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The Silent Grove

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Available in print for the first time, Dragon Age: The Silent Grove is the perfect introduction to BioWare's dark fantasy universe In this essential, canonical story from David Gaider, lead writer of the games, King Alistair, accompanied only by rogues Isabela and Varric, embarks on a quest deep inside the borders of Antiva - a nation of assassins Together, they will encou Available in print for the first time, Dragon Age: The Silent Grove is the perfect introduction to BioWare's dark fantasy universe In this essential, canonical story from David Gaider, lead writer of the games, King Alistair, accompanied only by rogues Isabela and Varric, embarks on a quest deep inside the borders of Antiva - a nation of assassins Together, they will encounter a prison break, dragons, the mysterious Witch of the Wilds, and one of the greatest secrets in the history of the world! Collects Dragon Age #1 - #6


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Available in print for the first time, Dragon Age: The Silent Grove is the perfect introduction to BioWare's dark fantasy universe In this essential, canonical story from David Gaider, lead writer of the games, King Alistair, accompanied only by rogues Isabela and Varric, embarks on a quest deep inside the borders of Antiva - a nation of assassins Together, they will encou Available in print for the first time, Dragon Age: The Silent Grove is the perfect introduction to BioWare's dark fantasy universe In this essential, canonical story from David Gaider, lead writer of the games, King Alistair, accompanied only by rogues Isabela and Varric, embarks on a quest deep inside the borders of Antiva - a nation of assassins Together, they will encounter a prison break, dragons, the mysterious Witch of the Wilds, and one of the greatest secrets in the history of the world! Collects Dragon Age #1 - #6

30 review for The Silent Grove

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sean Barrs the Bookdragon

    I really didn’t think this story would work. The situation seemed like a real impossibility, so I’ve been avoiding this for years. In all honesty I just thought it sounded desperate, an attempt to rake in some more dollars on the back of a successful franchise. I mean why the king of Ferelden would be going on a quest with two lowly rogues, I couldn’t begin to guess at. But, then I began reading and I realised how well this story is put together, and how perfectly it slots into the dragon age un I really didn’t think this story would work. The situation seemed like a real impossibility, so I’ve been avoiding this for years. In all honesty I just thought it sounded desperate, an attempt to rake in some more dollars on the back of a successful franchise. I mean why the king of Ferelden would be going on a quest with two lowly rogues, I couldn’t begin to guess at. But, then I began reading and I realised how well this story is put together, and how perfectly it slots into the dragon age universe. It’s great. It really is a good side story. I wish I’d read it sooner because Alistair is rather awesome in it; he is here in all his awkward glory. Alistair has heard a surprising rumour: his farther, King Maric, is alive. This has surprised him greatly because for many years he has believed him dead; he went missing years before and left no word with anybody. The news has come from a most unlikely place too; it has come directly from Antiva, which is a country renowned for its assassination and treachery. If you’ve played the video games you’ll understand the significance of this, and will probably want to skip this paragraph of my review. Alistair farther disappeared thirteen years previously. His death meant that his young and inexperienced son was left on the throne. His most trusted general, and Maric’s best friend, Logain betrayed him and allowed him to be slaughtered by the monstrous darkspawn. Alistair (King Maric’s bastard) was forced to take the crown and unite the shattered lands with the help of the Warden. This is all in the past. Alistair is now King and is utterly shaken at the news. So, he naturally wants to investigate the rumour personally; it’s far too sensitive to let anyone else do the dirty work. He wants his farther found. He doesn’t want to do it himself; he needs to, he has to. The king needs closure; he needs to put this behind him and move on with his reign. He has to find his farther. He may be dead or alive. It doesn’t matter. The details aren’t important. They just need an ending. I really do think this is a great story because it finally resolved one of the lingering questions I had about this series. I was also glad to see more of Alistair; he hasn’t seen the time of day since Origins. I’m not particularly fond of either of his companions, but as a trio the characters do create an interesting dynamic. The humour is effective, and they work surprisingly well together. Alistair’s narrative is in perfect sync with his character; he is acting the part of King now, but the reluctant cynic still remains behind the mask. He is still the same joker, and he’s still a temper (mage hunter). And in this he has reached breaking point. He really won’t let anything stand in his way. This first instalment receives an appropriate ending that may seem a little out of character, but Alistair’s changing. He now has a kingdom to rule, and he’s a little pissed off with interfering witches. This is a fun comic. Dragon Age Graphic Novel Trilogy 1. The Silent Grove- A cool four stars 2. Those Who Speak- A strong four stars 3. Until We Sleep - A bloody four stars

  2. 4 out of 5

    Angela

    I requested this as my partner is quite obsessed with the game and although I haven't played it myself (I'm still in the throes of Fallout: New Vegas) I've always enjoyed watching him play this as the graphics, storyline and missions were all rather spectacular. I was not disappointed by this graphic novel at all though I suspect if I had played the game I would have enjoyed and understood it a lot more. The artwork was definitely a highlight for me, it was absolutely fantastic, and I will read th I requested this as my partner is quite obsessed with the game and although I haven't played it myself (I'm still in the throes of Fallout: New Vegas) I've always enjoyed watching him play this as the graphics, storyline and missions were all rather spectacular. I was not disappointed by this graphic novel at all though I suspect if I had played the game I would have enjoyed and understood it a lot more. The artwork was definitely a highlight for me, it was absolutely fantastic, and I will read the rest in this series based solely on the art. Storyline was also very good and consise, which, from the few(ish) other graphic novels I've read, I've come to the conclusion that this is by far one of the better written I have come across. Although I only have the most basic of knowledge of the Dragon Age world, this graphic novel has more than persuaded me that I not only need to play the game but also to keep an eye on more releases by Gaider. An advanced reader copy was kindly provided by the publisher through Netgalley.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Veronica

    Let me start this by saying that I will be reading most of the Dragon Age brand throughout the next year because the game series has destroyed my life/taken over my life. I am a huge fan who once spent 36 hours playing the game, fell asleep with the controller in my hand, then woke up and continued playing. That being said, this comic was a bit of a disappointment. I felt at once both elated at seeing great characters from Origins and 2 meeting up, but anger when they didn't explain how they met Let me start this by saying that I will be reading most of the Dragon Age brand throughout the next year because the game series has destroyed my life/taken over my life. I am a huge fan who once spent 36 hours playing the game, fell asleep with the controller in my hand, then woke up and continued playing. That being said, this comic was a bit of a disappointment. I felt at once both elated at seeing great characters from Origins and 2 meeting up, but anger when they didn't explain how they met, what they had been up to since their respected games ended, or took any chances. This short comic didn't pull punches, and the big reveal wasn't that big of a reveal. I could not rate it down because I am still invested enough to care about where it is going, and I did like that the personalities of the character's stayed true during the dialog. However, I have to wag my finger at the confusing images. They were beautiful, yes, but they lacked movement. Usually in comics I can see more personality in the images, but these just didn't offer that as much as I would hope. Don't read this if you are not obsessed with the game franchise...

  4. 5 out of 5

    Bill Tillman

    Hold onto to your shield and bucklers! A graphic-novel with a clear plot & dialogue, I mean you will know each character & their intentions beginning to end. Colorful and dynamic art, I even jumped out of my skin when the serpent like dragon came onto the scene. This is too good to pass up, get it.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    In reviewing this graphic novel, I am fully aware that I will be revealing myself as a world-class geek! I am also aware that I'll be alienating a few readers here. However, I feel it's worth coming out of the nerdy closet just so I can be a bit of a video-game fangirl in my excitement over this! I love the Dragon Age games. I like video games in general, and I have ever since I was a kid. I used to love watching my brother play games like Final Fantasy VII and Metal Gear Solid. I loved the stor In reviewing this graphic novel, I am fully aware that I will be revealing myself as a world-class geek! I am also aware that I'll be alienating a few readers here. However, I feel it's worth coming out of the nerdy closet just so I can be a bit of a video-game fangirl in my excitement over this! I love the Dragon Age games. I like video games in general, and I have ever since I was a kid. I used to love watching my brother play games like Final Fantasy VII and Metal Gear Solid. I loved the stories and could forgive even the corniest dialogue! Things have moved on a bit since Lara Croft's boobs were hexagonal and the voice actors of games like Resident Evil were so bad your ears would bleed. These days, there are some games which are like stepping inside a good book and becoming the main character! The Dragon Age games are like that, and because I love their stories, I'm guilty of having spent far too many hours playing them! Unfortunately, DA3's release date is still being posted as “To Be Announced”. This means that fans like myself figured we were whole way away from being able to immerse ourselves in the world of Thedas again. But, bless David Gaider's soul, Dragon Age has come to the printed page! I have the prequel novels on my Goodreads Wishlist, but could hardly believe my luck (or my eyes) when, while browsing NetGalley for the first time in a year, I saw this! A graphic novel following Alistair, Varric and Isabela on a whole new journey. Alistair is the king of a land called Fereldan, and he is a character in Dragon Age: Origins. Isabela is a pirate hussy and Varic is a lovable dwarf and both appear as companions in Dragon Age 2. This GN takes place “almost a decade” after the Fifth Blight (the catastrophe that the first game is based around). In this book, Alistair is looking for his father, in search of answers to questions which have haunted him all his life. Now, I'm a fan so while reading this I was able to sink quickly into the world depicted. I knew the voices and mannerisms of the characters like they were old friends! And yes, I know that's uber-geeky! However, while I read, I tried to imagine what it would be like for someone unfamiliar with this world to read about it. While I think the story had plenty going for it, I think the mentions of other in-game characters and events might leave a lot of readers floundering. But, that being said, I feel like these books are probably designed to appeal to the existing fan base. The illustration was good, though I would have preferred Isabela and Alistaire to be more in-keeping with their game-selves as I feel Freed “uglied them up” somewhat. Varric was a little different, but cool. Overall, I loved the opportunity to see some of my favourite characters kicking but and swashing some buckle again! I'm not sure how much scope there is for a series as there are so many different possible endings to both of the games (the first more than the second...) that it seems like there might be a few elephants in the room after a while. In my games, for example, Alistair married my character. In other people's games, he ran away and never became King of Fereldan at all. I guess reading this GN is like playing a sequel to a game and loading a default save. The decisions and outcomes of the prequel are just the most typical outcomes. And yes, I know just how geeky that last paragraph made me sound. I may as well go ahead and give this a well-deserved four and a half stars! Then maybe I should go and watch reruns of Star Trek while trying to to learn how to write in Tolkien's elvish.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Lauren (Northern Plunder)

    This review was first posted on Northern Plunder, if you want to see more reviews please click here. I received a digital copy of this graphic novel from netgalley and whilst I had a few troubles as mentioned in other graphic novels read this way I didn't have so many this time because most of the font was large enough to not be over pixelated. Any how obviously I'm a fan of Dragon Age and even though I didn't complete the game (it's not my fault, I'm a hoarder, it's a disease!) I had played enou This review was first posted on Northern Plunder, if you want to see more reviews please click here. I received a digital copy of this graphic novel from netgalley and whilst I had a few troubles as mentioned in other graphic novels read this way I didn't have so many this time because most of the font was large enough to not be over pixelated. Any how obviously I'm a fan of Dragon Age and even though I didn't complete the game (it's not my fault, I'm a hoarder, it's a disease!) I had played enough to let my inner nerd completely devour this book page by page and end up pretty wowed by it all. The art work is also beautiful and its a lovely touch that it was in colour - a lot these days go for a black and white theme so this was a refreshing change - especially because the colours were so bright and vibrant, even for the darker characters. This graphic novel follows King Alistair on a long and dangerous quest to find the answers of his fathers disappearance, I guess its also to find some inner peace as he's only King because there is no one else left, I loved this story as we got to see a few different settings each one more beautiful than the last, and of course a wonderful dragon that was breath taking. At 82 pages this book is a little on the short side for me BUT it is only part one, I hope to stick around for the sequel because its certainly set up a great adventure to follow with many questions that I want answered too! Recommend? As with every graphic novel I review my answer is the same - Do you like graphic novels? Do you enjoy Dragon Age or simialr games? If yes, read it.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Shaheen

    My very first graphic novel review! Where do I begin? Dragon Age: The Silent Grove is set after the Fifth Blight (Dragon Age I) and follows Alistair, king of Fereldand (Dragon Age: Origins) and Isabela the pirate captain and Varric the ground dwarf from Dragon Age II. Alistair is forced to work with the two rogues in his quest to find his father, and the first step is to raid the archives of The Crows for information. This quickly sets him on the course of his adventure, where he chased by The C My very first graphic novel review! Where do I begin? Dragon Age: The Silent Grove is set after the Fifth Blight (Dragon Age I) and follows Alistair, king of Fereldand (Dragon Age: Origins) and Isabela the pirate captain and Varric the ground dwarf from Dragon Age II. Alistair is forced to work with the two rogues in his quest to find his father, and the first step is to raid the archives of The Crows for information. This quickly sets him on the course of his adventure, where he chased by The Crows, runs into witches and dragons, and has to be rescued a few times by his companions. This graphic novel is both dark and full of action, both qualities which are highlighted in the superb illustrations it features. The dialogue is clear and easy to follow, although some of the humour doesn't transfer across in print, like it does in the games. My favourite parts are easily the encounters with the Witch of the Wilds and her magnificent dragon (which looks damn scary!) - she is a feisty character who I ended up liking a little. This print edition Dragon Age comics is a must have for fans of the game - hopefully it will tide us over until the release of Dragon Age III! You can preview it on the Dark Horse Comics site. You can read more of my reviews at Speculating on SpecFic .

  8. 5 out of 5

    Anzu The Great Destroyer

    Ohkay. Dragon Age: The Silent Grove. Another video game inspired graphic novel. I can’t say that I hate the idea of reading more about a game I enjoyed playing but most of the time the stories end up disappointing me. In Dragon Age: The Silent Grove we follow the footsteps of Alistair who is to become King of Ferelden. Alistair used to be my love interest in the game (yes, I was desperate) so it’s funny to see him being all badass when, in truth, he’s just a little insecure man. I never liked hi Ohkay. Dragon Age: The Silent Grove. Another video game inspired graphic novel. I can’t say that I hate the idea of reading more about a game I enjoyed playing but most of the time the stories end up disappointing me. In Dragon Age: The Silent Grove we follow the footsteps of Alistair who is to become King of Ferelden. Alistair used to be my love interest in the game (yes, I was desperate) so it’s funny to see him being all badass when, in truth, he’s just a little insecure man. I never liked his character, to tell you the truth. And having the story revolve around him… well, you can imagine. Not impressed. I had some technical, if you can call them that, problems. Because of the images having a small resolution, the text is very difficult to read. Zooming in is a nightmare. I always have this type of problems when it comes to graphic novel ARCs and because of this I’m actually thinking of giving up the process of requesting and reviewing ARC graphic novels. ARC courtesy of Dark Horse Comics via NetGalley

  9. 4 out of 5

    Joeanne

    Interesting. The plot and art were just fine and I loved meeting Yavana. What I didn't love was the whitewashing, the coloring was OFF. The writing was a little boring and Alistair didn't feel very Alistair-y (guess it's because he's got the morbs at the moment), but Varric and Isabela were spot on. Also didn't like the (verbal and literal) beating up on Isabela, she got more injuries than the others combined. At a certain point (in a very particular panel) it just seemed like someones fetish hm Interesting. The plot and art were just fine and I loved meeting Yavana. What I didn't love was the whitewashing, the coloring was OFF. The writing was a little boring and Alistair didn't feel very Alistair-y (guess it's because he's got the morbs at the moment), but Varric and Isabela were spot on. Also didn't like the (verbal and literal) beating up on Isabela, she got more injuries than the others combined. At a certain point (in a very particular panel) it just seemed like someones fetish hm. It's a comic... so I know women are gonna be objectified unfortunately and I appreciate a sexy woman myself, but c'mon there's a limit. A more technical problem is the paneling. Some pages were really hard to figure out and that is a huge comics no-no. Seems like I'm complaining a lot, so why 3 stars at all? I love Dragon Age and this comic was fun despite my misgivings. Varric and Isabela have a great rapport (that hopefully Alistair gets in on in the next issues) and it's fun to see them all together on another adventure without the Warden or Hawke. The new things learned about Thedas from this issue alone are fascinating as well.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ash

    I’m a sucker for rogue characters.

  11. 5 out of 5

    TheTick

    The Silent Grove is graphic novel set in the Dragon Age universe, written by the same man who was the main writer of the games, David Gaider, along with Alexander Freed and Chad Hardin. If you've read this site at all, you know I loved Dragon Age: Origins and it's related content, and came around on Dragon Age 2 in the end. What's being reviewed here is the collection of six comics previously only available via the Dark Horse comics store. The story follows Alistair, King of Ferelden in the conti The Silent Grove is graphic novel set in the Dragon Age universe, written by the same man who was the main writer of the games, David Gaider, along with Alexander Freed and Chad Hardin. If you've read this site at all, you know I loved Dragon Age: Origins and it's related content, and came around on Dragon Age 2 in the end. What's being reviewed here is the collection of six comics previously only available via the Dark Horse comics store. The story follows Alistair, King of Ferelden in the continuity that exists for these comics and novels, as he searches for a secret hidden within Antiva. Along with Alistair are Isabela the pirate vixen, and Varric Tethras (with Bianca, of course). Unlikely companions for a king, as he himself points out, but his search is a personal one, not an official kingly one, so it fits. I like Varric and Isabela, so they work for me on that level as well. Along the way you find out more about the Witches of the Wilds, dragons, and the power of blood. The plot lingers a bit too long in places, and it's tough to get the right sense of humor invoked - I don't think the same jokes work in print as they do when you hear Isabela's mocking tone or Varric's smooth delivery. Because of that, The Silent Grove feels more serious. Not a bad thing, as it's definitely got some serious plots, but if you're looking for party banter, there isn't much here. Alistair is a bit of a sourpuss here. The art style is dark and a bit too busy for my tastes, having grown up on the brighter comics of the 80s and 90s before they started going heavy on shading faces and looking more realistic. All in all, it's a solid read if you are a fan of the Dragon Age universe, and enjoy comics. It helps if you like Alistair and want to know more about him. Bump it up to four stars if that's the case.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Melinda Landry

    I have to start off my review openly handing you the salt shaker, should you need a grain or two. I am not only a huge fan of Bioware and the writer (David Gaider), but of the specific characters chosen for this tale. This could have been the story of recently deceased Grey Warden Alistair riding a bog unicorn through the rainbow clouds of the Free Marches, en route to deliver Varric cake to the Anderfels, and I would have salivated. That said - this was an incredible start to the continuation of I have to start off my review openly handing you the salt shaker, should you need a grain or two. I am not only a huge fan of Bioware and the writer (David Gaider), but of the specific characters chosen for this tale. This could have been the story of recently deceased Grey Warden Alistair riding a bog unicorn through the rainbow clouds of the Free Marches, en route to deliver Varric cake to the Anderfels, and I would have salivated. That said - this was an incredible start to the continuation of Alistair's story. Through "The Silent Grove," we join King Alistair (et al) as he begins his mission to find his presumably deceased father, Maric. He's joined forces with two of our favorite rogues, Isabela and Varric, who serve not only as advisors in his journey, but kick-butt allies. The three make a stellar party, as witticisms, gall, and pure power often combine well. When reading this comic, it's important to see it as what clearly is - the extension of a story, possibly meant to fill the holes and time between Dragon Age II and the upcoming Dragon Age: Inquisition. Just about all of our known characters go missing sometime after the latter story concludes. Now we have at least a small idea of what they were up to! More importantly, some mysteries get solved. For one, the importance of the one dubbed "the Old God Baby" is brought into a better life. The "Witch of the Wilds" is found in a new (and possibly mind-blowing) way, and we begin to better understand the fate of King Maric, the Savior. The art style is cool and cutting, the writing is superb, and the story is one we need to hear. Check it out! Dragon Age fans will NOT be disappointed.

  13. 4 out of 5

    archdandy

    I received a copy of this through netgalley to review. The story is written in part by David Gaider who was the main writer for both Dragon Age: Origins and Dragon Age II and I think that helped a lot with how much I liked this graphic novel. It also helps that I am a huge Alistair fan (yes, I know, not many of us out there) and the plot revolves around him, so we get to learn a little more about him. I loved the witty banter between Isabela and Varric, that is one of my favorite parts about Dra I received a copy of this through netgalley to review. The story is written in part by David Gaider who was the main writer for both Dragon Age: Origins and Dragon Age II and I think that helped a lot with how much I liked this graphic novel. It also helps that I am a huge Alistair fan (yes, I know, not many of us out there) and the plot revolves around him, so we get to learn a little more about him. I loved the witty banter between Isabela and Varric, that is one of my favorite parts about Dragon Age II. The jokes may not come across as smoothly as they do in the video games because its hard to get the right intonation and characteristics for the lines the first time reading them in my head, but it was still easy enough to imagine the characters saying those things. One of the things I was sad to see is that Alistair seems to have hardened in the ten years between DA:O's plot and this plot. It makes sense I suppose as he has been a king for ten years and has had to shoulder a lot more responsibility. Although Gaider does keep many of Alistairs signature characteristics (his insecurities etc.) the innocence and humor that I loved about him were a little scarce. I will definitely be reading more in this series and I can't wait to see more of my favorite characters! Hopefully we will get to see how Alistair met Isabela (other than the brief encounter in DA II).

  14. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

    I received this as an ARC through Dark Horse Comics from netgalley.com. Pretty quick read. It's only 83 pages long. It took me a little while to get into it. I read the description and my first thought was immediately, "but Alistair wouldn't galavant around with Isabela and Varric --- especially not after defeating The Blight". I love Dragon Age: Origins (and Alistair) so I had to overlook this detail and read it anyway. (No, I do not like Dragon Age 2.) My thoughts were confirmed in the first coup I received this as an ARC through Dark Horse Comics from netgalley.com. Pretty quick read. It's only 83 pages long. It took me a little while to get into it. I read the description and my first thought was immediately, "but Alistair wouldn't galavant around with Isabela and Varric --- especially not after defeating The Blight". I love Dragon Age: Origins (and Alistair) so I had to overlook this detail and read it anyway. (No, I do not like Dragon Age 2.) My thoughts were confirmed in the first couple of pages when Alistair narrates to himself that he shouldn't be where he is alone, but especially not with those two. Despite my apprehensions, it does work. It's slow in a couple of places. If you've read The Stolen Throne, it follows a similar format, just with fewer pages and a lot more pictures. However, if you're reading this, you're more then likely reading it because you're already familiar with the characters, not because it's new to you. It's definitely worth a look if you're a fan of the games because in the parts where it's good - it's very good. I can't wait to get my hands on the next volume(s?) to find out what has become of Maric.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Brendan

    Being a fan of the game I have sourced alternative stories in between the games. This is a good little story with Alister and the grand storyteller himself, Varric. They are attempting to find out what happened to Alistairs father and throwing themselves into an adventure of their own. The story is interesting but for those outside the lore will struggle with the backstory. The story isn't grand and is basically setting up for bigger things. As a fan it covers some interesting ground.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ashly

    The art style isn't quite appealing, and it is not that much fun to read a storyline that conflicts with the world state you've created in the games. Overall, meh.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Anirudh

    I enjoyed the artwork but not sure what the story is about at this moment

  18. 4 out of 5

    Abhinav

    Shadowhawk reviews the graphic novel sequel to Bioware’s Dragon Age games, a new narrative penned by David Gaider and published by Dark Horse Comics. “Quite a mystery thriller set in the world of Ferelden, Dragon Age – The Silent Grove offers a lot of intrigue, swordplay, double-crossing and subterfuge but does not quite go the whole distance.” ~The Founding Fields Note: After writing the review I randomly found myself on the Dragon Age wiki and found that Ferelden isn’t the name of the world in t Shadowhawk reviews the graphic novel sequel to Bioware’s Dragon Age games, a new narrative penned by David Gaider and published by Dark Horse Comics. “Quite a mystery thriller set in the world of Ferelden, Dragon Age – The Silent Grove offers a lot of intrigue, swordplay, double-crossing and subterfuge but does not quite go the whole distance.” ~The Founding Fields Note: After writing the review I randomly found myself on the Dragon Age wiki and found that Ferelden isn’t the name of the world in the setting but one of the continents. The review inaccurately presumes that it is. Please ignore that misconception! Just as with Matt Forbeck’s Magic: The Gathering comics, David Gaider’s Dragon Age – The Silent Grove exposed me to a setting that I had no previous experience with, but by the time I was done with it, I wanted to explore more and more. Its funny how things work out that way. I’d heard about the Dragon Age games for ages but had never had a chance to get acquainted with them. Seeing the collected six issues of The Silent Grove on NetGalley was therefore a great chance to take that first step. I have to say, based on this first exposure, that I really like the setting of Dragon Age and the world of Ferelden. Conceptually and in terms of the atmosphere created by the writer and the various artists, I’m quite reminded of the Dragonlance novels by Tracy Hickman and Margaret Weis. The Dragonlance novels were my first real exposure to the wider world of speculative fiction, coming just ahead of me picking up my first Black Library novels. As such, I have a great fondness for those novels and for the world of Krynn which holds an endless fascination for me. Ferelden is every bit just as interesting as Krynn! In terms of the narrative, The Silent Grove is written quite well with some really interesting characters. However, it doesn’t quite go that whole distance. Some of the twists and turns appear to be tacked on for the benefit of filling up the page requirement, and not necessarily because they were the demand of the narrative itself. As such, the graphic novel wasn’t as enjoyable as I thought it would be. Nevertheless there are a lot of factors that still made me want to go on and get to the end of the story to see how things play out. You can find the full review over at The Founding Fields: http://thefoundingfields.com/2012/06/... Merged review: Shadowhawk reviews the graphic novel sequel to Bioware’s Dragon Age games, a new narrative penned by David Gaider and published by Dark Horse Comics. “Quite a mystery thriller set in the world of Ferelden, Dragon Age – The Silent Grove offers a lot of intrigue, swordplay, double-crossing and subterfuge but does not quite go the whole distance.” ~The Founding Fields Note: After writing the review I randomly found myself on the Dragon Age wiki and found that Ferelden isn’t the name of the world in the setting but one of the continents. The review inaccurately presumes that it is. Please ignore that misconception! Just as with Matt Forbeck’s Magic: The Gathering comics, David Gaider’s Dragon Age – The Silent Grove exposed me to a setting that I had no previous experience with, but by the time I was done with it, I wanted to explore more and more. Its funny how things work out that way. I’d heard about the Dragon Age games for ages but had never had a chance to get acquainted with them. Seeing the collected six issues of The Silent Grove on NetGalley was therefore a great chance to take that first step. I have to say, based on this first exposure, that I really like the setting of Dragon Age and the world of Ferelden. Conceptually and in terms of the atmosphere created by the writer and the various artists, I’m quite reminded of the Dragonlance novels by Tracy Hickman and Margaret Weis. The Dragonlance novels were my first real exposure to the wider world of speculative fiction, coming just ahead of me picking up my first Black Library novels. As such, I have a great fondness for those novels and for the world of Krynn which holds an endless fascination for me. Ferelden is every bit just as interesting as Krynn! In terms of the narrative, The Silent Grove is written quite well with some really interesting characters. However, it doesn’t quite go that whole distance. Some of the twists and turns appear to be tacked on for the benefit of filling up the page requirement, and not necessarily because they were the demand of the narrative itself. As such, the graphic novel wasn’t as enjoyable as I thought it would be. Nevertheless there are a lot of factors that still made me want to go on and get to the end of the story to see how things play out. You can find the full review over at The Founding Fields: http://thefoundingfields.com/2012/06/... Merged review: Shadowhawk reviews the graphic novel sequel to Bioware’s Dragon Age games, a new narrative penned by David Gaider and published by Dark Horse Comics. “Quite a mystery thriller set in the world of Ferelden, Dragon Age – The Silent Grove offers a lot of intrigue, swordplay, double-crossing and subterfuge but does not quite go the whole distance.” ~The Founding Fields Note: After writing the review I randomly found myself on the Dragon Age wiki and found that Ferelden isn’t the name of the world in the setting but one of the continents. The review inaccurately presumes that it is. Please ignore that misconception! Just as with Matt Forbeck’s Magic: The Gathering comics, David Gaider’s Dragon Age – The Silent Grove exposed me to a setting that I had no previous experience with, but by the time I was done with it, I wanted to explore more and more. Its funny how things work out that way. I’d heard about the Dragon Age games for ages but had never had a chance to get acquainted with them. Seeing the collected six issues of The Silent Grove on NetGalley was therefore a great chance to take that first step. I have to say, based on this first exposure, that I really like the setting of Dragon Age and the world of Ferelden. Conceptually and in terms of the atmosphere created by the writer and the various artists, I’m quite reminded of the Dragonlance novels by Tracy Hickman and Margaret Weis. The Dragonlance novels were my first real exposure to the wider world of speculative fiction, coming just ahead of me picking up my first Black Library novels. As such, I have a great fondness for those novels and for the world of Krynn which holds an endless fascination for me. Ferelden is every bit just as interesting as Krynn! In terms of the narrative, The Silent Grove is written quite well with some really interesting characters. However, it doesn’t quite go that whole distance. Some of the twists and turns appear to be tacked on for the benefit of filling up the page requirement, and not necessarily because they were the demand of the narrative itself. As such, the graphic novel wasn’t as enjoyable as I thought it would be. Nevertheless there are a lot of factors that still made me want to go on and get to the end of the story to see how things play out. You can find the full review over at The Founding Fields: http://thefoundingfields.com/2012/06/... Merged review: Shadowhawk reviews the graphic novel sequel to Bioware’s Dragon Age games, a new narrative penned by David Gaider and published by Dark Horse Comics. “Quite a mystery thriller set in the world of Ferelden, Dragon Age – The Silent Grove offers a lot of intrigue, swordplay, double-crossing and subterfuge but does not quite go the whole distance.” ~The Founding Fields Note: After writing the review I randomly found myself on the Dragon Age wiki and found that Ferelden isn’t the name of the world in the setting but one of the continents. The review inaccurately presumes that it is. Please ignore that misconception! Just as with Matt Forbeck’s Magic: The Gathering comics, David Gaider’s Dragon Age – The Silent Grove exposed me to a setting that I had no previous experience with, but by the time I was done with it, I wanted to explore more and more. Its funny how things work out that way. I’d heard about the Dragon Age games for ages but had never had a chance to get acquainted with them. Seeing the collected six issues of The Silent Grove on NetGalley was therefore a great chance to take that first step. I have to say, based on this first exposure, that I really like the setting of Dragon Age and the world of Ferelden. Conceptually and in terms of the atmosphere created by the writer and the various artists, I’m quite reminded of the Dragonlance novels by Tracy Hickman and Margaret Weis. The Dragonlance novels were my first real exposure to the wider world of speculative fiction, coming just ahead of me picking up my first Black Library novels. As such, I have a great fondness for those novels and for the world of Krynn which holds an endless fascination for me. Ferelden is every bit just as interesting as Krynn! In terms of the narrative, The Silent Grove is written quite well with some really interesting characters. However, it doesn’t quite go that whole distance. Some of the twists and turns appear to be tacked on for the benefit of filling up the page requirement, and not necessarily because they were the demand of the narrative itself. As such, the graphic novel wasn’t as enjoyable as I thought it would be. Nevertheless there are a lot of factors that still made me want to go on and get to the end of the story to see how things play out. You can find the full review over at The Founding Fields: http://thefoundingfields.com/2012/06/... Merged review: Shadowhawk reviews the graphic novel sequel to Bioware’s Dragon Age games, a new narrative penned by David Gaider and published by Dark Horse Comics. “Quite a mystery thriller set in the world of Ferelden, Dragon Age – The Silent Grove offers a lot of intrigue, swordplay, double-crossing and subterfuge but does not quite go the whole distance.” ~The Founding Fields Note: After writing the review I randomly found myself on the Dragon Age wiki and found that Ferelden isn’t the name of the world in the setting but one of the continents. The review inaccurately presumes that it is. Please ignore that misconception! Just as with Matt Forbeck’s Magic: The Gathering comics, David Gaider’s Dragon Age – The Silent Grove exposed me to a setting that I had no previous experience with, but by the time I was done with it, I wanted to explore more and more. Its funny how things work out that way. I’d heard about the Dragon Age games for ages but had never had a chance to get acquainted with them. Seeing the collected six issues of The Silent Grove on NetGalley was therefore a great chance to take that first step. I have to say, based on this first exposure, that I really like the setting of Dragon Age and the world of Ferelden. Conceptually and in terms of the atmosphere created by the writer and the various artists, I’m quite reminded of the Dragonlance novels by Tracy Hickman and Margaret Weis. The Dragonlance novels were my first real exposure to the wider world of speculative fiction, coming just ahead of me picking up my first Black Library novels. As such, I have a great fondness for those novels and for the world of Krynn which holds an endless fascination for me. Ferelden is every bit just as interesting as Krynn! In terms of the narrative, The Silent Grove is written quite well with some really interesting characters. However, it doesn’t quite go that whole distance. Some of the twists and turns appear to be tacked on for the benefit of filling up the page requirement, and not necessarily because they were the demand of the narrative itself. As such, the graphic novel wasn’t as enjoyable as I thought it would be. Nevertheless there are a lot of factors that still made me want to go on and get to the end of the story to see how things play out. You can find the full review over at The Founding Fields: http://thefoundingfields.com/2012/06/... Merged review: Shadowhawk reviews the graphic novel sequel to Bioware’s Dragon Age games, a new narrative penned by David Gaider and published by Dark Horse Comics. “Quite a mystery thriller set in the world of Ferelden, Dragon Age – The Silent Grove offers a lot of intrigue, swordplay, double-crossing and subterfuge but does not quite go the whole distance.” ~The Founding Fields Note: After writing the review I randomly found myself on the Dragon Age wiki and found that Ferelden isn’t the name of the world in the setting but one of the continents. The review inaccurately presumes that it is. Please ignore that misconception! Just as with Matt Forbeck’s Magic: The Gathering comics, David Gaider’s Dragon Age – The Silent Grove exposed me to a setting that I had no previous experience with, but by the time I was done with it, I wanted to explore more and more. Its funny how things work out that way. I’d heard about the Dragon Age games for ages but had never had a chance to get acquainted with them. Seeing the collected six issues of The Silent Grove on NetGalley was therefore a great chance to take that first step. I have to say, based on this first exposure, that I really like the setting of Dragon Age and the world of Ferelden. Conceptually and in terms of the atmosphere created by the writer and the various artists, I’m quite reminded of the Dragonlance novels by Tracy Hickman and Margaret Weis. The Dragonlance novels were my first real exposure to the wider world of speculative fiction, coming just ahead of me picking up my first Black Library novels. As such, I have a great fondness for those novels and for the world of Krynn which holds an endless fascination for me. Ferelden is every bit just as interesting as Krynn! In terms of the narrative, The Silent Grove is written quite well with some really interesting characters. However, it doesn’t quite go that whole distance. Some of the twists and turns appear to be tacked on for the benefit of filling up the page requirement, and not necessarily because they were the demand of the narrative itself. As such, the graphic novel wasn’t as enjoyable as I thought it would be. Nevertheless there are a lot of factors that still made me want to go on and get to the end of the story to see how things play out. You can find the full review over at The Founding Fields: http://thefoundingfields.com/2012/06/... Merged review: Shadowhawk reviews the graphic novel sequel to Bioware’s Dragon Age games, a new narrative penned by David Gaider and published by Dark Horse Comics. “Quite a mystery thriller set in the world of Ferelden, Dragon Age – The Silent Grove offers a lot of intrigue, swordplay, double-crossing and subterfuge but does not quite go the whole distance.” ~The Founding Fields Note: After writing the review I randomly found myself on the Dragon Age wiki and found that Ferelden isn’t the name of the world in the setting but one of the continents. The review inaccurately presumes that it is. Please ignore that misconception! Just as with Matt Forbeck’s Magic: The Gathering comics, David Gaider’s Dragon Age – The Silent Grove exposed me to a setting that I had no previous experience with, but by the time I was done with it, I wanted to explore more and more. Its funny how things work out that way. I’d heard about the Dragon Age games for ages but had never had a chance to get acquainted with them. Seeing the collected six issues of The Silent Grove on NetGalley was therefore a great chance to take that first step. I have to say, based on this first exposure, that I really like the setting of Dragon Age and the world of Ferelden. Conceptually and in terms of the atmosphere created by the writer and the various artists, I’m quite reminded of the Dragonlance novels by Tracy Hickman and Margaret Weis. The Dragonlance novels were my first real exposure to the wider world of speculative fiction, coming just ahead of me picking up my first Black Library novels. As such, I have a great fondness for those novels and for the world of Krynn which holds an endless fascination for me. Ferelden is every bit just as interesting as Krynn! In terms of the narrative, The Silent Grove is written quite well with some really interesting characters. However, it doesn’t quite go that whole distance. Some of the twists and turns appear to be tacked on for the benefit of filling up the page requirement, and not necessarily because they were the demand of the narrative itself. As such, the graphic novel wasn’t as enjoyable as I thought it would be. Nevertheless there are a lot of factors that still made me want to go on and get to the end of the story to see how things play out. You can find the full review over at The Founding Fields: http://thefoundingfields.com/2012/06/...

  19. 4 out of 5

    Steve Stivaktis

    An extremely in-character and interesting adventure with brilliant artwork to match.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Cassandra Fay

    All of the stars!! Ambassador for the cult of DA. I'm so biased towards Dragon Age, it's not even funny. I love it all so much, and I love Alistair, and Varric, and especially Isabella, my hot pirate gf. Need that DA lore 24/7 I'm still playing Dragon Age 3, 5 years later & I'll continue to play until DA:4 comes out. If there's more DA media to be consumed, please direct me. I've bought all the novels and I'm starting those soon too 😇.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Lakis Fourouklas

    Dragon Age: The Silent Grove is one of those graphic novels that take the reader on a long but beautiful journey into the not so bright worlds of the creators’ imagination. In this dark tale one can find just about everything, apart from romance, but maybe that’s to come in a future volume. This is the story of King Alistair, an unwilling King, and his quest to discover the whereabouts of his missing father, King Maric. Alistair never wanted to be a king, he wasn’t supposed to be one either and he Dragon Age: The Silent Grove is one of those graphic novels that take the reader on a long but beautiful journey into the not so bright worlds of the creators’ imagination. In this dark tale one can find just about everything, apart from romance, but maybe that’s to come in a future volume. This is the story of King Alistair, an unwilling King, and his quest to discover the whereabouts of his missing father, King Maric. Alistair never wanted to be a king, he wasn’t supposed to be one either and he: “never asked for an easy life – fruit every morning, servants cleaning my feet, bedclothes free from crawling things. I certainly wasn’t raised to expect it.” Why not? Because his mother was nothing but a servant. As for the rightful heir to the throne, King Cailan, he died a decade ago. But can a reluctant king be a good king? Well, perhaps he can, since for the past few years his homeland, the nation of Fereldin had known an unprecedented period of stability and prosperity. That, however, was not enough to make Alistair happy. And now, for the first time in years, he may at last have a chance to set things straight, for one and for all, as he receives some information about his father. In order to find out more he has to travel to the northern port city of Antiva. Instead of ordering an army to follow in his footsteps, or take along some faithful soldiers, he decides to hire a ferocious and beautiful woman that goes by the name Isabela, who’s a pirate, and her traveling companion, the dwarf Varric Tethras, to accompany him. Antiva though is not going to be their final destination, since once there they receive yet another piece of info, by Prince Claudio Valisti, a man with an agenda, that will first lead them to Velabanchel prison and then forwards to the Silent Grove, an enchanted place, where they are destined to meet Yavana, the Witch of the Wilds, and confront their worst foes and fears. During the long journey the authors and the illustrator, do a great job in describing to the reader how Alistair, the center of this special universe, feels at any given moment, and what one sees is a sad man. What can he do to get over his melancholia? Is it possible for him to embrace his destiny? Can he depend on anyone else but himself? And can he remain true to his purpose from beginning to end? This is a story of quite a few twists and turns that keep it going unperturbed from the first page to the very last. The passions of the protagonists come alive on the page, through wonderful words and beautifully drawn images, which make us empathize with them. And if there’s a message in here it’s this one: people can sometimes pleasantly surprise you, as they, for better or for worse, surprise Alistair. If you love fantasy you will love this graphic novel.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Cayt Landis

    Dragon Age: The Silent Grove is the first volume of the Dragon Age graphic novels, written by David Gader, lead writer for the Dragon Age video games. This particular story follows King Alistair as he, along with Isabela and Varric, attempt to discover the answers to a mystery involving magic, The Crows, and the past King of Ferelden. The story is canonical and adds to the lore of the Dragon Age universe. The Plot I really love Dragon Age and the entire universe surrounding it. I read all of the Dragon Age: The Silent Grove is the first volume of the Dragon Age graphic novels, written by David Gader, lead writer for the Dragon Age video games. This particular story follows King Alistair as he, along with Isabela and Varric, attempt to discover the answers to a mystery involving magic, The Crows, and the past King of Ferelden. The story is canonical and adds to the lore of the Dragon Age universe. The Plot I really love Dragon Age and the entire universe surrounding it. I read all of the codex entries in all of the games. The plot was interesting in that it added to the background of the world and the characters that I love. There was a lot of intrigue and action going, with mystery and assassination attempts. Some old characters pop up and that's a nice addition. The story, however, didn't really draw my interest as much as I would have liked. Perhaps because I'm used to being the protagonist in a Dragon Age story, I didn't feel as involved or invested in this storyline as I do in the games. The Artwork The artwork is in full color and is really pleasing. I loved seeing all of my favorite characters in illustrations that really stayed truthful to their look and feel. The images are dynamic and the color scheme is rich. I enjoy looking at each frame and they really convey the emotion and the action that is going on. I enjoy the art style though it is different from both the art of Dragon Age: Origins and the other two games as well, each of which have their own aesthetic to begin with. The X-Factor The best part of this comic is the fact that it's Dragon Age! I love Dragon Age. The series is my favorite set of games of all time and I have replayed them countless times. I'm a sucker for anything in the Dragon Age universe and I appreciate getting a new story from David Gaider, someone who really knows what he's doing when it comes to writing about Thedas, Alistair, etc. I love having the canon expanded. The more the better! The Verdict I enjoyed this comic and I would recommend it to anyone who loves the game series. If you haven't played the games or read the novels, I would suggest holding off on reading the graphic novel. I don't believe that the story would be as interesting or even make as much sense if you didn't have a background in the world of Dragon Age. But everyone should play the games at least once, so pick this up either way! Visit Vicarious Caytastrophe for this review and many more!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Donna

    I'm falling more and more in love with comics the more I read them. This is such a great introduction to this whole world and it's left me feigning for more. Between the artwork and the snark I really couldn't get enough of it. It's a fully realized world that gives me everything I'm looking for in a fantasy (kind of like Gaider tapped into my head and pulled out my fantasy needs) without overdoing it. There's magic and sorcery and dragons and villains and damaged heros and anti-heros but none of I'm falling more and more in love with comics the more I read them. This is such a great introduction to this whole world and it's left me feigning for more. Between the artwork and the snark I really couldn't get enough of it. It's a fully realized world that gives me everything I'm looking for in a fantasy (kind of like Gaider tapped into my head and pulled out my fantasy needs) without overdoing it. There's magic and sorcery and dragons and villains and damaged heros and anti-heros but none of it seems overdone. Unlike some fantasy it's not trying too hard at all. In fact it's barely trying because it really doesn't have to. The world feels effortless. From the beginning I'm in the middle of it, I believe in it and it keeps me reading. The three main character are all absolutely amazing. Alistair is a total snarker which, for a king in fantasy, at least in my experience, is a no-go. An unserious king? No way. Way, Ted! It's like if Simon Pegg wrote a fantasy this would be it. Alistair knows what he needs to do and tries his damndest to get it done but holy shit if things don't get in his way. He emotes a little, cracks jokes to himself and then sets back out again barely feeling set back but maybe just a little. Isabela is a total hardass chick that I'd like to get to know more about. She's a pirate, captain of her own ship and damn it all if she doesn't remind you about her fists of glory and the fact that she can nail you to a wall. But she's not so tough as to be obnoxious.She falls a few times and while she's not the kind of person to constantly take help she knows when she needs it and begrudgingly accepts. She's also one to readily offer her help. For a price, of course. And Varric? The snark-master dwarf? I don't know how you have comedic relief in something that's kind of a comedy already but Varric is it. The quips he kept coming out with had me laughing out loud. Literally. Here's some snarkxamples (snamples?) - 06/09 page 79 96.0% ""My name is Alistair Theirin and I'm king of Ferelden. Long live the king, long may he reign! And so forth. Pray to the maker he doesn't do something stupid…"" 06/09 page 68 83.0% ""Evidently we're going to ask Claudio how it feels to be stabbed in the chest."" 06/09 page 39 48.0% ""That sound is coming closer." "What do we do?" "Brown our trousers."" One is Alistair, two is Isabela and three is Varric. I need more DRAGON AGE. Sooner rather than later. Like fantasy? Like humor? Like a story that doesn't take itself too seriously? DRAGON AGE. Now.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Diayll

    Originally Reviewed at:Mother/Gamer/Writer Rating: 4.5 out of 5 Controllers Review Source:NetGalley Reviewer:Me I have been waiting on this one! Dragon Age Volume 1: The Silent Grove is definitely a graphic novel for fans of the game, Dragon Age:Origins and Dragon Age II. We see the return of Alistair who is our main character, on a quest to find his missing father Maric. Along beside him for the journey are Isabela, who you may recall is a thief and the captain of the pirate ship, The Siren’s Call. Originally Reviewed at:Mother/Gamer/Writer Rating: 4.5 out of 5 Controllers Review Source:NetGalley Reviewer:Me I have been waiting on this one! Dragon Age Volume 1: The Silent Grove is definitely a graphic novel for fans of the game, Dragon Age:Origins and Dragon Age II. We see the return of Alistair who is our main character, on a quest to find his missing father Maric. Along beside him for the journey are Isabela, who you may recall is a thief and the captain of the pirate ship, The Siren’s Call. Also we have Varric, the surface dwarf who narrates the story of Dragon Age II. So yes fans, we have an eclectic bunch who have banded together by necessity to find Alistair’s missing father. Being a fan of both video games, my expectations for this graphic novel were extremely high. Thank goodness I wasn’t disappointed! I was able to quickly immerse myself back into the world of Ferelden, a land that has been recovering from the Fifth Blight and a grave civil war. We are immediately thrown into the action as our characters meet one another to get acquainted before embarking on their first mission, raiding the archives of The Crows. From here on out, the story is filled with angst as we watch our character be betrayed, discover hidden secrets, and encounter The Witch of the Wilds. I was captivated and enjoyed every single minute of the non-stop action. Art wise, I liked the illustrations, though I do believe the characters looked a little more cartoonish than Dragon Age style. It wasn’t a huge issue, but I can see it throwing some fans of the series off. The mystery surrounding Alistair’s father was very intriguing and eluded to several possibilities in the upcoming continuation. I loved seeing The Witch of Wilds, Yavana. We also get a few references to her infamous mother and sister, Flemeth and Morrigan who are both heavily present in the games. And of course you can’t have Dragon Age without DRAGONS! So yup, you will see those too! Overall, this is definitely a graphic novel for fans of the series who want to immerse themselves deeper into the world. If you are not a gamer but still enjoy graphic novels with an exciting storyline and over-the-top characters, then please go and pick this one up!

  25. 4 out of 5

    João Jorge

    The best I can say about “The Silent Grove” is also the worst. Its decent. Its a safe comic, that doesn't take any risks and satisfies any “Dragon Age” fan without ever being or even trying to be anything more than average. The art is good enough, shining especially in the details in the armors, Isabela's attire and Varrics Bianca but with no moment of brilliance or any really amazing pages to stick in your mind. The story deals with Alistair and Maric and has huge lore potential but things alwa The best I can say about “The Silent Grove” is also the worst. Its decent. Its a safe comic, that doesn't take any risks and satisfies any “Dragon Age” fan without ever being or even trying to be anything more than average. The art is good enough, shining especially in the details in the armors, Isabela's attire and Varric´s Bianca but with no moment of brilliance or any really amazing pages to stick in your mind. The story deals with Alistair and Maric and has huge lore potential but things always seem by the numbers, tepid, with no real flair or charm. I found the script surprisingly flat, with Alistair in a perpetual brooding state of mind, without any of his famous humor. Isabela seemed to lack her wit and naughtiness and Varric... well Varric was just there with no real function in the plot and more as fan service than anything else. There are a few funny moments, some lines relating to the games and a few well drawn fights but it all seemed to lack energy and excitement. Of course I still loved the comic but that´s because i´m a huge “Dragon Age” nut and just seeing Antiva makes giggle like a little girl. But even for fans I thought there was something almost unforgivable about “The Silent Grove” and it was its portrayal of the “Antivan Crows”. The most deadly assassins in all of Thedas are used as nothing more than cannon fodder and represented as incompetent fools, lowly henchman who pose little or no threat. This was just a horrible representation of something the games have been hyping as an organization more feared than even a powerful army. This is just the start of what promises, and has the potential, to be an epic quest and as a beginning I suppose it set up things rather nicely and made me hyped for the next volume. There´s nothing really wrong with it but there´s nothing really great either. For a hardcore fan, as I am, this is still highly recommended, especially if you've read David Gaider´s books and witnessed other adventures with King Maric. Its worth it for the lore alone and its a highly enjoyable quest. It just never really manages to achieve its potential.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Michelle (In Libris Veritas)

    Anyone who has ever played Dragon Age knows it’s one of those games with a lot of lore packed into it. I mean everywhere you go you uncover more history and it becomes world rich in history. It’s also one of those games that you want to see more about, especially if you actually read all of the lore like I do. So this graphic novel is the perfect place to find out more about it all, including some of your favorite characters from the games. As soon as I saw the cover I knew this would be somethin Anyone who has ever played Dragon Age knows it’s one of those games with a lot of lore packed into it. I mean everywhere you go you uncover more history and it becomes world rich in history. It’s also one of those games that you want to see more about, especially if you actually read all of the lore like I do. So this graphic novel is the perfect place to find out more about it all, including some of your favorite characters from the games. As soon as I saw the cover I knew this would be something worth reading, you have the three most sarcastic people of the DA universe traveling together. I will say that Varric and Isabela are a bit toned down in this so some of the things you would expect them to say are not quite what you get from the games, but they are still themselves. Alistar remains true to the character you’ve grown to know, he still worries about everything and he’s still rather pessimistic when it comes to his path. The story itself is rather interesting and really gives you a great glimpse at some of the things merely mentioned in the two games. We get to see Antiva, though it’s far from anything I pictured it’s still pretty cool to get a glimpse of it. I rather like the inclusion of some new dragon lore as well as the Witch of Wilds, and I’m rather curious as to what all will happen with Alistair after this book. The art is really dynamic and colorful, and really helped the story come to life. I’d say this is definitely for those who are a fan of the Dragon Age games, and not so much someone who is new to all of it. While it’s not vital to the story to know the games, it will certainly effect how you perceive this if you have no clue what’s being referenced to and you might enjoy it less. This hits shelves tomorrow so make sure to check it out if you visit the graphic novel section! I received this from Dark Horse and Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Cassandra

    --Review courtesy from Book & Movie Dimension a Blog-- Kings, dragons, villains, and some mysterious sorcerres are what are scattered in Dragon Age, Volume 1. King Alistar is trying to recover his long-lost father , King Maric, has been imprisoned in , Velabanchel Prison, a seeming horrible place to be. He uncovers to his surprise that has been taken instead by Yavaneth a dragon witch. King Maric has agreed to be spirited away though much to the confusion of King Alistar. Through a last ditch --Review courtesy from Book & Movie Dimension a Blog-- Kings, dragons, villains, and some mysterious sorcerres are what are scattered in Dragon Age, Volume 1. King Alistar is trying to recover his long-lost father , King Maric, has been imprisoned in , Velabanchel Prison, a seeming horrible place to be. He uncovers to his surprise that has been taken instead by Yavaneth a dragon witch. King Maric has agreed to be spirited away though much to the confusion of King Alistar. Through a last ditch effort enlists the help of Varric and Isabella. Varric a archer and guide. Isabella is on the other hand a skilled assassin it is assumed. Something worth mentioning for Dragon Age, Volume 1 is the abundance of humor and ridiculousness whenever Varric is involved. Some of his comments are just hugely entertaining. Even so, its underlined by a certain serious tone from King Alistar who sees his mission as an important crusade. Not many joking around from him. Dragon Age, Volume 1 so far sets up an interesting Fantasy world which we are still in the dark about thus far. The artwork has presence and favors the writing in good balance. Dragon Age, Volume 1 is for the type of people that like Dark Fantasy or elaborate quests in their graphic novels. Overall: Good read Comic/Graphic Novel

  28. 4 out of 5

    Charlotte

    I find it ridiculously difficult to rate Graphic Novels. What do you rate them on: the story, the dialogue, the art, all of the above? I'm never sure. I do know that this is my favourite GN of all time however, because I LOVE Dragon Age. In case you didn't already know that. I love the whole concept of the entire trilogy, everything about them is amazing. This book brings back Alistair, my favourite character from the video games. Of course. I'm a girl. I fell in love with him hook line and sinke I find it ridiculously difficult to rate Graphic Novels. What do you rate them on: the story, the dialogue, the art, all of the above? I'm never sure. I do know that this is my favourite GN of all time however, because I LOVE Dragon Age. In case you didn't already know that. I love the whole concept of the entire trilogy, everything about them is amazing. This book brings back Alistair, my favourite character from the video games. Of course. I'm a girl. I fell in love with him hook line and sinker. He was amazing, and he's just as kick ass in this graphic novel. It was also awesome to see Varric and Isabela in here as well, because I love both of them. This is set after the second game (which I've yet to finish, yikes) and I loved how it didn't spoil anything. There were also plenty of references to the games which was amazing, including MORRIGAN! The art was beautiful as well, so I really don't have anything to complain about. All of the characters had their wit from the games, they had their charms and they were depicted gorgeously. I only wish it was larger so that I could read more but as far as I'm aware there are two more volumes of this story and another, larger graphic novel. So woo!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Alicia

    I came into this at a disadvantage because I'd never played the video game or learned anything about the Dragon Age world before picking up this book. I enjoyed it, but I imagine I would have enjoyed it more had I been familiar with the world and the characters. I felt like I was thrown into a story somewhere around the midpoint. Alistair, a king and the main character, is on a quest to find his missing father. He's assisted by a pair of pirates, a fight-happy dwarf and a smart-mouthed lady thief I came into this at a disadvantage because I'd never played the video game or learned anything about the Dragon Age world before picking up this book. I enjoyed it, but I imagine I would have enjoyed it more had I been familiar with the world and the characters. I felt like I was thrown into a story somewhere around the midpoint. Alistair, a king and the main character, is on a quest to find his missing father. He's assisted by a pair of pirates, a fight-happy dwarf and a smart-mouthed lady thief. I got a good feel for all three of these characters' personalities, and I liked all of them. Their dialogue had a touch of humor throughout, which was fun. Even without having the background that many readers will have, I felt that the story line was engaging enough to keep my interest. The artwork was just lovely! Dynamic images that would have told a story even without the words. In fact, occasional pages didn't have any words, and the image frames themselves did the job of moving the plot forward just beautifully. The artwork had amazing lighting and appealing characters with a wide range of looks. For me, the artwork was the standout aspect of this book.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Eric Piotrowski

    I was skeptical about this title, only I had been browsing at the comics shop for 45 minutes (as we waited for our Thai food takeout) and I felt bad. I'm a huge fan of Dragon Age: Origins, so I decided to take a chance. I'm glad I did. The characters and storyline are intriguing enough, but what really stands out here in the artwork and the narrative skill. No panel is wasted, and -- true to BioWare's best efforts -- the locations and people are superbly crafted. We're back with some people we kn I was skeptical about this title, only I had been browsing at the comics shop for 45 minutes (as we waited for our Thai food takeout) and I felt bad. I'm a huge fan of Dragon Age: Origins, so I decided to take a chance. I'm glad I did. The characters and storyline are intriguing enough, but what really stands out here in the artwork and the narrative skill. No panel is wasted, and -- true to BioWare's best efforts -- the locations and people are superbly crafted. We're back with some people we know (one from DAO and two from DA2), and there are allusions aplenty; the more you remember from those games, the more fun you'll have with this book. The final act is a bit disappointing, similar as it is to the lore of Skyrim. Obviously Bethesda didn't invent dragons, and DA even has them in its name. But the conclusion feels so very overdone and tired, so I can't in good conscience give this five stars. Still, it's well worth your time and another fun romp through the environs of Ferelden.

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