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The Ghost Fields

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The chilling discovery of a downed World War II plane with a body inside leads Ruth and DCI Nelson to uncover a wealthy family’s secrets in the seventh Ruth Galloway mystery. Norfolk is suffering from record summer heat when a construction crew unearths a macabre discovery—a downed World War II plane with the pilot still inside. Forensic archaeologist Ruth Galloway quickly The chilling discovery of a downed World War II plane with a body inside leads Ruth and DCI Nelson to uncover a wealthy family’s secrets in the seventh Ruth Galloway mystery. Norfolk is suffering from record summer heat when a construction crew unearths a macabre discovery—a downed World War II plane with the pilot still inside. Forensic archaeologist Ruth Galloway quickly realizes that the skeleton couldn’t possibly be the pilot, and DNA tests identify the man as Fred Blackstock, a local aristocrat who had been reported dead at sea. When the remaining members of the Blackstock family learn about the discovery, they seem strangely frightened by the news. Events are further complicated by a TV company that wants to make a film about Norfolk’s deserted air force bases, the so-called Ghost Fields, which have been partially converted into a pig farm run by one of the younger Blackstocks. As production begins, Ruth notices a mysterious man lurking on the outskirts of Fred Blackstock’s memorial service. Then human bones are found on the family’s pig farm. Can the team outrace a looming flood to find a killer? Laced with dry humor and anchored by perennial fan favorite Ruth, The Ghost Fields will delight fans new and old.


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The chilling discovery of a downed World War II plane with a body inside leads Ruth and DCI Nelson to uncover a wealthy family’s secrets in the seventh Ruth Galloway mystery. Norfolk is suffering from record summer heat when a construction crew unearths a macabre discovery—a downed World War II plane with the pilot still inside. Forensic archaeologist Ruth Galloway quickly The chilling discovery of a downed World War II plane with a body inside leads Ruth and DCI Nelson to uncover a wealthy family’s secrets in the seventh Ruth Galloway mystery. Norfolk is suffering from record summer heat when a construction crew unearths a macabre discovery—a downed World War II plane with the pilot still inside. Forensic archaeologist Ruth Galloway quickly realizes that the skeleton couldn’t possibly be the pilot, and DNA tests identify the man as Fred Blackstock, a local aristocrat who had been reported dead at sea. When the remaining members of the Blackstock family learn about the discovery, they seem strangely frightened by the news. Events are further complicated by a TV company that wants to make a film about Norfolk’s deserted air force bases, the so-called Ghost Fields, which have been partially converted into a pig farm run by one of the younger Blackstocks. As production begins, Ruth notices a mysterious man lurking on the outskirts of Fred Blackstock’s memorial service. Then human bones are found on the family’s pig farm. Can the team outrace a looming flood to find a killer? Laced with dry humor and anchored by perennial fan favorite Ruth, The Ghost Fields will delight fans new and old.

30 review for The Ghost Fields

  1. 5 out of 5

    Frances

    In the seventh series Detective Chief Inspector Harry Nelson and Ruth Galloway, a forensic archaeologist, are notified that a digger has unearthed an old plane from the Second World War II with a dead pilot inside. Galloway immediately determines the dead body did not die in the crash but had recently been placed inside and killed by a bullet through the head. The Ghost Fields is not only a crime novel, but an intricate story evolving around the main characters keeping the reader well entertaine In the seventh series Detective Chief Inspector Harry Nelson and Ruth Galloway, a forensic archaeologist, are notified that a digger has unearthed an old plane from the Second World War II with a dead pilot inside. Galloway immediately determines the dead body did not die in the crash but had recently been placed inside and killed by a bullet through the head. The Ghost Fields is not only a crime novel, but an intricate story evolving around the main characters keeping the reader well entertained. This was an easy light read, with witty dialogue throughout, and is definitely a winner.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Magdalena aka A Bookaholic Swede

    A buried WWII plane is found with its pilot still in the cockpit. But Forensic archaeologist Ruth Galloway soon discover that the man in the plane has been placed there. Who was he and why was he placed inside the plane? The Ghosts Fields are the seventh book in the Ruth Galloway series and I have read them all so I was quite happy when I was approved from this book over on NetGalley. Actually, I wasn't supposed to read this book now, but I let it get ahead in the queue since I really wanted to r A buried WWII plane is found with its pilot still in the cockpit. But Forensic archaeologist Ruth Galloway soon discover that the man in the plane has been placed there. Who was he and why was he placed inside the plane? The Ghosts Fields are the seventh book in the Ruth Galloway series and I have read them all so I was quite happy when I was approved from this book over on NetGalley. Actually, I wasn't supposed to read this book now, but I let it get ahead in the queue since I really wanted to read a crime novel and also wanted to read a book with familiar characters. This book picks up two years after the last book and Ruth daughter Kate now five years old and is starting school. Nelson, Kate's father Nelson is still married to Michelle, but he is as usual quite possessive of both Ruth and Kate. Which in my opinion he has no right to be since he chose to stay with Michelle. This case will bring them together again as they try to find out how the man came to be inside the plane and why after Ruth discover that the man has been dead for years but have been buried somewhere else. Also, when an heiress is attacked it seems that there is someone out there still out for blood... It felt nice to return to Ruth Galloway world and I was pleased that she has stopped (well not completely) obsessing about her weight. Her "relationship" with Nelson isn't the easiest. Having a child with a married cop isn't easy especially since she hasn't really moved on even though she tries. I like cold cases and this case with links to a prominent family turned out to be quite interesting and there is a part in this book what made me think of a special scene from the book /movie/TV-series Hannibal though less gruesome... All and all a good read and I'm looking forward to the next book in the series when it comes out! I received this copy from the publisher through NetGalley in return for an honest review!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Heidi

    Despite the strange present tense (it never bothered me until this entry— but it’s true that the tense can be disarming), I enjoyed both the mystery which included several generations of victims in one prominent landholding family and the personal tensions in Ruth’s private life. Lots of characters to keep track of and lots of victims— some just attacked and others killed. Almost an embarrassing amount of related victims. But never fear, the Norfolk detectives, aided but my favorite archeology p Despite the strange present tense (it never bothered me until this entry— but it’s true that the tense can be disarming), I enjoyed both the mystery which included several generations of victims in one prominent landholding family and the personal tensions in Ruth’s private life. Lots of characters to keep track of and lots of victims— some just attacked and others killed. Almost an embarrassing amount of related victims. But never fear, the Norfolk detectives, aided but my favorite archeology professor, solve all amidst a cataclysmic flooding event. Even Cathbad makes a few appearances but it’s Judy and Clough who are featured in secondary threads. One thing I’ve noticed— water and the sea are a constant in this part of England and in the Galloway series. I think I’m going to add Norfolk to my British bucket list of sites to see. On to the next mystery.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Hall

    Two years on from Ruth's appearance on TV and with a book under her belt she is singlehandedly going some way towards "putting the University of North Norfolk on the map", less for its archaeological connections and more for the rising crime rates one suspects! In this seventh outing featuring the forensic archaeologist, Dr Ruth Galloway, once again Elly Griffiths has made great use of Norfolk's historical connections to deliver a hugely satisfying puzzle to unravel. Followers of this series wil Two years on from Ruth's appearance on TV and with a book under her belt she is singlehandedly going some way towards "putting the University of North Norfolk on the map", less for its archaeological connections and more for the rising crime rates one suspects! In this seventh outing featuring the forensic archaeologist, Dr Ruth Galloway, once again Elly Griffiths has made great use of Norfolk's historical connections to deliver a hugely satisfying puzzle to unravel. Followers of this series will know that wherever DCI Harry Nelson and Dr Ruth Galloway are involved, archaeology can often dig up many more questions than it answers and that is once again the case here all topped off with a side serving of personal drama along the way. The Ghost Fields is a brilliantly plotted affair which hinges on the the eminent Blackstock family and their ancestral connections to the Norfolk landscape. Beginning in July 2013, Norfolk building magnate Edward Spens is capitalising on his plot of newly acquired land and pressing ahead with a development of beachfront apartments, much to the chagrin of local environmental opposition. When the digger strikes metal and reveals the cockpit of a military plane housing a dead pilot, DCI Harry Nelson of the North Norfolk Constabulary is called to the site accompanied by Dr Ruth Galloway, who is seconded to the Serious Crimes Unit alongside her university career. When Ruth reveals that the pilots demise was clearly not accidental, as evinced by the bullet wound through the centre of his forehead, work at the site is halted for a full excavation. With inconsistencies surrounding the preservation of the remains there are suggestions that this find could have been deliberately planted to head off development plans. Dogmatic DCI Harry Nelson's interest in what he considers to be a cold case is limited until he receives the results which prove that the body is none other than part of the well-known family who sold the land to Spens, namely the Blackstock clan. Frederick J. Blackstock left his Norfolk home in 1938 and travelled to America in search of a better life, only to enlist in the American Armed Forces and be billeted to an airbase a stone's throw from his former home. One of three brothers, the youngest of whom is still holding court at Blackstock Hall, Fred was believed to have been shot down at sea and was declared dead... That the family are a mysterious bunch adds to the suspicions and as Ruth uncovers signs of a recent activity in the pet cemetery behind the house, and human remains at the pig farm the family own, working out just what the once eminent Blackstock family have been hiding becomes tougher by the day.. Further upheaval is brought with the appearance of an American TV crew of which Frank Barker numbers, who see as ideal angle for a melodramatic wartime tale of a Norfolk boy returning home and reuniting the American contingent of the Blackstock clan who discover that England is not quite so "temperate" or cosy! It seems foolhardy to raise questions surrounding plot plausibility in this wonderful series, which by and can be overlooked and do not hinder another sublime instalment. Griffiths' delivers a story which evokes memories of the atrocities of the Second World War and the abandoned airfields which are lain to waste in the aftermath, representing unsettling reminders of the lives that were lost. That the story centres on the family that still reside at Blackstock Hall adds a poignancy to the whole affair with the imposing homestead now reduced to a crumbling ruin providing a suitably atmospheric backdrop. The reality behind "the ghost fields" name is brought home in a fittingly moving tribute. Unfortunately, the prophesying druid, Cathbad, takes a backseat in proceedings and his absence meant a lack of the spiritual charm that he brings to Elly Griffith's tales. The flipside though is the chance to see some of the ensemble cast taking more shape; notably Cloughie is furnished with real depth. This all shows that the series is becoming much more than just the Ruth and Nelson circus and bodes well for longevity. I am withholding judgement on DS Tim Heathfield, who stills feels somewhat like a square peg in a round hole and epitomises the definition of wooden. I will admit to developing itchy feet as regards the momentum in the Nelson and Ruth chemistry, craving some signs of life after so much treading water and I think Griffiths navigated this hurdle exceptionally well, setting the next instalment up as a potential make or break climax. The witty first-person narrative is fuelled by effortless humour, often meaning readers feel they are sharing a joke with Griffiths and poking fun at her characters traits and her trademark dry observation is the key. Knowing these characters and their quirks brings a familiarity and the sense that Griffiths is allowing us to share a private joke, whether it be at Phil's failure to comprehend irony or Clough's brush with aristocracy! Griffiths is a born storyteller and a consummate professional when it comes to combining her well crafted characters with an engaging plot. Whilst each of her novels does work as a standalone, it does it a disservice to read without prior knowledge. This is a series best served by reading in order, as the continuing storylines are an essential element of the pleasure! Marvellous.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ingrid

    Loved it.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sue

    The Ruth Galloway series continues to be one of my favorites. It has what I want and require from a mystery series: an intelligent and sympathetic protagonist; a mixture of mystery and "other", in this case archeology, a personal favorite interest; interesting and developed characters and relationships as well as relationships that grow over time; and of course a mystery that I want answered. Being a long-time Anglophile, the English setting doesn't hurt either! In this episode, during the cleari The Ruth Galloway series continues to be one of my favorites. It has what I want and require from a mystery series: an intelligent and sympathetic protagonist; a mixture of mystery and "other", in this case archeology, a personal favorite interest; interesting and developed characters and relationships as well as relationships that grow over time; and of course a mystery that I want answered. Being a long-time Anglophile, the English setting doesn't hurt either! In this episode, during the clearing of a field in preparation for development, a World War Two era plane is discovered. That in itself is not hugely surprising given how many planes flew out of Britain during the war. The surprise is the body in the cockpit. For further details about the body, I refer you to the book, but I also suggest you begin with the first book in the series, The Crossing Places

  7. 4 out of 5

    Richard

    Reading a Dr Ruth Galloway, Elly Griffiths novel is like catching up with an old friend, or putting on those comfy slippers after an arduous day on your feet. It is bliss, comfortable and comforting and leaves a smile on your face. This is the seventh in series that is becoming stronger with her wide cast of characters seemingly able to hold the stage while everything flows wondeerfully through Ruth. The writer wonderfully reviews the previous interactions in her books without repeating vast pages Reading a Dr Ruth Galloway, Elly Griffiths novel is like catching up with an old friend, or putting on those comfy slippers after an arduous day on your feet. It is bliss, comfortable and comforting and leaves a smile on your face. This is the seventh in series that is becoming stronger with her wide cast of characters seemingly able to hold the stage while everything flows wondeerfully through Ruth. The writer wonderfully reviews the previous interactions in her books without repeating vast pages from these previous novels but if you have read them, you just get it. For example her relationship with her boss - Phil. "'Ruth!' Ruth recognises the voice but she's in a good enough mood for it not to be dented by the appearance of her boss, Phil Trent. Even though he is wearing safari shorts. 'Hallo, Phil' 'Found anything else?' Honestly, isn't one Bronze Age body enough for him? It's one more than he has ever discovered" Priceless, and sums up their previous inter-relationships perfectly. "Mrs Galloway is her mother, a formidable born-again Christian living in South London, within sight of the promised land". Again tells us in a brief nugget how Ruth gets on with her Mum. The Ghost Fields is a simple story of finding an American plane in an old quarry pit that is being prepared for re-development. Ruth is called to take a look as there is a body in the cockpit dating back to the 2nd World War. Our on the spot archaeologist is troubled by the preservation of the body as in chalky soil it should have decayed more. A bullet in the pilot's head lends more belief that evidence may have been manipulated and when DNA testing reveals the airman's true identity a deeper mystery is revealed. Focus falls upon the Blackstock family, it is their land where the body is discovered and DNA testing reveals there is an hereditary connection with ancestory. A cold case/murder investigation needs to be followed up by Nelson and his team of detectives, meanwhile the human interest story is pursued by an American production team who discount facts if they blur the commercial impact of good TV. It is all beautifully written, a modern Kind Hearts and Coronets at times. But when attacks and deaths occur in the here and now this is a case that needs to be solved quickly especially as Nelson perceives Ruth to be in danger.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Susan Johnson

    This is my favorite mystery series currently and I love the main character, Ruth Galloway. Galloway is a fortiesh archeologist professor at an university in northern England. She is called in to help on cases when bones are found and the police have no idea how old they are. She is fiercely independent and lives out in the middle of nowhere raising her six year old daughter. In this installment, a bulldozer makes a grizzly discovery of a WWII airplane with the pilot still instill inside. Gallow This is my favorite mystery series currently and I love the main character, Ruth Galloway. Galloway is a fortiesh archeologist professor at an university in northern England. She is called in to help on cases when bones are found and the police have no idea how old they are. She is fiercely independent and lives out in the middle of nowhere raising her six year old daughter. In this installment, a bulldozer makes a grizzly discovery of a WWII airplane with the pilot still instill inside. Galloway is called in and discovers the body is the son of the family living in a nearby manor and he hadn't been piloting that particular plane. How did he get there and why? If that's not enough action, Galloway's friend is having a baby and Cathbad, the friendly druid, is not infallible. Several of his predictions are just wrong. Galloway has a little romance with an American film narrator but Inspector Nelson still has her heart. In all, a lovely story. Then why only 4 stars? Griffiths makes two swipes at Americans that not only set my teeth on edge but weren't even necessary to the story. They just come out of nowhere and left a bad taste in my sensitive mouth. One was about the machine that uncovered the airplane. Someone said Americans call it a digger and it really upset them. Personally I Have never heard the expression and I'm not sure why the statement was made. The second one was when there was a talk at a party and Dr. Galloway said that many Americans believed WWII was 1941-45. The fact is that Americans know it was a longer war but, for us, our involvement was really that period. Again I don't know why that snide comment was essential. Sometimes it is annoying for all Americans to be depicted as stupid. I still think this is one of the brightest and delightful mystery series being published.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Joan

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Although I enjoyed being back in the company of this ensemble of characters, I don't think this was one of Griffiths's stronger plots. Once again, the ending is somewhat ridiculous in that it involves not only Ruth's but just about everyone in the book's running around confronting and threatening each other and plunging into freezing, filthy water. The pictures in my head were slap-stick comical, not dark and threatening. Griffiths should really resist the temptation to build up to these overwro Although I enjoyed being back in the company of this ensemble of characters, I don't think this was one of Griffiths's stronger plots. Once again, the ending is somewhat ridiculous in that it involves not only Ruth's but just about everyone in the book's running around confronting and threatening each other and plunging into freezing, filthy water. The pictures in my head were slap-stick comical, not dark and threatening. Griffiths should really resist the temptation to build up to these overwrought endings. I also think that Ruth was a goddamned fool not to take Frank up on his offer to move to the UK. What in the world could any woman not like about Frank???

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kathy

    2013 was one of my best reading years ever. It was the year that I discovered Elly Griffiths' Ruth Galloway series and got to read the first five Ruth Galloway novels one right after the other. It was a blissful reading spring that year. But, once you're up to speed in a series, there is the yearly wait for the next book, and in a favorite series such as this one by Elly Griffiths, it's a hard wait. Once again, it was worth the wait. The Ghost Fields brought to life those characters I missed so 2013 was one of my best reading years ever. It was the year that I discovered Elly Griffiths' Ruth Galloway series and got to read the first five Ruth Galloway novels one right after the other. It was a blissful reading spring that year. But, once you're up to speed in a series, there is the yearly wait for the next book, and in a favorite series such as this one by Elly Griffiths, it's a hard wait. Once again, it was worth the wait. The Ghost Fields brought to life those characters I missed so much. Archeologist/professor/ Dr.Ruth Galloway, DCI Harry Nelson, Cathbad the Druid, Ruth's daughter Kate, DS Judy Johnson, DS David Clough/Cloughie, American academic/TV presenter Frank Barker, and even Phil Trent, Ruth's weasel boss. These characters have been developed with skilled care by the author, and it is little wonder that they have become like family to readers of the series. When the remains of a man, later to be identified as those of a member of a prominent family named Blackstock, are unearthed inside an American WWII plane in Norfolk , Dr. Ruth Galloway is called in by DCI Harry Nelson to help discover the chain of events leading to the dead man's death and subsequent placement in the plane, as her first pronouncement is that the victim had been shot in the head and couldn't possibly be the pilot. Thus begins an investigation into the death of Fred Blackstock, originally thought to have died as a part of an American flight crew in the waters off of Norfolk. The connection to what are called the "ghost fields" in the area is a step back into the days of WWII when there were American airfields established in Norfolk. DCI Nelson has his work cut out for him in dealing with the Blackstock family members who remain at Blackstock Manor, as buried secrets of missing family members and order of inheritance must be sorted. To further frustrate Nelson is the arrival of a television company that is doing a film on the American ghost fields with the focus being on Fred Blackstock who early in his life relocated to America and ironically ended up dying so near his British ancestral home as a part of the American forces. As well as the professional frustration, there is the added personal distraction with the American academic Frank Barker, who will narrate the film. Frank and Ruth have a past together, but before that Nelson and Ruth had a past, and there are a lot of emotions running amok. When another present day murder occurs, the urgency to solve the mysteries of the past is full on. Griffiths gives us the intensity that always accompanies her stories, as dark secrets come undone and twists of fates surface. There is never a lull in the flow of action and suspense. The author masterfully lets the reader know that danger is right around the corner, but we are wonderfully surprised with it when it strikes. The interplay of the characters and the growth of relationships and understandings throughout the series is a thing of beauty to watch. Ruth Galloway is strong and competent, but she is human, and human have their frailties, too. She is one of my absolute favorite fictional characters. This book in the series is rather a crossroads for Ruth's personal life, and readers will be grateful for Ruth confronting some of her feelings for others. Fans of Elly Griffiths and this series are going to be most thrilled with this well-plotted mystery that answers so many questions on so many fronts.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Leah

    Middle-aged hanky-panky... When developers start to dig up a field prior to building houses on it, the work is brought to a sudden halt by the discovery of a buried WW2 plane, complete with partially mummified corpse. Forensic archaeologist Ruth Galloway is called in, and spots something the police have unaccountably missed – a bullet hole in the corpse's forehead. Immediately knowing (psychically) that this wound was not caused during an airfight, she leaps to the conclusion that the man was the Middle-aged hanky-panky... When developers start to dig up a field prior to building houses on it, the work is brought to a sudden halt by the discovery of a buried WW2 plane, complete with partially mummified corpse. Forensic archaeologist Ruth Galloway is called in, and spots something the police have unaccountably missed – a bullet hole in the corpse's forehead. Immediately knowing (psychically) that this wound was not caused during an airfight, she leaps to the conclusion that the man was the victim of murder. When Elly Griffiths is on form, she's one of my favourite writers, so it saddens me to say that she is most definitely not on form in this book. The fundamental problem with amateur detectives in contemporary novels is that it becomes increasingly difficult for authors to find ways to link them to crimes. Griffiths has got round that in this one by really pretty much ignoring the crime and detection element, and writing a rather tired middle-aged love triangle instead – actually a love star, to be more accurate, since there are a total of five middle-aged people all either getting up to hanky-panky or wishing they could, usually with people other than their partners. Fascinating if anyone still cares whether Ruth and Nelson will ever get together, but I lost interest in that strand about four books ago. Ruth really has to stop hankering over someone else's husband and move on, and in the last book I thought she might actually be about to do so. Sadly not. The plot is both thin and full of holes, and drags on for ever with Nelson doing absolutely nothing towards actually solving the mystery. It shouldn't really be too hard either. Given that the victim was murdered during the war, then the killer must be either dead or in his late '80s at the youngest – narrows the field of suspects somewhat, don't you think? So since we know from the start by a quick arithmetical calculation that we can exclude almost every character from suspicion, there's not much tension. Except perhaps the tension of wondering how long it will be before Nelson and Ruth suss out what's staring the rest of us in the face. But their inability to work it out means that there's time for another murder to be done, finally expanding the field of suspects and throwing open the possibility that Nelson could start interviews or look for clues or stake people out or... well, something! But no, he sends off for DNA tests and we all wait and wait for them to come back, while the characters fill in the time with some fairly passionless flirting. Oh dear! I could mention that the reason the body is in the field is silly and contrived, or that to go along with the no detection there is also no archaeology to speak of. I could sigh over the fact that the book is written in the usual tedious present tense (third person) which really is not suited to a book that takes place over a period of months, and which feels even clumsier in this book than usual. Or I could mention that Ruth's low self-esteem and constant self-criticism become increasingly tedious as the series wears on – another thing I thought she was beginning to get over in the last outing. Oh! It appears I just did mention them! On the upside, Griffiths, as always, creates a good sense of place in this bleak Norfolk landscape, and her characterisation of Ruth is excellent, even if I find the character progressively more irritating. And while the bulk of the book is a drag with nothing much happening except love/lust affairs, the thrillerish ending is well written and enjoyable. But I'm afraid overall I think this is one for die-hard fans only - it's getting hosts of 5-stars, so it must be working for some people. But I think this fan has stopped being die-hard – the standard in the series seems to oscillate wildly from brilliant to pretty poor, and in my opinion it's time to draw it to a close and for Griffiths to move on to something different. Her last book, The Zig Zag Girl, not a Ruth Galloway one, was far superior to this in every way. 2½ stars for me, so rounded up. NB This book was provided for review by the publisher, Quercus. www.fictionfanblog.wordpress.com

  12. 4 out of 5

    Brenda

    Ghost Fields is the name given to the old World War II airfields in Norfolk. A crashed WWII plane is found during some construction, and there is a body in the cockpit. This book is also about an aristocratic family who have lived in Norfolk for generations and the secrets in their history. And there's also the continuing relationships between Ruth, Nelson, Michelle, Judy, Cathbad, and Clough. There are surprises in this book! The author consistently shows her characters growing and evolving over Ghost Fields is the name given to the old World War II airfields in Norfolk. A crashed WWII plane is found during some construction, and there is a body in the cockpit. This book is also about an aristocratic family who have lived in Norfolk for generations and the secrets in their history. And there's also the continuing relationships between Ruth, Nelson, Michelle, Judy, Cathbad, and Clough. There are surprises in this book! The author consistently shows her characters growing and evolving over the course of the series. I really like where she takes them in this book. The mystery is almost secondary but is solved and explained in the end. Weather plays an important part in the story. It is accurate as the author relates an extreme storm actually occurred in 2013. I've enjoyed this series so far and eagerly await the eighth book next month.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Moonlight Reader

    I spent the weekend reading the most recent three booksin this series & now I'm caught up until The Chalk Pit is released at the end of May. I think that this was my least favorite of the three I read this weekend - I didn't love the mystery. To talk for a moment about the characters, I'm pretty tired of eternal Nelson - Ruth - Michelle triangle. It is unclear to me what either of those women find to hold on to in their relationships with him. Someone needs to shit or get off the pot. I thou I spent the weekend reading the most recent three booksin this series & now I'm caught up until The Chalk Pit is released at the end of May. I think that this was my least favorite of the three I read this weekend - I didn't love the mystery. To talk for a moment about the characters, I'm pretty tired of eternal Nelson - Ruth - Michelle triangle. It is unclear to me what either of those women find to hold on to in their relationships with him. Someone needs to shit or get off the pot. I thought, perhaps, Ruth would do so in her relationship with Frank, who seemed like a pretty good buy, but, I guess not. That triangle has run its course and it time for someone, anyone, all of them, to move on.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    I really like this series, and in this story, we see forensic archeologist Ruth Galloway continue to be non-committal in relationships with men, and doing her best to juggle her university teaching job, being a consultant for the police, and raising her 5-year-old daughter Kate. The title comes from the name used for abandoned World War II airbases scattered along the Norfolk coast. Many (most?) were used by American planes and pilots. A local lad from a family of gentry, the Blackstocks, had go I really like this series, and in this story, we see forensic archeologist Ruth Galloway continue to be non-committal in relationships with men, and doing her best to juggle her university teaching job, being a consultant for the police, and raising her 5-year-old daughter Kate. The title comes from the name used for abandoned World War II airbases scattered along the Norfolk coast. Many (most?) were used by American planes and pilots. A local lad from a family of gentry, the Blackstocks, had gone to America before the war and came back as an airman. Ironically, he was reported missing and assumed dead after his plane crashed into the sea. At the opening of the story, a plane with his remains is discovered in a field being excavated for a condo development. Ruth seems to ping pong between men, and despite her descriptions of herself which are of an overweight, dowdy woman in her mid-40's, she attracts a few. She probably underestimates both her physical and intellectual attractiveness. Also, her inability to commit may be a plot device as readers continue to wonder what Ruth will do next - in her professional and well as her personal life.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Cold War Conversations Podcast

    Great labyrinthine modern day murder mystery dating back to World War 2. A dead body is found in a buried World War 2 aircraft wreck, but it's not the original pilot... Forensic archaeologist Ruth Galloway aids DCI Nelson to help solve the mystery. This is my second book by Elly Griffiths and my first of the Ruth Galloway series. The character of Ruth works really well. She's strong, but with the human frailties we all have and prefer to keep hidden. The book captures the beautiful Norfolk coast w Great labyrinthine modern day murder mystery dating back to World War 2. A dead body is found in a buried World War 2 aircraft wreck, but it's not the original pilot... Forensic archaeologist Ruth Galloway aids DCI Nelson to help solve the mystery. This is my second book by Elly Griffiths and my first of the Ruth Galloway series. The character of Ruth works really well. She's strong, but with the human frailties we all have and prefer to keep hidden. The book captures the beautiful Norfolk coast well with a blend of fictional and real locations sprinkled through the story. Being interested in military history I was also intrigued by the World War 2 element, which has been well researched. Eagle eyed readers may feel this is somewhat let down by the book cover showing a Spitfire which was rarely flown by the US air force and not an aircraft type mentioned in the story. However, I'm being too pedantic and all in all this is a highly readable crime thriller, with rich characterisation. I'll be “investigating” further the Ruth Galloway series after reading this book

  16. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    3.75 stars. I enjoy this series and will continue on with it, but at times it can become a bit soap opera-ish. Due to recent developments, I have a feeling this trend will continue. Having said that though, it is addictive and I do love these characters, as well as the audiobook narration. So I will keep going but I expect it to become more and more dramatic as we go, which moves it a bit from my "creepy British countryside" sweet spot where this series has sat for some time.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ingie

    Review written March 14, 2019 4.4 Stars - Simply a smooth, nice and solid good British crime case solved by my favorites MC’s Book #7 Very much enjoyed the 10:47 hrs audiobook (in a Swedish translation) perfectly narrated by the always delightful voice of Angela Kovács. No long winding review from me today, maybe some day ... or never? Whatever, I felt this seventh part a tiny bit better than some of the previous past ones. Looking forward to start book 8. I LIKE - Ruth ... and dear Nelson

  18. 4 out of 5

    Barbara Heckendorn

    This is another good Ruth Galloway thriller. While Ruth is at a Bronze Age excavation site, a WWII plane is found buried in the neighborhood. In the cockpit sits a corpse from the same time, only Ruth has to realize that this body was recently placed in the cockpit. With the help of modern technology, it quickly becomes clear that he is dead. The question that needs to be clarified is how did he get to this place? It was a fun read from the first to the last page. (4) This is another good Ruth Galloway thriller. While Ruth is at a Bronze Age excavation site, a WWII plane is found buried in the neighborhood. In the cockpit sits a corpse from the same time, only Ruth has to realize that this body was recently placed in the cockpit. With the help of modern technology, it quickly becomes clear that he is dead. The question that needs to be clarified is how did he get to this place? It was a fun read from the first to the last page. (4½)

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jo

    Just when I think Griffiths couldn't possibly come up with another excavation story - Bing! She's brilliant!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Wendy

    Loved this 7th book in Elly Griffiths "Ruth Galloway" series!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sandra

    3.5 stars.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Lyn Elliott

    Once I started, I had to keep reading. Elly Griffiths tells a good story, the settings, the characters and the relationships between them are far from formulaic and even though I jumped from Book 1 to Book 7 in the series I could very easily keep track of the changes in the lives of the main characters. A good crime read.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Cathy Cole

    Elly Griffiths' Dr. Ruth Galloway series is one of my must-buys, and it just keeps getting better with each new book. In The Ghost Fields, the weather plays an integral part in the action, first with unrelenting heat and then with endless rain and flooding. Griffiths makes Norfolk come to life, and her choice of title is particularly evocative. This book talks not only of the abandoned air fields of World War II, but other "ghost fields" from centuries past. Ruth is dealing with a Bronze Age bur Elly Griffiths' Dr. Ruth Galloway series is one of my must-buys, and it just keeps getting better with each new book. In The Ghost Fields, the weather plays an integral part in the action, first with unrelenting heat and then with endless rain and flooding. Griffiths makes Norfolk come to life, and her choice of title is particularly evocative. This book talks not only of the abandoned air fields of World War II, but other "ghost fields" from centuries past. Ruth is dealing with a Bronze Age burial when the book begins, and there have also been battles fought in the exact same area during the English Civil War. No, Norfolk is not short of ghost fields, and further questions arise once we're introduced to the Blackstock family. They live in a drafty, ramshackle manor house barely holding its own against the water around it, and the family is just as strange as the ancestral home. A batty grandfather. A pleasant but distant father. A welcoming mother who's filled with unrealistic schemes to turn the house into a moneymaker. A handsome, charming pig farmer of a son who values his privacy. An incredibly beautiful daughter who's determined to make her name as an actress. Each Blackstock is odd in his or her own way, and trying to gather them together is like trying to herd cats. When DCI Harry Nelson throws up his hands and growls that there are too many Blackstocks, you just have to smile ruefully and agree. But family is an important theme in The Ghost Fields, and it's not just the Blackstocks. Ruth's daughter Kate is five and now in school. Being a good mother is even more important to Ruth than the work she is so passionate about. Nelson has issues with both his family at home and his co-workers. He even realizes that he considers Clough and Judy to be family. Griffiths knows how to keep her readers completely involved with her characters. The mystery and the characters rely on each other. There's history. There's danger. There's plenty of family feeling, and contrary to a visiting American's belief that "there's never bad weather in England," there's plenty of that as well. By book's end, we may even have sorted out all those Blackstocks. The only bad thing about finishing The Ghost Fields is knowing that I have to wait for the next book. This series is superb, and this book is the best so far. If you've never met Ruth Galloway, treat yourself. Start at the beginning with The Crossing Places and read each one. You'll be as hooked as I am.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Lynn

    The Ruth Galloway series is my favorite series. I look forward to each book that is written and published. Since many have already given a synopsis of the book, I will say what I like about this series. One can read this as a stand alone book and still be able to follow it. However, I feel the reader would be missing the character development that has happened in the past six books. As a reader, I now care about Ruth and all the other regular characters because of the of the occurrences in past b The Ruth Galloway series is my favorite series. I look forward to each book that is written and published. Since many have already given a synopsis of the book, I will say what I like about this series. One can read this as a stand alone book and still be able to follow it. However, I feel the reader would be missing the character development that has happened in the past six books. As a reader, I now care about Ruth and all the other regular characters because of the of the occurrences in past books. As a reader I feel as I know the characters and this makes each new book special. The characters are the real strength of the series. The other strength is the atmospheric location and descriptive weather or climate information. One can see the bleak gray skies and feel the biting winds or rain. I have liked this from the first book but noticed in this book how well the author sets the scene with the location and weather. Many books drone on and on to describe and set the scene. Elly Griffiths does this succinctly and without extra information. This series made me realize that I like atmospheric mysteries. This seems like something I should have known already but perhaps I never thought about it before. I have liked all seven books. Perhaps my favorites are the first book The Crossing Places and this book The Ghost Fields. The first book is a favorite because I was introduced to Ruth Galloway, an single forty some forensic anthropologist. The police call her in as a resource person to give information on skeletons they have found. She is also a university professor. I liked her and wanted to know more about her. I loved the isolated area in the salt marsh where she lived. The first book was the most atmospheric for me. This book The Ghost Fields mixed history with a death from the WW2 era. It surprised everyone who was found murdered and where the body was. The mystery revolves around the Blackstocks who live in a bleak manor house. They each have quite different strange or quirky personalities. Then there was the continuation of the lives of all the reoccurring characters. Changes are happening in their lives and the lives are not remaining static. Also, the relationship of Ruth and Nelson intrigues. One wonders where it will go or if this is how it is going to remain. I love this series but will now have to wait for the next book to be written. I enjoyed it very much.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Nancy (essayist)

    I've read all of Griffith's Ruth Galloway mysteries over the last few weeks. Things I like about the series: the setting: the idea of real life women's concerns (like arranging child care) as part of a mystery series; the blend of archeology, mythology, and history; and the ongoing stories of the cast of characters. However, the last item is also what I've grown to dislike about the series: while it's fun to see some of the supporting players evolving, there's a sense that Ruth, the central char I've read all of Griffith's Ruth Galloway mysteries over the last few weeks. Things I like about the series: the setting: the idea of real life women's concerns (like arranging child care) as part of a mystery series; the blend of archeology, mythology, and history; and the ongoing stories of the cast of characters. However, the last item is also what I've grown to dislike about the series: while it's fun to see some of the supporting players evolving, there's a sense that Ruth, the central character, is mired in her salt marsh landscape, as frozen in time as the remains she studies. (view spoiler)[ I've spent the past few books waiting for Nelson and Ruth to either find their way back to each other or put their "affair" behind them once and for all. It's now clear that Griffiths has no desire to resolve their relationship and I'm feeling like I've been played. Is anyone out there writing Ruth and Nelson fan fic? I think I'd rather read that than the next book in the series. (view spoiler)[ (hide spoiler)] (hide spoiler)]

  26. 5 out of 5

    Mike Sumner

    I love the Ruth Galloway series by Elly Griffiths. The Ghost Fields is number 7 and it really is as well to read them in order as there are threads that run through the series that lock your interest and enthusiasm for the characters. Dr Ruth Galloway is a professor of forensic archaeology at the University of North Norfolk. She likes cats (an endearing trait for me!), Bruce Springsteen, bones and books. She does not like organised religion. She has a now five-year-old daughter, Kate, fathered by I love the Ruth Galloway series by Elly Griffiths. The Ghost Fields is number 7 and it really is as well to read them in order as there are threads that run through the series that lock your interest and enthusiasm for the characters. Dr Ruth Galloway is a professor of forensic archaeology at the University of North Norfolk. She likes cats (an endearing trait for me!), Bruce Springsteen, bones and books. She does not like organised religion. She has a now five-year-old daughter, Kate, fathered by DCI Harry Nelson after a brief extra-marital affair. Nelson is married to Michelle. He leads the Serious Crimes Unit in Norfolk. Michael Malone is a lovable character, also know as Cathbad. Born in Ireland and brought up as a catholic he now thinks of himself as a druid and shaman. DS David Clough (Cloughie) is Nelson's bagman, born in Norfolk - a tough, dedicated officer who dislikes political correctness and graduate police officers. He likes food, football, beer - and his job. And then there is DS Judy Johnson who now co-habits with Cathbad and has just given birth to a daughter. I have followed their lives since book #1 with great fondness. In a blazing heatwave in Norfolk a construction crew unearth a World War Two plane. The body inside isn't the pilot. A television company discovers bones on their latest shoot on a pig farm. They're human bones... One local family, the Blackstocks, links the two grisly discoveries and Ruth must solve the mystery of the ghost fields. With an inevitability she finds herself in harms way in a finish that has the pulse racing - a fabulous page-turner - that left me quite breathless come the end. Hats off to Elly Griffiths. You have done it again!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Damaskcat

    Ruth Galloway is called in to investigate the discovery of a crashed World War II plane buried in a field with the pilot still inside. But Ruth doesn't believe the body has been there since the plane crashed and thinks it has been buried somewhere else and moved to the plane recently. The plane and the body are discovered at the start of a controversial building development of luxury holiday homes. Ruth's investigation brings her into contact once again with DI Harry Nelson. This is a fascinating Ruth Galloway is called in to investigate the discovery of a crashed World War II plane buried in a field with the pilot still inside. But Ruth doesn't believe the body has been there since the plane crashed and thinks it has been buried somewhere else and moved to the plane recently. The plane and the body are discovered at the start of a controversial building development of luxury holiday homes. Ruth's investigation brings her into contact once again with DI Harry Nelson. This is a fascinating story and the tension builds right from the start of the book as gradually the connections of past and present are revealed. Ruth is brought into contact again with Frank, the American historian whom she met in a previous book in the series. Do they have the makings of a relationship? Or is Ruth always going to love the father of her five year old daughter, Kate? It was good to see more of the police characters - Judy who is just about to go on maternity leave; Clough, the same as ever and Tim who transferred from Blackpool having worked on a previous case with Nelson. The characters are well-drawn and likeable. I have a particular soft spot for the occasionally spiky Ruth who is gradually developing more self-confidence and for Cathbad, the Druid who is now the family man living with Judy and their son Michael. This is an absorbing mystery with plenty of interesting historical and archaeological background to it. It can be read as a standalone novel but is probably best read as part of the series as the web of relationships between the series characters is quite complex. I received a free copy of this book from NetGalley for review purposes.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Roman Clodia

    I love Ruth Galloway but as I've pointed out in other reviews Griffiths isn't always the most accomplished of plotters: here she has overcome that shortfall and has produced a book with all the trademark wonderful characterisation ('Phil looks at her quizzically. He doesn't always get irony unless he's concentrating'), sly observation ('Nelson, watching as Clough selects two biscuits conveniently stuck together') and outrageous wit ('Clough, who has been maintaining a stunned silence, says 'Are I love Ruth Galloway but as I've pointed out in other reviews Griffiths isn't always the most accomplished of plotters: here she has overcome that shortfall and has produced a book with all the trademark wonderful characterisation ('Phil looks at her quizzically. He doesn't always get irony unless he's concentrating'), sly observation ('Nelson, watching as Clough selects two biscuits conveniently stuck together') and outrageous wit ('Clough, who has been maintaining a stunned silence, says 'Are you telling me that these pigs could have eaten someone?'') that also hangs together plotwise. This reminded me, in fact, of one of those old Agatha Christie mysteries featuring a convoluted family history and an old house, with elements of something more literary (Dunmore, The Greatcoat) in its poignant evocation of WW2 airfields. Fans of Griffiths won't need any inducement to read this, especially as we get another wonderful instalment in the lives of Ruth's pseudo-family who we have come to love. Anyone new to the series really needs to start at the beginning to understand the convoluted personal lives that underpin the story - though some of the earlier plots are a bit clunky in places. This is so much fun, so entertaining, with a knowing sense of humour (''Ruth!' yells Nelson. 'Get behind the duck!'') - I loved this to pieces and read it in a single day.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ellen

    The Ghost Fields by Elly Griffiths. This is the 7th in the Ruth Galloway mystery series and happily my 7th. The reason I keep reading this wonderful series is not only for the realistic characters and evolving relationships...it's the endings. This story in particular is my favorite one to date. One thing I can count on with this author, E.G., is her endings. They never fail to confound me completely. This ending I never saw coming. The Edward Spens construction company is busy these days. Busy d The Ghost Fields by Elly Griffiths. This is the 7th in the Ruth Galloway mystery series and happily my 7th. The reason I keep reading this wonderful series is not only for the realistic characters and evolving relationships...it's the endings. This story in particular is my favorite one to date. One thing I can count on with this author, E.G., is her endings. They never fail to confound me completely. This ending I never saw coming. The Edward Spens construction company is busy these days. Busy digging up the grounds in Norfolk making ready for the new building site. Not everyone is as enthusiastic about this new endeavor as Mr. Spens. Then the man hired to do the digging hits against something hard and quite large. He gets out of the digger and encounters something that's beyond any explanation. My highest recommendations for this book as well as this series. An excellent read.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lisa B.

    This continues to be one of my favorite series.

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