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The Snow Queen

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Reprinted here for the first time since the 19th century, these color illustrations by T. Pym make the classic Andersen fairy tale even more magical. One of Andersen's best-beloved tales, The Snow Queen is a story about the strength and endurance of childhood friendship. Gerda's search for her playmate Kay–who was abducted by the Snow Queen and taken to her frozen palace–is broQueen Reprinted here for the first time since the 19th century, these color illustrations by T. Pym make the classic Andersen fairy tale even more magical. One of Andersen's best-beloved tales, The Snow Queen is a story about the strength and endurance of childhood friendship. Gerda's search for her playmate Kay–who was abducted by the Snow Queen and taken to her frozen palace–is brought to life in delicate and evocative illustrations.


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Reprinted here for the first time since the 19th century, these color illustrations by T. Pym make the classic Andersen fairy tale even more magical. One of Andersen's best-beloved tales, The Snow Queen is a story about the strength and endurance of childhood friendship. Gerda's search for her playmate Kay–who was abducted by the Snow Queen and taken to her frozen palace–is broQueen Reprinted here for the first time since the 19th century, these color illustrations by T. Pym make the classic Andersen fairy tale even more magical. One of Andersen's best-beloved tales, The Snow Queen is a story about the strength and endurance of childhood friendship. Gerda's search for her playmate Kay–who was abducted by the Snow Queen and taken to her frozen palace–is brought to life in delicate and evocative illustrations.

30 review for The Snow Queen

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    nedronningen = The Snow Queen, Hans Christian Andersen The Snow Queen (Danish: Snedronningen) is an original fairy tale written by Danish author Hans Christian Andersen. The tale was first published 21 December 1844 in New Fairy Tales. The story centres on the struggle between good and evil as experienced by Gerda and her friend, Kai. The Snow Queen is a tale told in seven stories (Danish: Historier): 1 - About the Mirror and Its Pieces. 2 - A Little Boy and a Little Girl. 3 - The Flower Ga nedronningen = The Snow Queen, Hans Christian Andersen The Snow Queen (Danish: Snedronningen) is an original fairy tale written by Danish author Hans Christian Andersen. The tale was first published 21 December 1844 in New Fairy Tales. The story centres on the struggle between good and evil as experienced by Gerda and her friend, Kai. The Snow Queen is a tale told in seven stories (Danish: Historier): 1 - About the Mirror and Its Pieces. 2 - A Little Boy and a Little Girl. 3 - The Flower Garden of the Woman Who Knew Magic. 4 - The Prince and the Princess. 5 - The Little Robber Girl. 6 - The Lapp Woman and the Finn Woman. 7 - What Happened at the Snow Queen's Palace and What Happened Afterwards. The devil, in the form of an evil troll, has made a magic mirror that distorts the appearance of everything that it reflects. The magic mirror fails to reflect the good and beautiful aspects of people and things, and magnifies their bad and ugly aspects. The devil, who is headmaster at a troll school, takes the mirror and his pupils throughout the world, delighting in using it to distort everyone and everything; the mirror makes the loveliest landscapes look like "boiled spinach." They attempt to carry the mirror into heaven in order to make fools of the angels and of God, but the higher they lift it, the more the mirror shakes with laughter, and it slips from their grasp and falls back to earth, shattering into billions of pieces, some no larger than a grain of sand. These splinters are blown by the wind all over the Earth and get into people's hearts and eyes, freezing their hearts like blocks of ice and making their eyes like the troll-mirror itself, seeing only the bad and ugly in people and things. There was only one way to get it out. Years later, a little boy Kai and a little girl Gerda live next door to each other in the garrets of buildings with adjoining roofs in a large city. One could get from one's home to the other's just by stepping over the gutters of each building. The two families grow vegetables and roses in window boxes placed on the gutters. Gerda and Kai have a window-box garden to play in, and they become devoted to each other as playmates, and as close as if they were siblings. Kai's grandmother tells the children about the Snow Queen, who is ruler over the "snow bees" — snowflakes that look like bees. As bees have a queen, so do the snow bees, and she is seen where the snowflakes cluster the most. Looking out of his frosted window one winter, Kai sees the Snow Queen, who beckons him to come with her. Kai draws back in fear from the window. By the following spring, Gerda has learned a song that she sings to Kai: Roses flower in the vale; there we hear Child Jesus' tale! Because roses adorn the window box garden, the sight of roses always reminds Gerda of her love for Kai. ... تاریخ نخستین خوانش: چهاردهم ماه نوامبر سال 2003 میلادی عنوان: ملکه برفی؛ نویسنده: هانس کریستین اندرسن؛ مترجم: بیژن نامجو؛ مشخصات نشر: تهران، فکربرتر، 1391، در 48 ص، مصور رنگی، فروست: قشنگترین قصه های دنیا؛ شابک: 9789646979628؛ گروه سنی: ب و ج؛ عنوان: ملکه برفی؛ نویسنده: هانس کریستین اندرسن؛ مترجم: مجید میرزامحمدی؛ مشخصات نشر: تهران، نهال نویدان، 1392، در 143 ص، فروست: افسانه پریان؛ شابک: 9789645680600؛ گروه سنی: ب و ج؛ افسانه ای ست، که روانشاد هانس کریستین آندرسن، نویسنده ی دانمارکی داستان‌های کودکان، نوشته است. داستان یکی از طولانی‌ترین، و همچنین تحسین برانگیزترین داستان‌هایی ست، که توسط این نویسنده، نوشته شده؛ و از روی آن، نسخه‌ های مصور بسیاری، به چاپ رسیده است. این کتاب هفت داستان دارد: 1 - آینه و تکه‌ هایش؛ 2 - پسر کوچولو و دختر کوچولو؛ 3 - باغ گل زن جادوگر؛ 4 - پرنس و پرنسس؛ 5 - دخترک دزد؛ 6 - زن فنی و زن لاندی؛ 7 - چه اتفاقی برای قصر ملکه برفی افتاد و پس از آن چه شد. ا. شربیانی

  2. 4 out of 5

    Christy

    3 stars I picked up The Snow Queen because I'm trying to fit in a few more Christmas reads and I got it free from audible. The narration was good, but the story was just okay for me. I know a lot of people love this story and read it as children... this was my first read through. It was only about an hour to listen. I liked it, but compared to my last holiday audible listen it just missed the mark for me.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Hilary

    This is a favourite winter read of my favourite childhood fairy tale. The story starts with Kay and Gerda pressing hot pennies against the ice on the inside of their windows to see out and there's a full page illustration of this. There is a double page illustration of the snow queen taking Kay away, the sledge pulled by a dapple grey horse accompanied by ice chickens and the world below looking like a scene from a Bruegel painting. The chapter of the little robber girl is accompanied by a beaut This is a favourite winter read of my favourite childhood fairy tale. The story starts with Kay and Gerda pressing hot pennies against the ice on the inside of their windows to see out and there's a full page illustration of this. There is a double page illustration of the snow queen taking Kay away, the sledge pulled by a dapple grey horse accompanied by ice chickens and the world below looking like a scene from a Bruegel painting. The chapter of the little robber girl is accompanied by a beautiful picture of Gerda escaping on the reindeer, a part of the story I am always thankful that the poor reindeer escapes. At the end of the story there is a scene which captured my imagination as a child, the planks that bridge between Kay and Gerda's attic bedrooms with their window boxes of roses, what child wouldn't love one of these to their friend's house! I would be very surprised if there were a nicer version of this story. Nicky Raven's retelling is superb and Vladyslav Yerko's illustrations are breath taking, so detailed, inventive, magical and perfect for this story.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Althea Ann

    This was one of my favorite stories as a very young child. I hadn't re-read this short tale in many many years. My thoughts upon rereading: Well, it's more sentimental than I remembered, and the tone, especially at the beginning, is almost verging on patronizing in the way it addresses the (presumably young) reader/listener. As a child, I don't think I picked up on that at all. It's also more overtly Christian/religious than I remembered. (I've noticed that about a good num This was one of my favorite stories as a very young child. I hadn't re-read this short tale in many many years. My thoughts upon rereading: Well, it's more sentimental than I remembered, and the tone, especially at the beginning, is almost verging on patronizing in the way it addresses the (presumably young) reader/listener. As a child, I don't think I picked up on that at all. It's also more overtly Christian/religious than I remembered. (I've noticed that about a good number of the 19th-century children's tales that I've re-read, George MacDonald for example, and Howard Pyle.) I think as a kid I just tuned that stuff out, but took it for granted. The imagery: still so beautiful! The shards of glass, the snowflakes, the roses... This is why the story has endured so long. It is simply gorgeous. As a child, I perceived Andersen's Snow Queen as the same character as Jadis, the White Witch, in CS Lewis' 'The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe.' As an adult, well, yeah, it is definitely the same character. Lewis took her, whole cloth, and her sleigh too.... Vivid memory - this story was the first time I'd ever heard of "Lapland," and it seemed like such a fantastic land. Interesting to realize that this portrayal of northern Finland was probably much more 'realistic' & contemporary (if remote) to children reading the story when it was first published, and people there still did depend on reindeer and travel by sleigh... The robber girl!!!! How on earth did I ever forget about her! Her practical and self-interested, but not quite 'bad' character is simply amazing. I've seen modern criticism of 'The Snow Queen' accusing it of being an apologist tale for domestic abuse, encouraging women to pursue relationships with men who mistreat them. It is possible to read the Snow Queen as the homewrecker, and Gerda as the good wife who must faithfully pursue her errant husband, represented by Kay, but I don't think Andersen intended that, or that the story actually is that. I think it's more likely that Andersen intended another possible reading: that of a Christian allegory, where both Gerda and Kay are, at times, led astray and forget what is right (Kay due to the shard of glass; Gerda due to the witch's enchantment), but eventually find their way back to the Faith & redemption and live in innocence and purity. However, I personally like the simplest and most direct reading: that the story is what it says it is, a narrative of bravery and friendship. That the enchantment on Kay is real, and not his fault, and that Gerda's dedication to her quest, and her achievement, is admirable. I think that one of Andersen's main intentions here is, clearly, to show women as brave, capable, and self-sufficient. Throughout the story, they keep appearing: First, of course, there's Gerda and her quest to rescue her friend. But there's also the childrens' grandmothers, who are more vivid characters than the childrens' parents; the witch, who keeps her cottage all on her own; the princess, who had no intention of marrying until she met a man who appreciated her intellect; the knife-wielding bandit girl, whose mother seems to be the leader of the robbers; & the Lapp woman, who gives Gerda help & directions on her quest, to meet a Finnish wise woman. Of course, the Snow Queen herself wields her power alone... The biggest takeaway I believe I had from this story, though, is from the very beginning. The imp's twisted mirror which shows everything as ugly and rotten, and its shard of glass that, in someone's eye does the same, took hold for me in the idea that the world is the world, but that how we look at it can be an option. We can focus on the mean and the corrupt in all things - or we can look for the beauty and the redeeming qualities of the world. It is up to us. (We don't have to see everything as boiled spinach.) ;-) Many thanks to NetGalley and Pushkin for the opportunity to revisit this tale. As always, my opinions are solely my own. Of course, differences in editions of a classic tale like this largely come down to the illustrations. So far, it looks like Amazon Japan has a couple of previews of the images from this edition, while other sites don't: https://www.amazon.co.jp/Snow-Queen-H...

  5. 5 out of 5

    Carole (Carole's Random Life in Books)

    This was a nice story. I hope to listen to it again in one sitting. I think I may have lost some of the story with all of the stopping and starting I did. I still don't feel compelled to watch Frozen after listening to this story.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Danielle The Book Huntress (Back to the Books)

    This is my favorite fairy tale, hands down. If I'm honest, I'm such a huge fan of snow and cold weather. The idea of snow becoming personified makes a lot of sense, because winter does seem to have a life of its own. I love in Texas, and we don't get much winter, but I grew up with it. I miss it so much! Reading this book makes me long for a good winter. Along with the evocative imagery of winter, there is a very emotional and spiritual love story. Kay and Gerda share a strong emotion This is my favorite fairy tale, hands down. If I'm honest, I'm such a huge fan of snow and cold weather. The idea of snow becoming personified makes a lot of sense, because winter does seem to have a life of its own. I love in Texas, and we don't get much winter, but I grew up with it. I miss it so much! Reading this book makes me long for a good winter. Along with the evocative imagery of winter, there is a very emotional and spiritual love story. Kay and Gerda share a strong emotional bond, but that bond is damaged by Kay's infection with the slivers from the shattered evil mirror. His eye and his heart are pricked, and it changes the way he sees the world, and makes his loving heart grow cold towards poor Gerda. But Gerda doesn't give up on him. When the Snow Queen steals away Kay, she goes searching for him, going on quite an odyssey and meeting some very unusual people along the way. But she never gives up on him. The lesson of sacrificial love never gets old. That kind of love can melt the fiercest frozen heart and claim back those who are lost. I loved rereading this, and the illustrations I had in my version was a lovely adjunct. If one has not ever read this book, I highly recommend it. It's available as a free ebook as part of Hans Christian Andersen's Fairy Tale collection.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Dem

    3.5 Stars The Snow Queen by Hans Christian Andersen was a beautiful story. I listened to this one on audio while wrapping Christmas presents in front of the fire. What great company this little book was.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Bionic Jean

    I remember being bored when I read this story as a child, and reading it again now, nothing has really changed for me. The Snow Queen starts out interestingly enough, and the imagery throughout is good, but as for the actual storyline... It is very long and discursive, and as in many fairy tales, the events seem very random, and the reader tends to lose the main thread. It is the sort of story which could make a marvellous stage production, with all its imaginative possibilities, or a film or TV adap I remember being bored when I read this story as a child, and reading it again now, nothing has really changed for me. The Snow Queen starts out interestingly enough, and the imagery throughout is good, but as for the actual storyline... It is very long and discursive, and as in many fairy tales, the events seem very random, and the reader tends to lose the main thread. It is the sort of story which could make a marvellous stage production, with all its imaginative possibilities, or a film or TV adaptation - as indeed it has, many times over the years. There are also many beautifully illustrated versions of the tale. The Snow Queen, or "Snedronningen", by Hans Christian Andersen, is one of his longest original fairy tales, which was first published in 1844. At its core it is about the struggle between good and evil as experienced by two children, a girl, Gerda and her friend, a boy, Kay. It is told in seven parts, or chapters: 1. The Mirror and the Splinters 2. A Little Boy and a Little Girl 3. The Old Woman's Flower Garden 4. A Prince and a Princess 5. The Little Robber Girl 6. The Lapp Woman and the Finn Woman 7. What Happened at the Snow Queen's Palace and What Happened After That The first part starts in Hans Christian Andersen's delightfully chatty way, "Listen! This is the beginning. And when we get to the end we shall know more than we do now." The storyteller tells of an evil troll, called "The Devil", who made a magic mirror which distorted the appearance of everything it reflected. It would never reflect the good and beautiful aspects of people and things, but instead magnify their bad and ugly aspects. "The Devil" thinks this is a great joke. He is the headmaster at a school for demons, who all decide to carry the mirror into heaven with the idea of making fun of the angels and God, But, "the mirror shook and grinned, and grinned and shook" until eventually all the demons dropped it, and it broke into "a million billion splinters", some no bigger than a grain of sand. These glass splinters "blew everywhere, getting into people's eyes, and making them see everything ugly and twisted. Some splinters even got into people's hearts and that was awful, because their hearts became like blocks of ice." The first part is quite a short chapter, explaining the underlying moral thread which is to run throughout the story. The next chapter introduces the two characters, the little boy Kay, and the little girl Gerda. They live next door to each other in a large city, in the garrets of buildings which have adjoining roofs. They play among the window boxes there, which are full of herbs and roses. It was easy to get from Gerda's to Kay's home, just by stepping over the gutters of each building. The two become great friends. Kay's grandmother tells them stories about the Snow Queen, who is ruler over the "snow bees" — snowflakes that look like bees. Just as bees have a queen, so do the snow bees. So wherever the snowflakes clustered the most, there you would find the Snow Queen. Looking out of his frosted window one winter's day, Kay sees the Snow Queen, who beckons to him to come with her. Kay is frightened and draws back from the window. The days pass and there is a thaw. But one day in Spring, something happens, "Oh! What's that pain in my heart! And oh! What's that in my eye?" Even though the child blinks and thinks it has gone, we can tell from their behaviour that one of the glass splinters from the evil troll, "The Devil"'s mirror has become lodged. The child becomes cruel and aggressive, and the other cannot understand the change in their friend, who teased them, "kicked the window box, and tore off the rose blooms", made fun of the kind grandmother, and did all sorts of horrid things. Everything seemed distorted and ugly to this enchanted child now, and the only interesting and beautiful things, are the tiny snowflakes to be seen through a magnifying glass. While Kay and Gerda are playing with their sleds in the snow, the Snow Queen appears as a woman in a white fur coat, driving a curious white sleigh carriage. The enchanted child is tempted to go back with the Snow Queen to their palace. If this is all beginning to sound familar to you, perhaps it reminds you of C.S. Lewis. The first part of this story, with the adjoining garrets and crossing over the rooftops, was very reminiscent of the first (or prequel) Narnia story, "The Magician's Nephew" At the beginning of that story, the Victorian children are neighbours in a similar type of building, and this aspect is crucial to the story's plot. Then in a similar way, C.S. Lewis clearly took his inspiration for the witch "Jadis" Queen of Charn, (who called herself the "Queen of Narnia") from Hans Christian Andersen's Snow Queen. The first meeting between Jadis and one of the children in "The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe" is almost a rerun of Hans Christian Andersen's idea. Just as C.S. Lewis's stories are clearly moral allegories, this earlier story is also a tale of good and evil. And all the subsequent story follows the child who is under the mirror's spell. It involves an evil sorceress, a clever crow, a pair of doves, a Prince and a Princess, a frightening robber girl, and a captive reindeer. There is a "Mirror of Reason", and a Chinese Puzzle. There is a beautiful flower garden, an old Finnish woman and an old Lapp woman. Throughout, the child is determined to rescue the friend, showing loyalty, great courage and tenacity. Eventually the children's adventures are over and the enchantment is dispersed by the power of love. Kay and Gerda make their way back to their home, to "the big city", where they find that everything is just the same, except that they themselves have grown through their experiences. At the end, the grandmother reads a passage from the Bible, "Except ye become as little children, ye shall not enter the Kingdom of Heaven", and Kay and Gerda realise that they were saved by their goodness and innocence. They will always remain children at heart. This story was originally included in the same book of fairy stories as "The Nightingale" which was a tribrute to Jenny Lind. But in the meantime, Jenny Lind had spurned Hans Christian Andersen's affections. The author subsequently - and rather unfairly - modelled the Snow Queen on what he saw as her icy manner towards him. The Snow Queen is a story of high fantasy, and usually included in most anthologies including works by Hans Christian Andersen; it is considered one of his greatest stories. However it does not really capture my imagination. I am extremely glad though, that he inadvertently provided the inspiration for part of C.S. Lewis's Narnia Chronicles, which I do enjoy enormously. "I can't give her any more power than she has within her. Don't you feel how strong that is? Humans and beasts are at her service as she makes her way through the wide world on her two bare feet. But she must not learn of her power from us. (view spoiler)[ It comes from the innocence of her dear child's heart. If she can't find her own way into the palace and free little Kay by herself, there's nothing we can do to help. (hide spoiler)] " (The Finn woman talking to the reindeer) Both illustrations are by Hans Christian Andersen's original illustrator, Vilhelm Pedersen

  9. 5 out of 5

    Joey Woolfardis

    Far more enjoyable than anticipated, though I think partly due to the wonderful geometric illustrations that accompanied the story. It is a fairly simple story with basic imagery and not a particularly great translation (I find all translations to be rather dire and wish the babel fish only existed) but it was an enjoyable read due to its simplicity. It feels almost unique in that there are heart-warming notions but no in-your-face morals. Characters and dialogue were vague and shaky at best, bu Far more enjoyable than anticipated, though I think partly due to the wonderful geometric illustrations that accompanied the story. It is a fairly simple story with basic imagery and not a particularly great translation (I find all translations to be rather dire and wish the babel fish only existed) but it was an enjoyable read due to its simplicity. It feels almost unique in that there are heart-warming notions but no in-your-face morals. Characters and dialogue were vague and shaky at best, but one cannot deny the lovely imagery and inventiveness of the piece. Definitely better than The Fir Tree, which was the first and only thing I'd read from Andersen. Blog | Instagram | Twitter | Pinterest | Shop | Etsy

  10. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    In this retelling of a Hans Christian Andersen classic, two young children have their friendship torn apart when a curse befalls one of them and he disappears. The Snow Queen lures him away, off to do her bidding. When the young girl goes looking for her friend, she is pulled in many directions and ends up hitting a dead end on more than one occasion. However, determination and the power of her love breaks down a wall or two and thaws a frozen heart, which allows the truth to triumph over all. N In this retelling of a Hans Christian Andersen classic, two young children have their friendship torn apart when a curse befalls one of them and he disappears. The Snow Queen lures him away, off to do her bidding. When the young girl goes looking for her friend, she is pulled in many directions and ends up hitting a dead end on more than one occasion. However, determination and the power of her love breaks down a wall or two and thaws a frozen heart, which allows the truth to triumph over all. Neo liked the story, but felt that it went on and on and on, with little of actual excitement. Andersen classics are not to be trifled with, but even still, it seemed the point was held on ice, like much of the Snow Queen’s prisoners.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Stepheny

    The Snow Queen was a free gift to audible members…last winter. It’s been loaded on my app for quite some time without really catching my interest. I made the decision to read it when I started season 4 of Once Upon a Time. The narration was really great and I enjoyed the story. I have never watched Frozen. I was worried about that for a while because it was the movie everyone was talking about it… I had to let it go… No one? Alright. Can’t blame me, can you? Anyway, it’s wo The Snow Queen was a free gift to audible members…last winter. It’s been loaded on my app for quite some time without really catching my interest. I made the decision to read it when I started season 4 of Once Upon a Time. The narration was really great and I enjoyed the story. I have never watched Frozen. I was worried about that for a while because it was the movie everyone was talking about it… I had to let it go… No one? Alright. Can’t blame me, can you? Anyway, it’s worth a read. The story is there, the characters are great. I can’t say a lot because it’s so damn short. Mayhap even shorter than this review! But, read it. Listen to it!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Mara

    Well, I'm not gonna turn down an audible freebie now am I? Their take: The Snow Queen will be free until January 31, 2015. Audible's 2014 Narrator of the Year Julia Whelan performs one of Hans Christian Andersen's most beloved fairy tales, The Snow Queen. This classic tale is a fantastical fable of two dear friends - one of whom goes astray and is literally lost to the north woods, while the other undertakes an epic journey to rescue him. This charming, strange, and wonderful story is Well, I'm not gonna turn down an audible freebie now am I? Their take: The Snow Queen will be free until January 31, 2015. Audible's 2014 Narrator of the Year Julia Whelan performs one of Hans Christian Andersen's most beloved fairy tales, The Snow Queen. This classic tale is a fantastical fable of two dear friends - one of whom goes astray and is literally lost to the north woods, while the other undertakes an epic journey to rescue him. This charming, strange, and wonderful story is a timeless allegory about growing up and the challenges of staying true to one's self, and it served as the wintry inspiration for the blockbuster hit Frozen.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Peter Monn

    Very dark but interesting. My full review will be up on my booktube channel at http://YouTube.com/peterlikesbooks

  14. 5 out of 5

    Becky

    Audible freebie (like everyone else). I listened to this one while trying, and failing, to take a nap. Stupid stuffyrunnysore nose. >_< I did like the reading of this one. I think that Julia Whelan had the right kind of voice for this story, and handled all of the characters well. She gave them each their own personality but didn't overwhelm the character with cartoonish voices. The story... well, it was a little innocently simplistic for me, and none of it really made any sense Audible freebie (like everyone else). I listened to this one while trying, and failing, to take a nap. Stupid stuffyrunnysore nose. >_< I did like the reading of this one. I think that Julia Whelan had the right kind of voice for this story, and handled all of the characters well. She gave them each their own personality but didn't overwhelm the character with cartoonish voices. The story... well, it was a little innocently simplistic for me, and none of it really made any sense (why would a cruel little girl let someone go just because? She enjoys keeping things against their will, and yet all of a sudden, she's going to be altruistic?) but I guess it's a fairy tale, so sense is not what they are intended to be made of. Still it was a quick little story, and it was free, so I can't complain.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Adam

    Disney's Frozen said it was based on Hans Christian Andersen's The Snow Queen. That's what piqued my interest in this classic. So, after reading this, I can say fairly that Frozen is VERY loosely based. I found elements that contribute to the world and lore in which Elsa becomes the Snow Queen, but Hans's Snow Queen is less endearing. In short, I'll place the Snow Queen / Frozen comparison in the category of good book, great movie, but each in their own right. Regarding edition, the K Disney's Frozen said it was based on Hans Christian Andersen's The Snow Queen. That's what piqued my interest in this classic. So, after reading this, I can say fairly that Frozen is VERY loosely based. I found elements that contribute to the world and lore in which Elsa becomes the Snow Queen, but Hans's Snow Queen is less endearing. In short, I'll place the Snow Queen / Frozen comparison in the category of good book, great movie, but each in their own right. Regarding edition, the Kindle ebook with this cover [The Snow Queen (Fairy eBooks) by Hans Christian Andersen, Marie-Michelle Joy and T. Pym... Published March 5, 2012] was a good version with illustrations for both e-ink Kindles and full color Kindle apps.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Colleen Houck

    It seems that Frozen was inspired by this story but I can't see much of a similarity. Really liked the determined little girl who sought after her lost playfellow. The phrase birds of a feather flock together stuck out to me and I looked it up to see if this was the first time it had appeared in literature. It wasn't. Apparently the origin of the phrase was William Turner's 1545 version of it in The Rescuing of Romish Fox: "Byrdes of on kynde and color flok and flye allwayes together." Though th It seems that Frozen was inspired by this story but I can't see much of a similarity. Really liked the determined little girl who sought after her lost playfellow. The phrase birds of a feather flock together stuck out to me and I looked it up to see if this was the first time it had appeared in literature. It wasn't. Apparently the origin of the phrase was William Turner's 1545 version of it in The Rescuing of Romish Fox: "Byrdes of on kynde and color flok and flye allwayes together." Though there was another similar phrase found in Plato's Republic and it's debatable if that was the origin of the phrase or not.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Lyn

    First published in 1844, The Snow Queen by Hans Christian Anderson is a delightfully charming, if somewhat dated, fantasy – back when fantasies were called faerie tales. Told in seven parts, Anderson borrows liberally from Christian themes and pre-Christian myth to create a richly complex, but simply entertaining story that children will enjoy and adults will find amusing, especially the classical, Biblical and mythic references that may be lost, unapologetically so, on a younger reader. C.S. Lewis fans wil First published in 1844, The Snow Queen by Hans Christian Anderson is a delightfully charming, if somewhat dated, fantasy – back when fantasies were called faerie tales. Told in seven parts, Anderson borrows liberally from Christian themes and pre-Christian myth to create a richly complex, but simply entertaining story that children will enjoy and adults will find amusing, especially the classical, Biblical and mythic references that may be lost, unapologetically so, on a younger reader. C.S. Lewis fans will no doubt see in the Snow Queen a model for the White Witch and apparently this was the early pattern for Disney’s popular film Frozen.

  18. 5 out of 5

    David

    This Audible freebie is a nice way to hear the original Hans Christian Andersen fairy tale. It's not a particularly thrilling fable - boys meets girl, boy loses girl, boy gets girl back - though really, it's the girl who does the getting. The story starts with an evil hobgoblin (also referred to as a demon) who goes to magic school (why did Rowling not find a way to hook this into her mythology?) and creates a magic mirror which shows "reality" in the harshest, ugliest way possible. I This Audible freebie is a nice way to hear the original Hans Christian Andersen fairy tale. It's not a particularly thrilling fable - boys meets girl, boy loses girl, boy gets girl back - though really, it's the girl who does the getting. The story starts with an evil hobgoblin (also referred to as a demon) who goes to magic school (why did Rowling not find a way to hook this into her mythology?) and creates a magic mirror which shows "reality" in the harshest, ugliest way possible. It is shattered into a million pieces, and spread around the world, where it becomes smaller mirrors, spectacles, or tiny specks of glass getting caught in peoples' eyes, creating mischief and cold-hearted misunderstanding. One such shard gets in the eye of a little boy named Kai, who then spurns his childhood sweetheart, Gerda. One day he goes wandering in the woods and is picked up by the Snow Queen. Gerda, convinced that he is not dead, goes on a quest to find him. There are talking flowers, talking crows, and a not-really-evil witch, and of course, the Snow Queen herself. A cute story with perhaps a few too many elements thrown in for the fantasy-minded modern reader, but it would certainly entertain children. Anderson does wrap this tale up with a rather saccharine Christian moral, but it's a story to please those in search of adventuresome girls and magical talking animals. Now maybe I should go see Frozen.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Steph

    I kind of like this. I was a little lost at the end but overall I thought it was really interesting. It's really different from what I'm used to and I'm really interested in the old interpretations of our modern retelling of the stories. The author definitely has an interesting imagination

  20. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Beautifully written and incredibly intriguing, I didn't absolutely love it but I didn't dislike it. Just a very nice, quick read to start the year. I can also see little fragments of it in Frozen!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

    So what do you do on a hot and sticky day - thats right read a book about snow and ice. I came across an opportunity to pick up a copy of the Snow Queen in the Everyman Children's Classic series and leapt at it. So after 95 pages of what I feel is quintessential Hans Christian Anderson here I am and I must admit that it did not disappoint. Like a lot in the series (and what seems to be a growing trend) the book used illustrations from one its famous predecessors. As such it completes So what do you do on a hot and sticky day - thats right read a book about snow and ice. I came across an opportunity to pick up a copy of the Snow Queen in the Everyman Children's Classic series and leapt at it. So after 95 pages of what I feel is quintessential Hans Christian Anderson here I am and I must admit that it did not disappoint. Like a lot in the series (and what seems to be a growing trend) the book used illustrations from one its famous predecessors. As such it completes the whole image of a timeless classic. However what struck me the most is that we have here a title which I cannot begin to measure its influence on popular culture and literature in general. However the story I read was like nothing I have read before. Keeping within the lines of no spoilers I can say that this was not the story I was expected (although to be fair I didn't know what to expect), however in reflection this is exactly what I should have expected. So another trip in to the world of Children's classics and I must admit they keep on surprising me.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jarom

    I. LOVE. THIS. STORY. Yes, this is a fairy tale that I plan to tell my children before I tuck them into bed at night. Holy cow. This is the tale of a boy and a girl. Simple enough, right? The story hasn't even begun and you know it will be good. It all begins with a mirror. Made by demons in the pits of Hades, this mirror takes everything good that looks into it and makes it the exact opposite. The better of a person you are, the worse it makes you look. This mirror shatters. Shar I. LOVE. THIS. STORY. Yes, this is a fairy tale that I plan to tell my children before I tuck them into bed at night. Holy cow. This is the tale of a boy and a girl. Simple enough, right? The story hasn't even begun and you know it will be good. It all begins with a mirror. Made by demons in the pits of Hades, this mirror takes everything good that looks into it and makes it the exact opposite. The better of a person you are, the worse it makes you look. This mirror shatters. Shards fall to the earth, and one of them pierces the heart of a boy. It poisons him, freezes his heart over, and he is spirited away by the mysterious Snow Queen. The girl, his close friend in childhood, notices his change in behaviour and when he goes missing, she embarks on a quest to save him. Following several encounters, she finally finds him deep in the Snow Queen's frosted palace, frostbitten and numb to the world. He doesn't recognize her. It is here that she realizes just how much he means to her, now that he looks at her with dead eyes. She can't get him to remember her, so she hugs him and turns to leave. And the shard of mirror falls out of his heart, and it all suddenly comes rushing back. He sweeps her off her feet and they live happily ever after, the end :) Perfect. This is a fairy tale that puts into perspective the journey. Everyone expects a happily ever after to fall into their lap as soon as they fall in love. We often overlook the dragons, the orcs, the goblins and imps that lie in the way to everlasting happiness, don't we? Well folks, love is easily found. Pure, true love, however, is what remains when the knight sheathes his sword for the last time. After the last bandit surrenders and the troll lies slain, that is when two lovers decide on a happily ever after. So the million dollar question: is love worth it? Is it worth the fight? I'm with Hans Christian Anderson: Heavens yes it is! Great story. Loved it.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Milica

    One day, when the Devil was feeling very good about himself, he created a special mirror. The mirror took everything that was good and beautiful in the world and turned it into bad and ugly, and when things were bad and ugly it did the opposite. When the goblins – the Devil’s pupils tried to fly to Heaven, to mock angels, the mirror laughed so much that it slipped from goblins’ hands and shattered into millions of pieces when it hit the ground. Some of those pieces were so small that they could One day, when the Devil was feeling very good about himself, he created a special mirror. The mirror took everything that was good and beautiful in the world and turned it into bad and ugly, and when things were bad and ugly it did the opposite. When the goblins – the Devil’s pupils tried to fly to Heaven, to mock angels, the mirror laughed so much that it slipped from goblins’ hands and shattered into millions of pieces when it hit the ground. Some of those pieces were so small that they could fly all around the world, and every time they got in someone’s eye, they made that person only see what’s wrong and bad about everything. That’s what happened to Kai. Kai was a small boy who had spent all his life playing with his best friend Gerda. Shortly after he was struck with the piece of mirror, the Snow Queen came and kidnapped him. Everybody thought that he was lost, everybody except of Gerda. In order to find Kai, with only innocence of a child as her power, Gerda will travel through dangerous places and meet all kinds of people, some good, some bad. But, what will happen when she finally finds him? The Snow Queen is a story about friendship, the purest kind, about children's innocence, and about love. I think I would have loved it more, had I read it as a child. This way some parts were boring to me, and the final resolution was painfully anticlimactic. Still, it was nice story and I’m glad I read it. This edition contains illustrations, and I found them nice addition to the story. I received a copy of this book via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Gavin

    This was another audiobook that Audible gave away for free. Unfortunately this was as bad as the last freebie offering. This was a dreadful bore. Thankfully it was a short read. Rating: 2 stars. Audio Note: Even the excellent Julia Whelan could not save this story.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Camilla

    3.5 stars!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Chrissie

    An excellent fairy tale. Fairy tales should first scare you and then resolve happily. This fits that bill. It must be entertaining to both the adult reading the tale and the child. I admit it; I was tense, annoyed and worried ....and then happy. If the parent is bored, it is not a good fairy tale. The child will feel your own emotional response. Hans Christian Andersen knew how to write stories for both adults and kids. I chuckled. I marveled at the author's ability to create an excit An excellent fairy tale. Fairy tales should first scare you and then resolve happily. This fits that bill. It must be entertaining to both the adult reading the tale and the child. I admit it; I was tense, annoyed and worried ....and then happy. If the parent is bored, it is not a good fairy tale. The child will feel your own emotional response. Hans Christian Andersen knew how to write stories for both adults and kids. I chuckled. I marveled at the author's ability to create an exciting story, ending with a comforting message. A bit simplistic, but that is in the definition of a good fairy tale. The religious message I could have done without. Audible gave this audiobook to all its members; its 2014 Christmas present. To narrate it they chose Julia Whelan, who won Audible's best narrator prize for the year. I loved the voice she used for the reindeer, but someone could have told her how to correctly pronounce the two Nordic children's names Kai and Gerda. Kai is pronounced" k-eye", not the name of the letter K. Gerda is pronounced gpear-da, not grrrr-da. Kai could have sounded more like a little boy than a little girl. Otherwise the narration was OK. I checked out Katherine Kellgren's reading of the same story and it was a bit better, but heck that was not free!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Mackey

    The Snow Queen is one of my favorite tales from my childhood. I grew up in the southern US where it never snowed so the imagery of so much snow and ice, reindeer and beauty always astounded me. Although I've moved north, while re-reading this story, that beauty still does overwhelm me. I had no idea that this was the premise for Disney's "Frozen" since I don't do Disney and even now I'm rather taken aback at the thought. The Snow Queen has so many layers, different stories, tales within tales an The Snow Queen is one of my favorite tales from my childhood. I grew up in the southern US where it never snowed so the imagery of so much snow and ice, reindeer and beauty always astounded me. Although I've moved north, while re-reading this story, that beauty still does overwhelm me. I had no idea that this was the premise for Disney's "Frozen" since I don't do Disney and even now I'm rather taken aback at the thought. The Snow Queen has so many layers, different stories, tales within tales and, of course, the overall moral. Its encompassing theme of friendship and love enduring and goodness, true goodness, triumphing over evil is always my favorite. In this particular tale it is seen as a power, a gift, and I like that for true goodness truly is a power in the world we live in today. Some have remarked that it is boring. I dare say that it is boring only to minds that have been dumbed down to Disney's level. That is too sad. The men who wrote these old fables were writing for children who devoured these tales with glee. The fact that adults cannot read them today says so much about out world.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Radwa

    After listening to a Myth and Legends' and Disney Origins' podcasts, both tackling this story, I had to read it, even though I already knew everything about it from the two podcasts. It's weird how "Frozen" is labeled is being adapted or whatever from this story, because other than Snow being an important part of the story, THEY HAVE NOTHING IN COMMON! Disney's Frozen and Hanz's Snow Queen are very different stories. Now onto this story, it's my first full-length story I've read by th After listening to a Myth and Legends' and Disney Origins' podcasts, both tackling this story, I had to read it, even though I already knew everything about it from the two podcasts. It's weird how "Frozen" is labeled is being adapted or whatever from this story, because other than Snow being an important part of the story, THEY HAVE NOTHING IN COMMON! Disney's Frozen and Hanz's Snow Queen are very different stories. Now onto this story, it's my first full-length story I've read by the guy (surprise!) and I found it fun and entertaining but it didn't blow me away, maybe because I've already heard it two times before reading? maybe. It was fun, just don't read it with Frozen in mind.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Sammm [involuntarily somewhat on hiatus]

    A digitized ARC of this book was provided by the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. For the reprimand of fans' misconception for a certain Disney film, please stick to the very end. ISBN13 9780399578519 is the ebook for this version (published by Ten Speed Press and released on the same day), both are the first American editions, thoughreview.For A digitized ARC of this book was provided by the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. For the reprimand of fans' misconception for a certain Disney film, please stick to the very end. ISBN13 9780399578519 is the ebook for this version (published by Ten Speed Press and released on the same day), both are the first American editions, though the original English hardcover of this specific version has already been published by Hutchinson last year in the UK: ISBN13 9780091959005. In case people never bother to check just which edition I'm reviewing, it's the one with Sanna Annukka's illustration; take a good look at the cover: Note: I am uncertain as to why the image quality appears to be quite horrid here on Goodreads, but if you click it, you'd see what NetGalley has actually provided. I knew of the story The Snow Queen (as in actually knew what it's about, instead of only knowing its existence), but this is in fact the first time I read it myself. When I was young, my mom has read a decent amount of children's books to me, but there were two specific stories I heard not from her, and instead from my older cousins: One of them I had a hard time pinning down just which one was told to me, could be East of the Sun and West of the Moon, Mr Simigdáli, or Pintosmalto, though I literally JUST narrowed it down to The Two Kings' Children; the other was obviously The Snow Queen (there was no other story I could mistaken it with). When I saw it on NetGalley, I figured it was the perfect time to actually read it myself. I did spot something that, if indeed was an error, would be a quick fix: On the very first page, "humor" is spelled with the British spelling "humour"; not sure if it's intentional, even though this was supposed to be an American edition. Now, layout-wise, the ARC file displayed on Adobe Digital Editions actually worked in the favor of shock-value... Since it's for some reason only displaying in single-pages, most of the time I wouldn't know when to expect a full-bleed illustration until it's right in my face, and sometimes, not being prepared could do wonders, for example: P.8 This flake grew bigger and bigger, until at last it turned into a woman, who was dressed in the finest white gauze which looked as if it had been made from millions of star-shaped flakes. She was beautiful and she was graceful, but she was ice-shining, glittering ice. She was alive, for all that, and her eyes sparkled like two bright stars, but in them there was neither rest nor peace. I mean... What kind of image does the description above conjure? For me, it's an elegant woman that makes you want to go down on your knees and warship her.... And then we get the full-bleed illustration on P.9... Now, I'm NOT saying the Snow Queen is fugly or anything, but I'll wholeheartedly admit that was definitely NOT the kind of imagery I was expecting! lol That being said, while Sanna Annukka's illustration may take some time to get used to, I cannot deny it certainly has style, which was why this edition caught my eye in the first place. For some reason I kept on assuming she'd be on a limited palette, but the color schemes every now and then goes from warm to cold and the other way around all over again, quite refreshing. So who exactly is Sanna Annukka? Don't recognize the name? It's okay, I didn't until I look it up, but I bet a good portion of people would actually recognize her work, such as the album cover she did for Keane (Under the Iron Sea), or her textile designs for Marimekko, where you can buy at CB2 (there's one in SF, and I know I most definitely have seen her work there without knowing it!) (info source) Her art in this book is consistent like what you'd be able to find online, giving me a very tribal and natural feel. I wasn't familiar with Scandinavian culture, so initially I was thinking of Native Americans or even Incas, but after looking up her bio and Googling "Sami", it all makes perfect sense. But yeah... what they all have in common is that they are indigenous people, and her art really has this spiritual quality to it, even though it's produced in a very modern way. Story-wise, was it everything I remembered or imagined it to be? Yes and No. When my cousins told me the story, they were not reading it word-to-word from a storybook; instead they were just recounting a story they've read. With the fact that I was positively young (possibly before or just starting elementary), it could be that I just didn't remember, or that they simply didn't include some of the specifics in the story when they were telling it to me. In fact, most of Gerda's adventure is new to me lol, as I only clearly remembered the outline of the story, and not the details. Note: "quotemarks followed by bold words indicate specific characters" I'm also not sure if there were supposedly some sinister metaphors within some of the encounters... I mean, reading the text itself, the actions of "the old woman skilled in magic" seemed innocent enough... Perhaps she really was just lonely and wanted the company of an adorable child... but for some reason... adding the illustrations... It kind of gives me the creeps... Again, that is NOT to say the art work is bad or anything of the sort! Just that it sheds light on different interpretations, making me reread those pages a couple of times so that I could form an opinion about the matter. Greda's talks with "the flowers" were also completely new to me. It oddly reminds me of Disney's 1951 animated adaptation Alice in Wonderlan where Alice talks to the flowers. (Note: While I am rather too familiar with Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, I actually haven't read Through the Looking Glass, and What Alice Found There, which was where the flowers appeared in canon, hence the mentioning of Disney's version.) I'm not sure if this was one of those "stories within a story" situation, or if the flowers' seemingly unrelated tales were actually foreshadowing anything (if they were, I was rather distracted by the randomness and didn't pick up the hints); anyhow, the whole thing was pretty surreally bizarre xP. Definitely memorable this time round though! Following we have "the prince" and "the princess", and then "the old robber woman" along with "the little robber girl". All I can say is that Greda sure went through a peculiar adventure to go save her sweetheart! While the story concluded in a rather typical fair-tale-ish ending, it was overall satisfactory for me. I do love the good old cheesy "love concurs all" notion bahahaha. xD --- Now, onto what I considered an important topic, but less relevant to this specific edition I'm reviewing. I've briefly discussed this with fellow Goodreads user Katherine Rebekah on a different platform, but as I'm not sure when the next time I'd be reading a different edition of The Snow Queen will be, I'll just address the issue here. This is the nicest way I can put it: If you call Disney's Frozen a retelling of The Snow Queen, you can eat dung. =] I am being totally serious when I said that was the nicest way I could phrase it; I have comments far more unpleasant that I don't care to pop a vein for. I'll tell you this, if Frozen hadn't been constantly mistaken for something it clearly isn't by the majority of its so-called fans, I probably wouldn't have had the utmost low opinion I have towards it. If you view Frozen as its own thing, it could probably earn a "not bad"/"mediocre, but not completely terrible", but if you retardedly state it as a retelling of The Snow Queen, then you've doomed yourselves, because if it serves as a retelling, it'd more than deservedly earned an extreme negative score, for there was basically little resemblance of Andersen's original tale. A "queen" having the ability to freeze stuff up isn't enough. And before you protest, I know fully well of the development of Disney's Frozen; it's the majority of the fans that didn't get their facts straight. Look it up, Disney has never stated Frozen was based on (hence being a retelling) Andersen's original tale; they DID originally want to do an actual adaptation, but it just wasn't working, and through out the process, what they were working on strayed further and further from Andersen's tale. They worked on what they had been working, which did start off aiming to be a retelling, but the end-product was not. While specific Frozen characters were based on specific characters from Andersen's tale, "the story" of Frozen as a whole, IS NOT based on the story of The Snow Queen. Disney was even super specific about it being only "inspired by" it during the end-credit, which I appreciate, cuz had they had the gull to blatantly write "based on", I would have caused a ruckus in the threatens (which I still think was a waste of money to go to, btw) So yeah, if you are a Frozen fan, I have no problems with it and I won't judge you, but if you go shouting nonsense and spreading false information that "Frozen is a retelling of The Snow Queen", THEN I WILL JUDGE YOU. The best part (shattered mirror that'd distort people's view on things) of The Snow Queen wasn't even featured in Frozen! Please stop embarrassing yourself with your ignorance! To Disney's credit, they (imo) saved their faces a little when they actually incorporated aspects of Andersen's tale in OUaT where you could clearly see that even they had made it clear that those two stories are separate things. I just hope people in general could be less confused about it. Sighs. --- Side-note: I happened to have also sent in a request for alongside this one, but that request was sadly declined by NetGalley. The Fir Tree actually IS a story I'm not familiar with; hopefully I'd get to chance to read this edition (art also by Sanna Annukka) someday.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Abigail

    The Snow Queen, illustrated by Vladyslav Yerko. Published in the Ukraine, this beautiful edition of Hans Christian Andersen's classic tale retains the format of the original, with seven "chapters" or parts. When young Kay is pierced with slivers of a demonic goblin's mirror, his heart turns to ice and he can only see the bad around him. Kidnapped by the Snow Queen, Kay is taken to the far north, where he becomes caught up in the "icy game of reason," and forgets everything he has ever loved. His chi The Snow Queen, illustrated by Vladyslav Yerko. Published in the Ukraine, this beautiful edition of Hans Christian Andersen's classic tale retains the format of the original, with seven "chapters" or parts. When young Kay is pierced with slivers of a demonic goblin's mirror, his heart turns to ice and he can only see the bad around him. Kidnapped by the Snow Queen, Kay is taken to the far north, where he becomes caught up in the "icy game of reason," and forgets everything he has ever loved. His childhood friend Gerda has not forgotten him however, and she undertakes a long journey to find him and bring him home... Like some of Andersen's other stories, The Ugly Duckling and The Little Mermaid among them, The Snow Queen is an original creation of the author, rather than a retelling of a traditional folktale. Interpreted by scholars and literary critics in many ways, at its heart, this tale concerns the conflict between good and evil, and between love and intellect. It is clear that Kay's icy heart, and inability to see anything but that which is evil and ugly, are tied to his desire to be "clever," to live by reason alone. Gerda triumphs because her loving heart transforms those around her, from crows to robber girls, into her allies. It is her tears, which spring from her love of Kay, that melt the ice in his heart. I am always particularly struck by Andersen's wisdom, as manifested in the words of the Finmark woman, who observes that the power of twelve men is as nothing compared to the loving heart of one innocent little girl. It is unfortunate that this beautifully-illustrated book, published in Kiev, Ukraine, is not more widely available in the United States. Vladylsav Yerko does a phenomenal job of bringing this tale to life, and his paintings are intensely involving, whether the scene depicted is icy or warm. This is one of the most gorgeously illustrated books currently in my collection, and I sincerely recommend it to anyone who loves fairy-tales.

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