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Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens (eBook)

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J. M. Barrie was a Scottish novelist and dramatist best known for creating the character Peter Pan. Barrie was made a Baronet in 1913 for his literary accomplishments. Peter Pan first appeared in a serial called The Little White Bird in 1901. In 1904 the play Peter Pan, or The Boy Who Wouldn't Grow Up was first produced. Barrie's inspiration for Peter Pan was the Davies fa J. M. Barrie was a Scottish novelist and dramatist best known for creating the character Peter Pan. Barrie was made a Baronet in 1913 for his literary accomplishments. Peter Pan first appeared in a serial called The Little White Bird in 1901. In 1904 the play Peter Pan, or The Boy Who Wouldn't Grow Up was first produced. Barrie's inspiration for Peter Pan was the Davies family. Barrie met the Arthur Llewelyn Davies family in Kensington Park where he walked his Newfoundland dog. The boys were his inspiration for Peter Pan. Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens begins with Peter as a baby. Peter lives in the middle of busy London in a secret world filled with fairies and birds. The story begins "If you ask your mother whether she knew about Peter Pan when she was a little girl she will say, "Why, of course, I did, child," and if you ask her whether he rode on a goat in those days she will say, "What a foolish question to ask, certainly he did." Then if you ask your grandmother whether she knew about Peter Pan when she was a girl, she also says, "Why, of course, I did, child," but if you ask her whether he rode on a goat in those days, she says she never heard of his having a goat. Perhaps she has forgotten, just as she sometimes forgets your name and calls you Mildred, which is your mother's name. Still, she could hardly forget such an important thing as the goat. Therefore there was no goat when your grandmother was a little girl. This shows that, in telling the story of Peter Pan, to begin with the goat (as most people do) is as silly as to put on your jacket before your vest."


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J. M. Barrie was a Scottish novelist and dramatist best known for creating the character Peter Pan. Barrie was made a Baronet in 1913 for his literary accomplishments. Peter Pan first appeared in a serial called The Little White Bird in 1901. In 1904 the play Peter Pan, or The Boy Who Wouldn't Grow Up was first produced. Barrie's inspiration for Peter Pan was the Davies fa J. M. Barrie was a Scottish novelist and dramatist best known for creating the character Peter Pan. Barrie was made a Baronet in 1913 for his literary accomplishments. Peter Pan first appeared in a serial called The Little White Bird in 1901. In 1904 the play Peter Pan, or The Boy Who Wouldn't Grow Up was first produced. Barrie's inspiration for Peter Pan was the Davies family. Barrie met the Arthur Llewelyn Davies family in Kensington Park where he walked his Newfoundland dog. The boys were his inspiration for Peter Pan. Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens begins with Peter as a baby. Peter lives in the middle of busy London in a secret world filled with fairies and birds. The story begins "If you ask your mother whether she knew about Peter Pan when she was a little girl she will say, "Why, of course, I did, child," and if you ask her whether he rode on a goat in those days she will say, "What a foolish question to ask, certainly he did." Then if you ask your grandmother whether she knew about Peter Pan when she was a girl, she also says, "Why, of course, I did, child," but if you ask her whether he rode on a goat in those days, she says she never heard of his having a goat. Perhaps she has forgotten, just as she sometimes forgets your name and calls you Mildred, which is your mother's name. Still, she could hardly forget such an important thing as the goat. Therefore there was no goat when your grandmother was a little girl. This shows that, in telling the story of Peter Pan, to begin with the goat (as most people do) is as silly as to put on your jacket before your vest."

30 review for Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens (eBook)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Zoë

    Book 28/100

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sepani

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I should have read this before reading Peter Pan. This story made me cry at the end; about how Peter felt when his mother was sleeping with another baby. However, I wanted to give 4 stars but I couldn't bring myself to do that.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Merphy Napier

    Because I'm behind on reviews, I'm just going to link this months classics wrap up https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FJKAH...

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jo (A follower of wizards)

    I just love the original story of Peter Pan, and I was rather excited to learn about this prequel. Unfortunately, my excitement did not last. I found the plot to be confusing and quite frankly, all over the place! Due to this, I found I had quite a bit of trouble understanding what was actually going on in the story, which is a major put-off for me. In the original story, I am able to connect with all the characters, but with this one, I had difficulties even relating to Peter! Having said all of I just love the original story of Peter Pan, and I was rather excited to learn about this prequel. Unfortunately, my excitement did not last. I found the plot to be confusing and quite frankly, all over the place! Due to this, I found I had quite a bit of trouble understanding what was actually going on in the story, which is a major put-off for me. In the original story, I am able to connect with all the characters, but with this one, I had difficulties even relating to Peter! Having said all of these negative comments, there was a magical fairy take element in this story, which is what I came for, and I enjoyed reading parts of Peter Pans childhood. Peter Pan,as a character, has always interested me, even now I am an adult. Having read this, I feel no different really, so to be honest, this book was unnecessary.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Olivia-Savannah Roach

    At the beginning of this book, it told me something along the lines of: to properly understand the story of Peter Pan, you need to understand Kensington Gardens. That is a lie. You do not need to read this book to understand, enjoy, or dislike (as was in my case), Peter Pan and Wendy. Put this book down. Go pick that one up. It'll be better than this, I assure you. This was very dry and boring to me. It kind of had the effect of reading a manual? But at the same time the author used 'you' so I g At the beginning of this book, it told me something along the lines of: to properly understand the story of Peter Pan, you need to understand Kensington Gardens. That is a lie. You do not need to read this book to understand, enjoy, or dislike (as was in my case), Peter Pan and Wendy. Put this book down. Go pick that one up. It'll be better than this, I assure you. This was very dry and boring to me. It kind of had the effect of reading a manual? But at the same time the author used 'you' so I guess Barrie was trying to involve me... it just wasn't happening. I didn't care about the gardens. It was nice to see how some children were portrayed at the time. But at the same time, I didn't care about this random girl and her brother. Okay, maybe we got to see a little bit of why and how Peter Pan became who he was. But I felt little sympathy for his character even though he goes for an emotional ordeal. I'm not sure if it has to do with the choice he makes at one point in the novel which could have led to a very different outcome, or whether it's because the writing style to this one was so dry. Or maybe I'm just heartless. Who knows?? Not for me. But nice try, J.M. Barrie.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kelly Brigid ♡

    “He was a poet, and they are never exactly grown up.” Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens could've been marvelous. Barrie's whimsical writing is stunning as always, but unfortunately, the narrative is so confusing and sporadic that it's difficult to follow. The juxtaposition of events in the present beside those in the future, doesn't work in accordance with the omniscient narrator. I spent the vast majority of the story wondering when a particular event was happening in the time line, and wheth “He was a poet, and they are never exactly grown up.” Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens could've been marvelous. Barrie's whimsical writing is stunning as always, but unfortunately, the narrative is so confusing and sporadic that it's difficult to follow. The juxtaposition of events in the present beside those in the future, doesn't work in accordance with the omniscient narrator. I spent the vast majority of the story wondering when a particular event was happening in the time line, and whether or not it was part of one cohesive plot. Due to this, I couldn't connect with Peter or the other various characters. The ending is quite bitter sweet, but I loved being able to understand Peter's origin. I also love the snide and mischievous actions and remarks from all the fairies. These sassy creatures are adorable and make for such an amusing addition to Barrie's magical world. Although I found this "prequel" to be more puzzling than enlightening, it's quite short in length, so I never found myself bored whilst reading it. Blog | Instagram | Twitter | Bloglovin

  7. 5 out of 5

    Antonomasia

    A children's story which was in print during my childhood, but which I'm reading for the first time in an adulthood: having been one of those kids who pretty much finished the children's section in the library, this is a rare bird indeed. I mostly, reflexively, find myself reading in the same way as I did when I was a child: with open minded acceptance of the peculiarities of this little world I'm now immersed in, and a hint of detachment. I know fairies aren't real, but this is how they do thing A children's story which was in print during my childhood, but which I'm reading for the first time in an adulthood: having been one of those kids who pretty much finished the children's section in the library, this is a rare bird indeed. I mostly, reflexively, find myself reading in the same way as I did when I was a child: with open minded acceptance of the peculiarities of this little world I'm now immersed in, and a hint of detachment. I know fairies aren't real, but this is how they do things here and that's fair enough. (And no-one's persistently making me pretend I think they are real, not like with Father Christmas.) People did things differently and thought and said differently in the past and that's okay too. Uninterested in suppressed-pederasty theories about the author which just seem irrelevant to my reading experience. And out of the corner of my eye it's apparent that there probably are things that could be written about Barrie's portrayal of women, but quite frankly, everyone in this story is a bit odd and the most relevant otherness here is child/adult, not male/female. Reading, it strikes me that most children's stories are about escape. Escape from control by adults into a world where you have responsibility for getting into and out of your own scrapes. (Is that what all children want? Or just a subset of us?) But in an era where it would be normal and incidental to mention that "When they came up to whip Maimie [who had been a little noisy after lights out] they usually found her sleeping tranquilly" escape would seem especially justified for all ... That sentence slashes violent red through the curious flower-bordered world of much of the rest of this short story. This time - at least 25 years after I perhaps should have first read this - my own escape is almost real, reading with no one to interrupt me or shout or try to discourage me from reading at the table even though it was the only way to keep things calm. Then someone came to the door to talk about a tree in the back garden that the neighbours want to prune. Though I don't have to do it myself, just let them in: false alarm, almost. How lovely it must have been to read this as a small child who visited central London parks, and go looking for fairies "within the circle of the seven Spanish chestnuts", as I looked for Wombles on Wimbledon Common at the start of the 80's, and countless other children have explored book-locations on the offchance that they might somehow really stumble into another world. But occasionally grown-up reality intrudes and I think how a park in that metropolis of 8 million seething souls could never be so enchantedlyquiet as it was in Edwardian days. And mention of the lights seen from afar at night in the park makes me giggle sadly for a second and wonder if they're really (anachronistically) cruisers. At the less inevitably-sordid end of the relational spectrum, I'm also reminded how accursedly simple it is being in love in children's literature: perhaps the least-escapist, most cynic-making aspect of reading it as a modern adult. It's not only the escape-from-the-world aspect which makes me understand why some people still love the Peter Pan stories so much as grown-ups, but Peter's existence as a "Betwixt-and-Between": of, and not of, more than one world, neither one thing nor t'other; having chosen on a whim, for a while, to be apart, then finding that it has become his lot.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    Somehow, this book fell a little flat for me. I enjoyed reading it, no doubt, but I think this was more due to the writing style (which was very easy for me to read) than the actual plot or the characters. I was actually a bit surprised by that, because I love fairies and was especially excited for that part of the story. Even though I did feel a little spark here and there, the big magical feeling never came.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Anna

    This is one of those happy-sad books – it is achingly sad when you really think about its essence. It is heart-breaking and yet hauntingly beautiful, written with wondrous whimsical charm and childlike imagination. Childlike, and yet also very adult, it has a wisdom and definite darkness to it as well. I love the idea of babies starting off life as birds, little birds hatching on the island in Kensington Gardens (hence we could fly, if we really believed it). I love the mentions of David, hands p This is one of those happy-sad books – it is achingly sad when you really think about its essence. It is heart-breaking and yet hauntingly beautiful, written with wondrous whimsical charm and childlike imagination. Childlike, and yet also very adult, it has a wisdom and definite darkness to it as well. I love the idea of babies starting off life as birds, little birds hatching on the island in Kensington Gardens (hence we could fly, if we really believed it). I love the mentions of David, hands pressed hard against his temples, trying to remember back to his days as a bird. The relationship between David and the narrator also felt like something special, a collaboration where child and adult together create a lore from their imaginings and it has become something real, a real place, to them both. Very dark, almost sinister ending, which I didn’t expect although there is a strange darkness running throughout the book. It would be fascinating to read the whole story within its original context of The Little White Bird. There is just something quite incredible about the story.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Larissa (Book Bosomed Blonde)

    What a darling little children's book! Why did my mother never read this to me? I am not happy with her right now haha This is a beautiful story about the magical world in the after hours of Kensington Gardens. You get the fairies, the talking birds and trees, and of course Peter Pan. It is written well and i think it is a book derived to open up the minds of the young readers and teach them that there is more to this world than what we see. I enjoyed it as an adult and i will definitely read th What a darling little children's book! Why did my mother never read this to me? I am not happy with her right now haha This is a beautiful story about the magical world in the after hours of Kensington Gardens. You get the fairies, the talking birds and trees, and of course Peter Pan. It is written well and i think it is a book derived to open up the minds of the young readers and teach them that there is more to this world than what we see. I enjoyed it as an adult and i will definitely read this to my own children someday. Get my full review @ Book Bosomed Blonde

  11. 5 out of 5

    Niina

    This is no-doubt the lesser-known half of the adventures of Peter Pan, and I must confess I wasn't even aware it existed before reading Peter and Wendy, or Peter Pan, whichever you prefer. The unfamiliar can often be scary, but at least literary-wise it's always better to try and approach anyway, and so it is with Peter Pan In Kensington Gardens, also. At first I was a bit weirded out by Peter being so small, aged only weeks, a complete totter, then I decided to roll with it and our trusted auth This is no-doubt the lesser-known half of the adventures of Peter Pan, and I must confess I wasn't even aware it existed before reading Peter and Wendy, or Peter Pan, whichever you prefer. The unfamiliar can often be scary, but at least literary-wise it's always better to try and approach anyway, and so it is with Peter Pan In Kensington Gardens, also. At first I was a bit weirded out by Peter being so small, aged only weeks, a complete totter, then I decided to roll with it and our trusted author to make the best out of it. And sure enough, Peter was already Peter with is personal quirks and head with blunt and sharp edges, and not being able to fly and not yet possessing his cocky ways he had some crazy adventures like trying to fly by a kite and crossing a churning river by night and losing his clothes to birds. The story of Peter is very touching, him being all ready to become a good boy and let her mother love her again some time, harboring both deep caring feelings and the will to adventure around some more before being ready to be a child. I dare say it's pretty much the same for everybody undergoing a chance - you can either move on or get stuck, whichever you prefer, and both decisions, were they done by your self or the circumstances, carry both sorrowful and joyful outcomes. It sure is kind of funny reading a growing up -story about a boy that won't grow up, but in this classic it's all done, well and beautiful and exciting. One of my favourite books from now on, hands down. The edition I read was illustrated by Arthur Rackham whom some may be familiar with, for example having worked with Alice in The Wonderland and such memorable tales. His style is gorgeous and lively covered with class, and I find it quite hard to say more. The pictures went very well with the story, they didn't get clumsy or controversial even by accident, not that I noticed at least, and definitely added to the story as a whole. What I think deserves to be mentioned too, is that they were placed in a manner that didn't spoil the following pages most of time, which was more than welcome. Fairies were not described too much in the book, but I do believe almost all of us have some sort of mental image which we bed them on, so it was really rather interesting to compare those of mine and those of the illustrator.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Samantha Gosselin

    I cried at the end. So did my mother. Every fiber of my being that might become a mother someday feels for Peter because sure he gets to fly and has eternal youth, but there's a dark side. We must all leave our childhood behind because we have no second chances in life. So sad. :( However, I love the author's way of describing things through a child's eyes. I love that I was once a bird. I love that I once spoke faerie. :)

  13. 5 out of 5

    Olivia

    Rambling and unintelligible in parts, but so detailed and iconic and developmental in others that it's almost enough to make a Peter Pan lover cry. Definitely plays up the melancholic aspects of the story.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Charlotte (The Writers' Crown)

    Nothing is more magical than the writing of Barrie. Another wonderful set of adventures about the beginning of Peter Pan. Wonderful to see all the original lore about fairies that we still see talked about today. Incredibly whimsical and inventive, sure to bring your inner child back out.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Randy

    Not quite what I was expecting. The story was decent enough but I feel like it was marred by the authors turn of the century british style. The prose definitely doesn't flow for the modern audience and that is unfortunate. Taking into account that this is only part of a larger book, some of the narrative structure is lost. There are a few references to other parts of the original book and it's here that the reader will feel lost. The stories themselves are a mixed bag. Some are quite good while ot Not quite what I was expecting. The story was decent enough but I feel like it was marred by the authors turn of the century british style. The prose definitely doesn't flow for the modern audience and that is unfortunate. Taking into account that this is only part of a larger book, some of the narrative structure is lost. There are a few references to other parts of the original book and it's here that the reader will feel lost. The stories themselves are a mixed bag. Some are quite good while others seem to go nowhere and add little to the overall story. There are frequent long passages of where Barrie tells smaller side stories and most end up only breaking the narrative pace causing the reader to lose interest in the main story. This isn't the Peter Pan most know but it's still an engaging look at where the story originated. I plan on reading Peter and Wendy so it will be interesting to see how Barrie developed the ideas and scenes in this short into a larger structured story.

  16. 5 out of 5

    LeGrand Hovey

    OLD TIME ‘JUVENILE FICTION’ CATEGORY This is the origin story of Peter Pan. Peter Pan begins the story as an infant who can fly, because apparently all infants used to be part bird. He flies to Kensington gardens as an infant, but he gets stuck there when he can’t fly anymore. The rest of the story largely occurs in Kensington gardens where Pan has adventures with fairies and he later meets a new friend, Maimie. The story itself is very imaginative and magical. The text is accompanied by beautifu OLD TIME ‘JUVENILE FICTION’ CATEGORY This is the origin story of Peter Pan. Peter Pan begins the story as an infant who can fly, because apparently all infants used to be part bird. He flies to Kensington gardens as an infant, but he gets stuck there when he can’t fly anymore. The rest of the story largely occurs in Kensington gardens where Pan has adventures with fairies and he later meets a new friend, Maimie. The story itself is very imaginative and magical. The text is accompanied by beautiful illustrations that really augment the story. The story is a fun read, though the ending is a little sad. The language is a little old, so it might put some people off. This story would appeal any who like fairytale type stories and to those interested in finding out about Peter Pans origin

  17. 5 out of 5

    Harry Collier IV

    Peter Pan is one of my favorite books and I think that everyone should read it. It is actually a rather tragic story of death and heaven. I have always wanted to read Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens to learn more about Peter and how he became what he became. This book was more like a series of sketches and while it was a fun read I can understand why it was mostly forgotten by history.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Zala

    "All children could have such recollections if they would press their hands hard to their temples, for, having been birds before they were human, they are naturally a little wild during the first few weeks, and very itchy at the shoulders, where their wings used to be." So, before we are born as humans, we are birds. Delightful! I guess that's why we all yearn to fly (don't we?). Which reminds me of something that happened when I was just a few months old... When I was a little, very much so, ba "All children could have such recollections if they would press their hands hard to their temples, for, having been birds before they were human, they are naturally a little wild during the first few weeks, and very itchy at the shoulders, where their wings used to be." So, before we are born as humans, we are birds. Delightful! I guess that's why we all yearn to fly (don't we?). Which reminds me of something that happened when I was just a few months old... When I was a little, very much so, baby, there was a day when something quite unexpected happened. My mum was in the process of changing my diaper, and just as she bent down to discard the full one and pick up a new, clean diaper, I jumped off the changing table. Right away my mum shrieked and fussed over me, and when she saw I was quite alright she called my father, grandmother and the family nurse. It was quite a shock and to this day she still doesn't know how I was able to jump off the table - it had barriers on all sides except the one where she stood, so I couldn't have rolled down. I guess I tried to fly that day. And failed. Now, the other interesting stuff (all of it was, but I had to pick some things to put in my review): The influences that made him the Peter Pan we all know: "Solomon had kept his promise and taught him many of the bird ways. To be easily pleased, for instance, and always to be really doing something, and to think that whatever he was doing was a thing of vast importance." [...] "He also became very learned in bird-lore, and knew an east-wind from a west-wind by its smell, and he could see the grass growing and hear the insects walking about inside the tree-trunks. But he could not swim!" And what he got from the faeries (beside the flying): "They are frightfully ignorant, and everything they do is make-believe." Faery lore: "One of the great differences between the fairies and us is that they never do anything useful." "They are not a bit cunning after Lock-out, but until Lock-out, my word!" "David tells me that fairies never say "We feel happy": what they say is, "We feel dancey."" "For, as you know without my telling you, Peter Pan is the fairies' orchestra." "As for their houses, it is no use looking for them, because they are the exact opposite of our houses. You can see our houses by day but you can't see them by dark. Well, you can see their houses by dark, but you can't see them by day, for they are the colour of night, and I never heard of anyone yet who could see night in the daytime. This does not mean that they are black, for night has its colours just as day has, but ever so much brighter." "Thus in a single moment about fifty marriages took place, for if you leap into each other's arms it is a fairy wedding." What put the Pan in Peter Pan: "Peter's heart was so glad that he felt he must sing all day long, just as the birds sing for joy, but, being partly human, he needed an instrument, so he made a pipe of reeds, and he used to sit by the shore of the island of an evening, practising the sough of the wind and the ripple of the water, and catching handfuls of the shine of the moon, and he put them all in his pipe and played them so beautifully that even the birds were deceived, and they would say to each other, "Was that a fish leaping in the water or was it Peter playing leaping fish on his pipe?"" And many, many more. This is a fantastic take on the early stages of life and how it begins, with tons of vibrant descriptions and intriguing ideas. However, it is quite sad at times, especially the ending, since it is Peter Pan's origin story. "Then I sha'n't be exactly a human?" Peter asked. "No." "Nor exactly a bird?" "No." "What shall I be?" "You will be a Betwixt-and-Between" Oh, a Peterbird then...

  19. 4 out of 5

    Rachel A.

    I absolutely loved the original Peter Pan book, so I was looking forward to finally reading the prequel. Unfortunately, it did not live up to my expectations at all. I found the book disjointed and confusing, to the point where I had trouble keeping track of the story. I did not connect with any of the characters, including Peter, as much as I did with those in the original story, so it was difficult for me to really engage with what was happening for them. After reading it, I discovered that al I absolutely loved the original Peter Pan book, so I was looking forward to finally reading the prequel. Unfortunately, it did not live up to my expectations at all. I found the book disjointed and confusing, to the point where I had trouble keeping track of the story. I did not connect with any of the characters, including Peter, as much as I did with those in the original story, so it was difficult for me to really engage with what was happening for them. After reading it, I discovered that although this book is considered a prequel, it was actually written after the original book. To me, it seems like an unnecessary addition to a story that really didn't need any further backstory.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Julia

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. First of all I may just be an evil anti-Classic reader since Peter Pan was really never a favorite of mine nor for the most part other Classic books. There were a few that I had to read of course or that I came to read for many other purposes but with the exception of just a few not many of them ended up making the cut for my reading enjoyment. And even though I knew there were other Peter Pan books in the series I was never really tempted to hunt them down just because. When my sister chose th First of all I may just be an evil anti-Classic reader since Peter Pan was really never a favorite of mine nor for the most part other Classic books. There were a few that I had to read of course or that I came to read for many other purposes but with the exception of just a few not many of them ended up making the cut for my reading enjoyment. And even though I knew there were other Peter Pan books in the series I was never really tempted to hunt them down just because. When my sister chose this particular book for me this month I was a bit leery about it but in a sense though it would do to make a nice bridge between the heavy nonfiction reading that I was doing to the fantasy book that was waiting to be read. As a result I wasn't thinking much but ending up finding a whole new level of reading that displayed J.M. Barrie's writing talent in a way that wouldn't have been seen if I had just stuck with his more famous "Peter Pan". The book feels a bit awkward in the sense that it seems be a continuance of another story for the reader isn't given much of an introduction but basically told that they need to know the layout of Kensington Gardens. Furthermore I couldn't also quite tell whom the narrator was suppose to be nor the secondary indirect narrator who was named David - perhaps a governess telling the story to her young ward? As a result the read was intimate but also a bit aloof. What made this book of particular interest to me was the fact that it included fairy lore and combined it with the telling of a Peter Pan character. The reason why I make Pan a character instead of giving the actual name is since this is still not the one that most readers have been introduced to since this one is only suppose to be a week old but in the illustrations carries himself like a toddler. And although he is a Betwixt-and-Between there is no mention of him ever growing up from this age status nor the find of Neverland. Furthermore there are episodes that any "Peter Pan" fan would recognize from the more famous work but otherwise everything else is given to explain a new fantasy world that is quite modern in its settings. To offset the modern, though, the illustrations are some of the most beautiful and detailed that I have seen from the timeframe while the fairy people aren't all presented as beautiful angelic beings but sometimes as a weird combination of troll/gremlin. All in all this is a book that I would suggest other Pan readers should read at least once to get a touch of the original model for Pan and to see how it stacks up when compared to the more famous work. But beware this is also a book that although it doesn't have a clear finish it is one that has a bit of a tragically dark close as well that implies that Peter isn't quite as innocent as many may think of him. Could it be since of his stay with the birds and the fairies?

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jackie

    I'm not sure why I've had Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens on my TBR shelf, but I'm glad I did, because otherwise, I probably wouldn't have chosen it to listen to today. Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens is the prequel of Peter Pan. When Peter Pan is very young, he believes he's a bird, which is also why he knows how to fly. The truth is, you could fly if your faith in your ability to fly was unshaken. However, as soon as you doubt you can fly, you will never again be able to anymore. The story is ve I'm not sure why I've had Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens on my TBR shelf, but I'm glad I did, because otherwise, I probably wouldn't have chosen it to listen to today. Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens is the prequel of Peter Pan. When Peter Pan is very young, he believes he's a bird, which is also why he knows how to fly. The truth is, you could fly if your faith in your ability to fly was unshaken. However, as soon as you doubt you can fly, you will never again be able to anymore. The story is very cute (if you've read it, just think about thimbles!). I like it at least as much as the famous Peter Pan story. The next time I'm in London, I must remember to visit Kensington Gardens, and to find the Peter Pan statue there.

  22. 5 out of 5

    ضحى الحداد

    I thought this book was a different book than The Little White Bird but it turns out that it's just the same chapters extracted from the original book and I have to be honest these chapters were the best of the book :D I enjoyed them so much and they flew by fast, the tone in these chapters is much softer than the rest of the book so you can read it and enjoy it .. the language will be a main issue here since it is very traditional, it will take some time to get the hang of it .. LOVED the backs I thought this book was a different book than The Little White Bird but it turns out that it's just the same chapters extracted from the original book and I have to be honest these chapters were the best of the book :D I enjoyed them so much and they flew by fast, the tone in these chapters is much softer than the rest of the book so you can read it and enjoy it .. the language will be a main issue here since it is very traditional, it will take some time to get the hang of it .. LOVED the backstory of Peter Pan and his mother .. so heartbreaking <\3

  23. 5 out of 5

    Cliff Jr.

    I just listened to the recording from Librivox, and it tore me up! It's especially sad when you know about the author's older brother who died when he was very young. Talk about survivor guilt. J. M. Barrie wrote himself into the story as the new baby who supplanted Peter, the reason his mother finally shut the window, which kept Peter from coming back! 😓😢😭

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jami Brown

    This childhood classic fairy tale is amazing.Peter Pan interrupt Wendy, John and Michael in their sleep, in the nursery. After showing them how to fly he takes them on an intense adventure, they see mermaids, pirates and other characters of a child's imagination. They end up getting into a battle with the evil Captain Hook.Who wins? You'll have to read to find out. I gave this 4 stars because even though I feel like the story was excellent I was not a fan of the illustrations, they feel childish This childhood classic fairy tale is amazing.Peter Pan interrupt Wendy, John and Michael in their sleep, in the nursery. After showing them how to fly he takes them on an intense adventure, they see mermaids, pirates and other characters of a child's imagination. They end up getting into a battle with the evil Captain Hook.Who wins? You'll have to read to find out. I gave this 4 stars because even though I feel like the story was excellent I was not a fan of the illustrations, they feel childish which I understand for a children's book. They seem as if done in crayon or colored pencil. They use softer colors but I believe that makes it even more appealing to the children reading it. Very simple Illustrations.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Emily Dones

    I liked this a lot. However, the narration was a bit , I don't know all over the place in the beginning. I liked that we got to see Peter before Wendy and his origins. Plus where he got some ideas like to build a house around Wendy.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Joseph Leskey

    This book is probably not bad. It is simply not to my particular tastes at the moment.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Alana

    I had no idea that Barrie had written other adventures of the infamous "boy who never grows up." This is his origin story, a fanciful tale of fairies, a twist on the "stork" story, and generally observing that children have much more imagination than adults. Parts of it were a bit tedious, to be honest, and it wasn't my favorite, but it was interesting to see how Barrie envisioned Peter coming into being and how all of the mystical creatures carry on when the humans leave the park after dark. 2.5/ I had no idea that Barrie had written other adventures of the infamous "boy who never grows up." This is his origin story, a fanciful tale of fairies, a twist on the "stork" story, and generally observing that children have much more imagination than adults. Parts of it were a bit tedious, to be honest, and it wasn't my favorite, but it was interesting to see how Barrie envisioned Peter coming into being and how all of the mystical creatures carry on when the humans leave the park after dark. 2.5/5

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kristina

    As a sort of prequel to Barrie's stage play Peter Pan to his later novel Peter Pan and Wendy, I found this book to be a bit all over the place. It was evident that certain aspects and story parts were then used in his later works, but putting them together in this novel just didn't appear to work very well. I don't know if it was just me and my perception of things, but the story parts didn't seem to flow very well. Perhaps it was just the language that wasn't flowing? As an infant, Peter Pan man As a sort of prequel to Barrie's stage play Peter Pan to his later novel Peter Pan and Wendy, I found this book to be a bit all over the place. It was evident that certain aspects and story parts were then used in his later works, but putting them together in this novel just didn't appear to work very well. I don't know if it was just me and my perception of things, but the story parts didn't seem to flow very well. Perhaps it was just the language that wasn't flowing? As an infant, Peter Pan managed to fly right out of his nursery window. He flew over rooftops and right to Kensington Gardens, where his brief lapse in belief ends up stranding him on an island full of birds. These birds take care of him, and eventually give him a way to sail back over into the Gardens. Here, he meets the fairies, and the wonderful "folk tales" of Peter Pan begin, causing many to wonder about his true character. One girl decides to stay the night in the Gardens in the hopes of meeting him, and once she does a very Peter Pan and Wendy-esque conversation takes place. Going into this, meaning before I actually read up on anything having to do with it, I believed that it was just a prequel. While it does detail Peter's time as a baby and small child, it was the parts more towards the end that threw me off the belief of its being a prequel. After all, it did and didn't make sense. But, in this aspect my opinion doesn't really mean a thing. As I mentioned above, I don't know if it was just the old writing that made the story flow so slowly in my head, or the fact that parts of the book just didn't appear to fit. Some stories, like Peter's infancy flight, obviously fit and were needed, while other stories just seemed too much like ramblings that didn't add anything to the story at all. Overall, it was a decent read. Peter Pan as a character has always fascinated me, whether it be in his original or Disney form. I've always held this love for his character, so having read this book, and even being a little bit disappointed, I won't regret it. The little bit that we get of Peter's childhood were some fine details to have when thinking about him as a whole. ☆☆☆/5 Recommend?: If you want to know more about Peter Pan's childhood.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    Not a prequel to the play/Novel that takes place in Neverland, but a different story entirely. The illustrations by Arthur Rackham really make this children's book come alive. This playful and sad tale tells the story of a Peter Pan who as a seven day old that gets himself stuck "Betwixt-and-Between" in Kensington Gardens after closing time and becomes the center of a world of talking birds and fairies that inhabit the park when the humans are gone.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Macie

    My rating this book was hard. I want to give it 5 stars because it's a classic story, and old original fairy tales hold a very special place in my heart, but I couldn't bring myself to. I love Barrie's story telling, he makes it very easy to read. But the story was odd and a bit difficult to really love. It is everything I expected it to be. It's very sad in places, and very fun in others. Absolutely worth reading for the sake of reading an original tale.

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