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Byron's Poetry

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The critical essays offer an integrated view of Byron's achievement as well as analyses of its different facets. Published for the first time is Bergen Evans's general essay "Lord Byron's Pilgrimage"; other essays are by John D. Jump, Michael G. Cooke, Francis Berry, Robert F. Gleckner, James R. Thompson, Frank D. McConnell, Leslie A. Marchand, and E. D. Hirsch, Jr. A speci The critical essays offer an integrated view of Byron's achievement as well as analyses of its different facets. Published for the first time is Bergen Evans's general essay "Lord Byron's Pilgrimage"; other essays are by John D. Jump, Michael G. Cooke, Francis Berry, Robert F. Gleckner, James R. Thompson, Frank D. McConnell, Leslie A. Marchand, and E. D. Hirsch, Jr. A special section, "Images of Byron," presents 26 views of Byron as artist and as the epitome of the Romantic hero, ranging from the perspectives of his contemporaries to those of such modern writers as James Joyce, Virginia Woolf, T. S. Eliot, and Albert Camus. A Chronology sets forth the main events of Byron's life, and a Selected Bibliography lists sources for further study.


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The critical essays offer an integrated view of Byron's achievement as well as analyses of its different facets. Published for the first time is Bergen Evans's general essay "Lord Byron's Pilgrimage"; other essays are by John D. Jump, Michael G. Cooke, Francis Berry, Robert F. Gleckner, James R. Thompson, Frank D. McConnell, Leslie A. Marchand, and E. D. Hirsch, Jr. A speci The critical essays offer an integrated view of Byron's achievement as well as analyses of its different facets. Published for the first time is Bergen Evans's general essay "Lord Byron's Pilgrimage"; other essays are by John D. Jump, Michael G. Cooke, Francis Berry, Robert F. Gleckner, James R. Thompson, Frank D. McConnell, Leslie A. Marchand, and E. D. Hirsch, Jr. A special section, "Images of Byron," presents 26 views of Byron as artist and as the epitome of the Romantic hero, ranging from the perspectives of his contemporaries to those of such modern writers as James Joyce, Virginia Woolf, T. S. Eliot, and Albert Camus. A Chronology sets forth the main events of Byron's life, and a Selected Bibliography lists sources for further study.

30 review for Byron's Poetry

  1. 5 out of 5

    Prakash Bisht

    Well they say "He was mad, bad and dangerous to know". I say the same you will love everything wrtten by him from short and beautiful "She walks in beauty" to epic "Don Juan". Just read it and love it.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Dana

    Byron's poems never fail to delight; I read this collection as part of a Late Romantic Literature course.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Tiffany

    As with all NCAs, I enjoyed the criticisms in the back, and I always enjoy Byron's work. I wish this edition would have been longer or had not contained so many excerpts. I would rather evaluate fewer complete works. I have not checked out the newer edition of this text, and do not know if it will be an improvement or just a reprint. I will check that later.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Cooper Renner

    I bought this primarily to read "The Giaour", "Prisoner of Chillon" and (maybe) some of what it contains of "Childe Harold's Pilgrimage" (which I've read some of before). I've read already Byron's plays and "Don Juan" (except possibly the unfinished Canto XVII) and quite like them. Now that I've read "Giaour" and "Chillon", I can see them as far lesser works than the plays and "Don Juan", though they must have helped prepare Byron for those longer, more powerful accomplishments.

  5. 5 out of 5

    James

    Excellent, though strictly chronological, presentation of Byron's works, dividing his life up into four major periods. That means Childe Harold's Pilgrimage will be spread out across three sections with other poems and letters interspersed, making this volume excellent for chronological studies but a little awkward for other types of study. Good though of course necessarily limited selection of criticism at the end and very good notes. Recommended for a serious introduction to Byron.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Wryly

    Boy be talkin' smack! I sometimes fantasized about reading his poetry slam style. One of my classmate compared Don Juan to Ludacris's pimpin' all over the world.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Luna Nethera

    He's one of my favorite authors.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Keith

    My thoughts as I read sections of this: Manfred *** – When published in 1816, Byron’s Manfred was much admired (when, as with everything Byron did, it did not shock). But it’s a rather static piece of art. There is no action. Manfred goes from one place to another to complain how miserable his life is as an all-powerful magician/sorcerer/magi, cursed with immortality. (It must be tough.) There’s also no character development – at least not in the traditional sense. Manfred’s opinions about suicid My thoughts as I read sections of this: Manfred *** – When published in 1816, Byron’s Manfred was much admired (when, as with everything Byron did, it did not shock). But it’s a rather static piece of art. There is no action. Manfred goes from one place to another to complain how miserable his life is as an all-powerful magician/sorcerer/magi, cursed with immortality. (It must be tough.) There’s also no character development – at least not in the traditional sense. Manfred’s opinions about suicide vary. Defiance is probably his singular – and most appealing – trait. And what is the back story? We never know, though most people believe Manfred (a magician?) had a relationship (physical? spiritual?) with his sister(?), Astarte, in which they may have not known they were related(?), though she is described as the feminine version of him (his twin?). Oh, and Astarte died in some unknown way(?) for some unknown cause (?). I can confidently report that you won’t be better informed about any these things after finishing the play. The question is: Does Byron even know the answers to these questions? Does this all even make sense on any level? Even to him? Or is he just making things up as he goes. We don’t know. Even today. So, there is fuzziness to this work. It does contain some good descriptions of the human experience, and Manfred’s Faust-like Promethean defiance is sure to please the rebel-against-god in all of us. (Well, most of us. Some of us?)

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jim Justice

    The limping rake makes me think.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Abby Graybeal

  11. 4 out of 5

    Liz Dymoke

  12. 5 out of 5

    Cindy

  13. 5 out of 5

    Марио Костовски

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kelsey Stone

  15. 4 out of 5

    Donna Padgett

  16. 5 out of 5

    Justin White

  17. 5 out of 5

    Anne

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jason Reynolds

  19. 4 out of 5

    Vanessa Lord

  20. 5 out of 5

    Brian

  21. 5 out of 5

    Gwendolyn Sapp

  22. 5 out of 5

    Mary Mclaughlin

  23. 4 out of 5

    Elvira Maričić

  24. 5 out of 5

    Chelby

  25. 5 out of 5

    Evi Sergetzi

  26. 5 out of 5

    Susan

  27. 4 out of 5

    Inna

  28. 5 out of 5

    Helga

  29. 4 out of 5

    David Lucas

  30. 5 out of 5

    Evan

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