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Afganistan, rok 1952. Abdullah i jego siostra Pari mieszkają wraz z ojcem i macochą w ubogiej wiosce. Ledwie wiążą koniec z końcem – znalezienie pracy graniczy z cudem. Szczególnie ciężkie dla rodziny są zimy. Dziesięcioletni Abdullah darzy trzyletnią, niezwykle pogodną Pari wielką, bezwarunkową miłością; stara się zastąpić jej nieżyjącą matkę i ojca, który nie poczuwa się Afganistan, rok 1952. Abdullah i jego siostra Pari mieszkają wraz z ojcem i macochą w ubogiej wiosce. Ledwie wiążą koniec z końcem – znalezienie pracy graniczy z cudem. Szczególnie ciężkie dla rodziny są zimy. Dziesięcioletni Abdullah darzy trzyletnią, niezwykle pogodną Pari wielką, bezwarunkową miłością; stara się zastąpić jej nieżyjącą matkę i ojca, który nie poczuwa się do przejęcia jej obowiązków. Aby zdobyć dla siostry skarb – piękne pawie piórko – Abdullah odda jedyną parę butów. Pewnego dnia wszystko się zmienia. Podróż z ojcem do Kabulu stanie się dla Pari i Abdullaha początkiem rozstania, które odciśnie piętno na ich przyszłym życiu.


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Afganistan, rok 1952. Abdullah i jego siostra Pari mieszkają wraz z ojcem i macochą w ubogiej wiosce. Ledwie wiążą koniec z końcem – znalezienie pracy graniczy z cudem. Szczególnie ciężkie dla rodziny są zimy. Dziesięcioletni Abdullah darzy trzyletnią, niezwykle pogodną Pari wielką, bezwarunkową miłością; stara się zastąpić jej nieżyjącą matkę i ojca, który nie poczuwa się Afganistan, rok 1952. Abdullah i jego siostra Pari mieszkają wraz z ojcem i macochą w ubogiej wiosce. Ledwie wiążą koniec z końcem – znalezienie pracy graniczy z cudem. Szczególnie ciężkie dla rodziny są zimy. Dziesięcioletni Abdullah darzy trzyletnią, niezwykle pogodną Pari wielką, bezwarunkową miłością; stara się zastąpić jej nieżyjącą matkę i ojca, który nie poczuwa się do przejęcia jej obowiązków. Aby zdobyć dla siostry skarb – piękne pawie piórko – Abdullah odda jedyną parę butów. Pewnego dnia wszystko się zmienia. Podróż z ojcem do Kabulu stanie się dla Pari i Abdullaha początkiem rozstania, które odciśnie piętno na ich przyszłym życiu.

30 review for I góry odpowiedziały echem

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    What did I think? I don't know exactly. Like his two other books, Hosseini is an excellent storyteller. He's great with words and produces images that flow like poetry. The story is touching, emotional and speaks of life's hardships and the difficult choices one must make. Deeper than that, it speaks of how the choices you make now may have a ripple effect- or echo- over time. If you don't happen to shed a tear at some point while reading, you're heartless. He captures your emotions from the ver What did I think? I don't know exactly. Like his two other books, Hosseini is an excellent storyteller. He's great with words and produces images that flow like poetry. The story is touching, emotional and speaks of life's hardships and the difficult choices one must make. Deeper than that, it speaks of how the choices you make now may have a ripple effect- or echo- over time. If you don't happen to shed a tear at some point while reading, you're heartless. He captures your emotions from the very first page and he does this very well, as he did in his other novels. You find yourself transported to 1950's Afghanistan where you smile, cry, and feel pity right alongside the unfortunate characters in this book. But Hosseini tried something different with "And The Mountains Echoed" and that was incorporating a slew of different characters as opposed to just two, like he did in his last two books, and I don't know if it worked out too well. Some people could have been mentioned in passing, or not even at all, as opposed to dedicating whole chapters to them, such as Markos and Thalia's story. Also the Bashiri cousins seemed unnecessary. Even though these characters were unique in their own way and provided food for thought regarding their plights, I still felt like these chapters dragged on when I was more concerned about what was happening with the others. It was like Hosseini deliberately sucked us in, made us get cozy with Saboor and his family just to rip them away from us and branch off onto some completely different writing exercise. As the reader, I just couldn't reshape my feelings to feel another strong connection to these new characters. Regarding the writing style, the book spanned over several generations and then spoke in the first person from the point of view of different characters from the next generation which got confusing at first, especially as he jumps between past and present and even geographical locations. Furthermore, he squeezed in yet another subplot towards the end of the book (with Iqbal and the commander) and it came off sounding short and incomplete. I feel like the author could have dedicated more pages developing and telling the story of the characters we already got to know and love in the beginning, rather than introducing new, unnecessary ones halfway through the book. This format Hosseini used left a lot of open ends and a kind of longing, leaving the reader unsatisfied. Not my favorite out of the three but still, somehow, an enjoyable read.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Natalie

    Date I finished this book: 06/09/2013 Date I was ready to review this book: Never Unfortunately, I have to review it because it is due back to the library tomorrow, so here comes my completely insufficient review. This book is by Khaled Hosseini. Really, what more is there to say? I knew it would be wonderful. I have to admit that the problem I ran into was that I was comparing it to his previous two books too often. And let's face it, they were amazing. And this book is incredible in its own right Date I finished this book: 06/09/2013 Date I was ready to review this book: Never Unfortunately, I have to review it because it is due back to the library tomorrow, so here comes my completely insufficient review. This book is by Khaled Hosseini. Really, what more is there to say? I knew it would be wonderful. I have to admit that the problem I ran into was that I was comparing it to his previous two books too often. And let's face it, they were amazing. And this book is incredible in its own right, too, but it's not to be compared. So, I tried to view this as its own book (which it most certainly is) and forget I had ever read the other two and that this was the first time I was experiencing Hosseini. I'm not going to recap. It would be pretty difficult to not give anything away. There are many stories within this one story. The characters are intertwined, although many will never realize that they are. The story comes full circle, but this is Mr. Khaled Hosseini, so I didn't expect a full blown happy ending. And *SPOILER ALERT*, I didn't really get one. None of this business going on: Although, I will say that maybe Disney and Hosseini are of one mind. Or at least Sebastian and Hosseini: Yes it is, Sebastian. Yes it is. What have I learned from this book? We (the human race) have (mostly) good intentions. But we (mostly) do not follow through. We soothe ourselves. We convince ourselves. We justify our actions. Or our lack of actions. We have an "out of sight, out of mind" way of thinking. It's a human flaw. And sometimes it has consequences that we cannot comprehend. Consequences that we may never realize because, hey, it's out of sight. Oh sure. Just like him to point out WHAT IS WRONG WITH ME! Not that I'm taking it personally... One thing anyone who has read my other reviews should know is that I frequently complain about: 1. Not making me care about the characters enough 2. Not being able to envision the surroundings - the people, the buildings, the culture, etc. I don't experience this problem with this book. The writing is so rich that I felt like I was there. My emotions reflected the emotions of the characters. I was invested. I am not ashamed to admit that I went back to chewing on my nails while reading this - a habit I gave up over a decade ago. SOMETHING BAD IS GOING TO HAPPEN!!! You would think this was an edge-of-the-seat suspense novel. It's not. But it is heartbreaking. I bet I cried no less than ten times. Granted, I cried when they showed a bear on the local news that they rescued from a telephone pole, so I cry more than the average bear (ha. ha. ha.). But it was still really heartbreaking...over and over and over because there were so many intertwined stories. I really enjoyed this book. I didn't love it in the same way I loved the previous two, but I loved it still. And I will give you a parting paragraph that is an example of the beautiful writing that makes me savor every word of this book: Now and then, when she turned to tap ash into a saucer, I stole a quick glance at the red polish on her toenails, at the gold-tinged sheen of her shaved calves, the high arch of her foot, and always at her full, perfectly shaped breasts. There were men walking this earth, I marveled, who had touched those breasts and kissed them as they had made love to her. What was left to do in life once you had done that? Where did a man go next once he'd stood at the world's summit? -------------------------- I just finished this. I am emotionally drained. Review coming soon. -------------------------- 04/18/2013 Did...did I just read that there is a giveaway for this? SHUT THE FRONT DOOR! Too much? Ok, I'll settle for cute and hope for the best. ;) -------------------------- WHAT?! A new book by Khaled Hosseini? I can't...I just can't....I can't even think straight right now BECAUSEOHMYGOODNESSIAMSOSOSOSOSOSOSOEXCIIIIIIIIIITED!!!!!!!! I CAN'T WAIT!! Have I mentioned how EXCITED I AM!? I am so excited!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Bobi Tychynski

    Why do people rate books before reading them? This skews the ratings and I wish people wouldn't do so... This was my most anticipated book of all time. I couldn't wait to read and and naturally was a bit let down. My least favorite of his three. I found the voice in some of the chapters a bit awkward. The characters were interesting and well developed for the most part. I didn't like how the author chose to weave everything together. There were some very well done parts -some moments that were ver Why do people rate books before reading them? This skews the ratings and I wish people wouldn't do so... This was my most anticipated book of all time. I couldn't wait to read and and naturally was a bit let down. My least favorite of his three. I found the voice in some of the chapters a bit awkward. The characters were interesting and well developed for the most part. I didn't like how the author chose to weave everything together. There were some very well done parts -some moments that were very beautiful. I'm glad I read this but won't anticipate the next book nearly as much although I will definitely read the next one hoping to experience something powerful.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Scarlet

    Here's something you should know about Khaled Hosseini: All his stories have more or less, the same ingredients. It always starts with Afghanistan in its pre-war days. The protagonists are children, guileless and innocent. Then the invasion happens. People separate, the bonds between them torn apart either by fate or by design. Many gut-wrenching chapters later, there's some kind of reunion but with a catch - there's something amiss, something unfulfilled, like a testimony to the unfairness of li Here's something you should know about Khaled Hosseini: All his stories have more or less, the same ingredients. It always starts with Afghanistan in its pre-war days. The protagonists are children, guileless and innocent. Then the invasion happens. People separate, the bonds between them torn apart either by fate or by design. Many gut-wrenching chapters later, there's some kind of reunion but with a catch - there's something amiss, something unfulfilled, like a testimony to the unfairness of life. To be honest, I'm not a fan of formulaic things. Yet, when it's Hosseini telling a story, I listen. I give in. I let his words curl around me like a blanket. I fall in love. And when it's all over, I clutch the book to my chest and weep like a child. Because formula or no formula, Khaled Hosseini just knows how to tell a story. He knows what to say and how to say it. It's like an art he's mastered - and no matter how many times he does it, the impact of it doesn't seem to fade. And the Mountains Echoed is an ode to siblinghood and all the joys and heartbreaks that come with it - the anguish of separation, the guilt of envy, the comfort of companionship, the burden of responsibility. Unlike his previous books, Hosseini adopts a short-story approach for this one. There are multiple narratives in multiple time-frames spread across several different countries, all connected by a common link to Afghanistan. The writing is beautiful, as always. Sample this: "All my life, I have lived like an aquarium fish in the safety of a glass tank, behind a barrier as impenetrable as it has been transparent. I have been free to observe the glimmering world on the other side, to picture myself in it, if I like. But I have always been contained, hemmed in, by the hard, unyielding confines of the existence that Baba has constructed for me, at first knowingly, when I was young, and now guilelessly, now that he is fading day by day. I think I have grown accustomed to the glass and am terrified that when it breaks, when I am alone, I will spill out into the wide open unknown and flop around, helpless, lost, gasping for breath." And the Mountains Echoed was one of my most anticipated books this year and it did not disappoint. That being said, it pales in comparison to his previous works - The Kite Runner and A Thousand Splendid Suns. Maybe it was the multiple POV thing. With so many characters and so many stories, it's inevitable that some would hit harder than the rest. Personally, I found the first half more emotionally striking - Abdullah, Nabi and Parwana's stories all made me tear up. I missed Afghanistan in the later segments. And in case it wasn't obvious enough, I just wanted to say that I love Khaled Hosseini. If it weren't for him, I would have foolishly associated Afghanistan with just the Taliban. It's shocking how little I know about this country even though it's so close to mine. Thank you for the culture-cum-history lessons, Mr. Hosseini. And even if your next book adheres to the formula, I'll still read it and in all likelihood, cherish it.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Will Byrnes

    The tale of how my father lost his sister was as familiar to me as the stories my mother had told me of the Prophet, tales I would learn again later when my parents would enroll me in Sunday school at a mosque in Hayward. Still, despite the familiarity, each night I asked to hear Pari’s story again, caught in the pull of its gravity. Maybe it was simply because we shared a name. Maybe that was why I sensed a connection between us, dim, enfolded in mystery, real nonetheless. But it was more than The tale of how my father lost his sister was as familiar to me as the stories my mother had told me of the Prophet, tales I would learn again later when my parents would enroll me in Sunday school at a mosque in Hayward. Still, despite the familiarity, each night I asked to hear Pari’s story again, caught in the pull of its gravity. Maybe it was simply because we shared a name. Maybe that was why I sensed a connection between us, dim, enfolded in mystery, real nonetheless. But it was more than that. I felt touched by her, like I too had been marked by what had happened to her. We were interlocked, I sensed, through some unseen order in ways I couldn’t wholly understand, linked beyond our names, beyond familial ties, as if, together, we completed a puzzle. I felt certain that if I listened closely enough to her story, I would discover something revealed about myself. In the opening chapter of And the Mountains Echoed, a poor father tells his children a story. A monster ravished a town until a child was offered to appease him. In order to save the rest of his family and the town, a father sacrifices his favorite child to the monster. Years later, unable to recover from the sorrow of this decision, the father scales a mountain to reach the monster’s fortress, seeking to bring his son home. But, finding that the boy is happy, well-fed, clothed and educated, he reconsiders. In this story is the core of the tales to come. Hosseini writes of the bond between parents and children, and the sacrifices some parents make to see that their children are well looked after. Does the benefit of a more comfortable home, a richer material upbringing, outweigh the loss of that natural parent-child experience? The theme of parenting, with complications well beyond the keep-or-send-away element, permeates. The son of a wealthy local big-shot comes to realize that his comforts come at the expense of others. A massively scarred girl is left by her mother in the care of someone who is probably better suited to raise her. A young woman sacrifices years of her life to take care of an ailing parent. A war-ravaged child is taken in by one of her caregivers. I am forever drawn to family as a recurring central theme of my writing. My earlier novels were at heart tales of fatherhood and motherhood. My new novel is a multi-generational family story as well, this time revolving around brothers and sisters, and the ways in which they love, wound, betray, honor, and sacrifice for each other.There are sibling issues galore here. An ugly duckling twin gets revenge on the favored twin, but takes on a considerable burden. A brother and sister who were very close, are torn apart at an early age, and must cope with the absence, of that missing other part of themselves. Friendships that seem more like sibling-hood sprout like poppies in Helmand. A Greek boy is joined by the daughter of his mother’s best friend. She remains longer than expected. A fast, but fragile friendship forms between a rich boy in Afghanistan and the son of a poor man. The cast here is international, as is the selection of settings. Hosseini was born in Kabul, but, as his father was an ambassador, he was exposed to the wider world. Dad was posted in Paris when the Soviets invaded Afghanistan. Hosseini’s time in France informs the parts of the book that are set there. Eventually his family immigrated to the USA, taking up residence in California, another site in the novel. He has visited his homeland since growing up in the West, like émigrés we meet in these pages. One Afghani emigrant struggles with the tension between remaining connected to his homeland, in a very concrete way, or maintaining his separation. How much responsibility for dealing with Afghanistan’s problems lies with those who have moved away? Hosseini, best-selling author of The Kite Runner and A Thousand Splendid Suns returns us to a world, or rather worlds that we have seen before, a harsh Afghanistan as the emotional and table-setting core, and western locales in which are echoed the events of the old world.…when you grow up in a Third World country, you know, poverty and affluence are juxtaposed. It's literally next door -- you don't have to go to another zip code. It's right there when you walk out in the street, and there are beggars and so on and so forth. So it becomes part of your life, and you can either not, just not reflect on it, but I must have, because I remember my stories always had to do with these things. There was always some guy who came from a very affluent background and some person who came from a much less privileged background, and their lives collided in some way, and tragedy would ensue inevitably. I mean, sort of a recurring theme in my stories One of the points Hosseini makes here is the commonality of East and West, despite outward differences. He mirrors many of his characters’ experiences. People sacrifice themselves to care for those in need of help in both places. Parents are no less stressed in the West than in the East in terms of struggling with decisions about their children. Pain is too much for some in both worlds. In both worlds there are characters who cannot face their futures and opt out. In both worlds young people sacrifice themselves to care for others. In both worlds there are characters who are seriously damaged physically and must cope with adapting to worlds that value beauty or at the very least normalcy. In both worlds parents give up their children. We really are the same beneath our cultures and histories. I do not have a comparative character count here, but it was my sense that this was a larger book than his first two. Each of those focused mostly on a smaller group of actors. This time it seemed there was more of an ensemble cast, in multiple stories. The links between some of the elements were a bit tenuous, as if a short story that was lying around was modified enough to serve a purpose in this larger tale and inserted. It is a large landscape and I felt that on occasion we wandered too long away from some of the primary characters, maybe lost some parts of their lives. To compensate for this, when we get back to them, we are offered a reader’s digest condensed report of what has happened since last we checked in. This created a bit of distance. That said, there is vast world of feeling here. Not only the agony of parents who feel they must give up their children, but the pain of other sundered familial connections as well. There are deep scars of guilt for terrible acts, and the pain of love denied. There is also joy in finding a kind of love where hope was slight, in reconnecting with those long lost, with saving and being saved. The echoes in the mountains are the sounds of tears, of both anguish and joy, universal, penetrating, human. Listen. This review is cross-posted at Coot's Reviews =============================EXTRA STUFF 12/3/13 - The results are in and And the Mountains Echoed was voted the Goodreads Choice Award winner for fiction

  6. 4 out of 5

    Morgan

    Every so often a book comes around that rocks you to your core. It makes you cry, laugh, think, feel and dream so intensely that when it is over you wonder where that life has gone. The characters are your friends and you realize you should probably call them because you haven't heard from them in awhile and you wonder what is going on in their lives. Then you remember that they aren't real and that seems impossible because they had a whole life that you were living for as long as you could hold Every so often a book comes around that rocks you to your core. It makes you cry, laugh, think, feel and dream so intensely that when it is over you wonder where that life has gone. The characters are your friends and you realize you should probably call them because you haven't heard from them in awhile and you wonder what is going on in their lives. Then you remember that they aren't real and that seems impossible because they had a whole life that you were living for as long as you could hold off racing to the end of the book to find out what happened. As a reader I wait for books like this to come out. Sometimes its months or years before I find one. And the Mountains Echoed is one of those books. The writing is incredible, the characters are memorable and the story is woven together with extreme care. Simply amazing. I received this book as a first reads book.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Leah

    Blown like leaves in the wind… ‘A story is like a moving train: no matter where you hop onboard, you are bound to reach your destination sooner or later.’ Within the first few pages of this book, the reader knows s/he’s in the hands of a master storyteller. In a village in rural Afghanistan, mid 1940s, a father tells a folk tale to his two young children. On the next day, they will travel to Kabul and start a chain of events that will take the reader on a journey across the world and through the Blown like leaves in the wind… ‘A story is like a moving train: no matter where you hop onboard, you are bound to reach your destination sooner or later.’ Within the first few pages of this book, the reader knows s/he’s in the hands of a master storyteller. In a village in rural Afghanistan, mid 1940s, a father tells a folk tale to his two young children. On the next day, they will travel to Kabul and start a chain of events that will take the reader on a journey across the world and through the decades. The novel is made up of a series of linked and interlinked stories about members of this one family, their descendants and people whose lives they touch. Hosseini takes us back and forwards in time but each episode tells a whole story of one of the characters. This made the book feel in some ways like a collection of short stories rather than a novel, but Hosseini brings us round in a perfect circle and the last few chapters bring all these disparate episodes into one immensely moving whole. The beauty of the writing is only matched by the humanity of the characters. Hosseini takes us inside their minds and their hearts and we see them laid bare, essentially good people but with their flaws and weaknesses exposed, to us and to themselves. Although much of the book takes place in Europe and America, Afghanistan remains at the heart of it because it remains in the hearts of the characters, even though they may have become part of the war- and poverty-driven diaspora. A beautiful and very moving book that brought me to tears on several occasions, this isn’t fundamentally about politics or war; it is about the unforgettable people who populate its pages – about humanity. And though there is sadness and sorrow here, there is also love and joy and a deep sense of hope. Highly recommended. NB This book was provided for review by Amazon Vine UK. www.fictionfanblog.wordpress.com

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kelly (and the Book Boar)

    2.5 Stars Oh that felt like blasphemy to type, but I’ve gotta be honest here. I loved The Kite Runner and A Thousand Splendid Suns, but Hosseini just missed the mark with this one. The story begins with a father telling his children a fable of an evil div (monster) who roamed various villages and would choose a home at random. Said home would have to sacrifice one of their children, or the div would kill as many as he pleased. The father in the story is beside himself with the idea of offering o 2.5 Stars Oh that felt like blasphemy to type, but I’ve gotta be honest here. I loved The Kite Runner and A Thousand Splendid Suns, but Hosseini just missed the mark with this one. The story begins with a father telling his children a fable of an evil div (monster) who roamed various villages and would choose a home at random. Said home would have to sacrifice one of their children, or the div would kill as many as he pleased. The father in the story is beside himself with the idea of offering one of his children to be slaughtered. That tale seems so fitting, because I can picture Hosseini at the editing table going through the same process. However, rather than opting to cull one (or a few) of the massive amounts of characters/stories in this book that were barely connected – he opted to keep them all. Unfortunately, that meant the ultimate sacrifice was my enjoyment. Too many characters – many with stories not long enough to actually to get invested in their lives. I’m sad that I had to type that.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Patricia

    I finished reading this book on May 24, but did not write a review because I didn't want to taint the experience for many of my friends who had not yet read the book. Since then I've seen several people post where they've finished the book and how much they loved it. Unfortunately I did not love it. I was highly disappointed in this book, it was not at all what I expected. I wanted the richness of the culture, I wanted to immerse myself in the feelings and experiences of the people who live a li I finished reading this book on May 24, but did not write a review because I didn't want to taint the experience for many of my friends who had not yet read the book. Since then I've seen several people post where they've finished the book and how much they loved it. Unfortunately I did not love it. I was highly disappointed in this book, it was not at all what I expected. I wanted the richness of the culture, I wanted to immerse myself in the feelings and experiences of the people who live a life so totally different from anything I've experienced. But I just did not get that feeling from this book. I loved the first one third, I loved the ending, but most of the middle of the book just didn't grab me. There was way too much jumping around with the characters, and everything just moved too fast-forward in time. All the characters got old too quickly. Perhaps because I had read his other 2 books and loved them so much, I was expecting something more similar to those. I wanted the entire story to be about Pari and Abdullah and their families, to me they ARE the story, way too much time was spent with what I considered unimportant characters and their lives. Doesn't Hosseini know his stories shouldn't be about internet, television, and airplanes?? He does so well with the culture of his country, and the traditions that form it, that's what I wanted from this book but it just wasn't there. The ending was wonderful, I had a lump in my throat when I read that. I just wish he had taken me on a better route getting there.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Pushkar Singh

    And The Mountains Echoed (ATME) is a brilliant stand-alone book, however, it's not up to the mark that Khaled Hosseini set for himself with his earlier two fantastic novels. Starting with the negatives, the narration style simply didn't work out. Though Mr. Hosseini deserves a pat on the back for trying out something different this time and not sticking to a tried and tested formula by going beyond a two-person narration as in A Thousand Splendid Suns (ATSS), but this time it just somehow looks And The Mountains Echoed (ATME) is a brilliant stand-alone book, however, it's not up to the mark that Khaled Hosseini set for himself with his earlier two fantastic novels. Starting with the negatives, the narration style simply didn't work out. Though Mr. Hosseini deserves a pat on the back for trying out something different this time and not sticking to a tried and tested formula by going beyond a two-person narration as in A Thousand Splendid Suns (ATSS), but this time it just somehow looks rusty in places. The editing was not up to the mark too, some parts could've been easily cut out, personally, the part of Markos and Thalia's sibling hood goes on for way too long. Along with that, ATME doesn't move you as much as the first two books did. However, coming to positives, the story is extremely beautiful. The way it places emphasis on relations between siblings or sibling-likes is refreshing and delightful. The characters are well sketched out and the imagery, as Mr. Hosseini is massively talented in, works too. Overall, the positives outweigh the negatives, however, Mr. Hosseini must keep the negatives in mind before we see a fourth one from him. He has been my all-time favourite author, and this is a great book, just not in the league of his astounding ATSS and The Kite Runner. 4/5

  11. 4 out of 5

    Nenette

    A pebble thrown in a pool of water creates ripples; never just one, but countless of them. This is what this story is all about. An uncle’s suggestion led to a father’s decision, and there was no stopping what happened afterwards. The ripples were so vast it looked almost impossible to trace back to the central plop that the pebble created; but secrets are meant to be revealed, truths are meant to be uncovered. The story played out through many decades in at least five countries among a myriad o A pebble thrown in a pool of water creates ripples; never just one, but countless of them. This is what this story is all about. An uncle’s suggestion led to a father’s decision, and there was no stopping what happened afterwards. The ripples were so vast it looked almost impossible to trace back to the central plop that the pebble created; but secrets are meant to be revealed, truths are meant to be uncovered. The story played out through many decades in at least five countries among a myriad of characters, and yet not once did I feel lost or confused while reading it. I feel for Abdullah and Pari, and I am glad that somehow there was redemption for them at the end, even if one can say that it was not too complete because of Abdullah’s condition. Another masterpiece from Mr. Hosseini, and may I say that in this third novel, he put the notch for himself much higher that it should be an exciting wait for the next one.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Marialyce

    You know how you hate when a good book ends? You know you have to keep reading, reading, reading because you just can't stop and yet you are ever so mad when the book does just that? You know how you feel like wow! how can I find another like this, a book as good, a book as well written, a book that has touched you in so many places? This is one of those books. Mr Hosseini has written a brilliant novel which is about family, its importance, its closeness even though one is continents away, and i You know how you hate when a good book ends? You know you have to keep reading, reading, reading because you just can't stop and yet you are ever so mad when the book does just that? You know how you feel like wow! how can I find another like this, a book as good, a book as well written, a book that has touched you in so many places? This is one of those books. Mr Hosseini has written a brilliant novel which is about family, its importance, its closeness even though one is continents away, and its ability to love through the years and separation. AS I was nearing the end, I had to think how this could have been anyone's story. Separated because of poverty, uprooted because of conflict, this family beset by many tragedies pushes forward. They reconnect and reunite in a future that looks to be bright and loving every bit as loving as that love which transpired between a brother and a sister so very long ago. This author has definitely a kindred mind with the human spirit. He speaks so well of people, making the reader get to know his characters on so many levels. He is a gifted storyteller and one who makes the pages fly as the thoughts of things held dear become a focus of one's life. He is able to see and portray so well that one's past can and often does have repercussions long after the incidents of life have intruded and that perhaps in reality it is through one's family that you can go home again even though Thomas Wolfe might disagree. This book can't come more highly recommended by this reader. It presents us all with the concept that no matter what country, nationality, heritage you may bring with you, the family and its core of love is ultimately the greatest equalizer to humanity.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Fabian

    One terrific novel. Great to know: the page-turning literary novel is alive & well in the 2010's! The intersecting stories are all pearls of a deep maudlin color mauve. Blue, frozen stories which, because of their humanity, resound like the echoes in mountains. (An interesting motif regarding the immobility of singular fates, &/or the full circle reconciliation with the past.) Wholeheartedly recommended to me by my pal Segen, & I in turn also wanna do the same.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Henry Avila

    Abdullah 10, is very close to his little sister Pari 3, his poor family living inside a mud house, in Shadbagh , a small village of Afghanistan, days walk from Kabul the capital, but the boy's whole life is taking care of this precious girl child, washing her, keeping the sister clean, playing and giving the baby things, reciting poems, taking the tiny female on rambles, doesn't matter, just content to be together, they are like twins...His kind mother has died and the stepmother Parawana , is i Abdullah 10, is very close to his little sister Pari 3, his poor family living inside a mud house, in Shadbagh , a small village of Afghanistan, days walk from Kabul the capital, but the boy's whole life is taking care of this precious girl child, washing her, keeping the sister clean, playing and giving the baby things, reciting poems, taking the tiny female on rambles, doesn't matter, just content to be together, they are like twins...His kind mother has died and the stepmother Parawana , is indifferent to their needs, besides she has a child of her own a male... to occupy her time , the surviving proud, strict parent Saboor ignores the two, too busy scratching out an existence , providing for his family's survival in the farm fields, just another laborer during the early 1950's trying to prevent starvation to his dependents . However an unbelievable event happens Pari is sold to a rich, childless couple, Suleiman Wahdati, a very private man even a recluse, and his sophisticated, beautiful, fun loving wife Nila, half French, she likes to have drinking parties, where everyone smokes in this traditional muslim society, at home, still feeling uncomfortable in such an intensely conservative country...though in Kabul, an unhappy marriage obviously ; the "adoption" arranged by Abdulla's stepmother's brother, "Uncle" Nabi... He, all his life regrets the idea, ( a big mistake that cripples his ambitions) to buy this pretty, talented girl, the chauffeur who works for them, the wealthy pair, in the large, frightening, cosmopolitan city of ever expanding Kabul...Abdullah howls in anguish ...the only person he loves has been taken cruelly away...it will change the destiny of many in the future. This third novel by Khaled Hosseini can't match the previous others, about the lives of scattered families and friends , in Afghanistan, France, Greece, and the United States... resembles more a bunch of short stories loosely connected , than a real novel, he is like an intense juggler with too many toys in the air, his thoughts divided, unfocused, uneasy , only so long can he keep these objects floating above, before they come crashing down to the floor causing havoc...it is a shame. If the writer had stayed with Abdullah and Pari as the main characters this would have been a great book... bored authors like to do different things, experiment, change their style , hoping to surprise readers but instead hurt the product not fatally here, it is still quite good, yet a slow puncture wound proves costly and the victim is us ...taking a long time to recover, nevertheless it hurts...people including writers are resilient, the future can be bright. Another day arriving and optimism coming with it...

  15. 4 out of 5

    Nimra khalid

    OMG..! OMG..! OMG..! OMG..! OMG..! OMG..! OMG..! OMG..! OMG..! Oh-MY-GOD..! (that pretty much Explains my reaction after seeing that a new book by Khaled Hosseini Is coming..!) .................................................................................... Seeing this review and 66 likes makes me smile.. After all the excitements and waiting, I practically ruined this book by trying to read it when I was not fit for reading. OH well, I can add another thing to my ever growing long list of regr OMG..! OMG..! OMG..! OMG..! OMG..! OMG..! OMG..! OMG..! OMG..! Oh-MY-GOD..! (that pretty much Explains my reaction after seeing that a new book by Khaled Hosseini Is coming..!) .................................................................................... Seeing this review and 66 likes makes me smile.. After all the excitements and waiting, I practically ruined this book by trying to read it when I was not fit for reading. OH well, I can add another thing to my ever growing long list of regrets and things that I could have done "not Wrong'. Review to come..! This book deserves some words from me.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Diane

    This is a difficult book to review. Hosseini is a good storyteller, but I have the same complaint about this book as I did with The Kite Runner, which is that they are too precious. As in, roll-your-eyes, on-the-nose precious. But before I focus on the negative, let me share the positive: This is an impressive story that spans generations and continents. Each chapter is told from a different character's point of view, and each section builds on the events that have come before, and by the end we This is a difficult book to review. Hosseini is a good storyteller, but I have the same complaint about this book as I did with The Kite Runner, which is that they are too precious. As in, roll-your-eyes, on-the-nose precious. But before I focus on the negative, let me share the positive: This is an impressive story that spans generations and continents. Each chapter is told from a different character's point of view, and each section builds on the events that have come before, and by the end we have covered more than 60 years of a family's story. The book opens with a legend about a giant who would go to a village and demand a child be sacrificed to him. A father was forced to give up his favorite son, and he was so heartbroken and upset that he later left the village to try and retrieve him from the giant. But when he arrived at the giant's house after many days of walking, he saw that his son was happy and was living a better life than he could have provided. The giant takes pity on the father and gives him a potion to help him forget his son. But did the father ever really forget? The meaning of this legend is soon made evident when we meet a boy, Abdullah, who is forced to say goodbye to his beloved sister, Pari, who is being sent to Kabul to be adopted. In the next chapter we meet the woman who will become Abdullah's stepmother, then we meet Abdullah's uncle, then we meet some cousins who used to be neighbors of the uncle... and so on, and so on. There are many good moments in the book, such as when a character recognizes their selfishness and vows to do better. Or when relatives have been reunited after a long separation because of the war. And as the story unfolds, we must ask if Pari was better off being adopted, or should she have stayed with her family in the village? A minor complaint of mine is I think Hosseini skimped on details of the wars in Afghanistan and on the clashes with the Taliban. True, he covered this in previous books, and in this book one of the characters wrote in a letter that the wars have been well-documented elsewhere, so there's no point in describing it. But I disagree, because I think it was a bit of laziness on the author's part. This is a story about an Afghanistan family from the 1950s to present day. The war violently disrupted the country and the family, and yet here it only surfaces as background noise. (For readers who want to know more about Afghanistan during this time period, I recommend the memoir The Favored Daughter by Fawzia Koofi.) For most of the book I was prepared to give it four stars, but about three-fourths of the way through I grew weary of the too precious dialogue, the characters who were just too earnest and understanding, and the seemingly endless exposition. (What pushed me over the edge was the extended section in Greece, which I think could have been cut entirely.) I think Hosseini is a big bestselling author because he tells good stories -- and for most people, that is enough. But when I compare him to my other favorite novelists, his books leave me wanting something more.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Lynne King

    This is my biggest disappointment with a book of all time, purely because Khaled Hosseini is one of my favourite authors. I loved his two previous books, “The Kite Runner” and “A Thousand Splendid Suns” but somehow I couldn’t get interested in the same way I did with his previous books. They both had so much depth. I think the fact that I lived in Saudi Arabia for many years possibly helped in that I could relate to them the way I did. But this book, well I found it to be “long winded” and not to This is my biggest disappointment with a book of all time, purely because Khaled Hosseini is one of my favourite authors. I loved his two previous books, “The Kite Runner” and “A Thousand Splendid Suns” but somehow I couldn’t get interested in the same way I did with his previous books. They both had so much depth. I think the fact that I lived in Saudi Arabia for many years possibly helped in that I could relate to them the way I did. But this book, well I found it to be “long winded” and not to my satisfaction at all and consequently I did skim read to my shame. The first chapter was excellent about Baba Ayub and the div. The choice that he had to make seemed to form the basis for the rest of the book. Abdullah and his sister Pari were really interesting but then I began to get lost in the book and rapidly my interest waned. Sad… The hardback looked the part but something was missing from this book. In my mind, it had no soul. I will, of course, read his next book but I wonder whether in fact he “has been there, done Afghanistan” and needs to move on to fresh pastures? He is a wonderful storyteller and perhaps pressures from the publishing world caused him to write in this particular convoluted way? I don’t know but nevertheless I look forward to reading his next book.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Chrissie

    Damn, And the Mountains Echoed made me cry. I just finished it. Gosh, why did it upset me so much?! And will others react as I have? Is it just stupid me? I can point at a million things that are wrong with the book....and yet, it has done something right since it has undeniably moved me. Rarely do books make me cry. OK, here is what I think is going on, in my head and in my heart: I will start with what is simple, but very important. This is the first book I have listened to where I would advise Damn, And the Mountains Echoed made me cry. I just finished it. Gosh, why did it upset me so much?! And will others react as I have? Is it just stupid me? I can point at a million things that are wrong with the book....and yet, it has done something right since it has undeniably moved me. Rarely do books make me cry. OK, here is what I think is going on, in my head and in my heart: I will start with what is simple, but very important. This is the first book I have listened to where I would advise very strongly that you read the paper book rather than listen to the audio version. There are three narrators: the author (Khaled Hosseini), a woman (Shohreh Aghdashloo) and a second male narrator (Navid Negahban). The latter two slur English words to such an extent that you must decipher what is being said by the context of the words. Cheek sounds like chick; swim sounds like "sweem"; breeze sounds like bees; words sounds like wards; shut sounds like shot; launches sounds like lunches. Must I go on? The woman's voice is so muted that you must increase the volume. I liked Hosseini's reading of the introductory fairy tale, but then later he enunciates every darn letter. Quite simply, the narration is unprofessional. Furthermore, why in the world have they even bothered to use three different narrators? The book shifts to different locations around the world - France, Greece and the US. I would have preferred three narrators: one fluent in French, one in Greek and one in American, or just one narrator that speaks fluent English. They all spoke what I think was meant to be English with an Afghan accent; let's just say poor English. Some of the characters lived in France since their early youth. The narration is so poor that it detracts from one's appreciation of the author's words. Read the paper book! This book is about an Afghan family, starting at the end of the 40s and ending a decade into the 21st Century. It is about the how the 20th Century has split families. It isn't unusual today to find members of one family spread all over the world. What does this do to us? And what is the essence of family....if we do not live near each other and if we do not have daily contact, hands on contact. Are we still bound to each other? Does family remain family? The book begins with a bedtime story, which is as I originally thought the central message of the entire book. So pay attention. The beginning is also the best part of the book, because there in the beginning you most intimately rub shoulders with the main characters. These characters will have children and grandchildren and spouses and friends and you never really come to know them as you do the first ones. The central theme of the book IS based on the choices that are made by the first characters we meet. Later chapters deal with one family and then another family or friend. They can almost be seen as separate stories, but yes they do all come together at the end. The problem is that the book does not succeed in bringing all of these diverse stories to life. Neither are all the different places brought to life. Afghanistan was well portrayed, but not Paris, not California, not Greece! The book tries to do too much. Or is it that Hosseini has best captured that which he knows best? I will credit him in his attempt to show what happens to "family" in today's globalized world. But none of the above is really what brought the tears to my eyes. We love someone, and even if we try our hardest to make the best choices, even if we sacrifice our own personal needs, still one can be left with such emptiness. Sometimes that emptiness simply cannot be filled. Sometimes we try our best, but so much is misunderstood. Life is damn messy. There can be a wonderful blessing in forgetting. I know that sounds crazy, but it is true. The book explains this better than I have.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Khaled Hosseini kills me. His writing seems to wound me as I'm reading his books. I remember when I read the Kite Runner I had to stop for a week or so to psyche myself up to finish it because it made me so sad. (I think I must be getting soft in my old age.) His writing rides a raw edge between nostalgia and pain: you don't want bad things to happen to his characters because they are already deeply wounded by circumstance. But then another part of me gets inspired to write when I read his work. Khaled Hosseini kills me. His writing seems to wound me as I'm reading his books. I remember when I read the Kite Runner I had to stop for a week or so to psyche myself up to finish it because it made me so sad. (I think I must be getting soft in my old age.) His writing rides a raw edge between nostalgia and pain: you don't want bad things to happen to his characters because they are already deeply wounded by circumstance. But then another part of me gets inspired to write when I read his work. I love how he gently handles these flawed, vulnerable creatures. They are pummeled and worked over again and again, but at the same time they are also luminescent with authenticity. It's excellent.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Joyeeta (Dauntless, I Choose You!)

    Speechless ✓ Swollen eyes ✓ Messed up mind ✓ Bitter sweet feeling ✓ Craving for more time to spend with the characters ✓ Here is what I have been trying to do for the last one hour (before helplessly falling asleep)- Aim: To write a review of the book. Result: Several crumpled pages. Reason: Mind full of emotions but out of words. Conclusion: I will be left like this each and every time I read a book written by Khaled Hosseini. Hosseini is a 'magician' who captures your mind with the simple tricks Speechless ✓ Swollen eyes ✓ Messed up mind ✓ Bitter sweet feeling ✓ Craving for more time to spend with the characters ✓ Here is what I have been trying to do for the last one hour (before helplessly falling asleep)- Aim: To write a review of the book. Result: Several crumpled pages. Reason: Mind full of emotions but out of words. Conclusion: I will be left like this each and every time I read a book written by Khaled Hosseini. Hosseini is a 'magician' who captures your mind with the simple tricks of powerful words and leaves you weeping silently but gifts you with a beautiful yet sad feeling. This time he has come up with an intriguing story of the siblings, Pari and Abdullah. The story may not be so special as The Kite Runner but the love the brother and the little sister share is unique. All I want to do now is thank Mr. Hosseini for giving me the character of Abdullah with whom I can share so many feelings. The bitter-sweet longings I felt years ago when my sister left home for college, all came rushing back when Pari was taken away from poor little Abdullah.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    This has probably been my most anticipated new release for a very long time. Like many people, I was totally awestruck by Hosseini's first novel The Kite Runner. His second; A Thousand Splendid Suns is up there in my Top Five Books, I was astounded by the story. Bearing this in mind, and despite my delight at acquiring a pre-publication copy of And The Mountains Echoed, I was a little nervous that I may be a little disappointed. Khaled Hosseini's fans do have to wait a long time between books, it This has probably been my most anticipated new release for a very long time. Like many people, I was totally awestruck by Hosseini's first novel The Kite Runner. His second; A Thousand Splendid Suns is up there in my Top Five Books, I was astounded by the story. Bearing this in mind, and despite my delight at acquiring a pre-publication copy of And The Mountains Echoed, I was a little nervous that I may be a little disappointed. Khaled Hosseini's fans do have to wait a long time between books, its been five years since A Thousand Splendid Suns. I can truthfully say that this is certainly worth that very very long wait. This is a story that spans generations, yet starts and finishes with the same characters. In 1952 a father and his two young children are travelling across Afghanistan, father has been promised some much needed work. The children; Abdullah and his little sister Pari are happy to be together, they adore each other and Abdullah has become more of a parent than a brother to Pari. When their mother died just after giving birth to Pari and then their father re-married and new half-siblings joined the family, Abdullah took on the protection and care of Pari. Neither of them can know that this journey will be the beginning of heartbreak that will stay with them for the rest of their lives. With heart-breaking realism, Hosseini tells the tale of a family split apart by poverty and desperation. From the small rural villages to the large bustling cities of Afghanistan, the writing transports the reader into the heart of the story, experiencing the sounds, the smells and the changing political landscapes. From immense poverty, to the greatest riches. From the modest and humble, to the arrogant and the proud, the cast of characters are a triumph. That one event in Kabul in 1952 leads on to many others, including characters and settings from Paris, to the Greek Islands and back to Afghanistan. Characters who appear, on the face of it, to be so different and so diverse are all connected in one way or another to the day that a loving father told his two small children the story of farmer Baba Ayub - it is this story, and its meaning that is threaded through the whole novel and which eventually turns from a fable to the truth. Whilst And The Mountains Echoed does not have the shock-factor of Hosseini's two previous novels, it is still a very important epic story that will leave a mark on anyone who reads it. The cast of characters is huge and the narrative often slips back and forward, which can at times, appear a little disjointed. However, this really does not detract from the story, or from the wonderfully evocative writing. Once again, Khaled Hosseini has produced a story that will break hearts and leave his fans, new and old, gasping for more.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Natalie

    There are always a few things to keep in mind when delving into a Khaled Hosseini novel. First, and most important, is that you WILL have your heart broken, at least once, probably multiple times, and most likely within the first few pages. Second, Mr. Hosseini does not deal in neatly wrapped-up endings redolent of "Happily Ever After." His stories are more complicated than that; there's no instant gratification of happy, fulfilled characters riding off into the sunset, but the overall result is There are always a few things to keep in mind when delving into a Khaled Hosseini novel. First, and most important, is that you WILL have your heart broken, at least once, probably multiple times, and most likely within the first few pages. Second, Mr. Hosseini does not deal in neatly wrapped-up endings redolent of "Happily Ever After." His stories are more complicated than that; there's no instant gratification of happy, fulfilled characters riding off into the sunset, but the overall result is far more satisfying, and far more real. That being said, "And the Mountains Echoed" is positively beautiful. Each portion, told from a different point of view, is a perfect short story that can stand on its own, but intertwined, they make up a rich and intricate tapestry, the story of an Afghan family (and the people whose lives they touch) that spans six decades and three continents. It kept me up late, kept me from paying attention at work, and left me in a state that I am coming to associate with Mr. Hosseini's work: crying a little, smiling a little, and sorely tempted to simply flip back to the beginning of the book and start the entire experience over again.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Wendy Pearl's Picks

    Having been a fan of Khaled Hosseini's first two books--even before they were published--I am delighted to say that this book may be his best one yet! It's a heart-felt, multi-generational tale that combines many characters and storylines...each one more gut wrenching than the last. I read most of this book in a perpetual state of goosebumps, and the last 20 pages with tears streaming down my face. And the Mountains Echoed--far more complex and multi-layered than his prior two novels--proves that Having been a fan of Khaled Hosseini's first two books--even before they were published--I am delighted to say that this book may be his best one yet! It's a heart-felt, multi-generational tale that combines many characters and storylines...each one more gut wrenching than the last. I read most of this book in a perpetual state of goosebumps, and the last 20 pages with tears streaming down my face. And the Mountains Echoed--far more complex and multi-layered than his prior two novels--proves that Hosseini is deserving of his many awards and accolades. He truly is a masterful storyteller.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Margitte

    The book starts off with this quote: Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing, there is a field. I'll meet you there. - JELALUDDIN RUMI, 13th century. From Afghanistan to Paris, to the Greek Islands to America, this story of three children from one father (two different mothers), born in the small village of Shadbagh in Afghanistan, winds its way through love, loyalty, happiness, heartbreak, war, peace and basically a thousand tragedies per square mile. Abdullah, Pari and their stepbrother The book starts off with this quote: Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing, there is a field. I'll meet you there. - JELALUDDIN RUMI, 13th century. From Afghanistan to Paris, to the Greek Islands to America, this story of three children from one father (two different mothers), born in the small village of Shadbagh in Afghanistan, winds its way through love, loyalty, happiness, heartbreak, war, peace and basically a thousand tragedies per square mile. Abdullah, Pari and their stepbrother Iqbal are the innocent children of a poor, but proud man. They are destined to roam the earth after their father had to make a heartbreaking decision. The title of the book is based on the famous family poem of William Blake, which was published in Songs of Innocence in 1789.When the voices of children are heard on the green, And laughing is heard on the hill, My heart is at rest within my breast, And everything else is still. ‘Then come home, my children, the sun is gone down, And the dews of night arise; Come, come leave off play, and let us away Till the morning appears in the skies.’ ‘No, no, let us play, for it is yet day, And we cannot go to sleep; Besides, in the sky the little birds fly, And the hills are all cover'd with sheep.’ ‘Well, well, go and play till the light fades away, And then go home to bed.’ The little ones leapèd, and shoutèd, and laugh'd And all the hills echoèd. In retrospection I am of the opinion that there is more of this poem embedded in the story than only the inspiration in its title. The prose in the book was as gripping as ever. Parwana, the stepmother, had a twin sister, Masooma, with a beauty that blistered the eyes. (view spoiler)["She interrupted conversations midsentence, smokers mid-drag. She was the trembler of knees, the spiller of teacups. Some days it was all too much for Masooma. Most days, however, the attention seemed to please her (Massoma). Most days, she relished her power to derail a man’s thoughts with a single fleeting but strategic smile, to make tongues falter over words." (hide spoiler)] In comparison to Masooma, Parwana was shuffling next to her, with her flat chest and sallow complexion. Her frizzy hair, her heavy, mournful face, and her thick wrists and masculine shoulders. A pathetic shadow, torn between her envy and the thrill of being seen with Masooma, sharing in the attention as a weed would, lapping up water meant for the lily upstream. Parwana was always second best and she had a secret that would define the rest of her life as well as the outcomes in the lives of these three children. She also had to accept that love would never be handed over on a silver tray to her; that Saboor's two children from his late first wife would never feel her love. They were on their own... The African expression, It takes a village to raise one child could have been true in the case of these three children, if it wasn't for politics, wars, and toxic family relationships destroying the lives of not only this family, but also an entire country and its people. In the case of Afghanistan it would ultimately take the world to raise these children, inside or outside the country. The first half of the book was mesmerizing and true to Khaled Hosseini's oevre. However, as the story unfolded, spanning over several decades, as well as several generations, and more and more characters made their appearance in the book, the magic disappeared from the face of the prose. It was a huge disappointment after waiting so many months to finally read the book. I felt more sad about the derailing of my high expectations, than I felt about the numerous characters in numerous countries getting dumped on the plot. The prose is still magical. The first half of the book was a joyful celebration of a master wordsmith at work. Beauty is an enormous, unmerited gift given randomly, stupidly. How true these words turned out to be in the end. I will always admire Khaled Hosseini's work, and I will remain a fan, but this book was not one of the highlights. I have hope though.

  25. 4 out of 5

    ❄️ Propertea Of Frostea ❄️ Bitter SnoBerry ❄

    Alright, time, fined me some free time to read this. Today, 17/5/2013. 3:22 pm/ 15:22 hrs. http://www.goodreads.com/user_status/... I shall read this wonder soon! ='D ***** A week later... I have the book O_O Have them all: Will begin in a few minutes :D <3 ***** 10th September, 2013... I'm done with this book. *review coming soon*

  26. 5 out of 5

    Paul E. Morph

    Holy crap, what can I say about this amazing novel? I'm in a bit of a dry spell, reviewing-wise, at the moment but I seriously think words would have failed me when trying to express how I feel about this book even at my most verbose. I loved both of Khaled Hosseini's previous novels (The Kite Runner and A Thousand Splendid Suns) but this one was even better. It touched me in my heart's most painful place and yet gave me hope for the future. There were tears. There was joy. There were tears again Holy crap, what can I say about this amazing novel? I'm in a bit of a dry spell, reviewing-wise, at the moment but I seriously think words would have failed me when trying to express how I feel about this book even at my most verbose. I loved both of Khaled Hosseini's previous novels (The Kite Runner and A Thousand Splendid Suns) but this one was even better. It touched me in my heart's most painful place and yet gave me hope for the future. There were tears. There was joy. There were tears again. The novel was so skilfully wrought. The connections between characters and events resonated with a subtle, graceful power most authors couldn't hope to achieve. I loved this book. My only complaint is that I wanted it to be twice as long. I await Hosseini's next novel like a slavering beast, chained to the wall of impatience.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    This and The Kite Runner are two of my all time favorites and this is my favorite author. EVERYONE should read these two books!!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Tahera

    With 'And the Mountains Echoed' I have read all three of Khaled Hosseini's books. I am not going to talk about the plot, story, characters of this book but I do want to say that I feel the reason why Khaled Hosseini is such a good writer is because of his writing style....it is simple yet effective. He does not use difficult phrases or long complicated words to describe people and situations in his book; he keeps his wording simple and this creates the desired effect in terms of emotions and fee With 'And the Mountains Echoed' I have read all three of Khaled Hosseini's books. I am not going to talk about the plot, story, characters of this book but I do want to say that I feel the reason why Khaled Hosseini is such a good writer is because of his writing style....it is simple yet effective. He does not use difficult phrases or long complicated words to describe people and situations in his book; he keeps his wording simple and this creates the desired effect in terms of emotions and feelings. He talks about his home country with complete honesty and without any excuses....he describes the good and the bad for what it is.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Sheryl Sorrentino

    First, a confession (in the interests of fairness and full disclosure): Khaled Hosseini has attained “untouchable” status in my view—so much so that, as my all-time favorite author, he can do no wrong. When an artist bestows upon me so much pleasure with his unbelievable gift, that shared connection engenders a sort of intimacy and expectancy. We begin to grow together. Like Hosseini’s first two novels (The Kite Runner; A Thousand Splendid Suns), And the Mountains Echoed delivers unmatched sensi First, a confession (in the interests of fairness and full disclosure): Khaled Hosseini has attained “untouchable” status in my view—so much so that, as my all-time favorite author, he can do no wrong. When an artist bestows upon me so much pleasure with his unbelievable gift, that shared connection engenders a sort of intimacy and expectancy. We begin to grow together. Like Hosseini’s first two novels (The Kite Runner; A Thousand Splendid Suns), And the Mountains Echoed delivers unmatched sensitivity, poignancy, and subtlety. Pari is the unifying thread connecting the many subplots flowing throughout this incredible book. Literally wrested from her older sibling’s arms as a toddler and sold to a wealthy Kabul couple, she quickly forgets her early years with her father and brother and grows up in the lap of luxury. Eventually raised in Paris and given every material comfort by a beautiful and manipulative mother—and spared an almost certain, senseless death from the bitter-cold winter in her small Afghan village, Pari retains a gnawing, vague sense that she does not know who she is or her true place in the world. Through Pari, Hosseini poses the first of many unanswerable riddles: Which is more important to a happy and meaningful life—a stable upbringing free from want, or the irreplaceable love of one’s biological family of origin? Fast-forward fifty years or so, and Hosseini hits us with another impossible moral dilemma: How do we help those facing incredible, tragic, and limitless need in far-flung places when we are so thoroughly mired in (and continually seduced by) our own “first-world” lives of luxury? Dr. Idris Bashiri (who as a child lived across the street from Pari’s adoptive father in Kabul) returns to Afghanistan with his coarse but well-to-do cousin, Timur, to reclaim his father's property (lost during the Russian invasion). Idris is deeply moved when he meets a tragically disfigured young girl living in a Kabul hospital (Roshi was attacked by her axe-wielding madman of an uncle over a petty property dispute). While Idris badly yearns—and genuinely intends—to use his medical connections to help this girl, once he leaves Kabul and returns to his cushy California lifestyle, more pressing (if less important) concerns (a demanding work schedule, a home renovation project) gradually steal his focus: “Talking about Afghanistan—and he is astonished at how quickly and imperceptibly this has happened—suddenly feels like discussing a recently watched, emotionally drenching film whose effects are beginning to wane.” Meanwhile, cousin Timur (a bawdy, womanizing real estate investor who cheats on both his wife and his taxes) swoops in to play the hero and snatch the glory. Through these two opposing characters, Hosseini subtly and cleverly poses yet another vexing question: Which is the better man—the one who can easily and grandiosely throw money around to garner popularity and admiration (and, as a secondary byproduct, help a few people out along the way)? Or the one whose authentic, feeling heart is in the right place, but who (like so many of us) is paralyzed by his own carefully-crafted, hard-won sense of wellbeing and cannot (or will not) follow through on his well-intentioned promises? As if this were not enough to ponder, And the Mountains Echoed poses yet another universal dilemma in its portrayal of Pari’s conflicted relationship with Nila (her adoptive mother); Markos’s relationship with his mother (Odelia); and the relationship between Pari’s niece (and namesake) and her father, Abdullah (the original Pari’s long-lost brother): How do we reconcile our wish to remain loyal to family with our instinctive need to pursue our own dreams and fulfill our destinies? Odelia makes an apt and wise observation about this most irksome of life’s realities: “It’s a funny thing, Markos, but people have it mostly backward. They think they live by what they want. But really what guides them is what they’re afraid of. What they don’t want.” Besides being a brilliant writer, Mr. Hosseini is—as all good writers must be—a keen observer of human nature. Several readers have complained that And the Mountains Echoed contains too many characters and confusing story lines, but Mr. Hosseini is an unimpeachable talent who has more than earned the right to experiment with characters and settings. And while his third novel can be a bit “tell-y” in places (Pari’s abbreviated recounting of her married life and the raising of her children, for example; Mr. Markos’s ruminations of his years in Tinos, Greece and his exodus to the far corners of the earth to escape his stifling young life), we should not punish Mr. Hosseini for having set the bar so high with his two prior books. Despite these minor flaws, Hosseini pulls this epic third novel off the ground and launches it through time and space with unequaled skill; his male characters in particular—Nabi (Pari’s step-uncle), Suleiman Wahdati (her adoptive father), Saboor (her biological father), and Abdullah (her brother) are each nuanced, complex, and deserving of compassion. Yes, this is a big story, and Hosseini uses numerous interdependent characters and subplots to deal with such unpleasant topics as the far-reaching consequences of war, separation, and disfigurement. Along the way, he handles—with his trademark sensitivity and grace—the various sacrifices we humans sometimes make balancing survival against our principles and beliefs. But what really knocks this novel out of the ballpark is its ending. I read this book twice, and each time I finished, I was reduced to tears. The scenes between Abdullah and his grown daughter (whom he named Pari after his missing sister)—and the powerful messages of hope and connection that the concluding scenes evoke—make this work deserving of five stars and render it a classic in its own right.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    In 1952 a poor Afghan family - Saboor, his second wife Parwana, his son Abdullah, 10, and daughter Pari, 3 are in dire straits in the town of Shadbagh, Afghanistan. Having recently lost a baby to the frigid Afghan winter Saboor decides to sell Pari to the Wahdatis - a wealthy childless couple in Kabul - to provide a better life for his family. This sets up the baseline for the story that reverberates down through multiple characters and generations.....which the author relates almost as series o In 1952 a poor Afghan family - Saboor, his second wife Parwana, his son Abdullah, 10, and daughter Pari, 3 are in dire straits in the town of Shadbagh, Afghanistan. Having recently lost a baby to the frigid Afghan winter Saboor decides to sell Pari to the Wahdatis - a wealthy childless couple in Kabul - to provide a better life for his family. This sets up the baseline for the story that reverberates down through multiple characters and generations.....which the author relates almost as series of short stories. In one story line we learn that Parwana's brother Nabi, chauffeur and houseman to the Wahdatis, brokered the sale of Pari, a deed that haunts him for the rest of his life. His motive, apparently, is his infatuation with Nila (Mrs. Wahdati) - who is unable to have children. Soon enough Mr. Wahdati becomes ill and Nila takes off for France with Pari. Nabi, an indispensable aide to Mr. Wahdati, is left to take care of his employer and eventually friend. In another section the author tells the story of Nila and a grown up Pari living in Paris. Nila is a poet whose writing scandalizes traditonal Afghans, and Pari is a talented student studying advanced mathematics. The relationship between Nali and Pari, as can happen with mothers and daughters, is sometimes difficult - and romance only adds to the tension. I was especially struck by this story line, musing that Pari's life was exponentially different (and better in my opinion) than it would have been with her birth family. Does this justify selling a child? Probably room for debate there. Other chapters are equally engaging. We find out that Saboor's second wife Parwana has a terrible secret of her own; that Saboor and Parwana's grandchildren become refugees when Shadbagh is taken over by Afghani war criminals; that a grown-up Abdullah eventually emigrates to America with his wife and daughter, also named Pari. Especially poignant are two separate stories of young girls with disfigured faces, one due to a dog bite, the other caused by a horrendous family tragedy. Both girls profoundly affect the people in their lives. All these stories, and a number of others, are illuminating and engaging; they also provide a glimpse of Afghan culture that many people are not familiar with. The book comes full circle when Pari, who has no memory of the event, learns of the circumstances of her adoption - and realizes why she has always felt that something was missing in her life. This is a wonderfully written book, well-worth reading. Highly recommended. You can follow my reviews at https://reviewsbybarbsaffer.blogspot....

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