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A Modest Proposal

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Classic Book for the Kindle: A Modest Proposal by Jonathan Swift ********************************** We are pleased to offer thousands of books for the Kindle, including thousands of hard-to-find literature and classic fiction books. Click on our Editor Name (eBook-Ventures) next to the book title above to view all of the titles that are currently available. *************** Classic Book for the Kindle: A Modest Proposal by Jonathan Swift ********************************** We are pleased to offer thousands of books for the Kindle, including thousands of hard-to-find literature and classic fiction books. Click on our Editor Name (eBook-Ventures) next to the book title above to view all of the titles that are currently available. **********************************


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Classic Book for the Kindle: A Modest Proposal by Jonathan Swift ********************************** We are pleased to offer thousands of books for the Kindle, including thousands of hard-to-find literature and classic fiction books. Click on our Editor Name (eBook-Ventures) next to the book title above to view all of the titles that are currently available. *************** Classic Book for the Kindle: A Modest Proposal by Jonathan Swift ********************************** We are pleased to offer thousands of books for the Kindle, including thousands of hard-to-find literature and classic fiction books. Click on our Editor Name (eBook-Ventures) next to the book title above to view all of the titles that are currently available. **********************************

30 review for A Modest Proposal

  1. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    Last night my daughter asked me to watch what passes for comedy to pre-teens on Nickelodeon; a show low on laughs but high on laugh track. It's Halloween week and of course the thematic drum of cheap scares and slutty costumes (those of you dads that have 11 year old girls know what it is like to take a knee at the end of the show to have a side-bar chat about this topic alone) plays large when midway through the episode a six year old girl dressed like a failing barrister circa 1735 comes firin Last night my daughter asked me to watch what passes for comedy to pre-teens on Nickelodeon; a show low on laughs but high on laugh track. It's Halloween week and of course the thematic drum of cheap scares and slutty costumes (those of you dads that have 11 year old girls know what it is like to take a knee at the end of the show to have a side-bar chat about this topic alone) plays large when midway through the episode a six year old girl dressed like a failing barrister circa 1735 comes firing on stage screaming at her parents because they got her a Jonathan Swift costume instead of the requested Taylor Swift. This is where I wanted to pause live TV to tell my daughter about the original Swift, about A Modest Proposal - how our current American culture screams for someone like him to write about our never-ending race problem, our soul sucking capitalism-at-any-cost, our failed PAC-fueled political system. But my daughter is 11, I am 45, it's late on Saturday night and I don't have it in me. I watch the Jonathan Swift girl rant and rave and I drool thinking about delicious Irish babies in a white wine sauce.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Elyse Walters

    One book leads to another.... After listening to the audiobook "Food: A Love Story", by Jim Gaffigan...a hilarious walking companion... I quoted a Bizzarre Line from Jim..."Maybe All Americans should just eat starving people from other nations".... my mind went elsewhere with that line ( the complete opposite with Jim... but laughed anyway).... So....getting a little more serious -- During the comments *Orinoco Womble (tidy bag and all)*, asked me if I had read/listened to Jonathan Swift's "A Modest One book leads to another.... After listening to the audiobook "Food: A Love Story", by Jim Gaffigan...a hilarious walking companion... I quoted a Bizzarre Line from Jim..."Maybe All Americans should just eat starving people from other nations".... my mind went elsewhere with that line ( the complete opposite with Jim... but laughed anyway).... So....getting a little more serious -- During the comments *Orinoco Womble (tidy bag and all)*, asked me if I had read/listened to Jonathan Swift's "A Modest Proposal". I hadn't! Doing a little research about the 'very short' satire...I first downloaded it on my Kindle for 'free' and read it... Still interested ...I downloaded the audiobook ...and listened to it The idea 'behind' "A Modest Proposal" starts with a much deeper profound purpose than Gaffigan's "Food", book. Sure, Gaffigan may had hit the button on a political- social issue with is 'eating starving people from nations', -- by accident... But Jim wrote about Food ... primarily because he likes to eat. It's a topic he knows about, and he's a comedian. Jonathan Swift had a clear intention with this 'tongue-and-cheek' ....( hilarious and somewhat repulsive), satire. His short story was definitely a Political and social issue satire. This book was first published in 1789. There were many starving and poor people in Ireland. Reading & listening to this small satire gave me a deeper appreciation for St. Patrick's day which was just celebrated a few days ago. Irish people were living in villages owned by wealthy English landowners..and for years lived under the power of The English Parliament. Swift set out to address the serious issue of poverty. His 'modest' proposal was to eat useless babies ...( by his calculations there were about 120 thousand)... which would help curb the population growth. Swift's imagination of profits and benefits, ( for wealthy England), from the Irish babies skin --( ladies gloves - men's boots)...was so creepy. .... It was all creepy ... with the undertone being a very sad time in history. Given how absurd this 'entire' story is -- I can only conclude Swift was pointing out the obvious ridiculousness ----people were fighting over land, money, and religion...when people were 'starving'. The modest proposal wasn't 'modest' at all... It was an earthquake ... Hoping to wake people up and move people into more humane actions.

  3. 5 out of 5

    James

    Book Review A Modest Proposal is a satirical work of fiction by Jonathan Swift, written nearly 300 years ago. It is an Irish piece, originally published anonymously, but served as a way to shove stupidity in the face of the English government and wealthy. Essentially, in order to solve the problem of poverty, people should eat their children. But it was written in a very serious manner, as though it were meant to be real suggestions. Ahead of its time, it propelled Swift to the forefront of b Book Review A Modest Proposal is a satirical work of fiction by Jonathan Swift, written nearly 300 years ago. It is an Irish piece, originally published anonymously, but served as a way to shove stupidity in the face of the English government and wealthy. Essentially, in order to solve the problem of poverty, people should eat their children. But it was written in a very serious manner, as though it were meant to be real suggestions. Ahead of its time, it propelled Swift to the forefront of both English literature and the 18th century collection of masterpieces. Although not very long (under 50 pages), the language is a bit outdated and requires a few translations to understand what he meant back during that period of time. The humor is undeniable. The time he took to create a solution for every aspect of the problem, as well as provide counter points, is incredibly delicious -- pun intended! Though a bit too absurd, even for me, it's still one of those parts of our English courses we all enjoy reading. It's hilarious to a 15-year old, who may not know all the different parts of history or the way in which governmental red-tape can work. Find a few pages online after perusing this review... just sample some of the words and phrases he used. It may push you into reading the whole thing! About Me For those new to me or my reviews... here's the scoop: I read A LOT. I write A LOT. And now I blog A LOT. First the book review goes on Goodreads, and then I send it on over to my WordPress blog at https://thisismytruthnow.com, where you'll also find TV & Film reviews, the revealing and introspective 365 Daily Challenge and lots of blogging about places I've visited all over the world. And you can find all my social media profiles to get the details on the who/what/when/where and my pictures. Leave a comment and let me know what you think. Vote in the poll and ratings. Thanks for stopping by. Note: All written content is my original creation and copyrighted to me, but the graphics and images were linked from other sites and belong to them. Many thanks to their original creators. [polldaddy poll=9729544]

  4. 4 out of 5

    Scribble Orca

    Goodreaders, my Friends, “…who peruse this [Review], Be not offended, whilst on it you [chew]: Denude yourselves of all depraved affection, For it contains no badness, nor infection: 'Tis true that it brings forth to you no birth Of any value, but in point of mirth; Thinking therefore how sorrow might your mind Consume, I could no [more] apt subject find; One [plume] of joy surmounts of grief a [duration]; Because to laugh is proper to the [rational person].”–Rabelais

  5. 4 out of 5

    Brad

    there is no better way to kick off a semester of literature than a modest proposal. one smart ass student always tries to derail the conversation with an early declaration of the proposal’s satire, but no one listens, and within moments i have a class of fifty - sixty students angry, frustrated, and sometimes rabid as i take swift’s ironic side and ask the students, with all the seriousness i can muster (which is quite a bit), if we shouldn’t give it a try? i follow that up with “why not?” after there is no better way to kick off a semester of literature than a modest proposal. one smart ass student always tries to derail the conversation with an early declaration of the proposal’s satire, but no one listens, and within moments i have a class of fifty - sixty students angry, frustrated, and sometimes rabid as i take swift’s ironic side and ask the students, with all the seriousness i can muster (which is quite a bit), if we shouldn’t give it a try? i follow that up with “why not?” after “why not?” then smack them upside the head with their universal humanist superiority complex, and force them to think. it’s so new to them they leave hating me or loving me. but they do leave thinking. poor bastards. except that one mormon in the front row. he never leaves thinking anything other than how superior he is. and what a dipshit i am.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    Macabre but good example of how you can use standard arguments to convince people - no matter how appalling your opinion may be. Scary!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Lynne King

    I came across this essay via Scribble's review and read it in no time. I thought it would be light reading and it turned out to be something completely different. Satire at its best from Mr Swift. I read this in the dentist's waiting room this morning and it certainly waylaid my normal fear of going there. The author has come up with a "modest" (nothing modest here) proposal to aid the Irish economy, stop the begging, give mothers (the breeders) the opportunity to get an income by selling their l I came across this essay via Scribble's review and read it in no time. I thought it would be light reading and it turned out to be something completely different. Satire at its best from Mr Swift. I read this in the dentist's waiting room this morning and it certainly waylaid my normal fear of going there. The author has come up with a "modest" (nothing modest here) proposal to aid the Irish economy, stop the begging, give mothers (the breeders) the opportunity to get an income by selling their little children and also the delicate meat will be in competition with pigs. I wonder if human flesh is salty? Perhaps I should go and talk to the cannibals on Borneo or other similar countries? Imagine having a child of around a year in age, all prepared and ready to be cooked, then eaten. I wonder if they need to be marinated first in wine? I was particularly taken with: "I have been assured by a very knowing American of my acquaintance in London, that a young healthy child well nursed, is at a year old, a most delicious nourishing and wholesome food, whether stewed, roasted, baked or boiled; and I have no doubt that it will equally serve in a fricasie, or a ragoust." Queer spelling but it was, after all, written in 1729. Everyone should read it and will understand the Irish humour and satire, if not already known. A delicious, light but yet thought-provoking book on the never-ceasing wonders of the imagination.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Florencia

    This review includes sensitive material that may be upsetting to some friends. (view spoiler)[ I shall now therefore humbly propose my own thoughts, which I hope will not be liable to the least objection. I have been assured by a very knowing American of my acquaintance in London, that a young healthy child well nursed is at a year old a most delicious, nourishing, and wholesome food, whether stewed, roasted, baked, or boiled, and I make no doubt that it will equally serve in a fricassee, or rago This review includes sensitive material that may be upsetting to some friends. (view spoiler)[ I shall now therefore humbly propose my own thoughts, which I hope will not be liable to the least objection. I have been assured by a very knowing American of my acquaintance in London, that a young healthy child well nursed is at a year old a most delicious, nourishing, and wholesome food, whether stewed, roasted, baked, or boiled, and I make no doubt that it will equally serve in a fricassee, or ragout. A child will make two dishes at an entertainment for friends, and when the family dines alone, the fore or hind quarter will make a reasonable dish, and seasoned with a little pepper or salt will be very good boiled on the fourth day, especially in winter. ** Photo credit: Jonathan Swift / CC Population / James Cridland, Flickr via Forbes. Photo of a baby lobster via IDN Times. (hide spoiler)] Jan 04, 16 * Also on my blog.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Bradley

    I continue to think that this supremely logical and inevitably practical work will become a part of American legislation any day now. You know, right after the FEMA camps have a permanent place in the common zeitgeist. Anyone want a potato? Update 11/19/15: It occurs to me that someone ought to write a cookbook to expound upon this most excellent suggestion. Any takers? Julia Childs? Hannibal Lector? Rush Limbaugh? So many excellent suggestions, I know, I know.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Duane

    This essay is what's known in English writing as "straight-faced" satire. Well, it's just a little too straight-faced for me. Swift's extended ironic rambling suggest's using Irish children as a food source to solve the problem of the down-trodden masses. It eliminates 100 thousand children from extended suffering, provides an income source for their poor parents, and provides table fare for the upper society. Swift was extremely aggravated with the Irish political system, the English class syst This essay is what's known in English writing as "straight-faced" satire. Well, it's just a little too straight-faced for me. Swift's extended ironic rambling suggest's using Irish children as a food source to solve the problem of the down-trodden masses. It eliminates 100 thousand children from extended suffering, provides an income source for their poor parents, and provides table fare for the upper society. Swift was extremely aggravated with the Irish political system, the English class system, and the lack of desire by the lower classes to improve their position. It certainly makes his point well enough, just not in a very tasteful manner.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Anthony Vacca

    Here’s a quick and easy recipe for roasted young “long pig” that is guaranteed to save a few bucks come the next last-minute dinner with friends or family: What You Will Need Butcher knife Olive oil or butter Seasonings (I have a soft spot for a pinch of Ambergris, a touch of Wattleseed, and a dash of Spanish Fly) Roasting pan Step 1 Trim away the end of the neck, and the end of each leg from the "knee" joint downwards. This is usually only necessary with wild-caught “long pig” because, if farmed, than Here’s a quick and easy recipe for roasted young “long pig” that is guaranteed to save a few bucks come the next last-minute dinner with friends or family: What You Will Need Butcher knife Olive oil or butter Seasonings (I have a soft spot for a pinch of Ambergris, a touch of Wattleseed, and a dash of Spanish Fly) Roasting pan Step 1 Trim away the end of the neck, and the end of each leg from the "knee" joint downwards. This is usually only necessary with wild-caught “long pig” because, if farmed, than it is sold trimmed for market. Step 2 Remove any internal organs such as the liver, kidneys, intestines or any other organs that might be left inside the body cavity. Rub the body lightly over both its inner and outer surfaces with olive oil or melted butter, and then season it with salt and pepper. If your recipe calls for additional herbs or spices, rub or sprinkle them over the rabbit at this stage. Step 3 Preheat your oven to 325 degrees Fahrenheit. Place in the roasting pan on its side, without a rack. Young “long pig” is too lean for the drippings to be fatty, and any juices that cook out will help keep the underside moist. Step 4 Baste every 20 to 30 minutes with more oil or butter to help keep it from drying out. Turn it after 45 minutes, if you wish, to ensure even cooking. Step 5 Roast until it reaches an internal temperature of 160 F, when tested by inserting an instant-read thermometer into the thickest part of the thigh. The entire process will take approximately 90 minutes with a market-weight of 10-12 pounds. Tips Tender “long pig” can also be roasted at 425 F for 20 to 25 minutes, giving it a chewier texture but a richer flavor. Many traditional recipes call for roasted “long pig” to be "barded," or covered with thin sheets of protective fat. This can be thinly-sliced pork back fat or lacy sheets of caul fat, but bacon is easier to find and works well. If a smoky bacon flavor is inappropriate in your dish, ask the butcher to sell you thinly-sliced uncured pork belly instead. The braising liquid can be reduced to concentrate its flavors, then thickened to make a sauce for your rabbit. WARNING The FSA's Food Safety and Inspection Service recommends cooking all game animals to an internal temperature of 160 degrees Fahrenheit to minimize the risk of trichinosis and other foodborne illnesses. This is especially crucial with wild-caught infants.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    This proposal made by J. Swift for combating poverty and overpopulation is as simple as it is ingenious. But that's the problem with simple and ingenious ideas: There must be someone to find them. Swift was a far-sighted visionary. Although expressed at the end of the 18th century the solutions depicted in his text are still relevant to modern society. I am sure some grave problems of today would be fairly easy to solve. With only some slight modifications to Swift's proposal hunger and poverty This proposal made by J. Swift for combating poverty and overpopulation is as simple as it is ingenious. But that's the problem with simple and ingenious ideas: There must be someone to find them. Swift was a far-sighted visionary. Although expressed at the end of the 18th century the solutions depicted in his text are still relevant to modern society. I am sure some grave problems of today would be fairly easy to solve. With only some slight modifications to Swift's proposal hunger and poverty would disappear almost overnight! Or the increasingly pressing problem of refugees pulling into Europe? Solvable! Someone should make an entry in Brussels, or give the parliamentarians there this highly topical essay to read. It will surely find a lobby. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

  13. 5 out of 5

    booklady

    It's been a long time since I first read this satirical masterpiece by Swift, which reads like its title and is anything but, "A Modest Proposal". In it, the author is 'proposing' a solution to the serious problems of overpopulation, unemployment, and food shortages, not to mention providing the social and moral benefits of kinder husbands and better parents. Mr. Swift has all the economic angles figured out and presents a very convincing argument, so straightforward and valid my daughter's high It's been a long time since I first read this satirical masterpiece by Swift, which reads like its title and is anything but, "A Modest Proposal". In it, the author is 'proposing' a solution to the serious problems of overpopulation, unemployment, and food shortages, not to mention providing the social and moral benefits of kinder husbands and better parents. Mr. Swift has all the economic angles figured out and presents a very convincing argument, so straightforward and valid my daughter's high school English 3 class, consisting of juniors and seniors, thought he was serious. And wasn't he? Well since Swift was advocating the 'that a young healthy child well nursed, is, at a year old, a most delicious nourishing and wholesome food, whether stewed, roasted, baked, or boiled...' I should hope he was writing his proposal for other reasons than a genuine suggestion. Indeed, Swift wrote “A Modest Proposal” in 1720 to call attention to abuses inflicted on Irish Catholics by well-to-do English Protestants. Although a Protestant himself, he was a native of Ireland, having been born in Dublin of English parents, and believed England was exploiting Ireland. He is also satirizing Catholic-Protestant relations when he reminds the Protestants that if the babies are eaten young, there will be less Catholics growing up to go Catholic churches. Even the Irish are rebuked in his essay, for stoically accepting abuse rather than taking action on their own behalf. And when it seems it can't get any better, the ending is the best of all! An absolute MUST read!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Ashleigh

    This is obviously an incredible satire, which hopes to give some satisfaction to the rich. I recently reread it after reading The Sorrows of Young Mike. In John Zelazny's parody, the main character parodies Jonathan Swift's modest proposal. It is a parody within a parody and the modern twist is displayed well.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Christopher

    Can you believe this guy? I realize that this was, like, a long time ago and things were different back then. Like, less civilized and they didn't value life like we do today and stuff. But omg, seriously! For all intensive purposes, this guy Swift was crazy. After I read this I literally cut my own head off. So apparently in the eighteenth century (and by the way, isn't it so stupid that it's called the eighteenth century when it was the 1700s? that makes like no sense at all), there was a lot o Can you believe this guy? I realize that this was, like, a long time ago and things were different back then. Like, less civilized and they didn't value life like we do today and stuff. But omg, seriously! For all intensive purposes, this guy Swift was crazy. After I read this I literally cut my own head off. So apparently in the eighteenth century (and by the way, isn't it so stupid that it's called the eighteenth century when it was the 1700s? that makes like no sense at all), there was a lot of poverty and poor people and hunger and stuff. And this guy Swift was thinking, "what should we do with all of these babies whose parents are struggling to care for?" And you'll never guess what his solution was... To eat the babies! I mean, I guess he was pretty smart. He argued it very well. He said that you should keep the babies while they breastfeed (uh, gross, bee-tee-dubs!) and like fatten them up and stuff, but when they get to about a year old when they're nice and chubby, you should roast them like a pig and make gloves and boots out of their skin and stuff. Seriously! Gross! I don't like to wear skin, thank you very much. My leather boots do me just fine! I mean, for one thing, isn't that really illegal? I'm pretty sure that you can't just do that to a baby, even if it's your own baby. And I know it's a doggy-dog world and you have to watch out for yourself, but I draw the line at eating babies. Irregardless of what this guy Swift says. Okay I seriously have to stop rambling about this now. I'm getting too worked up and I think I might get carpool tunnel syndrome from so much typing.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Bonnie

    ‘A Modest Proposal for Preventing the Children of Poor People in Ireland From Being a Burden on Their Parents or Country, and for Making Them Beneficial to the Publick’ otherwise known as simply 'A Modest Proposal' is anything but modest. 'I shall now therefore humbly propose my own thoughts, which I hope will not be liable to the least objection. I have been assured by a very knowing American of my acquaintance in London, that a young healthy child well nursed, is, at a year old, a most deliciou ‘A Modest Proposal for Preventing the Children of Poor People in Ireland From Being a Burden on Their Parents or Country, and for Making Them Beneficial to the Publick’ otherwise known as simply 'A Modest Proposal' is anything but modest. 'I shall now therefore humbly propose my own thoughts, which I hope will not be liable to the least objection. I have been assured by a very knowing American of my acquaintance in London, that a young healthy child well nursed, is, at a year old, a most delicious nourishing and wholesome food, whether stewed, roasted, baked, or boiled; and I make no doubt that it will equally serve in a fricasie, or a ragoust.' This satire was said to have been written in response to the heartless response to Irish poverty and the policies of the leaders at the time. ‘A Modest Proposal’ goes into extreme detail on how selling infants after the age of one will be beneficial to society which was quite humorous, indeed; however, as a satire it was obviously meant as a mockery and I do believe it hit the mark.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Pink

    Haha, I didn't know what the proposal would be! How very biting! I'm glad I wasn't spoiled before reading this. I think I'd have liked Jonathan Swift.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Paula W

    It gives a whole new meaning to "People are our greatest resource", doesn't it? This little satire made me miss Jon Stewart all over again.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Franky

    “But, as to my self, having been wearied out for many years with offering vain, idle, visionary thoughts, and at length utterly despairing of success, I fortunately fell upon this proposal….” Clever, brilliant and humorous satire and treatise here from Jonathan Swift that takes many a shot at several different aspects of how society handled the problems of poverty and starvation in Ireland as well as the rich among other areas. I find it amazing how Swift could take irony to a new level and for “But, as to my self, having been wearied out for many years with offering vain, idle, visionary thoughts, and at length utterly despairing of success, I fortunately fell upon this proposal….” Clever, brilliant and humorous satire and treatise here from Jonathan Swift that takes many a shot at several different aspects of how society handled the problems of poverty and starvation in Ireland as well as the rich among other areas. I find it amazing how Swift could take irony to a new level and for such an extended length of time in his essay, not only poking holes at aspects of society, but carrying it through. He begins his essay by setting up the problems and crisis of poverty in such a deadpan manner that the “solution” is such a shock (and quite funny). He argues so…well…swiftly and effectively, and elaborates quite thoroughly for his “plan” that I think, dear reader, you just might be convinced as well. There are some definite laugh out loud moments from Swift’s essay. Here are a few gems below: “they shall, on the contrary, contribute to the feeding, and partly to the clothing on many thousand…” “I grant this food will be somewhat dear and therefore very proper for landlords, as they have already devoured most of the parents…” “…so much wasted among us by the great destruction of pigs, too frequent at our table; which are in no way comparable in taste of magnificence to a well grown, fat yearly child, which roasted whole will make a considerable figure at a Lord Mayor’s feast.” And Swift says all this with a straight face. This one is so good you’ll be eating it up.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Fionnuala

    The number of souls in this kingdom being usually reckoned one million and a half, of these I calculate there may be about two hundred thousand couple whose wives are breeders; from which number I subtract thirty thousand couple, who are able to maintain their own children, (although I apprehend there cannot be so many, under the present distresses of the kingdom) but this being granted, there will remain an hundred and seventy thousand breeders. I again subtract fifty thousand, for those women The number of souls in this kingdom being usually reckoned one million and a half, of these I calculate there may be about two hundred thousand couple whose wives are breeders; from which number I subtract thirty thousand couple, who are able to maintain their own children, (although I apprehend there cannot be so many, under the present distresses of the kingdom) but this being granted, there will remain an hundred and seventy thousand breeders. I again subtract fifty thousand, for those women who miscarry, or whose children die by accident or disease within the year. There only remain an hundred and twenty thousand children of poor parents annually born. The question therefore is, How this number shall be reared, and provided for? which, as I have already said, under the present situation of affairs, is utterly impossible by all the methods hitherto proposed. For we can neither employ them in handicraft or agriculture; we neither build houses, (I mean in the country) nor cultivate land: they can very seldom pick up a livelihood by stealing till they arrive at six years old; except where they are of towardly parts, although I confess they learn the rudiments much earlier; during which time they can however be properly looked upon only as probationers: As I have been informed by a principal gentleman in the county of Cavan, who protested to me, that he never knew above one or two instances under the age of six, even in a part of the kingdom so renowned for the quickest proficiency in that art.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Joselito Honestly and Brilliantly

    Written in 1729, three years after the publication of Gulliver's Travels, at the time when Ireland was reeling from famine with an estimated 35,000 wandering beggars in the country. Drought and failing crops had forced entire families to quit their farms and took the roads begging for food. Landowners, of English ancestry, ignored their sufferings and opted to live abroad to evade payment of taxes and duties. The sub-title of this story reads: "For Preventing the Children of Poor People in Ireland Written in 1729, three years after the publication of Gulliver's Travels, at the time when Ireland was reeling from famine with an estimated 35,000 wandering beggars in the country. Drought and failing crops had forced entire families to quit their farms and took the roads begging for food. Landowners, of English ancestry, ignored their sufferings and opted to live abroad to evade payment of taxes and duties. The sub-title of this story reads: "For Preventing the Children of Poor People in Ireland from Being a Burden to Their Parents or Country, and for Making Them Beneficial to the Public" Jonathan Swift proposed to eat Ireland's hungry children to lessen the number of these wandering, hungry, innocent souls. And he wouldn't hear of any alternative remedies: "Therefore let no man talk to me of other expedients: of taxing our absentees a five shillings a pound: of using neither clothes nor household furniture except what is of our own growth and manufacture: of utterly rejecting the materials and instruments that promote foreign luxury: of curing the expensiveness of pride, vanity, idleness, and gaming in our women: of introducing a vein of parsimony, prudence, and temperance: of learning to love our country, ...of quitting our animosities and factions, ...of being a little cautious not to sell our country and conscience for nothing: of teaching landlords to have at least one degree of mercy toward their tenants: lastly, of putting a spirit of honesty, industry, and skill into our shopkeepers..." A masterpiece of irony and satire. Naughty Mr. Swift. Now, we have corned beef and hot dogs bearing his name. I hope there's no human flesh in them.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Esraa Aljuburi

    It was a sad read for me , the words depicting mothers followed by 4, 5 or 6 children all in rags importuning every passenger for alms , reading this satirical article, one could imagine that famines, extreme poverty and conflicts that lead Jonathan Swift to write his proposal were mere past and a blissfully no such atrociousness is still present in our days, while the contrary is true. Such scenes are still very common, at least in my home country. The world is still suffering, especially childr It was a sad read for me , the words depicting mothers followed by 4, 5 or 6 children all in rags importuning every passenger for alms , reading this satirical article, one could imagine that famines, extreme poverty and conflicts that lead Jonathan Swift to write his proposal were mere past and a blissfully no such atrociousness is still present in our days, while the contrary is true. Such scenes are still very common, at least in my home country. The world is still suffering, especially children who are paying the price of adults stupidities and nonsense fighting over Power, lands, money and differences in religions or ideas . It is sad to end up agreeing with Jonathan’s non modest proposal and truly believing that it is better for them to be devoured than to be grown up deprived from their least basic rights such as living in dignity , food , shelter, love and education. Many children in the – non developing - countries are suffering and will continue to suffer, so I still beseech the world to reconsider Jonathan’s Modest proposal and make it universal ! image safe

  23. 4 out of 5

    Gloria Mundi

    It is clear to me now what the modern European politicians are doing wrong. They are, obviously, not reading their classics. Europe is in the midst of a dire financial crisis with all sorts of complicated schemes being proposed to resolve the situation. And here we have a practical and sensible solution that nobody appears to have considered, despite the fact that it has been around since 1729! If you don't have enough money to feed your kids, EAT THEM! What could be simpler? Now, the author mentio It is clear to me now what the modern European politicians are doing wrong. They are, obviously, not reading their classics. Europe is in the midst of a dire financial crisis with all sorts of complicated schemes being proposed to resolve the situation. And here we have a practical and sensible solution that nobody appears to have considered, despite the fact that it has been around since 1729! If you don't have enough money to feed your kids, EAT THEM! What could be simpler? Now, the author mentions that this is a solution devised specifically in the context of Ireland. And I admit that the calculations will need to be re-done to reflect the demographics and circumstances at hand. But really, there is no logical reason why this solution would not work in the context of the Eurozone sovereign debt crisis. Somebody needs to send this to the Greeks. Certain celebrities have already endorsed the idea: [image error]

  24. 5 out of 5

    Diana

    Yet another read for my Brit Lit class. Swift's satire at it's finest. This author is one of the reasons I took the class, I enjoy his work. That being said this one was a bit shocking to me. I have always known the basics behind this piece, and his resolution to dealing with all the poor children in Ireland. That being said I spent most of my time reading this being extremely happy it was pure satire. Selling your babies to the gentry as a meat product, very strange. Early version of Soylent Gr Yet another read for my Brit Lit class. Swift's satire at it's finest. This author is one of the reasons I took the class, I enjoy his work. That being said this one was a bit shocking to me. I have always known the basics behind this piece, and his resolution to dealing with all the poor children in Ireland. That being said I spent most of my time reading this being extremely happy it was pure satire. Selling your babies to the gentry as a meat product, very strange. Early version of Soylent Green anyone. I hope this did make some in power at least think about how to change the Poor Laws for the better. Great author, who definitely got his point across.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Paquita Maria Sanchez

    I was told of this essay recently by a friend of mine in reference to her own unplanned pregnancy...she sarcastically considered using Swift's idea to...let's say... "make baby food" as one possible means of dealing with the infant once it's born. That kid is going to have some issues.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Anne Zappa

    The hospital's obstetrician department seemed to look like the inside of a stock exchange building. There was constant tumult of men bidding for all the babies that were to bee born that day. If a buyer was lucky, a lot of triplets were born on the day of his bid. The hospitals were provided with high security. These sites had become hot spots for suicide bombings. The terrorists had been manipulating people, using the name of Islam to besmirching the innocuous act of cannibalism. These men were The hospital's obstetrician department seemed to look like the inside of a stock exchange building. There was constant tumult of men bidding for all the babies that were to bee born that day. If a buyer was lucky, a lot of triplets were born on the day of his bid. The hospitals were provided with high security. These sites had become hot spots for suicide bombings. The terrorists had been manipulating people, using the name of Islam to besmirching the innocuous act of cannibalism. These men were local buyers, most of them were KFB* franchise owners. KFB* had dominated the baby meat market all over the world. To cut their costs, they had been bamboozling people by mixing monkey meat & baby meat. Most people couldn't discern the difference. People couldn't stop devouring on baby meat. It had more health benefits than any other type of meat. The hidden fact was that baby meat also caused impotency in both men & women alike. In the earlier days when baby meat was new on the market, getting people to like it was no problem. Mass media propaganda can make people want pretty much anything, just like the phones with an I. KFC* had been industriously trying to get back its market share. Studies sponsored by KFC* had shown that in the future we would end up eating our next generation. The world would be inhabited by a middle-aged impotent bourgeois which will finally get old & die. This triggered a lot of activists to protest & urge the myriads to stop eating babies which had an impact similar to the awareness drives for Global Warming. For no particular reason September 19th was sanctioned as the No-Baby-Eating Day. The capitalists continued making money, indifferent people continued eating babies, and people who read continued reading. Kentucky's Fried Baby* Kentucky's Fried Chicken*

  27. 5 out of 5

    Lit Bug

    A very short political tract by Swift in a lashing, satirical vein, the complete title of this tract is 'A Modest Proposal for Preventing the Children of Poor People in Ireland From Being a Burden to Their Parents or Country, and for Making Them Beneficial to the Public'. Published in 1729, an era when the British and the Irish were sworn enemies and when Ireland was reeling under a severe drought, Swift wrote this as an attempt to criticize heavily the British authorities who did nothing to stav A very short political tract by Swift in a lashing, satirical vein, the complete title of this tract is 'A Modest Proposal for Preventing the Children of Poor People in Ireland From Being a Burden to Their Parents or Country, and for Making Them Beneficial to the Public'. Published in 1729, an era when the British and the Irish were sworn enemies and when Ireland was reeling under a severe drought, Swift wrote this as an attempt to criticize heavily the British authorities who did nothing to stave off the plight of the Irish. The essay exhorts the Irish to give birth to as many kids as possible, feed them properly and then, when they are at their juiciest best, to eat them - since there is no other way to survive the fatal dearth of food. Mistaken by the readers as a genuine suggestion, the tract was heavily criticized. Only later did people see its extreme satire directed at the British, that suggested that very soon, the Irish would have no way but to eat their own children to survive the famine. A very rare piece of unmitigated, perhaps even venomous criticism, yet hilarious political-satire tract. 'The Modest Proposal' is anything but modest. And here's a few lines from it: 'I shall now therefore humbly propose my own thoughts, which I hope will not be liable to the least objection. I have been assured by a very knowing American of my acquaintance in London, that a young healthy child well nursed, is, at a year old, a most delicious nourishing and wholesome food, whether stewed, roasted, baked, or boiled; and I make no doubt that it will equally serve in a fricasie, or a ragoust.'

  28. 4 out of 5

    Bettie

    Opening: It is a melancholy object to those, who walk through this great town, or travel in the country, when they see the streets, the roads and cabbin-doors crowded with beggars of the female sex, followed by three, four, or six children, all in rags, and importuning every passenger for an alms. These mothers instead of being able to work for their honest livelihood, are forced to employ all their time in stroling to beg sustenance for their helpless infants who, as they grow up, either turn t Opening: It is a melancholy object to those, who walk through this great town, or travel in the country, when they see the streets, the roads and cabbin-doors crowded with beggars of the female sex, followed by three, four, or six children, all in rags, and importuning every passenger for an alms. These mothers instead of being able to work for their honest livelihood, are forced to employ all their time in stroling to beg sustenance for their helpless infants who, as they grow up, either turn thieves for want of work, or leave their dear native country, to fight for the Pretender in Spain, or sell themselves to the Barbadoes. http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/1080

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kaethe Douglas

    I can't think why I've never read this before. Maybe I never did because I knew what it was and didn't feel that I had to. If one were teaching English, it would have to be the textbook on satire, wouldn't it? The thing that strikes me most, is how angry Swift must have been when he wrote it, watching his country die at the hands of the British. Or perhaps it's just anger remembered in a moment of calm. Really makes me want to slap some modern writers upside the head (college essayists are partic I can't think why I've never read this before. Maybe I never did because I knew what it was and didn't feel that I had to. If one were teaching English, it would have to be the textbook on satire, wouldn't it? The thing that strikes me most, is how angry Swift must have been when he wrote it, watching his country die at the hands of the British. Or perhaps it's just anger remembered in a moment of calm. Really makes me want to slap some modern writers upside the head (college essayists are particularly egregious) and show them what it is like to be truly edgy. I own a copy.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Terris

    Wow! This one is so funny, also scary and disgusting! But what a smart thinker and writer Swift was!

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