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Cry Horror!

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Original Title The Lurking Fear • Arthur Jermyn • Cool Air • Pickman's Model • The Call of Cthulhu • The Colour Out of Space • The Hound • The Lurking Fear • The Moon-Bog • The Nameless City • The Shunned House • The Unnamable Cover Illustration: Richard Powers


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Original Title The Lurking Fear • Arthur Jermyn • Cool Air • Pickman's Model • The Call of Cthulhu • The Colour Out of Space • The Hound • The Lurking Fear • The Moon-Bog • The Nameless City • The Shunned House • The Unnamable Cover Illustration: Richard Powers

53 review for Cry Horror!

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jack Tripper

    This mass-market collection introduced a whole new generation to the works of Lovecraft in the late 50s, particularly in the U.K., and is one of the most influential books of horror and the weird of all-time. I'd already read all these stories over the years, but it's been nearly two decades for many of them, so I figured that my coming across a cheap, near-pristine copy recently was as good a reason as any to revisit these tales. I think this would be a perfect introductory point for newcomers t This mass-market collection introduced a whole new generation to the works of Lovecraft in the late 50s, particularly in the U.K., and is one of the most influential books of horror and the weird of all-time. I'd already read all these stories over the years, but it's been nearly two decades for many of them, so I figured that my coming across a cheap, near-pristine copy recently was as good a reason as any to revisit these tales. I think this would be a perfect introductory point for newcomers to Lovecraft's oeuvre, as opposed to just diving full steam ahead into the Cthulhu Mythos.* Here, you get a little bit of everything, with many different styles: archaeological expeditions into million year-old, subterranean alien tunnels and tombs ("The Nameless City"), investigations into demon-haunted mountain forests ("The Lurking Fear"), an exploration of a creepy old house with a macabre history and an unnatural fungus pervading the basement ("The Shunned House"), a grave robber relentlessly "hounded" by a winged shadow ("The Hound"), a nightmarish art gallery that just in fact may be true depictions of actual creatures ("Pickman's Model"), and many more. And of course there are the classics "The Call of Cthulhu" and perhaps my favorite of H.P's longer novelettes, "The Colour out of Space." Not many stories, new or old, are able to conjure up the same otherworldly sense of awe as these two tales, which is the main thing I look for in Lovecraft's work. I don't really find his stories overly "scary" (does anyone ever truly fear for the protagonist's safety while reading these?), but I do experience that inexplicable, chilling "frisson" in many of his better stories, such as the ones contain herein. There are a couple sub-par stories here, such as "The Moon-Bog," which is sort of an earlier, dry run version of the much better "The Rats in the Walls." Still, of the many vintage Lovecraft collections I own, this is one of the most varied and consistently excellent. I know a lot of collectors of horror paperbacks (including myself) own the early 80s Del Rey/Ballantine series with the Michael Whelan cover art, as they're still so readily available at used book shops (and of course the covers are awesome), but I find those volumes to have only a handful of top-tier Lovecraft in each, while surrounded by a bunch of his lesser tales. Naturally, everyone has their own likes and dislikes when it comes to ole' H.P. - and he can be very hit-and-miss with me - but I find Cry Horror! (along with The Dunwich Horror and Others and The Colour Out Of Space And Others) to be among the best and most diverse out of all the old-school paperbacks of his work that I've come across. And you can't beat that Richard Powers artwork. 5 Stars (ETA: I wasn't going to bring up and beat the dead horse that is H.P.'s racism, but I just thought I'd make a quick comment. I have no problem reading and enjoying these stories, while at the same time realize they are a product of their time. Certainly, the fact that they were written a long time ago in no way excuses the extremely xenophobic views expressed in some of his stories. And if these stories had been written today (or even in the past 50 years), I'd be on the front lines denouncing the author for spreading such hate. But many of Lovecraft's detractors act as if he's still a current figure or something, which is just odd to me, considering the many racist and/or homophobic and/or misogynistic authors in the sf/f community that are contaminating the world with their filth today (i.e. Vox Day and John C. Wright), and who are much more worthy of taking a stand against. As opposed to someone who's been dead for nearly 80 years.) *Also, why pay $15-$20 for a generic-looking trade reprint when you can get this for a fraction of the price? Just don't let S.T. Joshi know, or you may have to endure a lengthy lecture admonishing you for not reading his "corrected" versions.

  2. 5 out of 5

    John Mayer

    This was the first grown-up book, a paperback, I ever bought. I'd never heard of Lovecraft. I liked it but wearied of Lovecraft's style by the time I'd finished it (I was, after all, still in grammar school). Traded it for another excellent introduction to horror, _The Macabre Reader_, which introduced me to other great horror writers and solidified my love for the short story, a literary form that has become hard to find. Anyone out there begin their acquaintance with Lovecraft with this or a s This was the first grown-up book, a paperback, I ever bought. I'd never heard of Lovecraft. I liked it but wearied of Lovecraft's style by the time I'd finished it (I was, after all, still in grammar school). Traded it for another excellent introduction to horror, _The Macabre Reader_, which introduced me to other great horror writers and solidified my love for the short story, a literary form that has become hard to find. Anyone out there begin their acquaintance with Lovecraft with this or a similar paperback collection?

  3. 5 out of 5

    East Bay J

    I found this book at an antique store of sorts somewhere for $4.00. My wife and I take occasional excursions into the unknown wilds surrounding the Bay Area and I often find little things “I cannot do without.” Cry Horror was one of those things. Others include all sorts of vinyl LPs, goofy t-shirts, weird dust collectors and drinking glasses featuring pictures of women whose clothing disappears when said glasses are filled with cold liquids. I’ve been a Lovecraft fan since before I could drive I found this book at an antique store of sorts somewhere for $4.00. My wife and I take occasional excursions into the unknown wilds surrounding the Bay Area and I often find little things “I cannot do without.” Cry Horror was one of those things. Others include all sorts of vinyl LPs, goofy t-shirts, weird dust collectors and drinking glasses featuring pictures of women whose clothing disappears when said glasses are filled with cold liquids. I’ve been a Lovecraft fan since before I could drive and a Lovecraft collection this old (1958) at that price was too good to pass up. After my purchase, this book sat on one shelf or another for a few years. Honestly. I could have read it at any time but, obviously, did not. Then, after a renewed interest in the writing of Robert E. Howard led to a renewed interest in Lovecraft’s works, I finally got around to giving this one a go. I read Howard before I read Lovecraft and, at the time, had no idea these guys were pen pals, long distance buddies. I never thought of their writing as anything similar but, once I learned of their association and original publication in pulp mags like Weird Tales, I began to look at the association between the two. I’ve read some of the work of others in the “Lovecraft Circle,” specifically Robert Bloch, Fritz Leiber and August Derleth. Knowing what I know now, I most look forward to reading some Clark Ashton Smith and Frank Belknap Long. Something about this collection of correspondents lends something to the reading of their works. It adds a sense of the cultural space and time in which these writers wrote. Incidentally, in the course of reading up on Lovecraft, who was influenced by Poe, I learned that Mark Twain was about 14 when Edgar Allen Poe died. I would have guessed Poe’s career took place during Twain’s. Shows you what a little research (i.e. education) can do for your point of view. The eleven tales collected in Cry Horror are a good representation of Lovecraft’s work. Two of my favorites, “Pickman’s Model” and “The Hound” are included, as well as classics like “The Shunned House,” “The Color Out Of Space” and “The Call Of Cthulhu.” Finally getting around to reading Cry Horror also marked my introduction to “Facts Concerning The Late Arthur Jermyn And His Family” or, as it’s called here, “Arthur Jermyn.” Most Lovecraft stories are told as a first person narrative and this technique works quite well for the weird tale. It is half journalism, half memoir and it places the reader in the story as kind of a listener in a conversation. Lovercraft’s frequent inclusion of fabricated newspaper stories and quotes from fabricated journals lends a feeling of reality. Another key element is that these stories take place back east where the country is oldest and the woods, hills and even towns and cities have seen a great deal of turmoil. The transition from the 19th to 20th centuries was a spooky time in the United States. Lovecraft capitalizes on the wars, social strife and witchcraft trials wonderfully.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Abhishek

    This was my introduction to Lovecraft; I read it long back when I was in school. These dark disturbing stories by the master of the sinister definitely left a lasting impression on me. At the time I read it, although I had some trouble fully comprehending the dense 'Lovercraftian' prose and the complicated subject matters dealt therein; in stories like 'Color out of Space'; that didn't prevent them from haunting my lonely nights. The stories in this volume are a good selection. They are quite cre This was my introduction to Lovecraft; I read it long back when I was in school. These dark disturbing stories by the master of the sinister definitely left a lasting impression on me. At the time I read it, although I had some trouble fully comprehending the dense 'Lovercraftian' prose and the complicated subject matters dealt therein; in stories like 'Color out of Space'; that didn't prevent them from haunting my lonely nights. The stories in this volume are a good selection. They are quite creepy, dark and as most things Lovecraft, on the borderline of horror and science-fiction; providing a decent introduction and insight into the Lovercraftian world for the uninitiated.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Yuhun Şuhan

  6. 5 out of 5

    Brett

  7. 4 out of 5

    Richard

  8. 5 out of 5

    Charles Patterson

  9. 4 out of 5

    Mattie

  10. 5 out of 5

    Ashley Davis

  11. 4 out of 5

    C.W. Pennock

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ronald Weston

  13. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

  14. 5 out of 5

    Joseph DeBolt

  15. 4 out of 5

    Mia Nelson

  16. 5 out of 5

    Melinda

  17. 4 out of 5

    Sam

  18. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Hitchman

  19. 4 out of 5

    Fy K

  20. 4 out of 5

    Dbdude99

  21. 4 out of 5

    Brian Perry

  22. 5 out of 5

    Karl

  23. 5 out of 5

    Shalina Black

  24. 4 out of 5

    Andy

  25. 4 out of 5

    Tokkan

  26. 4 out of 5

    DeAnna Knippling

  27. 5 out of 5

    Zemichi

  28. 4 out of 5

    Shane

  29. 5 out of 5

    David

  30. 4 out of 5

    Goji

  31. 4 out of 5

    Vern Parvin

  32. 5 out of 5

    Gil

  33. 5 out of 5

    Kenny

  34. 4 out of 5

    ~bookthief223~

  35. 4 out of 5

    Johnny Andrews

  36. 4 out of 5

    David Brown

  37. 5 out of 5

    Brad

  38. 5 out of 5

    Ever Onward

  39. 5 out of 5

    Jake

  40. 4 out of 5

    Revel

  41. 4 out of 5

    Rick

  42. 4 out of 5

    Olivia

  43. 4 out of 5

    Veselina Staab

  44. 4 out of 5

    Hannah Rousey

  45. 5 out of 5

    Axolotl

  46. 5 out of 5

    Bill

  47. 4 out of 5

    David

  48. 4 out of 5

    Ginnikah Leah

  49. 4 out of 5

    Iram

  50. 4 out of 5

    Msullivam

  51. 4 out of 5

    Aleksandra Mironova

  52. 4 out of 5

    Rowan Erikson

  53. 4 out of 5

    Elle

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