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Zoo: The Graphic Novel

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All over the world, brutal attacks are crippling entire cities. Jackson Oz, a young biologist, watches the escalating events with an increasing sense of dread. When he witnesses a coordinated lion ambush in Africa, the enormity of the violence to come becomes terrifyingly clear. With the help of ecologist Chloe Tousignant, Oz races to warn world leaders before it's too lat All over the world, brutal attacks are crippling entire cities. Jackson Oz, a young biologist, watches the escalating events with an increasing sense of dread. When he witnesses a coordinated lion ambush in Africa, the enormity of the violence to come becomes terrifyingly clear. With the help of ecologist Chloe Tousignant, Oz races to warn world leaders before it's too late. The attacks are growing in ferocity, cunning, and planning, and soon there will be no place left for humans to hide.


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All over the world, brutal attacks are crippling entire cities. Jackson Oz, a young biologist, watches the escalating events with an increasing sense of dread. When he witnesses a coordinated lion ambush in Africa, the enormity of the violence to come becomes terrifyingly clear. With the help of ecologist Chloe Tousignant, Oz races to warn world leaders before it's too lat All over the world, brutal attacks are crippling entire cities. Jackson Oz, a young biologist, watches the escalating events with an increasing sense of dread. When he witnesses a coordinated lion ambush in Africa, the enormity of the violence to come becomes terrifyingly clear. With the help of ecologist Chloe Tousignant, Oz races to warn world leaders before it's too late. The attacks are growing in ferocity, cunning, and planning, and soon there will be no place left for humans to hide.

30 review for Zoo: The Graphic Novel

  1. 4 out of 5

    Peacegal

    I’ve never read a James Patterson book before, nor did I want to, but I’ll admit to being curious about ZOO. The storyline features animals of all sizes ganging up and waging war on the human race. Needless to say, the scenario is ripe for cultural commentary, but under the ultra-mainstream Patterson franchise, this graphic novel reads like a 1970s disaster flick. There’s our brilliant, manly hero who no one wants to believe until it’s too late. His ex-girlfriend, who is of course written as a sn I’ve never read a James Patterson book before, nor did I want to, but I’ll admit to being curious about ZOO. The storyline features animals of all sizes ganging up and waging war on the human race. Needless to say, the scenario is ripe for cultural commentary, but under the ultra-mainstream Patterson franchise, this graphic novel reads like a 1970s disaster flick. There’s our brilliant, manly hero who no one wants to believe until it’s too late. His ex-girlfriend, who is of course written as a sneering bitch. And then there’s the French woman, who, despite being a brilliant scientist, still ends up being the damsel in distress who must be rescued, and then of course it’s instant love and hopping into bed with our hero. Blech. The feminist in me says, F that noise. So, this is a world in which animals—even those normally shy and peaceful—are attacking and killing humans in droves. From the African plains to the city zoo to the suburban living room, animals ranging from lions to Labradors are forming terrifying packs to hunt down and destroy human beings. The world as we know it has been turned upside-down, and no one is safe. And yet--meat and dairy still widely available. There are multiple references to characters having plenty of bacon on hand or going to the store to buy more milk. Hey, if anyone has the right for some airing of grievances, it’s factory-farmed animals. Where are the enraged cattle overturning slaughterhouse-bound trucks, the hogs breaking out of their stinking sheds and waiting murderously for their tormentors? How pathetic that we are so divorced from the origins of our food that many readers won’t even make the connection in this huge plot hole. In such a scenario, animal advocates would no doubt have something to say about this bloody situation. However, instead of giving animal ethics a place at the countless discussion panels held throughout the story, the author’s depiction of activists is negative and embarrassingly outdated. The one nod we get to organized pro-animal activity is one page depicting a bunch of college students waving hand-scrawled signs while drinking beer and smoking pot. (Really? In every demo I’ve been to, we dressed like we were going to job interviews and acted like it, too.) Then, another, faceless group of demonstrators in ski masks and bandannas make an attempt on the lives of two scientists as they drive down the highway. In their conception of animal advocates, it’s as if the creators relied on fur industry press releases from the 1980s. In fact, the most realistic thing in the whole book was probably the depiction of the dangerous dog enthusiast. ZOO is a silly graphic novel, okay as a diversion if that’s what you want. Just don’t expect it to offer any Rise of the Planet of the Apes-style Big Questions along with its scenes of mayhem.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Mauoijenn

    Wow! I totally surprised by this graphic novel. It captured the story very well. I probably won't go to a Zoo anytime soon. :)

  3. 4 out of 5

    Mary Ann

    I was very disappointed in this book more because of the nudity. The acceptance that stealing an animal from a lab is okay.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Soobie's scared

    I picked this up because I saw the TV series. I'm not sure I'll ever read the original novel but I though that I could spare the time to read the graphic novel adaptation. First of all, it's very, very different from the TV series. I'm not saying it's better or worse, just different. And yeah, I had to admit that I haven't seen the last series finale because Zoo was one of those stop-gap series: one of those that can be moved around to fill in gaps. I kind of liked the art but sure Oz was shirtle I picked this up because I saw the TV series. I'm not sure I'll ever read the original novel but I though that I could spare the time to read the graphic novel adaptation. First of all, it's very, very different from the TV series. I'm not saying it's better or worse, just different. And yeah, I had to admit that I haven't seen the last series finale because Zoo was one of those stop-gap series: one of those that can be moved around to fill in gaps. I kind of liked the art but sure Oz was shirtless a lot. I don't mind it but this caught my eye. The animals were drawn in a very realistic way and also the settings were detailed. The story was a bit boring at the beginning because the main protagonist had to explain what was going on but then it got quite OK. Too many meetings with politicians but OK. The thought behind the novel and the graphic novel is food for thought. If I understood it the right way, (view spoiler)[all the animals got crazy because of pheromones. Cell phone use and hydrocarbons caused a change in the human pheromones as well which animals can smell. Since these new pheromones smelled evil, the animal attacked (hide spoiler)] . Easy peasy. The ending was good. And it so probable that something like that would happen, if (view spoiler)[cell phones and hydrocarbons (hide spoiler)] were to caused such effects.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Cale

    This is a very different apocalypse story. A scientist researching animal attacks discovers a tipping point is coming and does his best to head it off, to no avail. The story moves quickly, a bit talk-heavy but very interesting. It ties science, politics, and a bit of romance into one strong story about a world devolving into chaos. The ending is not some fairy tale, but feels like it's true to how things would really play out. There's still hope, but it's humanity that is ultimately its own wor This is a very different apocalypse story. A scientist researching animal attacks discovers a tipping point is coming and does his best to head it off, to no avail. The story moves quickly, a bit talk-heavy but very interesting. It ties science, politics, and a bit of romance into one strong story about a world devolving into chaos. The ending is not some fairy tale, but feels like it's true to how things would really play out. There's still hope, but it's humanity that is ultimately its own worst enemy. The art is black and white and strong. The characters are interesting and varied. And it all works pretty well. I'm curious now to read the original novel.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Lindsay from TrulyBooked

    While I wasn't sure how I was going to feel about this graphic novel (due to a spate of graphic novels recently that I haven't enjoyed), but this turned my doubts inside out. I was able to get lost in the book and the ending was what sealed its place in my favourites.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Stuart

    Fast paced enjoyable read, but reminiscent of other global environmental disaster films and novels. An updated version of "The Day of the Animals".

  8. 4 out of 5

    Marie

    The premise had great potential but how it was now I didn't really enjoy it. Also found the graphics to be less desirable.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ishu Shankar

    A threat for apocalypse where animals fight back in a way reacting to the changes and destruction humans made. A columbian university dropout scientist changing the course of the apocalypse against the usual diplomatic denial to obvious threat. It was scary in a way that this kind of apocalypse is actually possible. The artist has also done a great job with the ferocity in the faces of the animals. Makes you want to pick up the book and read the entire story.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Scott

    The story was just plain dumb. There was more than one character in this atrocity that figured out that animals were beginning to attack humans, yet they still kept their pet, putting their loved ones in critical danger. This is indicative of the plot as a whole - stay away!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Abby Glickman

    It was great it kept me forcing

  12. 4 out of 5

    Ann-Marie

    just didn't like the story line...

  13. 5 out of 5

    Russ

    Zoo: The Graphic Novel is better than the original book, Zoo. The book was fast-paced, but became tedious about two-thirds of the way through. Not so with the graphic novel, which remained engaging throughout. It’s the exact same story: grad school dropout Jackson Oz studies increasing cases of “human animal conflict” (HAC). Scientists and politicians delay the research for a cure because they don’t believe Oz. By the time they acknowledge it, it’s almost too late to pinpoint the cause and the so Zoo: The Graphic Novel is better than the original book, Zoo. The book was fast-paced, but became tedious about two-thirds of the way through. Not so with the graphic novel, which remained engaging throughout. It’s the exact same story: grad school dropout Jackson Oz studies increasing cases of “human animal conflict” (HAC). Scientists and politicians delay the research for a cure because they don’t believe Oz. By the time they acknowledge it, it’s almost too late to pinpoint the cause and the solution. Without spoiling anything, the solution has downsides that the people in power don’t like, so once again Oz finds himself in the minority. He wants the solution fully implemented but everybody else is too stuck in their ways to accept wholesale change. The pictures helped tell the story and cut down the need for text descriptions of setting, animal appearance, and animal behavior. For example, the scene of Oz following a dog into a dog lair, which helped him uncover a key clue about HAC, was handled much more efficiently in the graphic novel in just a few panels than in the book, where that story seemed to stretch on for multiple pages. As in the book, Chloe transitions from being a scientist with independent expertise into a stay-at-home mom. However, the graphic novel smoothed it out a little, with Chloe retaining some strength and independence, whereas the book presented her as Oz’s fawning doormat. However, Oz’s character development was probably stronger in the book than in the graphic novel. Oz in the graphic novel is too distant—I couldn’t really get a good feel for him as a person. Amazon reviewers have complained about the graphic novel being black and white. The lack of color struck me as odd at first, but once you get into it, you forget about it. In some ways it helped—it’s easier to make out character features and details in the animal’s faces in black and white. Too much color can be a little distracting and intense. Maybe they also wanted to keep it family friendly without a bunch of red blood splattered on the pages. The drawings of Oz’s chimpanzee Atilla are very well done. If you already read the book and you’re watching the CBS miniseries “Zoo,” or if you’re planning to read Zoo 2 (Patterson’s new novella) then reading the graphic novel is a great refresher on the original story. If you never read the original book, just skip it and read the graphic novel.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jacquline

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. To be perfectly honest, this book worked out much better as a graphic novel than it did the novel. I cannot say that about any adaptation that I have read, but I think it was fantastic. The reader was not bombarded by useless details and scene settings; the book was perfectly set up to keep the reader on the edge while reading. I had a feeling that the book would be much more entertaining as a graphic novel to start off, but I had to read the original story before I read any sort of adaptation. To be perfectly honest, this book worked out much better as a graphic novel than it did the novel. I cannot say that about any adaptation that I have read, but I think it was fantastic. The reader was not bombarded by useless details and scene settings; the book was perfectly set up to keep the reader on the edge while reading. I had a feeling that the book would be much more entertaining as a graphic novel to start off, but I had to read the original story before I read any sort of adaptation. I did not write this in the review of the novel, but I think it would have been better if it was written in as a series instead of a single novel, whereas the graphic novel could not have been any better. It even received a higher rating than the novel because of how much better the story was told. I understand that it was all Patterson’s ideas, but the adaptation was bold. I felt like it made a bigger statement, something to really disturb readers further with an eerie plotline. The images were also disturbing. Even though I already knew the story, I held my breath at a few moments because of the suspense the story built. In addition, I really liked how true it stayed to the original novel. The story was superb, and it only enhanced by this medium. I will say this: I would recommend the graphic novel over the novel to anyone who would be interested in this kind of story because of how much better it really is.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    I absolutely loved this book. Patterson has never really written anything this gritty before. The opening chapters were fabulous. I loved the descriptions of the animals changing into violent creatures. I found the main character of OZ was a little weak and his relationship with Chloe, well lets just say that she could have helped him more since he saved her life. Then the book fast forwards to 5 years later and the world is in absolute chaos being attacked by all animals. It was genius how OZ f I absolutely loved this book. Patterson has never really written anything this gritty before. The opening chapters were fabulous. I loved the descriptions of the animals changing into violent creatures. I found the main character of OZ was a little weak and his relationship with Chloe, well lets just say that she could have helped him more since he saved her life. Then the book fast forwards to 5 years later and the world is in absolute chaos being attacked by all animals. It was genius how OZ figured out what the problem was and how to solve it. I have to say I wasn't surprised that once the problem had been fixed for a few days, the higher up government people thought they could go back to their way of life. The ending was perfect because it wasn't like the normal everything is solved and goes back to normal ending. This book was fab and probably one of Patterson's best to date.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Lyricsninja

    i personally found Zoo to be a fun little read with a nice background message (which i wont reiterate due to a giant spoiler alert). but lets make it simple - humans are destroying the planet, and some of the many things we are doing cause the animals to act aggressively to the point of savagery. can we change quickly enough to stop from being wiped off the planet? the only real knock i have is once you hit a certain point, the writing is fast-tracked and careens a little out of control. aka hug i personally found Zoo to be a fun little read with a nice background message (which i wont reiterate due to a giant spoiler alert). but lets make it simple - humans are destroying the planet, and some of the many things we are doing cause the animals to act aggressively to the point of savagery. can we change quickly enough to stop from being wiped off the planet? the only real knock i have is once you hit a certain point, the writing is fast-tracked and careens a little out of control. aka huge buildup with a very quick resolution.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kristy

    I'm not the biggest fan of graphic novels, but once in awhile one will catch my eye. This one looked interesting, kinda like watching a killer animal movie. I wasn't disapointed either. I found it entertaining and believable, and when the cause of all the animal attacks came to light I thought it interesting and a different spin on usual animal mutations that are in these kind of stories. (Hint: it's not a virus.) Content Rating: PG-13 LSV ... (L) Some language, including two uses of God's name. I'm not the biggest fan of graphic novels, but once in awhile one will catch my eye. This one looked interesting, kinda like watching a killer animal movie. I wasn't disapointed either. I found it entertaining and believable, and when the cause of all the animal attacks came to light I thought it interesting and a different spin on usual animal mutations that are in these kind of stories. (Hint: it's not a virus.) Content Rating: PG-13 LSV ... (L) Some language, including two uses of God's name. (S) Some nudity near the beginning. (V) Animal attacks, including blood and gore.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Dianna

    Can animals wipe out civialization as we know it?? That is the main question through out this book. It is a suspenseful and enjoyable book to read. The only part I was disappointed in was about 3/4th the way thru' and it took a unexpected turn. I though "oh great. this is going to go down hill from here." But,surprising it didn't! It just got better, it tied the first part of the book to the last part of the book together nicely. If you ever wondered if animals can wipe out civialization, then read Can animals wipe out civialization as we know it?? That is the main question through out this book. It is a suspenseful and enjoyable book to read. The only part I was disappointed in was about 3/4th the way thru' and it took a unexpected turn. I though "oh great. this is going to go down hill from here." But,surprising it didn't! It just got better, it tied the first part of the book to the last part of the book together nicely. If you ever wondered if animals can wipe out civialization, then read this book and find out!

  19. 4 out of 5

    N.R. Tupper

    So much wrong with the logistics in this story. Maybe it was just me, but a man warning everyone that animals are getting increasingly more violent with humans who then decides to live with an ape and then leaves said ape with his GIRLFRIEND is just... more than I could swallow. If he doesn't believe his own story, why should I? A man who truly believed everything the main character claims to believe wouldn't live with an ape and certainly wouldn't leave it alone with people he cared for. Just sayin So much wrong with the logistics in this story. Maybe it was just me, but a man warning everyone that animals are getting increasingly more violent with humans who then decides to live with an ape and then leaves said ape with his GIRLFRIEND is just... more than I could swallow. If he doesn't believe his own story, why should I? A man who truly believed everything the main character claims to believe wouldn't live with an ape and certainly wouldn't leave it alone with people he cared for. Just saying. It was that point the story went downhill for me.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Stewart Tame

    Environmental disaster novel of a slightly different sort. A bit too pessimistic for my liking and the justification for the events happening seems a little too far-fetched for my liking. Overall, not bad, but there are much better thrillers out there. I've not read any of Patterson's books and, honestly, this graphic novel doesn't exactly make me eager for more of them.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Erin Newton

    I haven't read the actual Patterson novel that this graphic novel is based but I the graphic novel had lots of adventure, science stuff that wasn't overtly sci-fi, likable characters, and a really interesting plot. I enjoyed the artwork, too. The ending didn't really give any closure, perhaps there is a sequel in the works?

  22. 5 out of 5

    Terry Biehl

    The concept for the book in itself is an interesting one. However I was disappointed with the actual writing and phrasing of the book. It felt like a continual stream of metaphors. The main character was not very likeable in fact I really didn't connect with any of the characters. I was hoping for much more, but it did pass the time.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jane Russo

    Different then Patterson's typical crime novel, this is more like his young adult books. Not bad, I liked the concept. Typical ending for his books. I liked the change from his crime novels which honestly are beginning to sound all the same.

  24. 4 out of 5

    C.J. Davis

    I really enjoyed this graphic novel. It was a fresh take on the apocalypse. The illustrations were captivating, especially the "when animals attack" ones. I cared for the main character and the message was not too preachy.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Brenda Asterino

    I love books about biotech possibilities and I love it when it is based on facts. More people should read these. I did think the ending was a little weak but maybe that was to reflect the possibility of it not being the end. Worth the read and the pondering.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jackie

    Gripping, so far. Very Wilbur Smith, with a hint of Steven King. I wonder where it is going? 3.5 A good escapist read for a lazy Saturday. Very different to his usual books. A little Stephen King-ish.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Mandie

    after reading the actually story and then finding the graphic book it actually made more sense when a)you read and just visualise b) the read the graphic and really see what happened. made The Zoo one of my favourites of james pattersons.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Cherry Lish

    This is the first graphic novel, aside from Filipino comics and manga I think, I bought and finished. I like the plot, the possibility of it happening to our world, it gave me the chills. The message of this story is a warning.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Audrey

    I have to admit it took me a while to get into it as it isn't your typical James Patterson style. But the more I read, the more I got interested in the topic at hand. Kind of scary, but also seems very plausible. I really enjoyed it in the end.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Christine

    Typical Patterson, a quick read.

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