Hot Best Seller

All Around the Moon

Availability: Ready to download

Jules Verne was born in 1828 in France. His dream was to write a new kind of novel, which combined scientific fact with fiction. Verne eventually wrote 40 novels in his Voyages extraordinaires series. "What one man can imagine, another will someday be able to achieve." Is a quote from an article in the Encyclopedia Britannica that sums up Verne so well. In All Around the M Jules Verne was born in 1828 in France. His dream was to write a new kind of novel, which combined scientific fact with fiction. Verne eventually wrote 40 novels in his Voyages extraordinaires series. "What one man can imagine, another will someday be able to achieve." Is a quote from an article in the Encyclopedia Britannica that sums up Verne so well. In All Around the Moon three space travelers are conversing about science and mathematics. They decide to alter the course of their projectile, which leads to unanticipated results.


Compare

Jules Verne was born in 1828 in France. His dream was to write a new kind of novel, which combined scientific fact with fiction. Verne eventually wrote 40 novels in his Voyages extraordinaires series. "What one man can imagine, another will someday be able to achieve." Is a quote from an article in the Encyclopedia Britannica that sums up Verne so well. In All Around the M Jules Verne was born in 1828 in France. His dream was to write a new kind of novel, which combined scientific fact with fiction. Verne eventually wrote 40 novels in his Voyages extraordinaires series. "What one man can imagine, another will someday be able to achieve." Is a quote from an article in the Encyclopedia Britannica that sums up Verne so well. In All Around the Moon three space travelers are conversing about science and mathematics. They decide to alter the course of their projectile, which leads to unanticipated results.

30 review for All Around the Moon

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    Autour de la Lune = Round the Moon (Extraordinary Voyages, #7), Jules Verne Around the Moon (French: Autour de la Lune, 1870), Jules Verne's sequel to From the Earth to the Moon, is a science fiction novel which continues the trip to the moon which was only partially described in the previous novel. It was later combined with From the Earth to the Moon to create A Trip to the Moon and Around It. From the Earth to the Moon and Around the Moon served as the basis for the film A Trip to the Moon. تا Autour de la Lune = Round the Moon (Extraordinary Voyages, #7), Jules Verne Around the Moon (French: Autour de la Lune, 1870), Jules Verne's sequel to From the Earth to the Moon, is a science fiction novel which continues the trip to the moon which was only partially described in the previous novel. It was later combined with From the Earth to the Moon to create A Trip to the Moon and Around It. From the Earth to the Moon and Around the Moon served as the basis for the film A Trip to the Moon. تاریخ نخستین خوانش: روز هشتم ماه اکتبر سال 1971 میلادی عنوان: دور ماه؛ اثر - کتاب دوم سفر به ماه و کتاب هفتم از دوره ی کتابهای سفرهای شگفت انگیز؛ نویسنده: ژول ورن؛ مترجم: اردشیر نیکپور؛ تهران، بنگاه ترجمه و نشر کتاب، در 336 ص؛ سال 1343؛ چاپ دیگر: انتشارات علمی فرهنگی؛ در 296 ص؛ موضوع: داستانهای نویسندگان فرانسوی - سده 19 م در مدار ماه، یا «دور ماه» دنباله ای است، بر کتاب: از زمین تا کره ماه؛ که توسط ژول ورن نوشته شده، و در سال 1870 میلادی توسط انتشارات پی‌یر-ژول اتزل منتشر شد. بعدها این کتاب به کتاب از «زمین تا کره ماه» افزوده شد، و کتاب کاملتر «سفر به ماه» شکل گرفت. ا. شربیانی

  2. 5 out of 5

    Luís C.

    This story is a direct sequel to From the Earth to the Moon whose narrative was interrupted immediately after the "shooting". We find Barbicane, Nicholl and Ardan running at full speed towards our satellite aboard the shell. This short novel is an opportunity to take stock of the knowledge of the time about space and the moon. Of course, from our point of view some points seem very naive: presence of selenites, gravity "reversing" on the way between the two stars, astronaut opening the window of This story is a direct sequel to From the Earth to the Moon whose narrative was interrupted immediately after the "shooting". We find Barbicane, Nicholl and Ardan running at full speed towards our satellite aboard the shell. This short novel is an opportunity to take stock of the knowledge of the time about space and the moon. Of course, from our point of view some points seem very naive: presence of selenites, gravity "reversing" on the way between the two stars, astronaut opening the window of the cabin to throw garbage… But we must, however, keep in mind the perfectly novel idea of 1869 of the very idea of such an expedition; not to mention its disturbing similarity with certain Apollo missions that took place a century after exactly.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    The review from afar – No. 26 Re-revised forward to these overseas reviews: Since emulating a yo-yo, I continue to rely on the old-style Kindle 3G for any non-technical reading. I tip my hat to the fine folks at Project Gutenberg: virtually every title I have or will be reading in the near future comes from them. Around the Moon is the sequel to the amazing adventures of Barbicane, Nicholl, and Ardan (not to be confused with Rocky and Bullwinkle), first related in Jules Verne’s From the Earth to th The review from afar – No. 26 Re-revised forward to these overseas reviews: Since emulating a yo-yo, I continue to rely on the old-style Kindle 3G for any non-technical reading. I tip my hat to the fine folks at Project Gutenberg: virtually every title I have or will be reading in the near future comes from them. Around the Moon is the sequel to the amazing adventures of Barbicane, Nicholl, and Ardan (not to be confused with Rocky and Bullwinkle), first related in Jules Verne’s From the Earth to the Moon (FTETTM). (I read them as a set on the Kindle, but they were originally separate books.) It picks up pretty much where FTETTM left off which was not quite a cliffhanger, but certainly no bed of roses for our intrepid explorers! It’s really hard to say much about the circumstances that link the two books without writing a massive spoiler. So, I’m going to dodge that bullet, hum a few melodies and use subterfuge and misdirection instead… One of the things that I wondered about when reading these two books was the issue of, “does the moon have an atmosphere?” I’m generalizing here to any atmosphere because I think that the more specific breathable atmosphere would have been beyond the scope of science to determine when the book was written. (I believe that spectral lines from our sun were not observed until 4-5 years after FTETTM was penned and at that it was done using the sun’s own light during an eclipse. I do not think that they would have been able – even at that later time to analyze the gases present in any lunar atmosphere using that technique.) Returning to the question, it is an essential claim in FTETTM which changes the mission to one of a manned adventure. But if they were wrong, then they were doomed to a relatively rapid and lonely extinction. (They bring oxygen/air on board to provide oxygen for themselves and for the gas lamp/heater/cooking fire that they use to provide heat & light during those parts of the journey when they are not in direct sunlight. So, it’s not that Verne was unaware of the need for oxygen – or for that matter the removal of carbon dioxide.) It is a gambler’s bet and that gambler was Michel Ardan who generates so much public interest and support in the concept of going to the moon that he gets the fairly stuffy and proper Brisbane and Nicholl (at the time fierce opponents) to go with him. Leave it to those crazy Frenchman! The discussion/argument about the existence of an atmosphere is to me not up to the level of scientific discourse that Verne uses to propose and construct the gun, the projectile (capsule) and propellant. Perhaps I am quibbling, but it devolves into a form of demagoguery rather than learned debate. It’s one of my few disappointments with the story. One ought not to risk one’s life on the cleverness of a turn-of-phrase or the ability of one to shout louder than the rest. Reminds me of televangicals! Still, Around the Moon is a good conclusion to the story and one that keeps the smiles coming. It’s a Boy’s Own adventure in outer space even if all of the “boys” are middle-aged or older. Verne scores another award for precognition in final pages of the book, but that’s full spoiler material, so mum’s the word. Four more (4.0) Stars that will have you floating in zero-gee. You can get this book for free from the Gutenberg Project site.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Joe Wisniewski

    This is the continuation of the story "from the earth to the moon". It was written in a different era obviously, when the thoughts of travel to the moon and outer space travel were still of a nature of almost romantic fantasy. Unfortunately, we have become caloused to such endeavors as they now occur so frequently. For some readers, the painstaking detail of the geography of the moon as described by our travelers may seem monotonous, boring and even trivial. Again, this was written for another ti This is the continuation of the story "from the earth to the moon". It was written in a different era obviously, when the thoughts of travel to the moon and outer space travel were still of a nature of almost romantic fantasy. Unfortunately, we have become caloused to such endeavors as they now occur so frequently. For some readers, the painstaking detail of the geography of the moon as described by our travelers may seem monotonous, boring and even trivial. Again, this was written for another time when such details were simply not thought about or described anywhere in any detail. I loved the story. Alas, to live in a time when such travel was a fantasy.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kim

    "Round the Moon" is a novel by Jules Verne published in 1870. It is the sequel to "From the Earth to the Moon", written five years after that novel. There is absolutely nothing else I can think of to say about the novel that will not give away the plot to the first book. Not a single sentence, and because of that I'll make the rest of this a spoiler, if I remember that is, if I don't, then quit reading right now if you ever want to read the first book. (view spoiler)["Round the Moon" begins with "Round the Moon" is a novel by Jules Verne published in 1870. It is the sequel to "From the Earth to the Moon", written five years after that novel. There is absolutely nothing else I can think of to say about the novel that will not give away the plot to the first book. Not a single sentence, and because of that I'll make the rest of this a spoiler, if I remember that is, if I don't, then quit reading right now if you ever want to read the first book. (view spoiler)["Round the Moon" begins with three of the main characters from the first book on their way to the moon after being shot at it out of a cannon. They decided upon this rather unusual travel idea from our main character Barbicane, the president of the "Gun Club" in Baltimore who couldn't think of anything else to do with all the guns and cannons they had left after the civil war except fire at the moon. At first he and everybody else in the world seemed content just to shoot a "projectile" at the moon until Michel Ardan shows up announcing he's going to go to the moon inside the projectile and no one seems to have a problem with that even though no one knows who he is. Oh, other than being a "French adventurer" I don't know who he is either. He was supposedly inspired by the real-life photographer Félix Nadar. I haven't looked that up yet and I have a feeling that the real life photographer managed to stay on earth his entire life. So we have Ardan going to the moon, then we add Barbicane and his old rival and enemy, Captain Nicholl, an armor-making rival, who claims that the entire idea is absurd, will never work and after a rather strong fight with Barbicane over it they both agree to go along to the moon to prove which one of them is right. I think all three are crazy. For Barbicane to be right he will end up on the moon with no way of returning, unless he's planning on building a returning cannon and cannon projectile when he gets there, Nicholl, who can only be right if they die trying to get there, and Ardan who seems to be going no matter who is right. It doesn't matter now, it's too late to change their minds because they've finally been shot into space. I waited all the first book for this moment. Oh, they take two dogs along with them too but I can't remember why. The first chapter ends with this when the cannon is finally fired: "Ardan, dear friend," interrupted Barbican, in a grave tone, "a serious moment is now at hand. Let us meet it with some interior recollection. Give me your hands, my dear friends." "Certainly," said Ardan, with tears in his voice, and already at the other extreme of his apparent levity. The three brave men united in one last, silent, but warm and impulsively affectionate pressure. "And now, great God, our Creator, protect us! In Thee we trust!" prayed Barbican, the others joining him with folded hands and bowed heads. "Ten, forty-six!" whispered the Captain, as he and Ardan quietly took their places on the mattresses. Only forty seconds more! Barbican rapidly extinguishes the gas and lies down beside his companions. The deathlike silence now reigning in the Projectile is interrupted only by the sharp ticking of the chronometer as it beats the seconds. Suddenly, a dreadful shock is felt, and the Projectile, shot up by the instantaneous development of 200,000 millions of cubic feet of gas, is flying into space with inconceivable rapidity! The next chapter finds them alive but unconscious, Ardan being the first regain his senses, he goes and assists his fellow passengers and eventually everyone seems to be fine, everyone but one of the dogs that is, he was killed in the takeoff. Now, after eating a rather hearty breakfast this is the first thing they do: "The first thing now to be done was to see after the water cask and the provision chest. They were not injured in the slightest respect, thanks to the means taken to counteract the shock. The provisions were in good condition, and abundant enough to supply the travellers for a whole year—Barbican having taken care to be on the safe side, in case the Projectile might land in a deserted region of the Moon. As for the water and the other liquors, the travellers had enough only for two months. Relying on the latest observations of astronomers, they had convinced themselves that the Moon's atmosphere, being heavy, dense and thick in the deep valleys, springs and streams of water could hardly fail to show themselves there. During the journey, therefore, and for the first year of their installation on the Lunar continent, the daring travellers would be pretty safe from all danger of hunger or thirst." See, our travelers seem to be safe for two months at least, then they will either be living in homes on the moon or dead I suppose. Oh, breathing is taken care of also: "The air supply proved also to be quite satisfactory. The Reiset and Regnault apparatus for producing oxygen contained a supply of chlorate of potash sufficient for two months. As the productive material had to be maintained at a temperature of between 7 and 8 hundred degrees Fahr., a steady consumption of gas was required; but here too the supply far exceeded the demand. The whole arrangement worked charmingly, requiring only an odd glance now and then. The high temperature changing the chlorate into a chloride, the oxygen was disengaged gradually but abundantly, every eighteen pounds of chlorate of potash, furnishing the seven pounds of oxygen necessary for the daily consumption of the inmates of the Projectile." Among other things they had brought along picks, spades, and other tools that had been selected by the Captain; also various kinds of grain and various kinds of shrubs, which Ardan expected to transplant on the plains of the moon. Oh, they bring chickens too. I came to like Ardan, even though I never understood why he was there in the first place I was glad that he was, especially in times like this: "No, Ardan; not at all. The really difficult part of the question Barbican has done. That is, to make out such an equation as takes into account all the conditions of the problem. After that, it's a simple affair of Arithmetic, requiring only a knowledge of the four rules to work it out." "Very simple," observed Ardan, who always got muddled at any kind of a difficult sum in addition. "Captain," said Barbican, "you could have found the formulas too, if you tried." "I don't know about that," was the Captain's reply, "but I do know that this formula is wonderfully come at." "Now, Ardan, listen a moment," said Barbican, "and you will see what sense there is in all these letters." "I listen," sighed Ardan with the resignation of a martyr. "d is the distance from the centre of the Earth to the centre of the Moon, for it is from the centres that we must calculate the attractions." "That I comprehend." "r is the radius of the Earth." "That I comprehend." "m is the mass or volume of the Earth; m prime that of the Moon. We must take the mass of the two attracting bodies into consideration, since attraction is in direct proportion to their masses." "That I comprehend." "g is the gravity or the velocity acquired at the end of a second by a body falling towards the centre of the Earth. Clear?" "That I comprehend." "Now I represent by x the varying distance that separates the Projectile from the centre of the Earth, and by v prime its velocity at that distance." "That I comprehend." "Finally, v is its velocity when quitting our atmosphere." "Yes," chimed in the Captain, "it is for this point, you see, that the velocity had to be calculated, because we know already that the initial velocity is exactly the three halves of the velocity when the Projectile quits the atmosphere." "That I don't comprehend," cried the Frenchman, energetically." But, apropos of nothing, tell me, Barbican, what do you think of the Moon being an ancient comet, which had come so far within the sphere of the Earth's attraction as to be kept there and turned into a satellite?" "Well, that is an original idea!" said Barbican with a smile. "My ideas generally are of that category," observed Ardan with an affectation of dry pomposity. "Not this time, however, friend Michael," observed M'Nicholl. "Good, then I am a plagiarist." "That is possible, friend Nicholl, but not probable.' 'Why not?' 'Because - By Jove! I really do not know.' 'Ah!' cried Michel, 'how many hundred volumes one might fill with what one does not know!' 'The inconvenience, in this respect, is the same for the two faces, for the light reflected by the earth, is evidently devoid of heat. However, this invisible face is still more troubled with the heat than the visible face. I say that for you, Nicholl, because Michel would probably not understand.' 'Thank you,' said Michel.' Ok, all the things that happen to them while on their way to the moon I will leave up to you to find out for yourself. Did you know this rocket or whatever it is had windows that could actually open? I found it a little creepy that you would want to open a window while traveling through space, but I guess it's because I'm pretty sure it would be a very, very bad idea and Verne or at least his readers didn't know that yet. I'm not telling you if they ever make it to the moon or if Nicholl wins and they are still out in space somewhere. I'm not telling if they land and meet moon people (I wonder what moon people call themselves) and build houses and farms with their grain, plants and chickens. Or if they built another cannon to hurl themselves back to the earth. Go read the book and find out. Oh, the book was illustrated, here are a few of them. (hide spoiler)]

  6. 4 out of 5

    Noah Goats

    I loved De la Terre a la Lune. It was imaginative, surprisingly humorous, and fascinating in the way old science fiction can be. Old science fiction has a way of constantly surprising the reader with what it gets wrong and with what it gets right. The sequel, Autour de la Lune, which I began reading soon after finishing the first book, is likable in the same way without being quite as good. In fact, after beginning it and reading about half I was able to set it aside for over a year before comin I loved De la Terre a la Lune. It was imaginative, surprisingly humorous, and fascinating in the way old science fiction can be. Old science fiction has a way of constantly surprising the reader with what it gets wrong and with what it gets right. The sequel, Autour de la Lune, which I began reading soon after finishing the first book, is likable in the same way without being quite as good. In fact, after beginning it and reading about half I was able to set it aside for over a year before coming back to it and finishing the rest. Picking it back up was no problem. It’s a simple story with few characters and it’s just basically one event happening after another. Each event serves as a way of teaching something about space (frequently something that time has proven to be not quite correct), or to speculate about things they couldn’t have known for sure back then. Ultimately the book is quite silly (they are flying around in a huge artillery shell for eg and also they crack open a window at one point and stick a thermometer outside to take the temperature of space) but I just love Verne’s imagination and the way he did his best with the available science. I’ll bet that newer science fiction novels will look just as absurd in the future. As with all the books of Jules Verne, the vocabulary is pretty simple, so if French is not your first language you will be able to read it without too much trouble.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jordan

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I gave this book three stars for the imagination involved in writing it and for the characters. This is the sequel to From the Earth to the Moon and here we follow the three travelers as they circle the lunar globe and gaze upon her terrain from a distance never before possible. The selenography lessons we get can get a little tedious, as the book for some time becomes a kind of grade school curriculum couched in story form (not unlike The Swiss Family Robinson). From where we sit in the 21st cen I gave this book three stars for the imagination involved in writing it and for the characters. This is the sequel to From the Earth to the Moon and here we follow the three travelers as they circle the lunar globe and gaze upon her terrain from a distance never before possible. The selenography lessons we get can get a little tedious, as the book for some time becomes a kind of grade school curriculum couched in story form (not unlike The Swiss Family Robinson). From where we sit in the 21st century, some of the science is just plain funny, but I cannot fault Verne, who, believe it or not, seems to be quite concerned with facts. Among some of the most chuckle-inducing features of the book are the astronauts' ability to open the hatch of their vehicle in deep space as long as they close it quickly; the fact that the travelers are not weightless except for the brief moment when the vehicle reaches the point of gravitational neutrality between the earth and the moon (that is, where the pulls from both celestial bodies cancel each other out); the existence of a shallow atmosphere and trees on the dark side of the moon; the conclusion that, though now desolate, the moon must once have been inhabited; and the survival of the astronauts after an uninhibited fall at terminal velocity through earth's atmosphere into the Pacific ocean, although even Verne recognized that the friction caused by the speed of this descent was enough to set the outside of the craft ablaze like a meteor. Still, I credit him with more or less predicting the mode of reentry and splashdown of the real thing over a hundred years later. I must admit, though, my disappointment that our brave astronauts, as the crew of Apollo 13, were never able to land on the blond Phoebe, the Queen of Night.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Gabriella Gill

    This book was okay. It's the second part and conclusion to the preceding book, from the earth to the moon. Honestly, I guess I was mostly let down by the fact that (spoiler) as the title suggests, they never actually got to the moon. They just went around it, and there was a lot of theoretical scientific talk, some minor drama, and then landing back down on earth. I was glad, in part, that they never actually got to the moon and that there weren't five-winged, long-necked Selenites to greet them This book was okay. It's the second part and conclusion to the preceding book, from the earth to the moon. Honestly, I guess I was mostly let down by the fact that (spoiler) as the title suggests, they never actually got to the moon. They just went around it, and there was a lot of theoretical scientific talk, some minor drama, and then landing back down on earth. I was glad, in part, that they never actually got to the moon and that there weren't five-winged, long-necked Selenites to greet them, John Carter style, but I was somehow disappointed that they didn't.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Roman

    This was a very interesting book by Jules Verne. I thought it would be like Around the World in Eighty Days, yet it was more like 20,000 Leagues Under The Sea. It was a little, no scratch that, a lot more scientific than I thought it would be. I liked the sly, quick humor, but in my opinion there wasn't enough of it.

  10. 4 out of 5

    tENTATIVELY, cONVENIENCE

    review of Jules Verne's Round the Moon by tENTATIVELY, a cONVENIENCE - July 15, 2017 My complete review is here: https://www.goodreads.com/story/show/... This is the sequel to Verne's From the Earth to the Moon (1863 or 1865). I'm not sure whether I read that one or not. If I did I might've read it 50 yrs ago. Round the Moon was written in 1869 or thereabouts. I find it interesting partially b/c as far as Verne's Science Fiction goes it's more SCIENCE than it is an adventure story. It seems evide review of Jules Verne's Round the Moon by tENTATIVELY, a cONVENIENCE - July 15, 2017 My complete review is here: https://www.goodreads.com/story/show/... This is the sequel to Verne's From the Earth to the Moon (1863 or 1865). I'm not sure whether I read that one or not. If I did I might've read it 50 yrs ago. Round the Moon was written in 1869 or thereabouts. I find it interesting partially b/c as far as Verne's Science Fiction goes it's more SCIENCE than it is an adventure story. It seems evident to me that Verne researched this fairly thoroughly & dwelled perhaps a bit too much on presenting astronomical data in a barely fictionalized way. As such, I find it hard to imagine that this was as popular as his other Voyages Extraordinaires. It seems to me that this wd've appealed more to scientists concerned w/ nit-picking his facts than it wd've been to a general readership. Verne posits a gun club founded during the American Civil War membership in wch involves inventing or modifying a cannon or other weapon. "Then the war comes to an end—a black day for the members of the Gun Club. What future is there for its unique services to the military arts? The club's President, Impey Barbicane, calls a special meeting, assuring members that there will be an announcement of the greatest importance. He lays before them a proposal which takes their collective breath away : the Gun Club will sponsor a monster cannon which will fire a projectile to the moon!" - p 6 The above quote is from Robert A. W. Lowndes's introduction. One of the strange things about it is that the club's president is referred to as "Barbicane" while everywhere else in the bk he's "Barbican". "A few years ago the world was suddenly astounded by hearing of an experiment of a most novel and daring nature, altogether unprecedented in the annals of science. THE BALTIMORE GUN CLUB, a society of artillerymen started in America during the great Civil War, had conceived the idea of nothing less than establishing direct communication with the Moon by means of a projectile! President Barbican, the originator of the enterprise, was strongly encouraged in its feasibility by the astronomers of Cambridge University, and took upon himself to provide all the means necessary to secure its success. Having realized by means of a public subscription the sum of nearly five and a half millions of dollars, he immediately set himself to work at the necessary gigantic labors." - p 9 Ha ha! The stage is set, the recap is in place. According to an online inflation calculator, $5,500,000 in 1869 wd be worth $93,173,707.43 in 2016. Given that I'm from BalTimOre this whole biz about the Baltimore Gun Club titillates me (or something). BalTimOre is a city of violence (& extreme narrow-mindedness) & I'm sure that the preponderance of guns there contributes to that enormously. As such, when the former Mayor of BalTimOre turned Governor turned Presidential candidate, Martin O'Malley, came out in favor of gun control in his presidential campaigning I was both pleasantly surprised & sure he knew what he was talking about. I rue the day that guns were invented & wd like to see arms merchants shot to the moon in a cannon under the conditions described in this novel. The recap continues by stating that the projectile/spacecraft: "had not reached its mark, though it had approached near enough to be affected by the Lunar attraction; and that, its rectilinear motion having become circular, it should henceforth continue to describe a regular orbit around the Moon, of which in fact it had become the Satellite." - p 11 That having been the case, our heros the astronauts died off pretty quickly & that was that. Really there's no further reason to even discuss the novel (JUST KIDDING!). Now, of course, this having been written in 1869 it's bound to be a bit short on the scientific end of things considering the developments in the almost 150 yrs that've elapsed since then. There are some phenomenal DUH moments that're so far-fetched that they're practically unforgivable even as plot devices in the mid 19th century. One of them is that the astronauts don't even give a thought to what they're going to do once they get to the moon (other than land on it) nor do they give a thought about how they're going to get back. That's just unbelievably stupid, even for members of the Baltimore Gun Club. "how were they ever to get back? Could they ever get back? or ever even be heard from?" - p 12 ""See here, friends!" cried the Captain; "this going to the Moon is all very well, but how shall we get back?" "His listeners looked at each other with a surprised and perplexed air. The question, though a very natural one, now appeared to have presented itself to their consideration absolutely for the first time." - p 77 Right. Do you really expect us to believe that Mr. Verne?! Even dogs on the Moon seems believable by comparison. "["]Compel those Selenites to acknowledge, on spite of themselves, that the terrestrial race of canines is far superior to that of the very best Moon dog among them!" ""Dogs in the Moon!" sneered McNicholl, "I like that!" ""Plenty of dogs!" cried Ardan, "and horses too, and cows, and sheep, and no end of chickens!" ""A hundred dollars to one there isn't a single chicken within the whole lunar realm, not excluding even the invisible side!" cried the Captain, in an authoritative tone, but never taking his eye off the chronometer." - p 17 Verne might be on slightly more solid ground when he imagines the propulsive force necessary: ""Oh! four and a half little minutes!" went on Ardan. "Only think of it! We are shut up in a bullet that lies in the chamber of a cannon nine hundred feet long. Underneath this bullet is piled a charge of 400 thousand pounds of gun cotton, equivalent to 1600 thousand pounds of ordinary gun powder!["]" (p 18) Then again, maybe he isn't, I'd be no judge. The following passage made me think of The Hunt for the Meteor, wch was the last Verne bk I reviewed ( https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... ): ""It is a simple bolide, but one of such enormous dimensions that the Earth's attraction has made it a satellite." ""What!" cried Ardan, "another satellite besides the Moon? I hope thyere are not more of them!" ""They are pretty numerous," replied Barbican; "but they are so small and they move with such enormous velocity that they are seldom seen.["]" - p 30 I don't know how obvious some of the stupidities of the astronauts wd've been to the 19th century reader, probably not very, but to this 21st century reader Verne plays the the-reader-is-smarter-than-the-characters card a bit too much: ""What do you know?" cried the Captain, stretching over and seizing him by the left. ""The reason why we did not hear the report!" ""Well, why did we not hear it!" asked both rapidly in the same breath. ""Because we were shot up 30 times faster than sound can travel!"" - p 35 That was 'painfully' obvious to this reader many pages before the characters ever had the epiphany. Given that the speed of sound is reputed to've been discovered in 1640 that knowledge was presumably not that obscure over 300 yrs later when this bk was written. The projectile still has fairly Earth-like gravity until it reaches the gravipause between the Earth & the Moon. "Every now and then, he would climb up, by means of iron pins fixed in the wall, to inspect his treasures" (p 42) It's my understanding that they wd've experienced zero gravity long before then. Then again, I can just look that up on the internet. Didn't Verne know how to use the internet? Sheesh, those 19th century people were retarded. Well, ok, I take that back. They did know how to use Integral Calculus: ""It means," said the Captain, now taking part in the discussion, "that the half of v prime square minus v squared equals gr multiplied by r over x minus one plus m prime over m multiplied by r over d minus x minus r over d minus r ........that is———"" - p 48 Verne gets into quite a bit of what is to me abstruse math. This is endearing to me but reinforces my assertion that "I find it hard to imagine that this was as popular as his other Voyages Extraordinaires" A footnote on the bottom of page 52 is interesting in this light: "NOTE. In the French edition, the algebraical formulas having been very incorrectly printed, it cost the Translator a good deal of time and trouble to rectify them. The idea of explaining in the text how they had been arrived at, though at first seriously entertained, was soon abandoned. Doing so might perhaps have gratified the curiosity of some rare scientific student, but it would certainly have exhausted the patience of the general reader. For the benefit of our friend the student, however, we here append another of the means for solving the problem, over which the Cambridge men had so woefully blundered. It is furnished by one of our mathematical teachers." - p 52 The problem solving for this goes on for another 1.5 pages. I'm grateful for it even tho I didn't understand enuf of it for it to be of any value to me. The dig at the "Cambridge men" is interesting. Their miscalculation cd've cost the whole mission's success. There are 3 astronauts, 2 Americans & one Frenchmen. Verne was French. He uses the Frenchman for comic relief & gives the Americans the serious scientist characteristics. That seems politically motivated on his part. He essentially predicts that the Americans will reach the moon 100 yrs before it happened. I have to wonder why he picked the "Cambridge men" to be blunderers. That seems to be potentially touchy. Maybe somebody at Cambridge gave a bk of his a bad review. "How could they imagine that the Observatory men had committed such a blunder? Barbican would not believe it possible. He made the Captain go over his calculation again and again; but no flaw was to be found in it. He himself carefully examined it, figure after figure, but he could find nothing wrong. They both took up the formula and subjected it to the strongest tests but it was invulnerable. There was no denying the fact. The Cambridge professors had undoubtedly blundered in saying that the initial velocity of 12,000 yards a second would be enough to carry them to the neutral point. A velocity of nearly 18,000 yards would be the very lowest required for such a purpose. They had simply forgotten to allow a third for friction." - pp 54-55 Interesting. Verne has scientists making mistakes. This is realism, maybe it's even a realism that appears in other Verne bks but I don't remember that happening. Round the Moon is full of things going wrong & human error. That's one of the things I like the most about it. It's not populated by scientific super-beings but more by regular humans. Well, actually, they're a bit on the dumb side: "["]When we get to the Moon, what shall we do there? How are we going to amuse ourselves? I'm afraid our life there will be awfully slow!" "His companions emphatically disclaimed the possibility of such a thing. ""You may deny it, but I know better, and knowing better, I have laid in my stores accordingly. You have but to choose. I possess a varied assortment. Chess, draughts, cards, dominoes—everything in fact, but a billiard table." ""What!" exclaimed Barbican; "cumbered yourself with such gimcracks?" ""Such gimcracks are not good to amuse ourselves with, but are eminently calculated also to win us the friendship of the Selenites."" - p 57 Despite Verne's obvious attempts to be as scientifically accurate as possible throughout most of this (when he's not just being silly) things like this drinking-in-zero-gravity description aren't very convincing: "A slight effort carried him sailing over to the side of the Projectile. Opening a cupboard and taking out a bottle and a few glasses, he placed them in a tray. Then setting the tray itself in the air as on a table in front of his companions, he filled the glasses, passed them around, and, in a lively speech interrupted with many a joyous hurrah, congratulated his companions of their glorious achievement in being the first that ever crossed the lunar line." - p 90 It's easy to be critical of a description like this 148 yrs later. I'm sure that if I were to try to describe a situation 148 yrs in the future it wd be ridiculous. Still, how, exactly, did Ardan, the French adventurer, pour the alcohol? If the glasses were staying still in mid-air wdn't the booze also stay still in the bottle when it was turned upside-down? Wdn't this, then, necessitate applying some force to the bottom of the bottle to eject the alcohol in the direction of the glasses & wdn't that force then move the glasses as the booze hit it? Still, Verne does get into such thing as changes in relative muscular power: ""Shall my muscular strength dimish in the same proportion?" was the next question. ""On the contrary, it will be relatively so much the more increased that you can take a stride 15 feet in width as easily as you can now take one of ordinary length." ""We shall be all Samsons, then, in the Moon!" cried Ardan. ""Especially," replied McNicholl, "if the stature of the Selenites is in proportion to the mass of their globe." ""If so, what should be their height?" ""A tall man would hardly be twelve inches in his boots!" ""They must be veritable Lilliputians then!" cried Ardan; "and we are all to be Gullivers! The old myth of the Giants realized! Perhaps the Titans that played such famous parts in the prehistoric period of out Earth, were adventurers like ourselves, casually arrived from some great planet!"" - p 92 As much as I'm pleased to see Jonathan Swift's Gulliver's Travels referred to & as much as I'm pleased by Ardan's theory re Titans, I have to say that these speculations about the size of "Selenites" as based on the same relativities of humans, as well as on humanoid form, are a bit too silly for me. For one thing, everyone knows that Moon people are all female & scantily clad & that they listen to Theremin music all day. Where Verne really starts to get tedious is where he gets into the history of Moon mapmaking. Still, I appreciate that he goes to such scholarly lengths: "A few years afterwards, Hevel of Dantzic (1611-1688), a Polish astronomer—more generally known as Hevelius, his works being all written in Latin—undertook to correct Galileo's measurements. But as his method could be strictly accurate only twice a month—the periods of the first and second quadrant—his rectifications could hardly be called successful. "Still it is to the labors of this eminent astronomer, carried on uninterruptedly for fifty years in his own observatory, that we owe the first map of the Moon. It was published in 1647 under the name of Selenographia." - p 104 Verne was obviously preoccupied w/ whether people actually observe the Moon or not. I respect that, I think that people take for granted many things in their life w/o ever bothering to observe them closely. I'm sure I do. ""Have you ever seen the Moon?" said a teacher ironically one day in class to one of his pupils. ""No, sir," was the pert reply; "but I think I can safely say I've heard it spoken about." "Though saying what he considered a smart thing, the pupil was probably perfectly right. Like the immense majority of his fellow beings, he had looked at the Moon, heard her talked of, written poetry about her, but in the strict sense of the term, he had probably never seen her—that is canned her, examined her, surveyed her, inspected her, reconnoitered her—even with an opera glass!" - p 106 As our heroes get closer to the Moon in their projectile they get to observe color. This, of course, wd be Verne's extrapolations from the observations of astronomers whose work he wd've read. "In certain spots the greenish tint was quite decided, particularly in Mare Serenitatis and Mare Humorum, the very localities where Schmidt had most noticed it. Barbican also remarked that several large craters, of the class that had no interior cones, reflected a kind of bluish tinge, somewhat like that given forth by a freshly polished steel plate. These tints, he now saw enough to convince him, proceeded really from the lunar surface, and were not due, as certain astronomers asserted, either to the imperfections of spy-glasses, or to the interference of the terrestrial atmosphere." - p 125 Verne spent a great deal of time on scientific detail in Round the Moon. I reckon he wanted to get that pert student to actually look at & think about the Moon. "Toward five in the morning, the northern limit of Mare Imbrium was finally passed, and Mare Frigoris spread its frost-colored plains far to the right and to the left. On the east the travellers could easily see the ring-mountain Condamine, above 4,000 feet high, while a little ahead on the right they could plainly distinguish Fontenelle with an altitude nearly twice as great." "if we remember that Tycho, though nearly a quarter of a million miles distant, is such a luminous point on the lunar disc, that almost any moonlit night it can be easily perceived by the unaided terrestrial eye. What then must have been its splendor in the eyes of our travellers whose telescopes brought it actually four thousand times nearer!" - p 180 ""Now what is the consequence of this law? If the orbit were a circle, the satellite would always preserve the same distance from its primary, and its velocity should therefore be constant. But the orbit being an elipse, and the attracting body always occupying one of the foci, the satellite must evidently be nearer to this focus in one part of its orbit than in another. The Earth when nearest to the Sun, is in her perihelion; when most distant, in her aphelion. The Moon, with regard to the Earth, is similarly in her perigree, and her apogee. Analogous expressions denoting the relations of the Projectile towards the Moon, would be periselene and aposelene. At its aposelene the Projectile's velocity would have reached its minimum; at the periselene, its maximum. As it is to the former point that we are now moving, clearly the velocity mist keep on diminishing until that point is reached. Then, if it does not die out altogether, it must spring up again, and even accelerate as it reapproaches the Moon. Now the great trouble is this: If the Aposelenetic point should coincide with the point of lunar attraction, our velocity must certainly become nil, and the Projectile must remain relatively motionless forever!"" - p 200

  11. 4 out of 5

    Chad Bearden

    Originally posted on Examiner.com The Prescient Lunar Voyages of Jules Verne, part 2: "Round the Moon" - Fort Worth Literature | Examiner.com http://www.examiner.com/literature-in... In “From the Earth to the Moon”, Jules Verne practically invents modern science fiction by applying actual physics and chemistry to the far-fetched technical challenge of shooting a projectile to the Lunar surface. It was an incredible, seemingly visionary work, not so much because Verne invented some fantastical ima Originally posted on Examiner.com The Prescient Lunar Voyages of Jules Verne, part 2: "Round the Moon" - Fort Worth Literature | Examiner.com http://www.examiner.com/literature-in... In “From the Earth to the Moon”, Jules Verne practically invents modern science fiction by applying actual physics and chemistry to the far-fetched technical challenge of shooting a projectile to the Lunar surface. It was an incredible, seemingly visionary work, not so much because Verne invented some fantastical imaginary adventure. It was incredible because he demonstrated, with remarkable accuracy, an engineering feat of which mankind was actually capable. Great ideas are always more complicated in theory than in practice (which is why it took the United States 104 years after Verne’s publication to actually get to the make any of this happen!) but make no mistake: Jules Verne published, in no uncertain terms, a proclamation: Here is what we’re going to do, and here is how we’re going to do it. To preserve his reputation as an effective prognosticator, it probably would have been wise to stop while he was ahead. After all, “From the Earth to the Moon” does an admirable job of applying known science to solving the technical challenges of a moonshot. He wrote about what the physics and astronomy of his day could confirm, then prudently ends his book with a throng of Earth-bound onlookers wondering what exactly happened after the projectile exploded into the sky. To go further, to actually offer an account of the voyage to the Moon would require the author to explore far more speculative terrain. And as Verne himself notes in the opening chapter of “Round the Moon”, the Lunar sequel: “When a purely speculative discovery is announced to the public, it cannot be done with too much prudence…whoever makes a mistake in such a case exposes himself justly to the derision of the mass. Far better is it to wait.” The theories of the first book could be crudely confirmed by anyone who might want to sit down and do the math for themselves. But “Round the Moon”, while being a direct continuation of Barbicane’s Lunar endeavor, is a far different animal. “Round the Moon” tries to anticipate something no man had ever experienced, and wouldn’t for another century. He tries to imagine not only what the trip to the Moon would be like, but what Luna herself would reveal to any prospective astronauts. And to a modern audience for whom the space age is mostly blasé; who have seen footage of explorers bouncing around in the micro-gravity of shuttle missions; who have experienced the excitement of rovers on Mars and probes on the moons of Saturn; who have watched Apollo 13 and embraced the Space Race of the 1960s as part of our cultural heritage…well, to us, there are enough laughable inaccuracies in “Round the Moon” that Jules Verne seems knocked from his pedestal of scientific prophethood. The list of things he gets wrong is lengthy and glaring: The method used to brace the travelers against the massive acceleration at blast off is shoddy at best. One character sneaks livestock and seeds aboard the projectile so they can begin cultivating the Lunar soil upon landing. There are multiple (and therefore highly unlikely) encounters with extraterrestrial objects (meteors and the like, not aliens), which have rather questionable gravitational effects on the projectile. The method for keeping the travelers supplied with oxygen is a novel one, but not quite feasible in reality. While Verne has a decent go at describing weightlessness, he is undercut by a fundamental misunderstanding about how zero- and micro-gravity work. There is an entertainingly absurd underestimation of the effect of vacuum on the projectile’s pressurized interior. And possibly most damning to Verne’s ability to see beyond the realms of man’s observations, is one of Barbicane’s fellow astronauts, the Frenchman, Michel Ardan. At every turn, this clownish fellow babbles, wide-eyed, about his suspicions about life on the Moon, what to do after they land, outlandish theories about atmosphere and water, pausing only occasionally to loudly roll his eyes when Barbicane begins using precise calculations and cool rational thinking to predict and process details about their journey, instead of the Frenchman's preference for arbitrary confabulation. Ardan seems to represent all of the wild, imaginative theories that swirled around the astronomical community in the 19th Century. Many believed a balloon of sturdy enough construction could float to the Moon, and even the acclaimed astronomer William Herschel, as late as the 1820s believed there were trees on the Moon and beings with giant heads living on the Sun! With so many outlandish, mostly unverifiable claims being tossed about by educated scientists and ignorant laymen alike, it shouldn’t be surprising that Jules Verne would include some such nonsense. But this is where Verne proved once again that his prescience was uniquely refined. Eventually, the astronauts do indeed get close enough to the Moon to observe its surface. And what they witness is amazingly accurate. Further, while the predicted engineering feats of the first book are slightly less impressive from being a merely straightforward (albeit audacious) application of algebra and chemistry, “Round the Moon” dares to predict something that no man had yet to witness. Yes, astronomers had studied the moon in greater detail as the art of telescopy evolved. Cartographic surveys of craters and maria grew more and more detailed over the course of the 19th century, and Verne’s characters were intimately familiar with such details. But even as the buffoonish Ardan reminds us of theories about a thin atmosphere and pools of liquid water hiding at lower altitudes, or collecting on the mysterious far side of the Moon, Verne delivers a rebuttal of stark reality: a barren and lifeless satellite, devoid of anything but craters and sterile terrain. A depiction that was surely suspected by some devotees of Luna, but far from an accepted truth. In spite of all the entertainingly silly predictions about zero-gravity, vacuum and pressure, oxidizing the capsules interior, and Ardan’s hopeful prospects about space husbandry, Verne nullifies all the fantasy and nonsense, and leaves the astronauts speechless and humbled by what Buzz Aldren, one hundred years later, would call ‘magnificent desolation’. Jules Verne entered the realm of pure speculation, and detoured through a jungle of fantastic, sometimes ill-conceived, conjecture, yet still managed to get to the heart of what a true journey to the moon would be like. And in an ironic sidenote, there is a chapter where the rational Barbicane discusses with Nichols, the stern and militaristic third astronaut, the volcanic nature of the Moon’s surface. As the projectile sails over the iconic Tycho Crater, the two men hypothesize about what geologic process could be responsible for the sprawling ridges that radiate from the crater’s center. The clownish Ardan interrupts to suggest that crater might resemble a glass that has been struck by a rock, the radiating ridges the cracks produced by an impact. Barbicane and Nichols laugh off this suggestion. Little did they know Adran (and Verne?) was right. The vast majority of craters on the Moon are of the impact variety. Something most astronomers did not at the time suspect. Verne's first volume, "From the Earth to the Moon", is a satirical and fast-paced jaunt through American ingenuity and can-do spirit, sticking as much as possible to the hard facts. It is impressive in its predictive qualities. "Round the Moon" is a far different story, with a slower, more contemplative and speculative tone. And in spite of its tenuous tether to the known science of the day, it is just as eerily prescient of what the mankind would actually discover a century later, and a pretty accurate reflection of the haunting majesty of the only other place in the universe we've ever been. Continue reading on Examiner.com The Prescient Lunar Voyages of Jules Verne, part 2: "Round the Moon" - Fort Worth Literature | Examiner.com http://www.examiner.com/literature-in...

  12. 5 out of 5

    Rex Libris

    The summary in the bibliographic record was misleading. It made it sound like this was an expansion of the lunar description found in From the Earth to the Moon. Alas, it was not, it was only a portion of the book. Rather than read this, just get From the Earth to the Moon and read that.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Tony Zalmanov

    This is the second part of Jules Verne’s book: from the earth to the moon. Unlike the first book this edition is from the curious eyes of the people who will inhabit the projectile into its voyage into space. The three companions Barbicane, Michel Arden and, Nicholi are launched from an enormous cannon buried in a desolate part of Florida. Once in space the discover that their calculations where slightly skewed and instead of colliding with the moon the moons gravity will simply cause them to or This is the second part of Jules Verne’s book: from the earth to the moon. Unlike the first book this edition is from the curious eyes of the people who will inhabit the projectile into its voyage into space. The three companions Barbicane, Michel Arden and, Nicholi are launched from an enormous cannon buried in a desolate part of Florida. Once in space the discover that their calculations where slightly skewed and instead of colliding with the moon the moons gravity will simply cause them to orbit around the moon. After circum navigating the moon the men make several observations and calculations and determine that there is no life on the moon and there is also no atmosphere to be found. The endless orbit around the moon does not suit the men so they begin to plan a way to reach the moon’s surface. They decide to use rockets to propel themselves towards the moon but their plans backfire… Will these men reach earth? Will they be found? I am a huge fan of Jules Verne’s work. I will take advantage of every book of his I am fortunate enough to get my hands on. However this sequel seems like an afterthought of the original book. The concept was very good and well written at first but the story seems to drag on during the anti climactic middle of the book. There were far too many observations and a very limited amount of action. But otherwise I loved the book the end really caught me by surprise.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Elliot A

    I was very disappointed by this sequel to From the Earth to the Moon. It seemed to me that the author followed an advice to change the narration style from narrator-focused to dialogue-driven, which diminishes the fantastic element that made the first part so interesting and adventurous. Having said that, as a result of focusing more on the dialogue between the three characters present and the nature of the story and narration as a whole, these three men felt absurd in their behaviour and speech. I was very disappointed by this sequel to From the Earth to the Moon. It seemed to me that the author followed an advice to change the narration style from narrator-focused to dialogue-driven, which diminishes the fantastic element that made the first part so interesting and adventurous. Having said that, as a result of focusing more on the dialogue between the three characters present and the nature of the story and narration as a whole, these three men felt absurd in their behaviour and speech. The progress of the journey and the "science" behind such a journey to outer space cannot be easily described purely through dialogue alone, therefore the majority of the story felt more like a badly scripted after-school special. Reading this story, which was so dragged out and uninteresting, made me look forward to the end of each chapter so that I could take a break from continuously rolling my eyes. I was hoping for a story of great adventure, narration and science fiction, unfortunately I was left with nothing more than 148 pages of boredom. There were of few glimpses within the narration that resembled the narration in From the Earth to the Moon, which I so enjoyed and actually inclined me to give its sequel two stars instead of just one. Sadly it wasn't enough for me to reach for another Jules Verne book for a while. ElliotScribbles

  15. 5 out of 5

    Steve Mitchell

    The problem with this book really is that the science - at least the theory - has moved on so much since it was written thanks to actually sending people to the moon for the Apollo programme. Just as the science is better in 2001: A Space Odyssey than it is in Star Wars, most people would say that Star Wars is the better film because 2001 is dated. Ten years after the film is set there is still no lunar base and manned voyages to the gas giants are still many years in the future, but nobody comm The problem with this book really is that the science - at least the theory - has moved on so much since it was written thanks to actually sending people to the moon for the Apollo programme. Just as the science is better in 2001: A Space Odyssey than it is in Star Wars, most people would say that Star Wars is the better film because 2001 is dated. Ten years after the film is set there is still no lunar base and manned voyages to the gas giants are still many years in the future, but nobody comments that the laws of physics are routinely broken throughout Star Wars in a critical way. It is in the same way that I enjoyed HG Wells's First Men in the Moon much more than this book even though much of Wells's science is just fantasy from his imagination but Jules Verne attempted to write a novel that was accurate to the scientific theory of the day. I did enjoy the passages where Verne describes the problems of pseudo-science over science, and the fact that people cling to their original opinions rather than accepting new evidence until the paradigm shift forces a rethink. For that reason alone this novel - which is actually a great example of the science fiction genre, but just badly dated - is well worth a read.

  16. 4 out of 5

    JHoon

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. "Round the Moon" is the sequel to "From the Earth to the Moon". As the first book is about the preparation for reaching the moon, "Round the Moon" is about what happens during the journey to the moon. Although scientifically it is almost impossible to shoot a cannon with speed that can hit the escape velocity, the cannon is already orbiting around the moon (or going to the moon). The conversations between three different people were somehow amusing but serious, because they do not know that ther "Round the Moon" is the sequel to "From the Earth to the Moon". As the first book is about the preparation for reaching the moon, "Round the Moon" is about what happens during the journey to the moon. Although scientifically it is almost impossible to shoot a cannon with speed that can hit the escape velocity, the cannon is already orbiting around the moon (or going to the moon). The conversations between three different people were somehow amusing but serious, because they do not know that there is nothing but rocks and sands on the moon and they make assumptions with very accurate observations and calculations. Especially when Nicholl shows some mathematical calculations with Barbicane, the novel gets more reliable. Although the passengers cannot reach the moon, they are the heroes of their age because no one ever tried and was as brave as they were. Jules Verne's novels are really quick. He completely excludes unnecessary stories like love stories, not even including a woman. His novels may lack their values in a sense of literature, but their values as Science fictions are as significant as Shakespeare in classic.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jim

    Product Description Jules Verne was born in 1828 in France. His dream was to write a new kind of novel, which combined scientific fact with fiction. Verne eventually wrote 40 novels in his Voyages extraordinaires series. "What one man can imagine, another will someday be able to achieve." Is a quote from an article in the Encyclopedia Britannica that sums up Verne so well. In All Around the Moon three space travelers are conversing about science and mathematics. They decide to alter the course Product Description Jules Verne was born in 1828 in France. His dream was to write a new kind of novel, which combined scientific fact with fiction. Verne eventually wrote 40 novels in his Voyages extraordinaires series. "What one man can imagine, another will someday be able to achieve." Is a quote from an article in the Encyclopedia Britannica that sums up Verne so well. In All Around the Moon three space travelers are conversing about science and mathematics. They decide to alter the course of their projectile, which leads to unanticipated results. About the Author Jules Verne studied law but began writing stories and working in theatre as well. When Verne's father discovered his son was writing, he promptly withdrew his financial support. Verne then worked as a stockbroker.His wife encouraged him to pursue his writing, and he became acquainted with Pierre-Jules Hetzel, an important French publisher. Hetzel helped improve Verne's writings, which until then had been repeatedly rejected by other publishers. He died a wealthy man in 1905.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Lukas Dambrauskas

    This book wasn't so good as the first part. The first half was very interesting because there was written the travel to the moon very detailed, and it was full of unexpected things. There was even the answer of the question in the first part's start. Many adventures and simple scientific explanations were very good and the whole book whould be rated 5/5 stars if there wasn't the end. The second part was full of scientific explanations that wheren't very easy. I couldn't understand half of the wo This book wasn't so good as the first part. The first half was very interesting because there was written the travel to the moon very detailed, and it was full of unexpected things. There was even the answer of the question in the first part's start. Many adventures and simple scientific explanations were very good and the whole book whould be rated 5/5 stars if there wasn't the end. The second part was full of scientific explanations that wheren't very easy. I couldn't understand half of the words and about 5 chapters where just about the mountains in moon with boring facts like their height and diameter. The ending was better, there was an unexpected thing, but it wasn't very realistic, but it was fun to read. And the end of the ending was very interesting, so it saved the book from 3/5 stars. It is another not bad Jules Verne book but it wasn't as interesting as the first part. Anyway, I enjoyed reading it.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jake

    Round the Moon is a sequel to Jules Verne’s wonderful story From the Earth to the Moon . As sequels go, it’s quite satisfying. I remember wanting more after reading the original story, and this follow-up provided it. One of the main entertainments of this book is found in comparing what Verne hypothesized versus what we know of space travel and lunar conditions today. As with my review of the original story, I find the implausible sections of Round the Moon as or more fun than what Verne appear Round the Moon is a sequel to Jules Verne’s wonderful story From the Earth to the Moon . As sequels go, it’s quite satisfying. I remember wanting more after reading the original story, and this follow-up provided it. One of the main entertainments of this book is found in comparing what Verne hypothesized versus what we know of space travel and lunar conditions today. As with my review of the original story, I find the implausible sections of Round the Moon as or more fun than what Verne appears to have gotten scientifically correct. A side recommendation in a different medium: there is an equally fun and engrossing early cinematic take on traveling to the moon. It is called, The Woman on the Moon. This German silent film was released in 1929. You might find it at the library or via rental.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    Couldn't get into at all, the writing was so bland and seemingly pointless. Not to mention the fact that i really couldn't take it seriously- know it was written many years ago but some of the aspects of the plot were just ridiculous- the fact that Algebraic expressions are discussed in length with an air of almost the supernatural, like they're beyond normal people, and the basis of most of them was laughable, the fact that the spaceship was pretty much like a house and they sat around the couc Couldn't get into at all, the writing was so bland and seemingly pointless. Not to mention the fact that i really couldn't take it seriously- know it was written many years ago but some of the aspects of the plot were just ridiculous- the fact that Algebraic expressions are discussed in length with an air of almost the supernatural, like they're beyond normal people, and the basis of most of them was laughable, the fact that the spaceship was pretty much like a house and they sat around the couch as they took off and that they can open the portal of the ship in space as long as they do it fast. I can't even remember all of the things i was going to mention, but it wasn't even the lack of the knowledge of the time period that made this book subpar for me, it was mostly the air of pretentiousness that emanated from it

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kacey

    This is the sequel to From the Earth to the Moon, and something about it reads like the author felt obligated to write it. The previous book ended before the threesome actually went up into space, so this book is an answer to that problem. Again it's filled with science, math and the threesome talking over the various issues they face as they go toward the moon. Personally I'm glad that they didn't actually land. I think leaving it a mystery on whether or not the Moon was inhabited was a good mov This is the sequel to From the Earth to the Moon, and something about it reads like the author felt obligated to write it. The previous book ended before the threesome actually went up into space, so this book is an answer to that problem. Again it's filled with science, math and the threesome talking over the various issues they face as they go toward the moon. Personally I'm glad that they didn't actually land. I think leaving it a mystery on whether or not the Moon was inhabited was a good move. The book feels more realistic that way. After all those hard facts and scientific certainties, something as fantastic as moon-dwellers would've discredited the book. Again, it was another good book. Not a whole lot happens action-wise, but it does build up the fantasy and mysticism that surrounded the moon back then. And I think that's what makes it a good story.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    Jules Verne is great. Somehow his super Scientific writing style comes across as quaint and endearing, rather than like trudging through a swamp. Most of the time :) This one was fun, because at the time he wrote this book, it seemed absolutely extraordinary to think of man traveling to the moon, but now, obviously, that has happened. It was fun to see how he imagined space and the moon. It made me wish that I could for just a minute forget everything I know about space, and then have the chance Jules Verne is great. Somehow his super Scientific writing style comes across as quaint and endearing, rather than like trudging through a swamp. Most of the time :) This one was fun, because at the time he wrote this book, it seemed absolutely extraordinary to think of man traveling to the moon, but now, obviously, that has happened. It was fun to see how he imagined space and the moon. It made me wish that I could for just a minute forget everything I know about space, and then have the chance to see how I would have imagined it uninfluenced by modern knowledge. He gets a lot wrong, as I'm sure anyone would have, but it's fun to read about how he thought it was.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Phillip

    Just like the previous book, there's a lot of math and science in this one! So, if that's not your bag (like me), you tend to scan over it. But I can certainly see how it would inspire/interest those more scientifically/mathematically-inclined. I think this book suffers from the fact that ... we now actually know what the moon is like! So unlike the mystery of the time it was written, when a fiction writer could fill in gaps, the modern reader knows that there are certain things which are not tr Just like the previous book, there's a lot of math and science in this one! So, if that's not your bag (like me), you tend to scan over it. But I can certainly see how it would inspire/interest those more scientifically/mathematically-inclined. I think this book suffers from the fact that ... we now actually know what the moon is like! So unlike the mystery of the time it was written, when a fiction writer could fill in gaps, the modern reader knows that there are certain things which are not true and cannot be done. That said, the three character story is great, all three bring something to the story. I did like the resolution of the story, though ... the last book was such a cliff-hanger!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mr.B

    The logical conclusion of From the Earth to the Moon. In the former novel, three intrepid travelers are launched to the moon; in the sequel, they come back to earth. Sorry for the spoilers, but what else can be reported? Along the way, Verne amazes us with the extent of his researched knowledge of space travel and astronomy and physics and chemistry and the history of moon studies. I figure that by the time I finish reading Verne's collected works this summer, I'll have also visited the bulk of The logical conclusion of From the Earth to the Moon. In the former novel, three intrepid travelers are launched to the moon; in the sequel, they come back to earth. Sorry for the spoilers, but what else can be reported? Along the way, Verne amazes us with the extent of his researched knowledge of space travel and astronomy and physics and chemistry and the history of moon studies. I figure that by the time I finish reading Verne's collected works this summer, I'll have also visited the bulk of a set of detailed encyclopedia. As always, a fun read, but this one leaves more holes than others I've read.

  25. 4 out of 5

    David

    Round the Moon does not live up to the standard set by the work before it, From the Earth to the Moon. The characterizations stagnate quickly, and the plot floats along with little creative impetus. Several things occur that seem contrived and lacking in creative intent. I mostly got through and found enjoyment in Round the Moon because parts of it reminded me of From the Earth to the Moon. While I don't regret reading it, I don't feel that I got a lot out of it in retrospect. Maybe people who e Round the Moon does not live up to the standard set by the work before it, From the Earth to the Moon. The characterizations stagnate quickly, and the plot floats along with little creative impetus. Several things occur that seem contrived and lacking in creative intent. I mostly got through and found enjoyment in Round the Moon because parts of it reminded me of From the Earth to the Moon. While I don't regret reading it, I don't feel that I got a lot out of it in retrospect. Maybe people who enjoy anachronisms more than myself would get a greater satisfaction in reading this story.

  26. 5 out of 5

    William

    See if you recognise this: Three men are launched from Florida on a mission to the moon. During the flight an accident knocks them off course, they will now miss the moon. Inventiveness and mathematics allows them the check the build-up of CO2 in the capsule and allows them to loop around the moon, giving them a glimpse of the dark-side before their conical capsule splashes down in the ocean to be picked up by a US naval vessel. Apollo 13 in 1970? Actually Jules Verne in 1870. Really seriously spo See if you recognise this: Three men are launched from Florida on a mission to the moon. During the flight an accident knocks them off course, they will now miss the moon. Inventiveness and mathematics allows them the check the build-up of CO2 in the capsule and allows them to loop around the moon, giving them a glimpse of the dark-side before their conical capsule splashes down in the ocean to be picked up by a US naval vessel. Apollo 13 in 1970? Actually Jules Verne in 1870. Really seriously spooky – exactly 100 years apart. Putting the SERIOUS spookiness to one side, how does this book work as a story? It’s kind of Jekyll & Hyde, you’ll have two to three pages of utter hilarity mixed with deep philosophical questioning (very Pratchett), then five to six pages of science or maths explained to you, pretty much textbook style. Given that a lot of the science is now either common knowledge, and the awe-inspiring mysteries that would have drawn you through the dry lectures have now been poked and prodded by Armstrong et al. the book has lost some of it’s edge, which is not to fault Mr Verne – just the march of history. I just feel silly discussing anything else about this book other than the fact that this is Apollo 13, 100 years early! . I just can't get over it. Someone get Tom Hanks a top hat for some re-shoots.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Nella

    I still enjoy Verne's books more than I expected; they are fun adventures with a sense of wonder, and a lot of (often incorrect, but getting marvelously close for when it was written and certainly very creative) science. This one also includes a treatment of America and Americans that is simultaneously flattering and scathing satire, which I found fun. It doesn't really bother with deep characters or the like, but I did enjoy the angle of ex-soldiers finding new purpose and getting to use their I still enjoy Verne's books more than I expected; they are fun adventures with a sense of wonder, and a lot of (often incorrect, but getting marvelously close for when it was written and certainly very creative) science. This one also includes a treatment of America and Americans that is simultaneously flattering and scathing satire, which I found fun. It doesn't really bother with deep characters or the like, but I did enjoy the angle of ex-soldiers finding new purpose and getting to use their skills in something that isn't about war and death but rather about progress. But you can't really get away from the era in which it was written. At least Journey to the Center of the Earth included a female character, even presented as as good a scientist as any man (though still to ~female~ to go on an adventure). From Earth to the Moon has all of zero women. I was also really uncomfortable with the talk about colonizing the moon and "civilizing" anyone living there, and even if the story is set just after the American civil war it doesn't have anything to say on race relationships other than that everyone is free and equal now, apparently.

  28. 5 out of 5

    John

    I can't believe that Verne didn't always have it in mind to continue this particular story as the first book finished rather abruptly with the blast off and no indication of what happens to the three "astronauts". Thus this continuation answers the question...to some extent. There is a lot of scintific or quasi scientific observation to get through and the three characters seem to be there solely to take up different positions on the various theories highlighted. Thus dialogue remains stilted... I can't believe that Verne didn't always have it in mind to continue this particular story as the first book finished rather abruptly with the blast off and no indication of what happens to the three "astronauts". Thus this continuation answers the question...to some extent. There is a lot of scintific or quasi scientific observation to get through and the three characters seem to be there solely to take up different positions on the various theories highlighted. Thus dialogue remains stilted...or perhaps that's the fault of the translator and the characters are wildly blase about the whole escapade. It is notable that in neither of the books does a woman ever enter the scene - indeed the only female "character" is one of the dogs which they take with them and her eventual fate isn't even revealed. The other dog dies and is jettisoned along with a lot of other rubbish - no points to Verne for celestial environmentalism. Unfortunately and ultimately disappointingly - SPOLIER ALERT - a chance encounter with a passing meteor means their course deviates and they never get to their destination. Thus Neil Armstrong can still claim the honour.... or should that be Tintin?

  29. 4 out of 5

    D.J.

    We catch up with three of the luckiest men in the universe to find their skeletal systems still solid and their artillery shell transport a comfortable abode. What follows fills in the “That’s it?” ending from the previous installment (much like Verne’s sequel to Poe’s Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym), with chapters flip-flopping between conversation and calculations amongst our astronauts and observations of the view beyond the spaceship’s portholes. This novel could be described as a Twenty Tho We catch up with three of the luckiest men in the universe to find their skeletal systems still solid and their artillery shell transport a comfortable abode. What follows fills in the “That’s it?” ending from the previous installment (much like Verne’s sequel to Poe’s Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym), with chapters flip-flopping between conversation and calculations amongst our astronauts and observations of the view beyond the spaceship’s portholes. This novel could be described as a Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea in space - albeit much shorter and with much more creative use of science to make up for the lack of research at the time. However, this creativity does lead to some moments of humor and horror when the reader realizes the real-world results of our character’s actions. All said, this was an educational insight to the knowledge of space travel in the nineteenth century. I can’t wait for the film adaptation starring Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson and Kevin Hart.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Diogo Muller

    Another fascinating early sci-fi book by Verne, and again, the main selling point of this book for me was the outdated science: while, in hindsight, it's easy to make fun of some assumptions in this book, it's clear that Verne took most of what was known or theorized back then into consideration, when writing this book. Even if we ignore this, this book is a fun adventure that has an engaging plot with great characters and a progression that keeps the reader wondering what will happen next with o Another fascinating early sci-fi book by Verne, and again, the main selling point of this book for me was the outdated science: while, in hindsight, it's easy to make fun of some assumptions in this book, it's clear that Verne took most of what was known or theorized back then into consideration, when writing this book. Even if we ignore this, this book is a fun adventure that has an engaging plot with great characters and a progression that keeps the reader wondering what will happen next with our three heroes. If you liked the previous book in this series - and you should read it before reading this - you'll probably also like this one.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.