon, decides to honor the body of the former while denying the latter an honorable burial. Polyneices's body is left to rot outside the wal The last part of the Oedipus plays by Sophocles, Antigone, centers around the events which have occurred after the death of Oedipus in Colonus. Back in Thebes, Eteocles and Polyneices, the sons of Oedipus, have killed each other through their battle over the thrown. Eteocles, the chosen king, had fought with his usurping brother Polyneices and their uncle, Creon, decides to honor the body of the former while denying the latter an honorable burial. Polyneices's body is left to rot outside the walls of the city where birds can pick at the flesh of the corpse. In Ancient Greek beliefs, not having a proper burial meant that Polyneices's spirit would be left to wander the earth and not able to descend into Hades. Antigone, sister of the two brothers, decides that she needs to bury her brother's body. Though Creon has decried that anyone who buries Polyneices will be killed, she cannot allow her brother to be so disrespected in death. Antigone discusses the event with her sister, Ismene, who advises against such a course. Antigone is engaged to her cousin Haemon, the son of Creon, and has much to live for. Ismene cautions her against throwing away her life after that of the dead brother, but Antigone remains resolute. Creon comes in with his chorus of soldiers, justifying his decision against the burial of Polyneices. Novels comes to him that someone has buried the man and gone against Creon's decree. They uproot Polyneices and then Antigone is found attempting to rebury him. Creon is left no choice but to condemn Antigone to death for disobeying his decree. Antigone justifies her actions by telling Creon that she is obeying the law of her family and the law of the Gods and would do it again. As Antigone is taken off, Creon sends her to be walled up in a cave to die alone. His son, Haemon, enters and tells Creon that he will kill himself if Creon does not free his betrothed. Nevertheless, Creon refuses to change his decision. Tiresius then enters and tells Creon that if he does not free Antigone, dreadful events will take place and he will be punished by the Gods. Creon rushes off to free Antigone, but he finds that she has already hung herself in the cave. Haemon, in despair, commits suicide and Creon's wife when she hears the news also kills herself. Bereft of all his family, Creon is left in despair alone and fatherless because of his unnatural actions.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Wait, no, THIS is my favorite of the Oedipus cycle. My love is fickle. How did I not remember how good this was? The extended speeches are just as incredible as those in the other two plays, but what Antigone has over them is lightning-quick back-and-forth arguments that made my heart pound just from how good they were. I’d also forgotten how interesting the character of Antigone is (she milks that walk to her death for everything it’s worth), and how much Sophocles plays with gender stereotypes Wait, no, THIS is my favorite of the Oedipus cycle. My love is fickle. How did I not remember how good this was? The extended speeches are just as incredible as those in the other two plays, but what Antigone has over them is lightning-quick back-and-forth arguments that made my heart pound just from how good they were. I’d also forgotten how interesting the character of Antigone is (she milks that walk to her death for everything it’s worth), and how much Sophocles plays with gender stereotypes of strength. Please do yourself a favor and read this one.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    I really enjoyed this. It’s easy to read (minus a few of the long chorus paragraphs), and Antigone is the heroine of Greek tragedies I never knew I needed. She’s got a backbone, a level of principles high above those around her, and she’s not afraid of anyone. Least of all King Creon. Honestly, she’s so ahead of her time, I did not expect the high levels of sass I got while reading this, and it’s surprisingly funny in places too. The overall short length stopped this getting too ‘bogged down’ to I really enjoyed this. It’s easy to read (minus a few of the long chorus paragraphs), and Antigone is the heroine of Greek tragedies I never knew I needed. She’s got a backbone, a level of principles high above those around her, and she’s not afraid of anyone. Least of all King Creon. Honestly, she’s so ahead of her time, I did not expect the high levels of sass I got while reading this, and it’s surprisingly funny in places too. The overall short length stopped this getting too ‘bogged down’ too. I’m really glad I picked this up. I might even delve into more Greek tragedies in the future if they’re like this. It’s not as dry as it seems.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Trish

    I am not well-schooled in tragedies--the Greek tragedies, that is--but when I learned that one of the books I intended to read for the Man Booker award this year was based on the story of Antigone, I thought now was a good time to have a look. This is the first I have encountered of the play, I loved it. It is filled with terrific emotion and common responses to tragedy, as well as wisdom unbound. The personalities are strong and salty...and act on their promises. Those of you who know the story w I am not well-schooled in tragedies--the Greek tragedies, that is--but when I learned that one of the books I intended to read for the Man Booker award this year was based on the story of Antigone, I thought now was a good time to have a look. This is the first I have encountered of the play, I loved it. It is filled with terrific emotion and common responses to tragedy, as well as wisdom unbound. The personalities are strong and salty...and act on their promises. Those of you who know the story will still be thrilled by the Chorus at the end saying "Grand words of proud men are punished with great blows, and this, in old age, teaches wisdom." And "Wisdom is by far the foremost part of happiness..." Oedipus's two sons kill one another, as decreed by fate, and his two daughters are forbidden by King Creon to bury the body of one of the sons because Creon thought him a traitor. Antigone decides she will bury him anyway because this is the custom of the city and is a courtesy to the gods. Terrible events ensue. We never learn here why the two sons are unequally loved. Perhaps that backstory is given in another play. This edition is printed left side with the Greek, right side with English. It has a detailed introduction in which the story and all the characters mentioned are described in their relationship to the main actors in this story. That was helpful. At the end are extensive notes and discussion about word choices and inferred meanings. I thought this was impressive.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jonfaith

    Owen Bennett Jones recently wrote on the Islamic State in the LRB. "Every time a Jihadi movement has won power it has lost popularity by failing to give the people what they want: peace, security and jobs." When I read that I thought about poor King Creon. I have always felt disturbed by the vice of fate in this play which steadily traps and crushes. It was Creon's hubris which caught my attention this time. Doesn't he have a mandate? I imagine him simply incredulous. Why this dissent? Subsequen Owen Bennett Jones recently wrote on the Islamic State in the LRB. "Every time a Jihadi movement has won power it has lost popularity by failing to give the people what they want: peace, security and jobs." When I read that I thought about poor King Creon. I have always felt disturbed by the vice of fate in this play which steadily traps and crushes. It was Creon's hubris which caught my attention this time. Doesn't he have a mandate? I imagine him simply incredulous. Why this dissent? Subsequently I read a number of secondary pieces, though as I feared Creon is a symbol, whereas Antigone remains human, though her plight is class-conscious according to some, whereas others view matters as a collision of opposed ideas. Jean-Pierre Vernant and Pierre Vidal-Naquet explored such in their Myth and Tragedy in Ancient Greece. Rather, it is between two different types of religious feeling; one is a family religion, purely private and confined to the small circle of close relatives, the philoi, centered around the domestic hearth and the cult of the dead; the other is a public religion in which the tutelary gods of the city eventually become confused with the supreme values of the State. Who would have guessed that a few hundred years after the Enlightenment such rituals and disputation would remain foregrounded? My views on progress and positivism have been eroded greatly over the course of my adult life. A chill remains in the air and yet a glimmer of hope persists, even now. I hope to always harbor such impossibilities

  15. 5 out of 5

    Liz Janet

    “All men make mistakes, but a good man yields when he knows his course is wrong, and repairs the evil. The only crime is pride.” I have always found this play, and any of Sophocles’ tragedies, as comedies. Apparently I have a very bad sense of humour. But there is nothing more hilarious in literature than poetic justice. It is not as funny as Oedipus Rex, but it is quite funny still, since Antigone sticks it up to Creon. Antigone is the daughter of Oedipus and Jocasta, and she has also now lost h “All men make mistakes, but a good man yields when he knows his course is wrong, and repairs the evil. The only crime is pride.” I have always found this play, and any of Sophocles’ tragedies, as comedies. Apparently I have a very bad sense of humour. But there is nothing more hilarious in literature than poetic justice. It is not as funny as Oedipus Rex, but it is quite funny still, since Antigone sticks it up to Creon. Antigone is the daughter of Oedipus and Jocasta, and she has also now lost her two brothers, who died fighting each other over the throne. Creon, the uncle and new king, declares one of the brothers as the traitor, and forbids his burial. Antigone is having none of that, for family is family to her, even if burying her brother can get her killed. In the eyes of the gods, her brother must be buried, while her uncle decides to go against he laws of the gods as punishment, Antigone is not pleased. THIS IS BASICALLY A PLAY ABOUT THE HARD BATTLE BETWEEN LAW AND CUSTOM. I do disagree with the treatment of Antigone in the play, for she is not categorized as the tragic hero, that role is given by Sophocles, to Creon, and he goes and undermines Antigone as a lunatic from a highly dysfunctional family. (I mean it is true, but Creon is also from this family) “A man, though wise, should never be ashamed of learning more, and must unbend his mind.”

  16. 4 out of 5

    Cassandra Kay Silva

    This was of course some of the most fluid and beautiful writing I have come across in a long time. I have wanted to read this play for years and finally ran across a copy of it. The words were an absolute song and the bits by the choir thrown in were terribly fun to act out in your mind. I would love to see this on stage. I am not sure if the plot was exactly my favorite but the words alone were enough to rock me into a happy lull of entertainment and contentment.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Paul Fulcher

    I read this in preparation for reading Home Fire by Kamila Shamsie from this year's Man Booker longlist. And I read in a different translation to the edition shown here, one sticking more literally to the original Greek, including not translating terms where it felt there was no satisfactory equivalent. This was important in clarifying some of the key themes, but rather puts the onus of interpretation back on the reader (and this reader is no expert in ancient Greek philosophy). A number of things I read this in preparation for reading Home Fire by Kamila Shamsie from this year's Man Booker longlist. And I read in a different translation to the edition shown here, one sticking more literally to the original Greek, including not translating terms where it felt there was no satisfactory equivalent. This was important in clarifying some of the key themes, but rather puts the onus of interpretation back on the reader (and this reader is no expert in ancient Greek philosophy). A number of things struck me in the differing views of Antigone and Creon which have modern day relevance, and which I suspect will also feature in Home Fire. - the ambiguous use of the word nomos - which to Antigone denotes customs and values, and to Creon the laws of the land (and, in this context, his laws) [https://www.britannica.com/topic/nomo...] - similarly Antigone's appeal to the rules of the gods, rather than those of the state/ruler - Antigone's prioritisation of philia (obligations to friends, family: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philia) over obligations to the state, and Creon's explicit rejection of that stance: Whoever deems a philos more important than a fatherland, this man I say is nowhere. or in Seamus Heaney's rewrite of the play, which forms the epigraph for Home Fire: The ones we love . . . are enemies of the state. - and most strikingly in a 2016-7 context Antigone's lament that she is a metic, not among the living nor among the dead (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metic). In modern day parlance, she is essentially proclaiming herself a citizen of nowhere, in the accusatory phrase used in the most offensive and inflammatory speech given by a British prime minister in my lifetime. This has left me eagerly awaiting my copy of Home Fire.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Viji (Bookish endeavors)

    What a work it was.!! The copy I have is by Penguin Little Black Classics series,and I was delaying reading it since the print was tiny and set in a style I didn't like. But now I realize what a stupid I was to have delayed reading such a piece of beauty... Moralizing isn't everyone's forte. Too many have written such a lot of works on the topic that the moment one starts reading something on it,the natural reaction is 'not again.!' This book is a bit different in that genre. It moralizes,it tal What a work it was.!! The copy I have is by Penguin Little Black Classics series,and I was delaying reading it since the print was tiny and set in a style I didn't like. But now I realize what a stupid I was to have delayed reading such a piece of beauty... Moralizing isn't everyone's forte. Too many have written such a lot of works on the topic that the moment one starts reading something on it,the natural reaction is 'not again.!' This book is a bit different in that genre. It moralizes,it talks of morals of men and God.. It goes on to lengthy arguments,though not much in terms of rationality,on many occasions.. Antigone and Creone and Haemon and Tiresias puts up their own arguments. But nowhere do feel a sense of boredom. Sophocles has given strength to each character,no matter which part he argues. Each one of them talks as if there is fire in their words,a fire that can't be quenched by the other person's arguments. 'It's a dreadful thing to yield.. But resist now? Lay my pride bare to the blows of ruin? That's dreadful too.' The fear described in these words,the fear of knowing the right but refusing to go back on one's actions because of pride,it's a folly we all are guilty of. Pride is a sin,but it is the most humane of feelings. It is impossible not to feel it,if for nothing then for one's lack of it. We all hold on to our words and actions like its a part of us. We would rather die than take back our words. We say-a man is only as good as his words. And this King is no less human in that... But see where that pride takes him.. In the beginning,Creon tells Ismene, 'Don't even mention her-she no longer exists.' And in the end,he tells his attendants, 'I don't even exist-I'm no one. Nothing.' But we don't have to be bothered of all these,do we.? Pride is something we can't avoid.. I'm proud of my books and so are you of other things.. But let aside moralizing.. The book is a masterpiece... When injustice is the law.. I might sound stupid for bringing Che into such a regal and archaic setting,but I guess I'm not. The dilemma portrayed here,the choice between the law of the land and the moral laws one hold within,is something that every human faces. To bend or to resist is the question. And Antigone makes her choice courageously. She refuses to submit to the law of the land which she calls injustice,and decides to court death for a law she holds to heart,the law of God. The classic dilemma between law of customs and law of intuition. But it would be somewhat gray to call it law of intuition since there is no pure law of intuition,all our ideas are colored by our genes and circumstances. Antigone's act of defiance is inspiring. And that is what makes this work so fiery. A read that was thoroughly entertaining.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Hannah

    This was a reread for me. The first time I read this play was in my sophomore year or high school and I remember liking it but I LOVED it this time around. It's fabulous and now I want to read the rest of the Theban plays.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Huda Aweys

    My review in English first then in Arabic-ريفيو بالانجليزي في البداية يليها ريفيو بالعربي Antigone, Oedipus's girl of his mother! Thebes's girl .. legend's girl .. complexities's girl .. who inherited the legacy of all those, cumbersome legacy .. make she reject .. make she impetus to die, in order to complete the legend, and for.. the rift in Thebes extends and expands and grows .. Antigone Oedipus's girl, who inherited his pride and stubbornness and as, his walked to Destiny (as he and she were My review in English first then in Arabic-ريفيو بالانجليزي في البداية يليها ريفيو بالعربي Antigone, Oedipus's girl of his mother! Thebes's girl .. legend's girl .. complexities's girl .. who inherited the legacy of all those, cumbersome legacy .. make she reject .. make she impetus to die, in order to complete the legend, and for.. the rift in Thebes extends and expands and grows .. Antigone Oedipus's girl, who inherited his pride and stubbornness and as, his walked to Destiny (as he and she were called !).. with courage ... and stupidity ! .. she just decided to refuse and die ! Just refuses to refuse ! and to defend its refusal to limit death .. Antigone, which tired of people, mob screaming so she decided to escape ,withdrawal and death , decided to complement the line of the rift in Thebes, that line begun by her father, a crack of deep questions and philosophy, .. in order to complete the legend! ***** انتيجون بنت اوديب من امه ! .. بنت ثيبا .. بنت الاسطورة .. بنت التعقيدات و التى ورثت ميراث مرهق عن كل هؤلاء .. ميراث دفعها للرفض .. دفعها دفعا للموت كي تتم الاسطورة و يمتد الشرخ و يكبر و يتوسع .. شرخ التساؤلات العميقة .. شرخ البحث .. شرخ الفلسفه ... شرخ العبث .. شرخ ثيبا انتيجون بنت اوديب التى ورثت عن اباها العند و الكبرياء ، و الاستسلام للمصير و للقدر (كما ادعى الاثنان .. الأب و البنت ! ) بكل شجاعه .. و غباء ! أنتيجون التى قررت ان تهرب و تخلص من الغوغاء و من الصراخ بالموت ...

  21. 5 out of 5

    Lea

    I remember hating Antigone when I had to read it in High School, so I was surprised that it wasn't too bad actually.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Mel Bossa

    Well, this resonated deeply with me. Especially the relationship between Antigone and her flighty and untrustworthy sister Ismene. Man, that part when Ismene now suddenly wants to stand at her sister's side after the King Creon has sentenced Antigone to be immured, really pissed me off and brought up all kinds of feelings of injustice and indignation. As with Electra, Antigone is a woman alone facing the self-righteousness of an elder king unwilling to lose face or learn anything new he hasn't s Well, this resonated deeply with me. Especially the relationship between Antigone and her flighty and untrustworthy sister Ismene. Man, that part when Ismene now suddenly wants to stand at her sister's side after the King Creon has sentenced Antigone to be immured, really pissed me off and brought up all kinds of feelings of injustice and indignation. As with Electra, Antigone is a woman alone facing the self-righteousness of an elder king unwilling to lose face or learn anything new he hasn't sought out himself. Sophocles's play was meant to be an examination of the budding democracy rising against the old tyranny, and again, he chose a woman to embody that "bud". And what better way to destroy the idea of freedom than to brick it up and starve it? A brief summary of the play for those who aren't familiar with the story. Antigone is Œdipe's and Jocaste's daughter and those two were mother and son, remember? After Œdipe found out that he hadn't escaped the oracle of his birth and in total ignorance had killed his father and married his own mother, he stuck needles in his eyes and Jocaste hung herself. Antigone, Ismene and their two brothers Polynice and Étéocle are taken in by their uncle Creon who has now become king after Étéocle's death. Antigone's story begins after her brother's deaths. The two men offed each other over Polynice taking the "enemy Argos" side after he was exiled by his brother who refused to share the throne with him. Okay, so they killed each other and now Antigone is betrothed to Hemon, son of Creon. But there's one little thing keeping her from finding peace in her already fucked up life: Creon has decided that Étéocle would get a Greek burial, but Polynice's body would be left out to rot and be eaten by the vultures. Antigone knows that Hades will not accept her brother in the world of the dead if he isn't properly cared for before leaving the world of the living. She decides to disobey the king and in the night, begins the burial of her brother. Ismene bitches and moans and tells Antigone she's crazy for taking such a risk, but Antigone will not back down on this. She's striving for the realm of greater ideas and understands that while the laws of men come and go, what right is right no matter what the patriarchy dictates. Anyhoo, needless to say she sends Creon in a state of self-important rage and he proceeds to monologue himself into a corner and has to make do on his threats to have her immured and starved. Then everybody he loves takes the high road and dies with her and Creon is left with nothing but his throne. It's a Greek tragedy, yes, but in real life, Creon often gets what he wants and the Antigones of the world are still screaming behind high walls.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jenny

    I'm sticking with my original rating on this one. I enjoyed reading it again. Unfortunately, my students didn't seem to connect to it. The translation I remember reading as a student was much better--the one in our anthology is very complex and takes away from the simplicity of the Greek language. The ideas become lost in "thees" and "thous." I don't know why the translator felt the need to mimic Shakespeare. However, my students wrote very interesting and (some) nuanced responses to my question I'm sticking with my original rating on this one. I enjoyed reading it again. Unfortunately, my students didn't seem to connect to it. The translation I remember reading as a student was much better--the one in our anthology is very complex and takes away from the simplicity of the Greek language. The ideas become lost in "thees" and "thous." I don't know why the translator felt the need to mimic Shakespeare. However, my students wrote very interesting and (some) nuanced responses to my questions about Anitgone, Ismene, Creon, and Haemon. Maybe they're getting more out of it than they think or want to :) My appreciation for this play lies in an interest in Ancient Greek literature and culture but also in the play's language and ideas. I love the conflict between Antigone and Creon, the conflict of "heaven's laws" versus the state. Being a woman of faith myself, I can appreciate Antigone's desire to bury her brother according to the gods' rituals even though it means disobeying her uncle, King Creon, who imposes the law that anyone who buries Polyneices will die. Antigone chooses a noble and honorable death doing something she believes in over life in subservience to a king that she can't fully respect. I also appreciate the topics of fate and wisdom--the end theme as I understand it is that only by wisdom (acceptance, in this case) can we be comfortable with Fate, who does what she wants without regard to person. If we constantly fight against Fate, against the gods, we will always struggle. If we accept their ways and allow what happens to happen, we are wise and will find happiness and peace. It's an interesting concept to convey through this "ill-starred" family (Antigone is, of course, the famed Oedipus' daughter, which means that her mother is also her grandmother, and that all her siblings are also her cousins; my students liked this part...). I highly recommend this play, but it makes the most sense in context, so read Oedipus Rex first and Oedipus at Colonus next, if you can, before you read this one.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Neil

    I read this in preparation for reading Home Fire by Kamila Shamsie which is one of the books on this year's Man Booker longlist. I've come out of it with a mental picture of Creon with blonde, wispy hair and an overactive Twitter account. And then I came across this: https://www.uvapolitics.com/editorial.... In this article, we read the following quote: But how can a person be called illegal? Is not the purpose of the law to protect persons and establish conditions in which they may flourish? Readin I read this in preparation for reading Home Fire by Kamila Shamsie which is one of the books on this year's Man Booker longlist. I've come out of it with a mental picture of Creon with blonde, wispy hair and an overactive Twitter account. And then I came across this: https://www.uvapolitics.com/editorial.... In this article, we read the following quote: But how can a person be called illegal? Is not the purpose of the law to protect persons and establish conditions in which they may flourish? Reading Antigone brings these questions to mind and challenges us to make sense of the meaning and relationship between law, justice, order, leadership, obligations, and community. I would also point people to Paul's review (https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...) and the discussion in the comments there. I'm looking forward to reading Home Fire.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Tristan

    The immortality of Antigone is ensured because of the agelessness of it's themes. Antigone struggles to bring to light that the law is not necessarily right. Creon struggles to enforce his rule and make sure that all live lawfully. These characters are mirrors of ourselves in a long-lost time when ancient people had the same problems as modern men and women. Are you a good and just person if you are a law-abiding one? Can there be a moral landscape outside of the law? Could the law be wrong? Ant The immortality of Antigone is ensured because of the agelessness of it's themes. Antigone struggles to bring to light that the law is not necessarily right. Creon struggles to enforce his rule and make sure that all live lawfully. These characters are mirrors of ourselves in a long-lost time when ancient people had the same problems as modern men and women. Are you a good and just person if you are a law-abiding one? Can there be a moral landscape outside of the law? Could the law be wrong? Antigone is a sharp reminder that we can not fall into sedate patterns of life where the world around us isn't observed and questioned. It shows the struggle we all can familiarize with between morality, the law and the compromise between the two that we must all inevitably fall.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Serethiel ☽ ✨

    Read my full review at: http://merikthorne.blogspot.com/2017/.... Antigone's brother has died, and her uncle, King Creon, orders his body to be left to the wilderness, untouched by anyone. But when Antigone defies his orders and buries her brother, Creon is enraged... For should Antigone's highest loyalty be to her God? Or should it be to an earthly authority? Antigone was a fascinating story, though I feel it might've been better performed rather than actually read. The writing style was supporti Read my full review at: http://merikthorne.blogspot.com/2017/.... Antigone's brother has died, and her uncle, King Creon, orders his body to be left to the wilderness, untouched by anyone. But when Antigone defies his orders and buries her brother, Creon is enraged... For should Antigone's highest loyalty be to her God? Or should it be to an earthly authority? Antigone was a fascinating story, though I feel it might've been better performed rather than actually read. The writing style was supportive and direct, much like a traditional script. However, I didn't feel that much personality was added to the characters. Maybe another sign that Antigone was intended to be a play? By the end, I was rather confused on what Sophocles's perspective was; did he believe one's highest loyalty should be to God, or to their king? Still, I did enjoy Antigone to a point, and it made for an enlightening read. :) You may want to know: There is violence, warfare, and murder, as well as several instances of suicide. There were also false idols (since this was written based on Greek mythology); there might've been a stray swear word or two.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Christopher

    Sophocles, oh Sophocles. A happy man who wrote sad plays... I read the Fitts and Fitzgerald version (not the J.E. Thomas which was the first one that came up when entering the book) because I couldn't easily get my hands on the Seamus Heaney edition without spending a few dollars. But, I'll take the iambic hexameter. I think it reads pretty nicely. This is one of those Ancient Greek morality plays that comes across to a modern reader as a bit two-dimensional: "What's more important, my duty to o Sophocles, oh Sophocles. A happy man who wrote sad plays... I read the Fitts and Fitzgerald version (not the J.E. Thomas which was the first one that came up when entering the book) because I couldn't easily get my hands on the Seamus Heaney edition without spending a few dollars. But, I'll take the iambic hexameter. I think it reads pretty nicely. This is one of those Ancient Greek morality plays that comes across to a modern reader as a bit two-dimensional: "What's more important, my duty to obey the law of the state that seems reasonable on first blush, or my duty to my family, to the gods, to my own conscience?" Sophocles shows us (as early as 441 BC) that there are some serious problems with deontology. I think there's some fantastic language in here and that this is required reading in the Western canon for a reason.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Joey Woolfardis

    There's barely anything in the world as hilarious and amusing as a Greek tragedy. Oedipus is, in many ways, the daddy, but daughter Antigone holds her own as well. So much to think on, so much to learn, so much to laugh at. Those silly incestuous Greeks. Blog | Instagram | Twitter | Pinterest | Shop | Etsy

  29. 4 out of 5

    Amal Bedhyefi

    Antigone is definitely one of my favorite heroines ! Strong , brave , daring , courageous but most importanty honest , sincere , loyal and she stands up for what she believes in. Her situation was hopeless and tough . She had to choose between being obedient to her uncle the king's rules who demands that her brother's body remains unburied with no funeral saying that's the right thing to do for a traitor and a rebel , and choosing to honor her brother . Eventually , she buries the body and faces t Antigone is definitely one of my favorite heroines ! Strong , brave , daring , courageous but most importanty honest , sincere , loyal and she stands up for what she believes in. Her situation was hopeless and tough . She had to choose between being obedient to her uncle the king's rules who demands that her brother's body remains unburied with no funeral saying that's the right thing to do for a traitor and a rebel , and choosing to honor her brother . Eventually , she buries the body and faces the horrible consequences of the crime . Highly recommend it if you're into Greek Drama !

  30. 4 out of 5

    Phoenix2

    Can't say that I hated Anitgone, but it's not my favourite of the greek classics. Antigone was a futuristic character for the period she was in and she could be easily set apart from all the other character who either were too set in their ways or to afraid to act. I also like her fiance and loved the tragic ending of their love story, though this play is not about the romance that formed between the two characters.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.