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Lorna Doone: A Romance of Exmoor is a novel by Richard Doddridge Blackmore. It is a romance based on a group of historical characters and set in the late 17th century in Devon and Somerset, particularly around the East Lyn Valley area of Exmoor. Blackmore experienced difficulty in finding a publisher, and the novel was first published anonymously in 1869, in a limited three Lorna Doone: A Romance of Exmoor is a novel by Richard Doddridge Blackmore. It is a romance based on a group of historical characters and set in the late 17th century in Devon and Somerset, particularly around the East Lyn Valley area of Exmoor. Blackmore experienced difficulty in finding a publisher, and the novel was first published anonymously in 1869, in a limited three-volume edition of just 500 copies, of which only 300 sold. The following year it was republished in an inexpensive one-volume edition and became a huge critical and financial success. It has never been out of print. It received acclaim from Blackmore's contemporary, Margaret Oliphant, and as well from later Victorian writers including Robert Louis Stevenson, Gerard Manley Hopkins, and Thomas Hardy. A favourite among female readers, it is also popular among males, and was chosen by male students at Yale in 1906 as their favourite novel. The Authorized Lorna Doone - [ FREE AUDIOBOOKS DOWNLOAD ] [ ANNOTATED ] for Kindle Edition offers reader special Kindle enabled features, including interactive table of contents.Easy to use table of contents take you right to the chapter and verse you are looking for


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Lorna Doone: A Romance of Exmoor is a novel by Richard Doddridge Blackmore. It is a romance based on a group of historical characters and set in the late 17th century in Devon and Somerset, particularly around the East Lyn Valley area of Exmoor. Blackmore experienced difficulty in finding a publisher, and the novel was first published anonymously in 1869, in a limited three Lorna Doone: A Romance of Exmoor is a novel by Richard Doddridge Blackmore. It is a romance based on a group of historical characters and set in the late 17th century in Devon and Somerset, particularly around the East Lyn Valley area of Exmoor. Blackmore experienced difficulty in finding a publisher, and the novel was first published anonymously in 1869, in a limited three-volume edition of just 500 copies, of which only 300 sold. The following year it was republished in an inexpensive one-volume edition and became a huge critical and financial success. It has never been out of print. It received acclaim from Blackmore's contemporary, Margaret Oliphant, and as well from later Victorian writers including Robert Louis Stevenson, Gerard Manley Hopkins, and Thomas Hardy. A favourite among female readers, it is also popular among males, and was chosen by male students at Yale in 1906 as their favourite novel. The Authorized Lorna Doone - [ FREE AUDIOBOOKS DOWNLOAD ] [ ANNOTATED ] for Kindle Edition offers reader special Kindle enabled features, including interactive table of contents.Easy to use table of contents take you right to the chapter and verse you are looking for

30 review for Lorna Doone - [ FREE AUDIOBOOKS DOWNLOAD ] [ ANNOTATED ]

  1. 5 out of 5

    Werner

    This enduring 19th century classic (never out of print since it was first published) has been on my radar ever since I saw an old black-and-white film version of it as a kid; but my interest was really piqued by the 2000 BBC/A&E miniseries adaptation. (As it turns out, I would rate the fidelity of the latter to the book at only about 65%; but that's another discussion!) Recently, I nominated it as a common read in the classics group I belong to here on Goodreads, and it won the poll. Author B This enduring 19th century classic (never out of print since it was first published) has been on my radar ever since I saw an old black-and-white film version of it as a kid; but my interest was really piqued by the 2000 BBC/A&E miniseries adaptation. (As it turns out, I would rate the fidelity of the latter to the book at only about 65%; but that's another discussion!) Recently, I nominated it as a common read in the classics group I belong to here on Goodreads, and it won the poll. Author Blackmore was a native of the Exmoor region where this novel is set, and well versed in its history and lore. Interestingly, his plot here isn't wholly invented; the exiled nobles-turned-outlaws, the Doones, were remembered in the area as having really lived, back in the days of Monmouth's rebellion (1685), as were Lorna Doone and John Ridd. With some liberties, the locations and buildings described in the book are real as well. The edition I read, the 1944 one from Dodd Mead's Great Illustrated Classics series, actually has black-and-white photographs of several of these, as well as of a contemporary portrait of Lorna herself (which shows her to be a genuinely beautiful young woman). Of course, by 1869, oral tradition recorded only the barest outlines of the events of those days; it provided the germ of the idea here, but all of the substance of the story is Blackmore's own. In style and substance, this tale is very much in the Romantic manner, with an appeal to the emotions, a setting that includes a lot of pure wild nature (with both its beauty and its danger --the bogs can be lethal), adventure, and passionate but pure love at its heart. Modern readers might question whether John and Lorna fall for each other too readily and quickly, since they haven't actually had much interaction by the time they fall in love (that's not a spoiler, since we know from the Goodreads description that they do!). In the historical context, however, I would say that this isn't unrealistic. Young people in that era didn't date (and didn't expect to); they took for granted that they had to size each other up seriously in what limited interaction they had, and didn't require as much time to make up their minds. (They also were socialized to be psychologically open to the idea of marriage and commitment as a natural and positive thing, not a horrible fate to be evaded and staved off as long as possible.) John's first-person narration has, at times, a strain of dry, often unconscious humor; and John is himself an interesting character: honest to the core, a cross between naivete and peasant shrewdness, slow to anger but really formidable when he's roused (he's well over six feet tall, and strong in proportion), magnanimous to a fault, much smarter than he lets people think, with plenty of virtues to admire and a few foibles that make you occasionally want to swat him. The other characters are wonderfully drawn and brought to vivid life, too, and the family relationships and other personal interactions are as real as life (and, like life, sometimes entail some painful lessons). Blackmore's well aware that even good people aren't perfect. He manages to give the reader a feel for the rhythms and routines of 17th-century farm and community life, for the role of simple Christian faith in the character's lives, and the folkways of a vanished rural culture. And he's to be commended, IMO, for daring to depict a love that crosses two of the most yawning chasms that divided 17th --and 19th-- century English society (poor commoner vs. wealthy nobility, and Protestant vs. Catholic --though he doesn't develop the latter theme as much as the former). As a rule, 19th-century diction in a novel doesn't bother me. Here, though, the author's style is SO digressive and orotund that it can at times be irritating. He's also consciously writing (because of the first-person narration) in a style that's meant to seem Jacobean, and so archaic even in Victorian times; and he reproduces West Country dialect, especially in the speech of the less-educated characters, very meticulously, and that style of speech can be quite difficult to understand in places. His narrative pace is also somewhat slow, in a plot that spans the years from November 1673 to 1685 and after (the opening chapters are, or seem, particularly slow-paced, since the reader isn't, at that point, already drawn in and used to the style); given that this is a 646-page novel, that makes it a slow read. There are places where the plotting, IMO, could benefit from being tauter. Given these considerations, a judicious editor could probably have cut the length by 100 pages, and improved the book. Concealed identity is a common plot trope in Romantic fiction from this era, but Blackmore doesn't handle it very well here. (view spoiler)[Lorna supposedly has no memory of being kidnapped at seven or eight years old, which is implausible, especially when she can still recognize her former nurse! (hide spoiler)] . John's narration is interlarded with irksome sexist comments; and while Lorna's no milksop, RDB does portray her very much in passive, damsel-in-distress mode, and he has a penchant for making her and other females faint or be prostrated by emotional stress, since their "weak" feminine nervous system can't handle such things and needs to be more sheltered. Aaaargh! (The miniseries was much more enlightened in its handling of female characters than the actual book is.) Altogether, these flaws cost the book a fifth star; but I still really enjoyed it overall, and felt that it earned its four!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Piyangie

    Lorna Doone, a Romance in Exmoor is a beautiful romance and adventure story set in the South West of England during the Monmouth Rebellion. Set against this historical background, this beautiful novel tells the story of young John Ridd who as he grows in to manhood and rights the wrong done to his family and parish by a group of “noble” outlaws and at the same time winning the hand and heart of the beautiful and noble Lorna Doone. The story is narrated by the protagonist, John Ridd. And Blackm Lorna Doone, a Romance in Exmoor is a beautiful romance and adventure story set in the South West of England during the Monmouth Rebellion. Set against this historical background, this beautiful novel tells the story of young John Ridd who as he grows in to manhood and rights the wrong done to his family and parish by a group of “noble” outlaws and at the same time winning the hand and heart of the beautiful and noble Lorna Doone. The story is narrated by the protagonist, John Ridd. And Blackmore has taken great pains to make him a reliable narrator. He had approached the narrative in such a way that no partiality could be attached to it. Every important event in the story whether it placed the protagonist at an advantageous position or at his detriment, has been honestly and truthfully portrayed. For my part, I enjoyed this fair and balanced account of the story. The story, as I mentioned before, is both a romance and adventure. The romance is a sweet love story between the young John Ridd and beautiful Lorna Doone which grows little by little from their childhood. Blackmore has taken it to his heart how this romance should be. It is a little sentimental perhaps. Nevertheless the charming and passionate writing draws the reader in to their life and love. The adventure part of the story is a mixture of true historical events of the Monmouth rebellion and young John Ridd's battle with the group of outlaws to protect his home, his farm and his neighbourhood from their brutality. This, however, is not a heart racing and action packed adventure, but a slow and steady one. It was a little surprising for I consider an adventure to be a bit fast paced. But equally surprising is seeing me enjoying the slow paced adventure nevertheless. This is nothing short of a miracle for I cannot recall having enjoyed a slow paced adventure this much before. And all the credit for my forbearance lies in Blackmore's captivating writing. Since I mentioned Blackmore's writing quite often I have to say that I have not read such mesmerizing writing for quite some time. The poetic beauty and sing song quality in his writing touched me profoundly. I can honestly say that I have only seen equal skill in the usage of language and writing in one other writer; and he is Thomas Hardy. Both being so sensitive towards nature and surroundings, their writing and their stories are so alluring. The set up being the country side of South West England, Blackmore brings to light the charming lives of farmers and the undisturbed natural habitat of Exmoor thorough his beautiful and captivating descriptions. In this backdrop, Blackmore brings out a simple protagonist in John Ridd. He is the hero, but an unusual one. Without making a perfect hero, Blackmore brings in a slow witted yet physically strong hero, who is a farmer and a professional wrestler - an uncommon combination. However, this imperfect character brings realism to the story and enables the reader to connect with him instantly. His charming love interest Lorna is a character that balances between reality and imaginary thus giving a fairy tale quality to the story. The placement of these characters and all the other contributing characters are so well done that overall effect is quite charming. I can go on and on about this beautiful and mesmerizing piece of literature for I think I'm quite bewitched. I have read a young adult version of this long ago and remember enjoying it. But the complete novel is nothing short of perfection. I was quite taken in with the lives, love and adventure of the Exmoor and was loathed to leave it and the Plovers Barrow, the cozy little home of John Ridd. It was one of the most melancholic literary parting that I had ever undergone. There is nothing more left to say. That I loved this beautiful novel is proved beyond a doubt. To all who could endure a slow paced adventure combined with a sweet romance set up against a beautiful backdrop of 17th century Exmoor, Lorna Doone is just for you.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Misfit

    What an awesome tale. Written in the 19th century, but telling a tale about the late 1600s during the times of Charles II and James II. Our hero, John Ridd is a simple, albeit wise and honorable farmer who as a young lad meets Lorna Doone of the dreaded, evil outlaw family of higher born Doones, and it's love at first sight. There are lots of ups and downs and surprises, along with the author's gorgeous prose describing the english countryside and farmlife. You have to pay attention though, as n What an awesome tale. Written in the 19th century, but telling a tale about the late 1600s during the times of Charles II and James II. Our hero, John Ridd is a simple, albeit wise and honorable farmer who as a young lad meets Lorna Doone of the dreaded, evil outlaw family of higher born Doones, and it's love at first sight. There are lots of ups and downs and surprises, along with the author's gorgeous prose describing the english countryside and farmlife. You have to pay attention though, as none of the characters are wasted. What might seem as inconsequential events and characters earlier in the story are brought back in full circle to the tale, along with a great mystery about Lorna's past as the author slowly peels out the many layers of his story. Highly highly recommended. If you enjoy Thomas Hardy, Charlotte Bronte or Dickens this will probably be right up your alley.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Sean Kennedy

    I was surprised at how much I struggled with this book. I love my nineteenth century literature, and I absolutely love the last TV adaptation (although it seems they took the best parts of the book and eradicated all the filler) but there were times I was almost ready to give up on this. It just so happened that then a scene would come along to distract me and hold my attention and then be followed by fifty pages of sheer boredom. Not to mention that the characters are all unlikable. John Ridd is I was surprised at how much I struggled with this book. I love my nineteenth century literature, and I absolutely love the last TV adaptation (although it seems they took the best parts of the book and eradicated all the filler) but there were times I was almost ready to give up on this. It just so happened that then a scene would come along to distract me and hold my attention and then be followed by fifty pages of sheer boredom. Not to mention that the characters are all unlikable. John Ridd is a bully who thinks too much of himself, whips the man who works for him with the slightest whim, hates the sister who challenges his manly authority and stalks pretty Lorna Doone until she can do nothing but accept his strange version of love. Lorna herself is insipid and can hardly even manage the simple act of walking while talking without needing to rest because it makes her feel faint. The gender roles are appalling. The mother and the 'good' sister fawn all over John and cater to his every wish and command, while the 'bad' sister is disliked because she has a brain and wants to use it. I'm telling you, when you actually feel more for the characters who are rapists, murderers and thieves, you're in a lot of trouble. I'm going to stick to the TV version, thanks. And I think this is the only time a movie has been superior to its source material.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Luís C.

    I put a lot of time reading this book, yet the story is very good but I admit that it's very slow. On the one hand because the choice of characters is quite small and the other partn it is a great (big) paved anyway. I started the story in the summer, and it is for these two reasons I have just finished it. So no, the story is beautiful, she tackles the subject of love that will meet many problems: the aspect of social class (if we can still speak like that), money, religion and royalty .

  6. 4 out of 5

    K.

    3rd Review February 2018 Read again to beguile the winter days. So beguiled. Enchanted. If you are the type of reader who might find great joy in listening to an old man telling his long and rambling love story of a life (imagine a comfortable fireside setting, cushy chairs, popcorn and cocoa) then you will adore this book. If you're the type of reader who would be impatient, bored or even annoyed in such a setting, you will not enjoy this book so leave it alone rather than revile it. Reader, you m 3rd Review February 2018 Read again to beguile the winter days. So beguiled. Enchanted. If you are the type of reader who might find great joy in listening to an old man telling his long and rambling love story of a life (imagine a comfortable fireside setting, cushy chairs, popcorn and cocoa) then you will adore this book. If you're the type of reader who would be impatient, bored or even annoyed in such a setting, you will not enjoy this book so leave it alone rather than revile it. Reader, you must be prepared to wander. You must be inclined to be patient in the telling. You must be willing to delight in bygone days imagined. You must be eager for a jaunt back in time, reveling in the difference from the slowness of then to the hurry of now. You must be content with deciphering dialect (or skipping the undecipherable). You must be disposed to worship the adorable Lorna with her devoted John, or at least try to understand why he does...think of your own love story. Does anyone love your love as you do? This is one long, long ramble of the love of a man for a woman. It is the sweetest of love stories. It will sweep you up and carry you away. You can thank me later. My other two reviews don't do it justice. Nor will this one. I don't have the proper words or the time. But really, if you haven't yet...give it a try. I challenge you not to fall in love with the bumbling, sweet, yet strong John Ridd. I love all the cast of characters, but his I love the most. -- 2nd Review Nov 09, read with bookgroup I hate it when this book ends! Really it couldn't keep going, but I so want it too. I just want to live on that farm in that beautiful country. Learning that Blackmore was devoted to gardening and farming made this book and the narrator's love for the land even more beautiful. I wrote a little note to my bookgroup apologizing to them if anyone was annoyed by the many many asides, colloquialisms, archaic words and descriptions (which I love) they would appreciate a quote from the book after one of the side-stories: "Now this has led me out of my way; as things are always doing, partly through their own perverseness, partly through my kind desire to give fair turn to all of them, and to all the people who do them. If anyone expects of me a strict and well-drilled story, standing "at attention" all the time, with hands at the side...., and eyes going neither right nor left; I trow that man has been disappointed many a page ago, and has left me to my evil ways; and if not, I love his charity." I love every single word of this book. To me the cadence is like poetry or a beautiful song. I would love to meet Mr. Blackmore someday, I would just love to hear him speak. I think he poured his whole soul into this book. I have to think the way John Ridd loves Lorna is the way Blackmore loved his wife. It's beautiful. His humans are so real and his wit so perfect. Those of you wishing to know what Lorna Doone is about, will have to go elsewhere, I don't have time to do a summary. Suffice it for me to say it's wonderful. I will stick in a couple of my most favorite lines. "And I for my part can never conceinve how people who live in towns and cities, where neither lambs nor birds are (except in some shop windows), nor growing corn, nor meadow-grass, nor even so much as a sick to cut, or a stile to climb and sit down upon --how these poor folk get through their lives, without being utterly weary of them, and dying from pure indolence, is a thing God only knows, if His mercy allows Him to think of it." -- "She looked as if she had been visited by many troubles, and had felt them one by one; yet held enough of kindly nature still to grieve for others." -- "...It strikes me that of all human dealings, satire is the very lowest, and most mean and common. It is the equivalent in words, for what bullying is in deeds; and no more bespeaks a clever man, than the other does a brave one. These two wretched tricks exalt a fool in his own low esteem, but never in his neighbor's; for the deep common sense of our nature tells that no man of a genial heart, or of any special mind can take pride in either." -- "...goodness of heart is more important than to show good reason for having it." -- This is a passage between the wily Counsellor (Lorna's "uncle") and John's mother: 'Good, madam! I may look upon that as your sanction and approval: and the College of Heralds shall hear of it. And in return, as Lorna's guardian, I give my full and ready consent to her marriage with your son, madam.' 'Oh, how good of you, sir, how kind! Well, I always did say, that the learnedest people were, almost always, the best and kindest, and the most simple-hearted.' 'Madam, that is a great sentiment. What a goodly couple they will be! and if we can add him to our strength—' 'Oh no, sir, oh no!' cried mother: 'you really must not think of it. He has always been brought up so honest—' 'Hem! that makes a difference. A decided disqualification for domestic life among the Doones. But, surely, he might get over those prejudices, madam?' 'Oh no, sir! he never can: he never can indeed. When he was only that high, sir, he could not steal even an apple, when some wicked boys tried to mislead him.' 'Ah,' replied the Counsellor, shaking his white head gravely; 'then I greatly fear that his case is quite incurable. I have known such cases; violent prejudice, bred entirely of education, and anti-economical to the last degree. And when it is so, it is desperate: no man, after imbibing ideas of that sort, can in any way be useful.' -- "Pure pleasure it is to any man, to reflect upon all these things. How truly we discern clear justice, and how well we deal it. If any poor man steals a sheep, having ten children starving, and regarding it as mountain game (as a rich man does a hare), to the gallows with him. If a man of rank beats down a door, smites the owner upon the head, and honours the wife with attention, it is a thing to be grateful for, and to slouch smitten head the lower." (wasn't that a bit of satire?:) LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE THIS BOOK! ---------------------------- 1st Review The movies hardly ever do books justice. This is no exception. However, it's a fairly large book, so it's no wonder. Loved every minute of it. I loved rolling the language around in my mouth. I think some would be annoyed at the chattiness of the author, if the "asides" were removed you might get rid of 300-400 pages of the 700+ book. I loved them though. In the movie I saw (A&E version) they portrayed John Ridd (narrator, hero) as a vengeful young man eager to wreak havoc on the dirty Doone's for their dastardly actions against Ridd's father and his love, Lorna. He's not like that at all in the book. In fact, his peaceful, self-effacing and honest nature is the great highlight of the book. This would be a fabulous book to put in the category "Blood and Morality Tales for Young Boys" because it's got plenty of action, blood, and adventure--with only a tinge of romance (the guy has to get the girl)and the hero is really heroic not only in action but in character. I wonder about getting a youngster through the "asides" but I think a good reader would be caught up enough in the story to go through with it. Blackmore did a super job of creating suspense and action clear until the very end. -----------

  7. 4 out of 5

    Tweety

    Just as good the third time round as the first! I can't say anything that hasn't already been said so I'll just say what I liked and why. R. D. Blackmore's descriptions of the countryside and the Doone's valley are some of my favorite parts. One of my favorite chapters is chapter 8, where we first see inside Doone Valley. Next we have Tom the highwayman with his strawberry horse Jenny. What a pair. Tom manages to be endearing even when he's a thief with an eye for finery. Lorna Doone has a sweetn Just as good the third time round as the first! I can't say anything that hasn't already been said so I'll just say what I liked and why. R. D. Blackmore's descriptions of the countryside and the Doone's valley are some of my favorite parts. One of my favorite chapters is chapter 8, where we first see inside Doone Valley. Next we have Tom the highwayman with his strawberry horse Jenny. What a pair. Tom manages to be endearing even when he's a thief with an eye for finery. Lorna Doone has a sweetness that over rides even sweet Annie, John's sister. And Ruth Huckaback my favorite character. Such a lovable little redhead! Now since I don't know what to say I'll add a picture from my other favorite chapter, chapter 16

  8. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    The plethora of interesting aspects to this book makes it difficult to decide about which ones to write. John Ridd is a young boy living in the wilds of western England in the 17th century, when his father is murdered by a band of outlaws who torment, bully and rob the farmers and good people of Exmoor. The Doones occupy their own outlaw village and not only survive by robbing those around them but also prey on the their neighbors for sport. When John Ridd’s father stands up to these bullies, he The plethora of interesting aspects to this book makes it difficult to decide about which ones to write. John Ridd is a young boy living in the wilds of western England in the 17th century, when his father is murdered by a band of outlaws who torment, bully and rob the farmers and good people of Exmoor. The Doones occupy their own outlaw village and not only survive by robbing those around them but also prey on the their neighbors for sport. When John Ridd’s father stands up to these bullies, he is murdered and leaves behind his widow, Sarah Ridd, his prosperous farm, and his three children. Although John grows up without the guidance of his father, he develops into an upstanding, strong and honest man. Never for a minute does John harbor resentment or a grudge against the Doones. If he had let hate and vengeance consume him, his heart would never have been open to receive the love of Lorna Doone and he would have missed out on the greatest love of his life. What impressed me most about these star-crossed lovers is that they refuse to let the sins of their families ruin their happiness. R.D. Blackmore has created a character in John Ridd that is an enduring moral example for all ages. Find this review and others at: www.thebookbindersdaughter.com Despite unfortunate circumstances and countless obstacles, the zeal of John and Lorna’s love never wanes. John’s thoughts and actions are always carried out with his love in mind, no matter how long it has been since he has beheld her face. This romance is an interesting lesson for those of us in the 21st century who are accustomed to social media, Skype, text messaging, and any number of gadgets that keep us constantly in connection with one another. We do not have to wait days and weeks for a letter from a loved one or travel on an extended and tedious journey to reach our beloved. In this age of “out of site, out of mind,” would a man and woman be so patient, faithful and enduring in their love as John and Lorna? The plot is also one of the factors that made me devour this book. The reader is kept in constant suspense wondering whether or not the evil villians, in the form of the Doones, and especially their leader Carver Doone, will get their just deserts. Will anyone come to the aid of the innocent people of Exmoor to stomp out these bullies, or will John Ridd and his neighbors take matters into their own hands? John’s cousin, Tom Faggus, who is also a highway robber, has many interesting parts in the storyline. Although, as a counterexample to the Doones, he robs the rich and gives the spoils to the poor. R.D. Blackmore kept me guessing the various fates and outcomes of his characters until the very end. R.D. Blackmore’s tale has the perfect formula for a great novel: romance, adventure, a bucolic setting, and indelible characters. The tale of John Ridd has truly captured my heart and like all my favorite classic books, it will be one of those that I will reread again and again.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Mela

    It is must read for every fan of historical fiction (especially of seventeenth-century England). I think, not all fans will love the style of writing but still, they should try to read it at least. It was really good historical fiction. It portrayed superbly everyday life and the impact of big events on common people. we of the moderate party, hearing all this and ten times as much and having no love for this sour James, such as we had for the lively Charles, were ready to wait for what might happ It is must read for every fan of historical fiction (especially of seventeenth-century England). I think, not all fans will love the style of writing but still, they should try to read it at least. It was really good historical fiction. It portrayed superbly everyday life and the impact of big events on common people. we of the moderate party, hearing all this and ten times as much and having no love for this sour James, such as we had for the lively Charles, were ready to wait for what might happen, rather than care about stopping it the price of horses' shoes was gone up again, though already twopence-farthing each; and that Betty had broken her lover's head with the stocking full of money There were also fascinating descriptions of important events and historical issues. Flying men, flung back from dreams of victory and honour, only glad to have the luck of life and limbs to fly with, mud-bedraggled, foul with slime, reeking both with sweat and blood, which they could not stop to wipe, cursing, with their pumped-out lungs, every stick that hindered them, or gory puddle that slipped the step, scarcely able to leap over the corses that had dragged to die There was the wisdom too, so precious, especially in historical fiction, that teaches us or at least is trying to teach us. Too late we know the good from bad; the knowledge is no pleasure then; being memory's medicine rather than the wine of hope Hope, of course, is nothing more than desire with a telescope, magnifying distant matters, overlooking near ones; opening one eye on the objects, closing the other to all objections. And if hope be the future tense of desire, the future of fear is religion—at least with too many of us. Now this may seem very strange to us who live in a better and purer age—or say at least that we do so—and yet who are we to condemn our fathers for teaching us better manners, and at their own expense? But, as I wrote, the style of writing was a bit specific. There were moments I felt tired of reading. There was something in too long sentences and the order in them, that made reading a bit wearisome. Also, some parts of love story (the talks between lovers) were a tiny bit too... sweet and fairy-tale as to me (I mean, I like it in other books, but in here it didn't feel perfect). "You sweet love," I said at this, being slave to her soft obedience; "do you suppose I should be content to leave you until Elysium?" "How on earth can I tell, dear John, what you will be content with?" "You, and only you," said I; "the whole of it lies in a syllable. Now you know my entire want; and want must be my comfort etc. etc. Nonetheless, these flaws were nothing comparing to the other aspects and advantages of the novel.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Terence

    A pleasant surprise, I admit. I first saw a copy of this book on my library's (used) bookshelves for 25 cents but even that ridiculously low price didn't tempt me enough to purchase it. I didn't want to get stuck with one of those heavy, portentous, late Victorian tomes that would render me comatose. Then, however, I watched this version of the book. The plot looked interesting so the next time I was browsing the library's shelves I took the 2-bit plunge and bought the book. And I'm glad I did. Fro A pleasant surprise, I admit. I first saw a copy of this book on my library's (used) bookshelves for 25 cents but even that ridiculously low price didn't tempt me enough to purchase it. I didn't want to get stuck with one of those heavy, portentous, late Victorian tomes that would render me comatose. Then, however, I watched this version of the book. The plot looked interesting so the next time I was browsing the library's shelves I took the 2-bit plunge and bought the book. And I'm glad I did. From its first pages, where a young John Ridd unknowingly meets the young girl who would become Lorna Doone, to John's final fight with the savage Carver Doone, murderer of his father and attempted ravisher of Lorna, Lorna Doone is a fast-moving, improbable but delightful adventure. John Ridd, our narrator, is a stolid, peace-loving yeoman farmer who desires above all to live quietly on his farm with the woman (and the family) he loves. But circumstances conspire to place "obstacles" in his path. The coincidences that bring John and Lorna together, split them, and then join them once again are outlandish but you don't care since, first, you really like both characters and are rooting for them the entire time, and, second, Blackmore's writes sprightly and assuredly; its a pleasure to read. And peppered with acerbic comments about women, law, religion, village life, and other aspects of English society (some examples of which can be found in my update feeds). Recommended for those who like the novels of Rafael Sabatini and others like him.

  11. 4 out of 5

    RitaSkeeter

    I was excited to read this *romance not historical* classic, but sadly (very sadly given there were 750 pages of it) it just wasn't really my cup of tea. Ironically, it was the historical parts of the novel I liked a lot more than the 'romance'. I liked the setting, I liked the way the story was set up with those evil Doones, and I liked all the descriptions of the natural environment and the farmin' life. What I didn't like, and what made those 750 pages drag, were the characters. We have our pro I was excited to read this *romance not historical* classic, but sadly (very sadly given there were 750 pages of it) it just wasn't really my cup of tea. Ironically, it was the historical parts of the novel I liked a lot more than the 'romance'. I liked the setting, I liked the way the story was set up with those evil Doones, and I liked all the descriptions of the natural environment and the farmin' life. What I didn't like, and what made those 750 pages drag, were the characters. We have our protagonist John 'Jan' Ridd. A stolid, good, manly kind of bloke. In short, a bit of a boring dolt. And then there was Lorna. A Victorian model of a good, meek, prone to swoons type of woman. In short, a wimp. It was interesting to read in the editor's notes that Blackmore revised an earlier edition of the book to downplay sexual elements of Lorna. I suspect I may have enjoyed the 'unrevised' edition more. I never felt any real connection to the characters and their plight, and the flabbiness of the prose turned the possibly exciting bits into not so exciting because I was snoring by the Blackmore finally got to the point. It was an okay read. Can't say I'll be queueing up any more of Blackmore to read though.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    I was assigned a (vastly abridged) version of this when I was in grade school, which kept 90% of the plot but cut out a lot of the description and the on and on. This was in 4th or 5th grade, but it has stayed with me ever since. I read the abridged version so many times it literally fell to pieces, and this was my first time reading the unabridged version. Blackmore wrote in the dialogue of the time, writing "in accent" so to speak, which was difficult to get through at times. For some of his c I was assigned a (vastly abridged) version of this when I was in grade school, which kept 90% of the plot but cut out a lot of the description and the on and on. This was in 4th or 5th grade, but it has stayed with me ever since. I read the abridged version so many times it literally fell to pieces, and this was my first time reading the unabridged version. Blackmore wrote in the dialogue of the time, writing "in accent" so to speak, which was difficult to get through at times. For some of his characters, I literally had to read the dialogue out loud to try to sound out what he was writing. Thankfully, this was only one or two of the characters, the rest were much easier to read through. He does kind of go on at points, and the plot has so many twists and turns that you practically need a diagram to keep up with it--but that was very much the style of the time. It's well worth the effort you put in to get through it; obviously, if 15 years after the first time I read it it's still haunting me.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    Available at Gutenberg Project: http://www.gutenberg.org/catalog/worl... Not so good as expected.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Library Shelf

    Well---I think Blackmore outdoes the Brontes in romance and stirring action with Lorna Doone. The best romance action packed novel. I was so proud of myself as an eleven-year old when I read the "dumbed down" version of the book. They need to do a Young Adult version of Blackmore's heavy-weight novel so that readers allergic to anything over 250 pages will pick this one up for a good reading experience. OK---forget it you purists out there---I've already argued in favor of Classic Comics, abridg Well---I think Blackmore outdoes the Brontes in romance and stirring action with Lorna Doone. The best romance action packed novel. I was so proud of myself as an eleven-year old when I read the "dumbed down" version of the book. They need to do a Young Adult version of Blackmore's heavy-weight novel so that readers allergic to anything over 250 pages will pick this one up for a good reading experience. OK---forget it you purists out there---I've already argued in favor of Classic Comics, abridged versions, anything that will eventually get someone to finally upgrade to the UNABRIDGED version of a book. Well, I came to loving classics via comic books so I guess I'm "one of those". So---elitists I'm for bringing the PUBLIC into the reading world while you snicker and look down on us!

  15. 5 out of 5

    catriona (reads)

    What a first book to read for Victober! The perfect sweeping, slightly over the top romance. Highly recommend the audiobook narrated by Jonathan Keeble, John Ridd's voice shines through wonderfully in his performance!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Andrea Zuvich

    Even better the second time around!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan

    That Carver Doone's a real bastard, if I remember correctly.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kailey (BooksforMKs)

    Young John Ridd is called home from school when his father is murdered by notorious highwaymen, the Doones. Although others cry out for revenge, young John focuses on working his mother's farm, and growing up tall and strong, without bitterness in his heart. While he is fishing one day, he comes across the lovely Lorna Doone, the innocent granddaughter of the leader of the Doone clan. The two children become secret friends, and as they grow up, their love blossoms. Lorna is promised in marriage Young John Ridd is called home from school when his father is murdered by notorious highwaymen, the Doones. Although others cry out for revenge, young John focuses on working his mother's farm, and growing up tall and strong, without bitterness in his heart. While he is fishing one day, he comes across the lovely Lorna Doone, the innocent granddaughter of the leader of the Doone clan. The two children become secret friends, and as they grow up, their love blossoms. Lorna is promised in marriage to her violent cousin, Carver Doone, but John vows to rescue her from the clutches of the Doone family. This story definitely deserves the title "epic", since it covers a lot of ground, although the basic storyline is fairly simple. There's some focus on the political unrest of the time and the impact it has on Exmoor, with several armies, Dukes, and papists sweeping across the country. Such a rich historical background really brings a lot of depth to the story, and provides many twists and turns to the plot. The wild countryside of Exmoor is the perfect backdrop for the mystery, suspense, violence, romance, and wildness of the story. The different terrain of the farms, the moors, the seaside, and the crags and mountains practically become their own characters, informing the reader of the mood of each scene. We get used to the comfort and safety of the fields around the farm, so that when violence comes rushing into that scenery, we are shocked and outraged. We expect to see strange and weird sights and sounds in the mysterious crags and gullies of a rocky terrain, so we are doubly interested to hear of ghostly sightings or mystifying disappearances. I felt connected with John's character, since he is the narrator, and his personality shines through every page. But I didn't connect with Lorna very much until the middle of the book when her character started to really flourish. There are many wonderful supporting characters, each with their own backstory and place in the plot. John's mother, who dotes on him and spoils him and gives him his own way in everything. Sweet darling Annie, John's sister, who apparently can do no wrong in John's eyes. Mysterious and cynical Uncle Huckabuck, whose only goal is to acquire more money despite his already substantial fortune. Little cousin Ruth Huckabuck, misunderstood and ignored, but with a full and loving heart. Lazy John Fry, the foreman of the farm, who is only useful if you can stop him telling the most outrageous lies. The dashing Tom Faggus, an honorable highwayman, adored by all the countryside for his gallantry. And a dozen more, who becomes John's friends or enemies, each with a life of their own, and pouncing off the page through their native dialogue, their startling actions, and close emotional pull. One thing I did NOT like about the writing style was how the narrator, John himself, talks in chronological circles sometimes. He will be telling you about this thing that happened, and then he'll say, 'Oh, but 3 months before that this other thing happened. And I neglected to mention that this person was a guest at the farm the whole time, so they saw it all too.' Ugh! Why can't you just tell things in order?!?! It was very distracting, but after the first 100 pages or so, I kind of got used to his upside-down-and-backwards storytelling style. Another annoying thing about the writing was these long flights of fancy into descriptions of the passing seasons, and the plants and trees blooming, or the beautiful snowflakes, blah blah blah. I mean, I love a good description, as long as you keep it to under 4 sentences, NOT 4 pages! (He gave Dickens a run for his money here.) There were also many thoughtful pages about the meaning of good and evil, and how people react to politics, and whether titled people are truly noble at heart, and how husbands and wives behave to each other, and when violence is good or whether it is always wrong, and whether or not this and that, etc... and again, I love a good philosophical thought process, but keep it to about 3 or 4 paragraphs, NOT 4 pages. It breaks up the storyline and slows down the action, and you lose your reader's interest. I disliked how John is constantly saying that he isn't very smart, and he doesn't deserve the credit for some good deed, and he is just a humble farmer, and he knows that the reader won't think much of him, just a simple man with a simple mind, and no quickness to his thoughts, and the reader must forgive him for being so feeble-minded. ON and on and on... in every chapter! OMG, John! We know you're stupid already. Just get on with the story and stop being so darned humble! Urgh. The repetition of this one thing got on my nerves so bad! Overall though, I enjoyed this story immensely! The entanglement of the plot, the rich scenery, the irresistible characters, and the exciting mystery kept me interested and delighted with each chapter.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Sammis

    Back in March I tried to read Lorna Doone but realized too late that my copy was a horribly abridged edition. The book was barely recognizable as the original R. D. Blackmore romance. By July I had found a second, older and complete version and added it to my list for the Classics Challenge. In the meantime, other obligations got in the way and I was forced to leave Lorna Doone to the wire. Lorna Doone is framed around the Monmouth rebellion but the book isn't a historical fiction. The Doone clan Back in March I tried to read Lorna Doone but realized too late that my copy was a horribly abridged edition. The book was barely recognizable as the original R. D. Blackmore romance. By July I had found a second, older and complete version and added it to my list for the Classics Challenge. In the meantime, other obligations got in the way and I was forced to leave Lorna Doone to the wire. Lorna Doone is framed around the Monmouth rebellion but the book isn't a historical fiction. The Doone clan's ties to Monmouth serves as a way to explain their antagonism to John Ridd and his family. It's also a narrative excuse to throw in adventure, danger and derring-do. In all of this political unrest, Lorna escapes the Doone clan and seeks refuge with Ridd's kith and kin. They had been friends (on and off and in secret) since they were children after a chance meeting at a waterfall. Though no one is pleased with John's plan to help Lorna for fear of retaliation from the Doones, he is supported and Lorna is welcomed into their household. As so many romances do, Lorna Doone has a nail biting climax. If Blackmore had been writing a tragedy, the ending would have been very different. To the observant reader, the outcome won't be to much of a surprise (but still a relief) for the opening chapters where John, now an old man, is looking back on his life as his grandchildren tease him for his sentimentality. Had I more time, I would have preferred to go through Lorna Doone in greater detail as I am doing with Don Quixote (next post coming in two weeks). Maybe sometime I will go back and reread Blackmore's novel a third time. Right now, though, I'm planning to walk through Ulysses after I finish with Don Quixote.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Madolyn Chukwu

    The ultimate nightmare: a woman being shot during her own wedding ceremony! What a scenario. That is what sticks in my mind after reading this book, regarded as a classic. Admittedly I read only one of the shortened abbreviated versions, as many told me there was no way I could read or even understand the original work. But it does not matter. The version I read was exciting though harrowing enough; and one wonders at the simple, often brutal life of the denizens of this British place centuries The ultimate nightmare: a woman being shot during her own wedding ceremony! What a scenario. That is what sticks in my mind after reading this book, regarded as a classic. Admittedly I read only one of the shortened abbreviated versions, as many told me there was no way I could read or even understand the original work. But it does not matter. The version I read was exciting though harrowing enough; and one wonders at the simple, often brutal life of the denizens of this British place centuries ago. There is a lot of cruelty, but John Ridd’s love for the lovely Lorna shines through. After all sorts of tribulations that one would have thought had no real solutions, Ridd wins his woman who is very much a noble lady now…and then she is shot by the villainous Carver on her wedding day! No wonder Ridd exacts revenge man to man and ends the life of Carver. Best of all, Lorna survives the shooting and the book has a very happy ending. Tears….

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sara Madden

    I read this in high school because I found a copy my mom had when she was in high school. I loved it so much, I started reading more English literature which carried me into college and ultimately my introduction to Jane Austen and the Brontes. Lorna Doone sent me into a world of great literature in which I will always be grateful. The story of Lorna and John is timeless and gets pushed into the shadows by other great works of art like Romeo and Juliet, Tristan and Isolde and Elizabeth and Darcy I read this in high school because I found a copy my mom had when she was in high school. I loved it so much, I started reading more English literature which carried me into college and ultimately my introduction to Jane Austen and the Brontes. Lorna Doone sent me into a world of great literature in which I will always be grateful. The story of Lorna and John is timeless and gets pushed into the shadows by other great works of art like Romeo and Juliet, Tristan and Isolde and Elizabeth and Darcy. Give it a chance, you won't be disappointed.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    Being terrible for buying tons of books at a time, which then sit untouched on my physical and virtual shelves for years whilst I get distracted by newer, shinier books, I thought I’d start this year by trying to get through some of my backlog. I picked Lorna Doone - this was a HUGE mistake, nearly robbing me of my reading mojo just two books into the new year. John Ridd is a farmer in the village of Oare and leads a simple enough life. Bringing in the harvest, going fishing, and hoping to avoid Being terrible for buying tons of books at a time, which then sit untouched on my physical and virtual shelves for years whilst I get distracted by newer, shinier books, I thought I’d start this year by trying to get through some of my backlog. I picked Lorna Doone - this was a HUGE mistake, nearly robbing me of my reading mojo just two books into the new year. John Ridd is a farmer in the village of Oare and leads a simple enough life. Bringing in the harvest, going fishing, and hoping to avoid the local colour - the Doone’s, a family of apparently noble birth who spend their time robbing and killing as many of the locals and visitors to Exmoor as they can. John falls in love with one of their number, Lorna, through a chance encounter at a young age, and from there on starts planning on how to release her from the Doone’s clutches. A classic that has apparently never been out of print since its publication, I can only imagine that every other reader is far more patient and clever than I am. Moving slower than a comatose sloth, and filled with incredibly dense language that was agony to wade through, if I was any other person I would have abandoned this book fairly quickly. Unfortunately, my approach is a little more Magnus Magnusson (“I’ve started so I’ll finish”),  leaving me to read of John walking backwards and forwards across Exmoor, describing every sodding single blade of grass in minute detail each time, and having virtually incomprehensible conversations with the locals: Zailor, ees fai! ay and zarve un raight. Her can't kape out o' the watter here, whur a' must, goo vor to vaind un, zame as a gurt to-ad squalloping, and mux up till I be wore out, I be, wi' the very saight of 's braiches. How wil un ever baide aboard zhip, wi' the watter zinging out under un, and comin' up splash when the wind blow. Latt un goo, missus, latt un goo, zay I for wan, and old Davy wash his clouts for un.” Nope, me neither. If you like your reading matter to be incredibly hard work, with a meandering plot and using 100 words where it could have used one, Lorna Doone will be well up your street. Otherwise, avoid at all costs. **Also posted at Cannonball Read 10**

  23. 4 out of 5

    Cricketb

    This looks like the right cover. As a young teen, I would read this late into the night while babysitting. When the parents came home, I'd greet them in 1811 English. In grade 8, my teacher noticed me reading the last in the Anne of Green Gables series (a book I'd spent 3 years looking for, pre-internet), and said it was too young for me. So, next week I brought in this. Tiny print. Onion skin paper. Huge number of pages. The teacher stopped bothering me. After writing my final university exam, I ask This looks like the right cover. As a young teen, I would read this late into the night while babysitting. When the parents came home, I'd greet them in 1811 English. In grade 8, my teacher noticed me reading the last in the Anne of Green Gables series (a book I'd spent 3 years looking for, pre-internet), and said it was too young for me. So, next week I brought in this. Tiny print. Onion skin paper. Huge number of pages. The teacher stopped bothering me. After writing my final university exam, I asked Mom to send me this book, and I enjoyed it all over again. A few years ago, though, I stalled half-way through. This might have been because I didn't have the time to sit and read for hours on end and get into it.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Michael Arnold

    I really loved this book. I have a love for the 18th century, and stories about rural life, and of history. This novel appeals to all of those perfectly. The start is like the novel Cider with Rosie and about growing up in a rural and rough 'agricola' world, the middle involves the political turmoils in the 1700s, and the end is sort of gothically like Jane Eyre, just with guns and firefights with outlaws. Never read this book? READ IT! READ IT NOW!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Marialyce

    While I thought the beginning was a wonderful one, this book as I reached the middle tended to drag for me. I enjoyed the pictures the author painted of the countryside and the characters certainly were presented in a clear and wonderful manner. I liked the characters of John and Lorna and one could not fault their love and the romantic elements that carried throughout the novel. It had all the elements of a great novel incorporating the relevant historical pieces, but the sometimes authentic di While I thought the beginning was a wonderful one, this book as I reached the middle tended to drag for me. I enjoyed the pictures the author painted of the countryside and the characters certainly were presented in a clear and wonderful manner. I liked the characters of John and Lorna and one could not fault their love and the romantic elements that carried throughout the novel. It had all the elements of a great novel incorporating the relevant historical pieces, but the sometimes authentic dialect used oftentimes threw me off track in the reading flow. There was a lot of male bravura in the book as John and Carver strive to win Lorna for their own. Of course John seems to be the perfect male (perhaps a bit too) while Carver and the Doones are the perfect villains. Filled with a family of love and goodness, the Ridds are in direct contrast to the Doones who are evil right down to their core. The interactions between the two families are what drives the story as well as the inclusion of characters who add their own dimensions to the tale. While I liked the book, it is not one I could see myself revisiting. I was in fact a bit disappointed in it as the story seemed to go on and on in the middle and did not pick up until the calamitous ending. I was glad when I finished and at times found myself skimming which is a sign to me that the reading of this novel was wearing on me. I am glad I read it but more importantly, I am glad that I finished it...

  26. 5 out of 5

    Clare Cannon

    Just finished listening to this on audio. Masterfully read, but for the first few hours it was hard work deciphering the old English accent. After that it was fine, I don't know if the actor lightened up on the twang - maybe John started speaking more properly as he spent more time with Lorna, or maybe I just got used to it. An interesting classic romance with plenty of historical detail from the late 1600s. The story of the star-crossed lovers surrounded by the evil Doones reminded me a little o Just finished listening to this on audio. Masterfully read, but for the first few hours it was hard work deciphering the old English accent. After that it was fine, I don't know if the actor lightened up on the twang - maybe John started speaking more properly as he spent more time with Lorna, or maybe I just got used to it. An interesting classic romance with plenty of historical detail from the late 1600s. The story of the star-crossed lovers surrounded by the evil Doones reminded me a little of Jamaica Inn (though Jamaica Inn is a favourite, this one didn't quite make it). The nasty Doones never have Jem Merlyn's dangerous appeal though. I love listening to a classic alongside my contemporary reads, there's so much more in them than in most newer books. Depth of character, a plot that is extraordinary in an ordinary way, historical detail, and they don't leave you feeling bitter. Even though the lovely Lorna's main attraction is her beauty, at least she's good and selfless and handles her rather traumatic life quite well. John is a great protagonist and I was very happy to learn about 17th century England (and their accents) in his company.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Tis an enjoyable yarn. However, the narrator/ hero is detestable. He admits that he wouldn't have loved Lorna if she'd been plain. And his bovine sensibilities are offended by intelligent women. Why is the she with him? Superficiality is his only distinction. Really, which is sexier a highwayman or a farmer? *concludes with rendition of 'I've got a brand new combine-harvester'* *rests case*

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ann Klefstad

    Another book from childhood. Read it sitting in the woods by a river. Every day, took it outside and read with my feet in the water. 12? 13? like that. To this day, I remember the odd union of the virtual landscape so vividly evoked and the actual one around me.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Lorna

    Ironically, not really my favourite kind of book - too much drama for me. My mother says she used to play "Lorna Doone" in the playground at school as a child. I always wonder what that could possibly have looked like!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Joelle

    There are some books that catch you and hold you captive. You fall into them and can’t climb out until the last page has been feverishly read. There are other books that take you slowly, gradually, and almost imperceptibly into their arms. Lorna Doone is such a book. Disclaimer: This book is extremely long and I only read about 25% of it in its printed form. I can recommend the audiobook read by Jonathan Keeble. His accent is enchanting and he makes the characters live. Be prepared for a long lis There are some books that catch you and hold you captive. You fall into them and can’t climb out until the last page has been feverishly read. There are other books that take you slowly, gradually, and almost imperceptibly into their arms. Lorna Doone is such a book. Disclaimer: This book is extremely long and I only read about 25% of it in its printed form. I can recommend the audiobook read by Jonathan Keeble. His accent is enchanting and he makes the characters live. Be prepared for a long listen because it’s 26 hours long. The book may be titled Lorna Doone, but it’s really about John Ridd. John is a farmer of large proportions and slow wit. I wasn’t sure if I liked him at first, but he snuck up on me and I fell in love with him. He’s not as slow as he makes himself out to be. The book is written in first person perspective and John is a very humble fellow. He may not think himself clever, but he is intelligent, loyal and true. Once he decides what he wants and the best action to take, he goes at it determined to succeed. When he decides he’s in love with Lorna the result is inevitable, or so he and the reader think. John’s relationship with his sister, Annie, is one of my favorite subplots. While John is falling in love with the heir to an outlaw empire, Annie falls in love with a highwayman. The situations that arise are sometimes humorous, the the siblings support each other throughout despite the opinions of others. Lorna and John have a long and twisted road to travel before their HEA and I thoroughly enjoyed tagging along. Don’t start a mob and burn me at the stake, but sometimes I prefer to watch the movie before reading the book. When it comes to the classics and wordy authors (like Dickens), I like to find out if I’m interested in the plot, and have a general idea of the story before diving into 1200 pages. I watched Lorna Doone (2000) and it made me want to read the book and know all the little details and background knowledge that are habitually left out of movie adaptations. I’m happy now.

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