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The Broken Window

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El regreso de Lincoln Rhyme, el criminólogo tetrapléjico que protagonizó El coleccionista de huesos. «Si alguna vez te has preocupado por toda la información que alguien podría encontrar sobre ti en la red, esta novela te aterrará». The Globe and Mail Jeffery Deaver es uno de los grandes maestros del thriller psicológico actual. Varias cuentas de correo electrónico, tu per El regreso de Lincoln Rhyme, el criminólogo tetrapléjico que protagonizó El coleccionista de huesos. «Si alguna vez te has preocupado por toda la información que alguien podría encontrar sobre ti en la red, esta novela te aterrará». The Globe and Mail Jeffery Deaver es uno de los grandes maestros del thriller psicológico actual. Varias cuentas de correo electrónico, tu perfil en Facebook, páginas de Twitter e Instagram, tus fotos en Flickr... ¿Y si alguien fuera capaz de recopilar toda la información que vas volcando en la red? ¿Y si ese alguien estuviera dispuesto a utilizarla para colarse en tu casa y convertirte en una víctima más de su locura… o incluso a hacer de ti el culpable perfecto? Cuando su primo Arthur es acusado de matar a una mujer, Lincoln Rhyme decide que ni el más inútil de los asesinos dejaría tantos rastros. Ayudado por la detective Amelia Sachs, el criminalista tetrapléjico se dispone a jugar una mortal partida de ajedrez contra un rival invisible, que además puede anticipar cada uno de sus movimientos. En la octava novela de su más popular personaje, Jeffery Deaver aborda el mundo de pesadilla al que puede conducirnos internet. Tras leer La ventana rota nos lo pensaremos dos veces antes de volver a encender el ordenador.


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El regreso de Lincoln Rhyme, el criminólogo tetrapléjico que protagonizó El coleccionista de huesos. «Si alguna vez te has preocupado por toda la información que alguien podría encontrar sobre ti en la red, esta novela te aterrará». The Globe and Mail Jeffery Deaver es uno de los grandes maestros del thriller psicológico actual. Varias cuentas de correo electrónico, tu per El regreso de Lincoln Rhyme, el criminólogo tetrapléjico que protagonizó El coleccionista de huesos. «Si alguna vez te has preocupado por toda la información que alguien podría encontrar sobre ti en la red, esta novela te aterrará». The Globe and Mail Jeffery Deaver es uno de los grandes maestros del thriller psicológico actual. Varias cuentas de correo electrónico, tu perfil en Facebook, páginas de Twitter e Instagram, tus fotos en Flickr... ¿Y si alguien fuera capaz de recopilar toda la información que vas volcando en la red? ¿Y si ese alguien estuviera dispuesto a utilizarla para colarse en tu casa y convertirte en una víctima más de su locura… o incluso a hacer de ti el culpable perfecto? Cuando su primo Arthur es acusado de matar a una mujer, Lincoln Rhyme decide que ni el más inútil de los asesinos dejaría tantos rastros. Ayudado por la detective Amelia Sachs, el criminalista tetrapléjico se dispone a jugar una mortal partida de ajedrez contra un rival invisible, que además puede anticipar cada uno de sus movimientos. En la octava novela de su más popular personaje, Jeffery Deaver aborda el mundo de pesadilla al que puede conducirnos internet. Tras leer La ventana rota nos lo pensaremos dos veces antes de volver a encender el ordenador.

30 review for The Broken Window

  1. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    In this eighth book in the series, wheelchair-bound criminalist Lincoln Rhyme and his partner, detective Amelia Sachs, are drawn into the investigation when Lincoln's cousin Arthur Rhyme is arrested for murder. Lincoln and his team soon discover that the real murderer is a serial rapist/murderer who uses personal information from a data mining company to lure his victims and to plant evidence so innocent people are arrested for the crimes. The source of the personal data used by the perpetrator In this eighth book in the series, wheelchair-bound criminalist Lincoln Rhyme and his partner, detective Amelia Sachs, are drawn into the investigation when Lincoln's cousin Arthur Rhyme is arrested for murder. Lincoln and his team soon discover that the real murderer is a serial rapist/murderer who uses personal information from a data mining company to lure his victims and to plant evidence so innocent people are arrested for the crimes. The source of the personal data used by the perpetrator seems to be an information collection company called Strategic Systems Datacorp (SSD). When Lincoln's team starts to investigate SSD, the murderer - dubbed "522" - realizes that his plan has been discovered. Enraged, he cooks up schemes to get the detectives off his trail so he can continue his crime spree. Deavers is a master at this type of story and the book zips along at a brisk pace and holds your interest. Aside from the plot I was very interested to learn how much information about us is collected and collated by professional "data collectors." They apparently itemize the kinds and brands of products we use, our educational history, what kind of vacations we take, what restaurants we favor, where we get our hair cut, etc.etc. Ditto for all our relatives, friends, and acquaintances. In the book, the murderer makes use of this kind of information to plot his crimes. You can follow my reviews at https://reviewsbybarbsaffer.blogspot....

  2. 4 out of 5

    stephanie

    oh my lord. i haven't been this creeped out by a book in like, forever. and now i'm totally bothered by the fact that there is all this information that *I'VE* put on the internet about myself and my book tastes and now there's all this CRAZY ASS INFORMATION that EVERYONE can find out about me. i love ron pulaski, almost more than amelia. i love watching him grow over the series - i love lincoln, i love lon, and mel, and the crazy computer techs. this writing is tight and plotty and crazy-brilli oh my lord. i haven't been this creeped out by a book in like, forever. and now i'm totally bothered by the fact that there is all this information that *I'VE* put on the internet about myself and my book tastes and now there's all this CRAZY ASS INFORMATION that EVERYONE can find out about me. i love ron pulaski, almost more than amelia. i love watching him grow over the series - i love lincoln, i love lon, and mel, and the crazy computer techs. this writing is tight and plotty and crazy-brilliant. i didn't want it to end. plus there's mention of the unsub from The Cold Moon and i do love me some follow-up. i can't recommend this one enough. it's utterly wonderful and brilliant. i'm ticked i'll have to wait until 2009 for the next book from Jeffery Deaver. it will be kathryn dance, though, and i do love her. so. the book made me want to burn my computer and never get on the internet again. that's saying a lot.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Obsidian

    Well after a kick butt book #7, I had high hopes for book #8, instead this one floundered a lot IMHO. We also have Sachs in my opinion being a total nitwit for how she handles an inappropriate relationship with someone she is close to. And I have to say that this book was highly repetitive from beginning to end. I think that Deaver was trying to tell three stories in this one, and they all get pretty lost. The ending I found to be off and just setting things up for the next book in the series. A Well after a kick butt book #7, I had high hopes for book #8, instead this one floundered a lot IMHO. We also have Sachs in my opinion being a total nitwit for how she handles an inappropriate relationship with someone she is close to. And I have to say that this book was highly repetitive from beginning to end. I think that Deaver was trying to tell three stories in this one, and they all get pretty lost. The ending I found to be off and just setting things up for the next book in the series. At least I got off my butt and put out a hold request for the first book in the Kathryn Dance series though. In "The Broken Window" we have Rhyme focused on a mysterious case in London. No you will have no idea at all what that is about until the end of the book so feel free to skim any references to that, I know I did. Of course I guessed at the reveal though of why Rhyme was so interested in this case, I just don't know why Deaver hid it (badly) from readers. When Ryhme's cousin's wife (his cousin's name is Arthur) comes to visit him though, Sachs and Rhyme agree to look into Rhyme's cousin's arrest for a rape and murder he claims that he is innocent of. Within a few short chapters readers are then made hip to that fact as well. Though of course, Rhyme reveals something about his cousin that calls that all into question (not for readers though since we all get a POV of the guilty party in this one). This is what I mean by the book floundering. It would have been cool to not reveal the POV of the killer in this one. It would have been nice if Deaver had the book segue back from the team investigating (Rhyme, Sachs, Pulaski) and Rhyme's cousin Arthur who is in detention and is pretty close to a nervous breakdown. Then readers can wonder about Arthur once we have Rhyme revealing something to Sachs about why Rhyme has not been in contact with his cousin in 10 years. The rush to show that Arthur is clearly being set up and Rhyme and Sachs just trying to catch the bad guy made the book boring to me. We get the killer's POV in this one, and honestly I had a hard time with it. Besides being a murder and rapist he seems off the reservation entirely. I don't know how a person like this is able to do what he does in this book without anyone being able to stop him. I know that "The Broken Window" is a cautionary tale by Deaver about how everything is being digitized and if someone wanted to they could ruin your life, but this was way too much like "The Net" for me, but somehow more terrible....and yep, going to lower the star rating on this one again as I sit and think about that. We also have the POV of the character of Pam in this one (and please let this be the last time). This is the teen that Rhyme and Sachs have a connection to due to the events in "The Bone Collector." Sachs has taken the girl under her wing and even though Pam has a foster family, she practically lives with Rhyme and Sachs at both of their places and Sachs looks on her like a daughter (a daughter that badly needs a lot of therapy). The story-line could have been okay, but when we find out that Pam is involved with a 40 year old man she loves and Sachs doesn't have the fool arrested I just shook my head. Readers definitely understand Pam's past, but I had a hard time with her telling this grown man that she would see him if he got divorced from his wife. He has two kids younger than Pam and ugh, I just maybe banged my head there and I have to move on. This whole story-line ticked me off and wrecked the flow of the book. The writing got way too repetitive for me while reading. You will read a lot of references to Kathryn Dance in this one. I started to want her to make an appearance since I was sick of Rhyme talking about how Dance has shown him how to look at people to tell if they are lying. Also Pulaski is a fav or mine, but I am getting really tired of reading about how his ears burn when he gets upset or embarrassed. I really want to see some growth with this character. We get echoes of it here and there, but his POV's ultimately started getting on my nerves. The ending just kind of happens and then of course jumps back to the case that Rhyme was interested in going on in London. I hope the next book brings things back up a notch.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Melanie Cattanach

    Scared me spitless, yet here I sit sharing information about my reading preferences on the web.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    The best reason for rereading a book is getting it in a better edition, in this case a Hard covered version which meant that the paperback has been retired. This is a Lincoln Rhyme novel that delves into the world of data-mining and during this story he certainly does not pull his punches when it comes to giving a moral judgement over this industry. Hidden in this book is a thriller and whodunit, the murder of a woman gets Rhymes cousin into trouble being used as a sacrificial lamb for a horrible The best reason for rereading a book is getting it in a better edition, in this case a Hard covered version which meant that the paperback has been retired. This is a Lincoln Rhyme novel that delves into the world of data-mining and during this story he certainly does not pull his punches when it comes to giving a moral judgement over this industry. Hidden in this book is a thriller and whodunit, the murder of a woman gets Rhymes cousin into trouble being used as a sacrificial lamb for a horrible murder and theft. Which triggers Rhymes attention and starts him on a road about identity theft and loss of privacy in the face of modern society and its needs. In this book we learn a wee bit more about Rhymes past and how he started on the road towards America's biggest crime-scene technician. And it does contain some surprising moments. Not the greatest book in the Rhymes series, at times it felt like it was cruising along at cruise-control, but for the continuity fans the book has a new and a recurring baddie who really takes your breath away when it comes to being totally immoral. Worth your while reading.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Alan Cotterell

    Disturbing A story about the amount of data on each and every one of us and how it can be used in the right hands and in the wrong. Can't say much more without spoilers. Once again am excellent story with a brilliant protagonist. Unfortunately once again there seemed to me, that there was a large chunk of fairly slow story line in the middle. But either side of this was very fast paced. For this reason I am awarding 4 not 5 stars.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Terri

    I gave this 3 stars. Mostly because I have big issues with an author using lazy words (or technically fake words) like 'people've' and 'might'v've'. I don't care who you are, putting 'v've at the end of a word is simply not acceptable. There was a lot of this book that I thoroughly enjoyed and couldn't wait to read in bed at night, but as the book went on, something didn't feel right. The writing was not so great in parts, only it wasn't that. I think I can only do a spoiler and all those who hav I gave this 3 stars. Mostly because I have big issues with an author using lazy words (or technically fake words) like 'people've' and 'might'v've'. I don't care who you are, putting 'v've at the end of a word is simply not acceptable. There was a lot of this book that I thoroughly enjoyed and couldn't wait to read in bed at night, but as the book went on, something didn't feel right. The writing was not so great in parts, only it wasn't that. I think I can only do a spoiler and all those who haven't read it look away (this spoiler won't tell you who the killer was, but it will tell you a little of the plotline) - (view spoiler)[I didn't like the way Deaver went through the suspect list one by one. Making us think it was each one in turn and then building the kicking in the door and busting the killer feel only to learn, nope, another dead end. You expect one of those in a crime thriller, but not as many as was in this book (hide spoiler)] . Another one of those books that a half star would be handy for as, in actuality, I would give this 3.5 stars.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    Another crime solved by the great criminalist Lincoln Rhyme and his partner Amelia Sachs. This one was a creepy story about identity theft at its very worst - the big problem for me is that I can totally see this happening in the world today - makes me want to throw away all my store club cards and credit cards and live "off the grid." We also get some interesting family history for Lincoln this time. Highly recommended for fans of the series and those who enjoy criminal mysteries.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Beth

    Not worried about identity theft? Read THE BROKEN WINDOW by Jeffrey Deaver. You will be. A serial killer has gone undetected because he has been able to pin the crime on some innocent person each time. The killer “knows everything” about his murder victims and so is able to get close to them and then plant evidence that proves the guilt of innocent people because the killer "knows everything" about them, too. But how does he do it? How is he able to know everything about these people? Where does h Not worried about identity theft? Read THE BROKEN WINDOW by Jeffrey Deaver. You will be. A serial killer has gone undetected because he has been able to pin the crime on some innocent person each time. The killer “knows everything” about his murder victims and so is able to get close to them and then plant evidence that proves the guilt of innocent people because the killer "knows everything" about them, too. But how does he do it? How is he able to know everything about these people? Where does he get this information? And who could have access to it? Enter Lincoln Rhyme, a recurrent character in many of Jeffrey Deaver’s novels, and his partner, Amelia Sachs. They get involved when Rhyme’s cousin is arrested for a murder and soon find that the real killer has access to both the cousin's and the murder victim's personal data. That's when they learn about data mining. In the process, so does the reader. Data miners store personal data about everyone all the time--everything they do. Rhyme and Sachs learn that this is the only way the killer could “know everything.” So they investigate a large data miner and speak with the few people who can access all the data. The reader realizes that these people must be suspects. But which one is it? Whoever it is accesses Rhyme’ and Sachs’ personal data now, too, and can even use data mining “predictive software” to know their next move. If you like thrillers/mysteries and have never tried Deaver, as I hadn’t, this would be a good book to start with. The privacy issues it deals with will really scare you and make you wonder how much of it is real. Deaver lists several Web sites where you can get further information.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jerry

    3.5 stars.. Another outing with Lincoln Rhyme in the books.. I enjoyed this one, though The Stone Monkey, my first Lincoln Rhyme novel remains my favorite. An interesting concept, featuring a unique type of serial killer/hoarder/hacker who frames others to take the fall for his crimes. I think he really shows the dangers of all the invasion of privacy issues we deal with in our daily lives, showing just how all the seemingly random bits of data collected in our lives can and are probably right 3.5 stars.. Another outing with Lincoln Rhyme in the books.. I enjoyed this one, though The Stone Monkey, my first Lincoln Rhyme novel remains my favorite. An interesting concept, featuring a unique type of serial killer/hoarder/hacker who frames others to take the fall for his crimes. I think he really shows the dangers of all the invasion of privacy issues we deal with in our daily lives, showing just how all the seemingly random bits of data collected in our lives can and are probably right now being used by Big Brother to track our every move. (I'm referring to a particular file maintained by this data collection company, the table of contents of this file takes up 13 pages of the novel, all listing information that is likely out there and possibly accessible. Probably worth the read for that section alone. Otherwise, had a bit of a time with some of the book.. Lincoln Rhyme doesn't know what an RFID tag is (2008 pub. date) really? Doesn't know about data mining...? This guy who practically eats and breathes through technology.. indeed, should have been accepted into MIT didn't know any of this stuff? Deaver obviously chose to keep Rhyme ignorant on these facts in order to educate the reader in a great deal of detail. At times quite interesting, but sometimes a bit overdone. These Rhyme novels all follow a similar pattern, but are usually coupled with a great deal of research into the theme. Overall an entertaining read.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Cameron

    This is the latest Lincoln Rhyme novel from Jeffrey Deaver Rhyme, a forensic consultant for the NYPD, and his detective partner, Amelia Sachs, take on a psychotic mastermind who uses data mining—the business of the twenty-first century, not only to select and hunt down his victims but also to frame the crimes on complete innocents. Rhyme is reluctantly drawn into a case involving his estranged cousin, Arthur, who's been charged with first-degree murder. But when Rhyme and his crew look into the s This is the latest Lincoln Rhyme novel from Jeffrey Deaver Rhyme, a forensic consultant for the NYPD, and his detective partner, Amelia Sachs, take on a psychotic mastermind who uses data mining—the business of the twenty-first century, not only to select and hunt down his victims but also to frame the crimes on complete innocents. Rhyme is reluctantly drawn into a case involving his estranged cousin, Arthur, who's been charged with first-degree murder. But when Rhyme and his crew look into the strange set of circumstances surrounding his cousin's alleged crime, they discover connections to a company that specializes in collecting and analyzing consumer data. Further investigation leads them to some startlingly Orwellian revelations: Big Brother is watching your every move and could be a homicidal maniac. The topical subject matter makes the story line particularly compelling and we finally find out how Lincoln became a paralyzed and we learn a bit about his family. Very satisfying!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Ellen

    April 7, 2014 The Broken Window: A Lincoln Rhyme Novel I've enjoyed the Lincoln Rhymes books and especially appreciate the camaraderie between rhyme & Amelia Sachs. This is a revision of my first review for this book. I listened to this novel on CD narrated expertly by George Guidall. Arthur Rhyme has been charged with the crime of murder. A heinous murder. Now he desperately needs the help of his cousin, Lincoln Rhyme. This story centers on a psychopathic monster but a monster with a brain. April 7, 2014 The Broken Window: A Lincoln Rhyme Novel I've enjoyed the Lincoln Rhymes books and especially appreciate the camaraderie between rhyme & Amelia Sachs. This is a revision of my first review for this book. I listened to this novel on CD narrated expertly by George Guidall. Arthur Rhyme has been charged with the crime of murder. A heinous murder. Now he desperately needs the help of his cousin, Lincoln Rhyme. This story centers on a psychopathic monster but a monster with a brain. The fiend has been able not only to elude the police but to also have innocent people accused and convicted of his diabolical crimes. The suspense was intense as the plot line continued to grow. The relationship between Lincoln and Sachs developed with this case joining them to their investigation and each other. The mystery never ends.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Magpie67

    Weird and disturbing.... the collector was weird and the gathering of all the information on all individuals and then stored... disturbing, creepy, and down right scary. This perp enjoyed destroying lives by manipulating their buying habits and events in their lives. For him it was an experiment to watch men he chose to lose everything they had in life and to this; he stole their identities. The women he choose... sick rapist and a collector. But he was also a hoarder, the collections he needed Weird and disturbing.... the collector was weird and the gathering of all the information on all individuals and then stored... disturbing, creepy, and down right scary. This perp enjoyed destroying lives by manipulating their buying habits and events in their lives. For him it was an experiment to watch men he chose to lose everything they had in life and to this; he stole their identities. The women he choose... sick rapist and a collector. But he was also a hoarder, the collections he needed to have, to keep in his closet was insane. This perp worked for a company that stores data and thus he used this data for his own desires that were not natural; even though he thought himself quite normal. 522 proved to be very difficult to pin down until he made a few errors that Sachs found as she worked her way through suspects. Little did she know she had someone trailing her, someone hoping for his own justice. While 522 was trying to skew the team's personal lives... Sachs was following the clues to his doorstep.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Ramsey Hootman

    So one of the things I love about the Lincoln Rhyme series is how Deaver tackles a different interesting research topic in each book. This time, however, his topic du jour was something I am very familiar with: internet culture. Well, I guess his focus wasn't so much that as privacy issues. Anyway, geeks came to the forefront here. And... as always with any outsider's view of a culture, it was flawed. He did a pretty good job, but it's still fairly evident that Deaver isn't terribly familiar wit So one of the things I love about the Lincoln Rhyme series is how Deaver tackles a different interesting research topic in each book. This time, however, his topic du jour was something I am very familiar with: internet culture. Well, I guess his focus wasn't so much that as privacy issues. Anyway, geeks came to the forefront here. And... as always with any outsider's view of a culture, it was flawed. He did a pretty good job, but it's still fairly evident that Deaver isn't terribly familiar with current technology. I'm not even a programmer, so I'm not going to nitpick on that front, but his use of the term "jewel box" made me laugh. (He means "jewel case.") He also had his internet "expert" (a teenager) state that the best way to get a locked or protected image off of the internet is to take a photo of the screen with a digital camera. Uhhh, screencap, anyone? Granted, this piece of information is setup for a clue that appears later - in a much more reasonable context. And of course if you've ever been involved in any attempt at personal data collection (as a marketer or whatnot) you know it's far more difficult to collate information than the scenario presented by the Big Brother company in this book. Of course the level at which these folks are collecting data is absurd, but I'll chalk that up to the fictional big conspiracy trope. It works. Ish. Nitpicking done, I'm still giving this book 4 stars (probably more like 4.5) because, as usual, I very much enjoyed it. Deaver's frequent habit is to put one or several big twists at the end of his books - there's not much of that in this one, but I don't consider that critical to my enjoyment. This book is more people-centered, and Deaver spends more time in this book than in any of the others in this series on Rhyme's personal side; it's nice to finally see some of his past. I also liked that he continued the thread of the Watchmaker as a kind of side-plot... looking forward to seeing this villain surface again!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Dipanjan

    Ever since I got introduced to Lincoln Rhyme in the "Bone Collector", I can never get enough of him. In "Broken Window", Lincoln Rhyme returns with a dazzle after his last adventure "Cold Moon" which had a left us in a shock (can't reveal any details). "The Broken Window" has a formidable villain. This plot is not about Lincoln chasing the evil. Somewhere down the line, it becomes the evil chasing Lincoln and making him squeal from every angle. Lincoln is helpless, truly. This book shines BECAUSE Ever since I got introduced to Lincoln Rhyme in the "Bone Collector", I can never get enough of him. In "Broken Window", Lincoln Rhyme returns with a dazzle after his last adventure "Cold Moon" which had a left us in a shock (can't reveal any details). "The Broken Window" has a formidable villain. This plot is not about Lincoln chasing the evil. Somewhere down the line, it becomes the evil chasing Lincoln and making him squeal from every angle. Lincoln is helpless, truly. This book shines BECAUSE of the "man who knows everything". He takes over lives of others and leaves a trail of destruction in the process. He slowly usurps the victims' identity and plays them like a spider with a fly in her web. He has speed and he has accuracy. AND he is confrontational. He tackles his problems "HEAD ON". He truly gives Lincoln & Amelia a run for their money. "The Broken Window" has so much twists and turns that the reader feels like a Ping-Pong ball most of the times. You will not know where you are going, neither will you know how you got there. I stopped counting the times where I said "Oh ... My ... God". The subject and the premise of the crimes will take you into a very frightening view of the Information Age. The entire setup is creepy as it is contemporary. This book is yet another awesome Lincoln Rhyme adventure and the credit for that goes to the formidable villain who has the reader losing gasping through the pages. Do Not Miss this ride. P.S - Without giving away spoilers, I recommend this book is read in series, after Cold Moon.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kathy McC

    "You often hear the old legend that our body is worth $4.50 for parts. Our digital identity is worth far more." Awesome and frightening! Story of a perpetrator's use of data mining techniques to set up perfect crimes and frame perfect strangers for the crimes. If even half of the plot of this book is a possible reality, we must all "be afraid; be very, very afraid"! While there is violence in this book related to the crimes committed, the graphic descriptions prevalent in too many crime novels "You often hear the old legend that our body is worth $4.50 for parts. Our digital identity is worth far more." Awesome and frightening! Story of a perpetrator's use of data mining techniques to set up perfect crimes and frame perfect strangers for the crimes. If even half of the plot of this book is a possible reality, we must all "be afraid; be very, very afraid"! While there is violence in this book related to the crimes committed, the graphic descriptions prevalent in too many crime novels is absent. Deaver does a magnificent job of keeping the main focus on the solving of the crimes rather than spending time over-describing every gory detail. I would say this would be a great movie, but I'm sure the producers would feel compelled to change the focus to the blood. Characters are well developed and interesting. I wonder how he knows so much about the criminal mind, as the criminal in the story is one twisted individual. "The future of data is the future of society." "There is eternal existance. Just look at the trove of data about your life. Built the moment you are born, it's all permanent, copied, and indestructible. It's stored and backed up in a million places."

  17. 4 out of 5

    Gloria ~ mzglorybe

    this was not one of my favorite Deaver books. I had to make a choice to finish it or review some new pre-releases for Amazon so I opted out of finishing this for now anyway. The subject matter was interesting enough - it is about identity theft by a rapist/murderer who gathers information electronically of a victim and also sets up a potential person to blame for the crime - he commits the crime but plants dna evidence to link the person who potentially will be arrested for the crime. Scary to th this was not one of my favorite Deaver books. I had to make a choice to finish it or review some new pre-releases for Amazon so I opted out of finishing this for now anyway. The subject matter was interesting enough - it is about identity theft by a rapist/murderer who gathers information electronically of a victim and also sets up a potential person to blame for the crime - he commits the crime but plants dna evidence to link the person who potentially will be arrested for the crime. Scary to think this can be done... more ammo for those criminals out there. I remember seeing a movie once where the part of Lincoln Rhyme, the main character of these novels was played by Denzel Washington, so I always imagine him black, like Denzel. In this novel, Lincoln Rhyme's cousin is arrested for one of the murders and he is white, so that kind of threw me.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Dickison

    A good Lincoln Rhyme mystery dealing with the collection and manipulation of personal data, in this case, to frame people for murder. Lincoln and Amelia resolve the issue and the bad guy dies. But was he the only bad guy, or were the data collectors just as responsible? If anyone ever steals my identity I assume they will return it after a few hours of boredom. I would recommend this book to anyone who enjoys Lincoln Rhyme stories.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    Great read, dealing with identity theft.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Steve Sarner

    This is a really scary and good book - enjoyed its insight on idenitity theft and data

  21. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    I really didn't like it. The beginning was ok but the more I read the more I hated it. I almost didn't finish it but since I have never done that I decided to stick it out. There was so much needless rambling about crap that didn't contribute to the story at all and I just skimmed over most of it. The longer the book went on the more ridiculous the plot became. This will not be going back on my bookshelf.

  22. 4 out of 5

    David

    I thought the confirmation of a killer outside the range of Arthur Rhyme came too early. Most of the rest of the novel was just tracking down the inevitable. But I was interested enough in the inevitable to keep reading.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Margaret

    I enjoyed this book. It was not possible to guess who the murderer was and there were interesting twists to the story until the end. It is the first book I have read by this author and I will probably read more now.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Phyllis

    Thought I had I figured out but I wasn't even close loved it

  25. 5 out of 5

    Melanie

    The writing is good. But I've been reading this out of sentiment for random authors my dad read when he was alive. Otherwise, I almost never read white male authors. I hate the way they write women, POC, generally the disabled. I am on mobile and don't care to deconstruct Amelia Sachs but...I will never read this author again. And it's reminded me why I don't read white guys.

  26. 4 out of 5

    The BookChick

    Book Description: Lincoln Rhyme and partner/paramour Amelia Sachs return to face a criminal whose ingenious staging of crimes is enabled by a terrifying access to information.... When Lincoln's estranged cousin Arthur Rhyme is arrested on murder charges, the case is perfect — too perfect. Forensic evidence from Arthur's home is found all over the scene of the crime, and it looks like the fate of Lincoln's relative is sealed. At the behest of Arthur's wife, Judy, Lincoln grudgingly agrees to inves Book Description: Lincoln Rhyme and partner/paramour Amelia Sachs return to face a criminal whose ingenious staging of crimes is enabled by a terrifying access to information.... When Lincoln's estranged cousin Arthur Rhyme is arrested on murder charges, the case is perfect — too perfect. Forensic evidence from Arthur's home is found all over the scene of the crime, and it looks like the fate of Lincoln's relative is sealed. At the behest of Arthur's wife, Judy, Lincoln grudgingly agrees to investigate the case. Soon Lincoln and Amelia uncover a string of similar murders and rapes with perpetrators claiming innocence and ignorance — despite ironclad evidence at the scenes of the crime. Rhyme's team realizes this "perfect" evidence may actually be the result of masterful identity theft and manipulation. An information service company — the huge data miner Strategic Systems Datacorp — seems to have all the answers but is reluctant to help the police. Still, Rhyme and Sachs and their assembled team begin uncovering a chilling pattern of vicious crimes and coverups, and their investigation points to one master criminal, whom they dub "522." When "522" learns the identities of the crime-fighting team, the hunters become the hunted. Full of Deaver's trademark plot twists, The Broken Window will put the partnership of Lincoln Rhyme and Amelia Sachs to the ultimate test. My Thoughts: Wow. This story was quite a twisty suspense thriller. One thing I love about Deaver is how he connects his books and stories to one another. Some facet of a story is left trailing to be picked up in another story. He absolutely does a masterful job making connections. I won’t go into the story because the description provides a wonder teaser to whet a readers literary appetite. However, I will say that the story was totally captivating. The true criminal mastermind (UNSUB 522) behind all the death and misdeeds was brilliant. It was very scary how he could screw with and screw up so many lifes…without much effort. Character Honorable Mentions: A secondary character who deserves an honorable mention is Pulaski. The patrol officer really showed his metal in this story and you could really see his development as a character. He is beginning to think like a criminalist. Another one of Rhymes protégés like Amelia. A tertiary character who deserves an honorable mention is Jorgensen. The man’s life was totally destroyed my 522. His career…GONE. His finances…GONE. His family…GONE. His life…SCREWED. Amelia originally thought he was unbalanced and he might have been. Who wouldn’t have been after their life was upended. But Jorgensen saved the day and saved Amelia’s hide from 522. Granted, he was more geared to get revenge against 522; nevertheless, he saved Amelia’s life in an interesting twist of events. Although this book is a work of fiction, it's quite possible that someone could worm into your life to do something like this if they had a mind to. What a sobering thought. Suspensful. Thrilling. Scary. Brilliant. Just a few adjectives that describe the book.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jerry B

    Rather Ho-Hum Entry in Lincoln Rhyme Series... We're nearly all the way through the complete booklist of Jeffery Deaver, and generally enjoy his writing. He is best known for his forensic investigator Lincoln Rhyme (with sidekick/girlfriend Amelia Sachs) series, made all the more famous by the Bone Collector (the first in the set), made into a movie with Denzel Washington as the leading man. “Window” is a representative story, and about as formulaic as the rest. A serial killer is knocking off vic Rather Ho-Hum Entry in Lincoln Rhyme Series... We're nearly all the way through the complete booklist of Jeffery Deaver, and generally enjoy his writing. He is best known for his forensic investigator Lincoln Rhyme (with sidekick/girlfriend Amelia Sachs) series, made all the more famous by the Bone Collector (the first in the set), made into a movie with Denzel Washington as the leading man. “Window” is a representative story, and about as formulaic as the rest. A serial killer is knocking off victims, and lo and behold Rhyme’s cousin Arthur is arrested in an open and shut case for the latest murder. When it seems the forensic evidence left behind is almost too conclusive, the police team suspects a frame. Similar murders reinvestigated point to the same perpetrator, and the hunt is on. Meanwhile, workers at a “data mining” company, a firm that specializes in assembling personal details and transactions about just about everybody on earth, are suspects and play a heavy role in the plot. To some extent, the whole book is an excuse to reveal Deaver’s outlook on the growing lack of privacy and risks of identity theft and loss of "freedom" in the internet age. We didn’t find this novel particularly electrifying, as evidenced by the couple of weeks (about ten days over our norm!) it took to wade through it. The pages and pages devoted to the information processing stuff got tiresome – in this era of the “Patriot” Act and Facebook and Google excesses, this is hardly earth shattering news (even in 2008). While the plot was clever enough, the cops themselves becoming targets is nothing new for Deaver – so the whole thing just left us a little bit bored. In our estimation, “Broken Window”, not even a particularly apt title, is thus just a rather average Deaver outing.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Barbara M

    Its been quite a while since I read a Lincoln Rhyme novel. I've been off reading other books to match various book club and challenge books. I'm really glad this came up in my TBR challenge. I think it might be my favorite Rhymes so far. This is all about identity theft and manipulation. Deaver does an excellent job making the manipulation of information. Lincoln's cousin, with whom he had a close relationship to his teens but no longer, has been arrested for murder. Throughout the story, we get Its been quite a while since I read a Lincoln Rhyme novel. I've been off reading other books to match various book club and challenge books. I'm really glad this came up in my TBR challenge. I think it might be my favorite Rhymes so far. This is all about identity theft and manipulation. Deaver does an excellent job making the manipulation of information. Lincoln's cousin, with whom he had a close relationship to his teens but no longer, has been arrested for murder. Throughout the story, we get bits and pieces of the cousins relationship as Lincoln tries to clear his name. It is a convoluted case that has everything to do with several murders in which other people have been arrested, tried and found guilty. A serial murderer who has found a way to commit his crimes while convincing everyone else that a perfectly innocent person was responsible - pretty scary the way that happens. Every time I thought they'd caught the guy, the story took a twist. I did a little listening to the audio and reading of the e-book when an audio wasn't appropriate. The audio is the same narrator that has done the others in the series and he's quite good. If I have a complaint, it is the repetition of the notes on the white board. It takes up quite a few pages and quite a bit of listening time. With the book, you can skim past quickly but with the audio, you usually just listen.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Viji (Bookish endeavors)

    Love it love it love it love it... Echoing 522.. ;) The book was one of THE best thrillers I've ever read,the plot getting more ominous with every page.. With the trademark twists of Deaver,this book easily takes place in the list of unputdownable. Pam and the clock maker made the story feel more close to heart,giving the feeling of belonging to a reader who have read the previous books in the series. But you are in for serious disappointment if you are looking for walking-the-grid and forensic w Love it love it love it love it... Echoing 522.. ;) The book was one of THE best thrillers I've ever read,the plot getting more ominous with every page.. With the trademark twists of Deaver,this book easily takes place in the list of unputdownable. Pam and the clock maker made the story feel more close to heart,giving the feeling of belonging to a reader who have read the previous books in the series. But you are in for serious disappointment if you are looking for walking-the-grid and forensic work like the previous ones. This is more like Dan Brown's 'digital fortress' or Huxley's 'brave new world' type. But you're in for a real thrilling read.!! The only place where I felt a bit lacking was the choice of the antagonist.. I felt it could have been somebody else,the power of his actions doesn't seem to suit the person. My reaction when I saw the antagonist was,"him.?! Really.?!! You must be joking.!!" Well.. That was the only place I felt a bit off.. But the brilliance of the work as a whole completely eclipses it. HIGHEST RECOMMENDATION.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Christy

    Criminologist, quadriplegic Lincoln Rhymes has been estranged from his cousin Arthur for years. When Arthur is arrested for the murder of a young woman, Arthur’s wife implores Lincoln to help. The forensic evidence against Arthur strongly links him to the murder, but Lincoln’s paramour Amelia Sachs is suspicious that everything is so clear-cut and suspects Arthur has been set up. She and Lincoln, with the aid of NYPD, learn Arthur isn’t the first person who has been framed for a murder he didn’t Criminologist, quadriplegic Lincoln Rhymes has been estranged from his cousin Arthur for years. When Arthur is arrested for the murder of a young woman, Arthur’s wife implores Lincoln to help. The forensic evidence against Arthur strongly links him to the murder, but Lincoln’s paramour Amelia Sachs is suspicious that everything is so clear-cut and suspects Arthur has been set up. She and Lincoln, with the aid of NYPD, learn Arthur isn’t the first person who has been framed for a murder he didn’t commit. Their investigation takes them into the world of data mining and identity theft and pits the duo against a psychopathic serial killer who manages to stay one step ahead. This thriller hits on a subject some may find a bit disturbing, the ability of computers to follow us on our daily journeys and pinpoint our location at any point in time. Deaver offers the reader a look into Lincoln’s past family life, as well as his present relationship with Amelia. Forensics are exceptional and the plot filled with suspense and terror. Another great addition to this excellent series.

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