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Arbeiten Sie Nie Härter Als Ihre Schüler Und Die Sechs Anderen Prinzipien Guten Unterrichts: [Mit Umfangreichem Werkzeugkasten Zum Download]

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Robyn R. Jackson explains how to develop a more fluid and automatic way to respond to students and to deliver great teaching every time. Find out how to get to the next stage of becoming a master teacher.


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Robyn R. Jackson explains how to develop a more fluid and automatic way to respond to students and to deliver great teaching every time. Find out how to get to the next stage of becoming a master teacher.

30 review for Arbeiten Sie Nie Härter Als Ihre Schüler Und Die Sechs Anderen Prinzipien Guten Unterrichts: [Mit Umfangreichem Werkzeugkasten Zum Download]

  1. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    I trudged through this book. It was truly a matter of soldiering on through. I read this book as part of a group study for school. I highlighted and commented for several chapers when I discovered that the book was on loan. Now I have to buy a new copy for the district. And I don't even like the book! I understand where the author is coming from. The problem is that I don't agree with her underlying philosophies. The title is Never Work Harder than Your Students but, on page 74 she I trudged through this book. It was truly a matter of soldiering on through. I read this book as part of a group study for school. I highlighted and commented for several chapers when I discovered that the book was on loan. Now I have to buy a new copy for the district. And I don't even like the book! I understand where the author is coming from. The problem is that I don't agree with her underlying philosophies. The title is Never Work Harder than Your Students but, on page 74 she talks about spending her summers re-writing her curriculum and planning for the upcoming year. Right there, she's already working harder than her students. I understand why she's doing it; I do it myself. But I felt cheated that she was so disingenous with her title. I agreed with her in chapter 2 about setting objectives. It's hard to distinguish between setting objectives and setting the activities we want students to do. I admit that setting learning goals and objectives are difficult tasks for me. I would like more training on them but at this point every new training I go to about setting objectives and learning goals tells me to emphasize something different. I'm confused about it. I guess I didn't get the clarification I was hoping for.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Carrie G

    “Never Work Harder Than Your Students” is just one of the seven “master teacher “principles outlined in this book by Dr. Robyn R. Jackson. The complete set of principles is: 1) Start where your students are. 2) Know where your students are going. 3) Expect to get your students to their goal. 4) Support your students along the way. 5) Use feedback to help you and your students get better. 6) Focus on quality rather than quantity.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ken

    Practical stuff of a more no-nonsense, conservative bent, but even for this liberal Rousseau-style teacher a lot of the points hit home. Jackson delineates seven principles that can turn you into a master teacher (though not overnight, trust me). Yes, there were a few holes and a few contradictions in her arguments, but overall it was an impressive kid- and learning-oriented display. The real treat is when she shares transcripts from presentations (on this very material) before teachers who shoo Practical stuff of a more no-nonsense, conservative bent, but even for this liberal Rousseau-style teacher a lot of the points hit home. Jackson delineates seven principles that can turn you into a master teacher (though not overnight, trust me). Yes, there were a few holes and a few contradictions in her arguments, but overall it was an impressive kid- and learning-oriented display. The real treat is when she shares transcripts from presentations (on this very material) before teachers who shook their collective heads. We've all been THERE on Professional Development Days, no? At least Jackson, stopped her presentation and said, "OK, let's talk." And talk they did (much to our entertainment and edification). This would be a good book for all teachers, not just English teachers, because it goes to the very soul of why we teach and what we intend to accomplish. Sometimes the obvious is fuzzy (damn it).

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kelsey

    This is my favorite teacher book I’ve read so far. It helped me completely plan my next unit in a much more strategic way for students. I wish I could have read this earlier on, but I’ve taught for 10 and a half years now and this is still a great help!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Claudia

    I was drawn to the title, because I often say I shouldn't be the one working hard in class, 'cause I've already learned this...the hard work of learning is STUDENTS' jobs. That said, Jackson goes much deeper...she distills master teachers practices down to 7 principles...I like that idea, since we can organize everything we do around those principles and values: Start where your students are; know where they're going; expect to get your students there; support students; use effective I was drawn to the title, because I often say I shouldn't be the one working hard in class, 'cause I've already learned this...the hard work of learning is STUDENTS' jobs. That said, Jackson goes much deeper...she distills master teachers practices down to 7 principles...I like that idea, since we can organize everything we do around those principles and values: Start where your students are; know where they're going; expect to get your students there; support students; use effective feedback; focus on quality, not quantity; and never work harder than your students. Along the way she tells stories to illustrate her points, she backs it up with research, and she makes it all feel very practical. The resources, starting with the 'quiz' and ending with reflection guides, problem solving tools, tips for book study, make the book even more valuable for teachers. Lots to think about here...this will be one I return to.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Relyn

    for at school book club 5/20/11 Confession time, I didn't finish this book. The end of the school year craziness just got too crazy. We're going to do the book club again early next year. I plan to finish this then. 7/21/13 I am catching up and cleaning up my Goodreads. That means adding dates to forgotten books. Somehow I never got back to this one. As I recall, she had great thought and ideas, but wasn't a very engaging writer. That happens a lot with teacher books, but I for at school book club 5/20/11 Confession time, I didn't finish this book. The end of the school year craziness just got too crazy. We're going to do the book club again early next year. I plan to finish this then. 7/21/13 I am catching up and cleaning up my Goodreads. That means adding dates to forgotten books. Somehow I never got back to this one. As I recall, she had great thought and ideas, but wasn't a very engaging writer. That happens a lot with teacher books, but I don't seem to be willing to push through most of the less engaging ones.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    Lots of great ideas about how to think smarter about teaching, and it even includes some concrete ideas for implementing these principles. Since I'm a new teacher who's just glad to have survived her first year, the book was overwhelming because there is SO much I need to improve on. After another year or two, I'll be able to think about this book a little more systematically.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kaleigh Gibbons

    This book was okay. I liked her 7 principles and the way she anticipated objections ("Yes, but...") within the chapters. There are definitely things I will take away from this book! However, the title is a bit of a misnomer. You'll most definitely be working harder than your students, but it will all be upfront. It's really "Never Work Harder Than Your Students During Classtime".

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    Nice layout to assess where you're at as an instructor, what's basic teaching and concrete examples of how to improve your teaching. Focus on engagement, student driven activities and feedback.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Joel

    I wish I'd skipped the Marzano book and read this one first. Logical, bite-sized steps to improve how I do what I do, and good tools to get it done.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    This was a well written book that kept the reader engaged with the information provided. The author makes it clear that learning to be a master teacher is a process and takes work and time. It does not happen overnight no matter what pressures that you are under to achieve that status. The seven principles are a great starting point: 1. Start where your students are. 2. Know where your students are going. 3. Expect to get your students to their goal. 4. Support your stu This was a well written book that kept the reader engaged with the information provided. The author makes it clear that learning to be a master teacher is a process and takes work and time. It does not happen overnight no matter what pressures that you are under to achieve that status. The seven principles are a great starting point: 1. Start where your students are. 2. Know where your students are going. 3. Expect to get your students to their goal. 4. Support your students along the way. 5. Use feedback to help you and your students get better.* 6. Focus on quality rather than quantity. 7. Never work harder than your students. The first thing we must learn as educators is to get out of our own way when it comes to teaching students. We do not need to do all the talking or provide all the answers. As an ice breaker rather than asking students to tell each other who they are, where they are from and what their goals are let’s try having them ask each other: 1. What their responsibilities are as a student? 2. What their teacher’s responsibilities are? 3. What is their responsibilities to their classroom community? 4. What is their classroom community’s responsibilities to them? From there we can develop a contract to go also with the course syllabus. This book holds many great suggestions on how to organize a classroom to encourage student learning and engagement. Although written for the K-12 classroom it could also be used at the college level. I believe what one of my educational teachers taught me when I was getting my bachelor's degree. We all have tool boxes that we use to help our students master the learning objectives. The more tools we have in the tool box the better prepared we are to help students to achieve their educational goals. Just remember that no matter how cool a tool is their will be only so many students that tool works on so the more tools we have the better chance we have at helping all our students to achieve their goals.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Krista Mae

    I found this book to be eye-opening and incredible. I have read many reviews that give the book (and author) a hard time saying that the title is misleading, but if you make it through the whole book you'll see what she's talking about! I think there's an important distinction to be made here - the title, and one of her 7 principles, is not "Never work MORE than your students," it's "Never work HARDER than your students." As she mentions in the book, it is very easy as an educator to I found this book to be eye-opening and incredible. I have read many reviews that give the book (and author) a hard time saying that the title is misleading, but if you make it through the whole book you'll see what she's talking about! I think there's an important distinction to be made here - the title, and one of her 7 principles, is not "Never work MORE than your students," it's "Never work HARDER than your students." As she mentions in the book, it is very easy as an educator to jump into books and professional development hoping for the next big kick or next big thing that will suddenly ignite the master teacher within you and make teaching a breeze; that is, unfortunately, not how it works!! Teaching is hard work! But if we learn to work smarter, not necessarily harder, we can be the master teachers we want to be and that our students want us to be. Jackson's principals of great teaching are a need-to-know for all educators, and I can't wait to put some of her suggestions into practice in my own classroom!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kristi

    The title is a bit misleading as the book is about 7 principles that will lead any teacher to become a master teacher. The beginning of the book starts with the mindset of a master teacher and a quiz to find out where you are in the process of becoming a master teacher. I just finished my 7th year teaching and scored as a novice. At first I didn’t care much for this book because it was about the hard work I needed to do to become a master teacher and couldn’t see how that applied to the title of The title is a bit misleading as the book is about 7 principles that will lead any teacher to become a master teacher. The beginning of the book starts with the mindset of a master teacher and a quiz to find out where you are in the process of becoming a master teacher. I just finished my 7th year teaching and scored as a novice. At first I didn’t care much for this book because it was about the hard work I needed to do to become a master teacher and couldn’t see how that applied to the title of the book. Once I arrived at Principle 4 I finally opened to the value of what the author was teaching and found that I was excited to begin making changes in my teaching practice. I’m starting the new school year working on Principle 2 and have already listed new approaches I will take this year in my classrooom. I highly recommend this book for new and experienced teachers alike.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kristin Eoff

    This book has a compelling title and a lot of good ideas and concepts, but the premise is somewhat contradictory. The author says to not work harder than your students but then gives some unrealistic suggestions, such as making differentiated assignments, tutoring on Saturdays, contacting parents with lots of notices about their children, forcing students to retake assessments, and enforcing a host of interventions. I think if you are doing all of that consistently, you are a master teacher and This book has a compelling title and a lot of good ideas and concepts, but the premise is somewhat contradictory. The author says to not work harder than your students but then gives some unrealistic suggestions, such as making differentiated assignments, tutoring on Saturdays, contacting parents with lots of notices about their children, forcing students to retake assessments, and enforcing a host of interventions. I think if you are doing all of that consistently, you are a master teacher and have more time and energy than I have. However, Jackson does stress that progress is incremental and one shouldn't be discouraged by mistakes and setbacks, so any small steps to improve one's teaching are a good idea.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Koslowski

    This was my third attempt at trying to read this book cover to cover and it just doesn't feel like the right way to do it. If I could do it over again, I would have taken the quiz at the beginning, then read the tools at the end, and then gone over the chapters. Going from the start makes the process feel very daunting and deflating as if to say "that's a lot of stuff I have to do to not work harder than my students." Take the quiz and go to the chapters on which you need help. Treat it like ref This was my third attempt at trying to read this book cover to cover and it just doesn't feel like the right way to do it. If I could do it over again, I would have taken the quiz at the beginning, then read the tools at the end, and then gone over the chapters. Going from the start makes the process feel very daunting and deflating as if to say "that's a lot of stuff I have to do to not work harder than my students." Take the quiz and go to the chapters on which you need help. Treat it like reference and not so much as a ln instruction manual.

  16. 4 out of 5

    P Bright

    Many chapters in this book felt labored and confusing. Sometimes the author's voice was simply too smug and the teachers she worked with were sometimes portrayed as simpletons. However, a few chapters were quite good. The one about evaluations I found particularly good. A colleague emerged from her recent evaluation post-interview crying. I wish she could have had someone go through this chapter with her before the observation because I know last year was also a very negative experience. She is Many chapters in this book felt labored and confusing. Sometimes the author's voice was simply too smug and the teachers she worked with were sometimes portrayed as simpletons. However, a few chapters were quite good. The one about evaluations I found particularly good. A colleague emerged from her recent evaluation post-interview crying. I wish she could have had someone go through this chapter with her before the observation because I know last year was also a very negative experience. She is now leaving the profession. :(

  17. 4 out of 5

    Maria

    Interesting book. First three chapters were too boring because of the repetation and some useless incidents, but starting from the 4th the writer started having new twist in dealing with teachers' role towards their students learning. There are some of the helpful guided plans to establish effective learning process in a healthy environment.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Nikki

    I read this as part of a group read for my school. It was fine; she had a few nice ideas, but she didn't really go into too much detail. At times I felt like she was "talking down" to her reader and her style was lacking. I'll take away a couple of ideas from this book, but I don't think I'll be using much from her.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Lynnie

    Honestly didn’t find it moving. 2.5 stars

  20. 4 out of 5

    Christy

    Overall a good book. Although one chapter really fired me up and my spouse had to hear about it. Chapter five was maybe my favorite.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

    Very clear principles, applicable; looking forward to trying some of these ideas out. Some have already worked for me.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Penny Clawson

    great piece

  23. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Meunier

    This book was worth reading. It was larger in scope but less specific than some other teaching books I have read (Fundamental Five or Teach Like a Champion for example) but all of the seven "Principles" are valuable. I think most teachers who have been on the job for awhile will probably find that they already apply many of the principles to some extent but most will find at least one principle that bears closer reading. For me the most interesting principles were #1 (Start Where Your Students A This book was worth reading. It was larger in scope but less specific than some other teaching books I have read (Fundamental Five or Teach Like a Champion for example) but all of the seven "Principles" are valuable. I think most teachers who have been on the job for awhile will probably find that they already apply many of the principles to some extent but most will find at least one principle that bears closer reading. For me the most interesting principles were #1 (Start Where Your Students Are) and #3 (Expect Your Students To Get There). The former deals in part with recognizing the different "currencies" at play in the classroom. Is a student not engaging in a lesson because they don't have the the correct currency (ability to navigate the classroom environment, work with others, ask questions, etc.)? Or maybe they have the correct currency but don't value the "capital" of the classroom (learning)? It gave me a new way to think about common classroom interactions. I'd recommend Principle #3(Expect Your Students To Get There) for "veteran" teachers. I thought it would be another discussion of goal-setting, etc. but instead the chapter touched on such diverse topics as faith, values, belief and even torture (the Stockdale Paradox is discussed and parallels drawn to teaching!). I liked this chapter the most because it validated the real doubt and hopelessness most teachers feel occasionally and gave me some ideas for adjusting my attitude so that I can get through to more students.

  24. 5 out of 5

    L.n. Hill

    I felt a kinship with the writer of this text. Almost like she has been spying on ME for the last few years and decided to use my glaring teaching mistakes for this text!!! Periodically I would say (out loud) this is ME! I did that TOO!!! What a wake up call. Written in a no nonsense style, this author offers practical and insightful advice. I would recommend this book to any teacher interested in perfecting your craft for the sake of your students and for your own sanity. I will be re-reading t I felt a kinship with the writer of this text. Almost like she has been spying on ME for the last few years and decided to use my glaring teaching mistakes for this text!!! Periodically I would say (out loud) this is ME! I did that TOO!!! What a wake up call. Written in a no nonsense style, this author offers practical and insightful advice. I would recommend this book to any teacher interested in perfecting your craft for the sake of your students and for your own sanity. I will be re-reading this book as I encounter some of the pitfalls of the past in an effort to improve in the areas that I am deficient in. Worth every cent!

  25. 4 out of 5

    David

    Just an excellent read for any teacher. I do not think that you will get new information or learn some amazing techniques for your classroom instruction but you will receive validation for what you think you are doing right. I really appreciate the easy style with which she writes. I read this book as part of a book study two years ago. I have just ordered two more of her books for my department's pedagogy bookshelf. I must admit that I was really harsh to my self in the rating system sheet she Just an excellent read for any teacher. I do not think that you will get new information or learn some amazing techniques for your classroom instruction but you will receive validation for what you think you are doing right. I really appreciate the easy style with which she writes. I read this book as part of a book study two years ago. I have just ordered two more of her books for my department's pedagogy bookshelf. I must admit that I was really harsh to my self in the rating system sheet she has included in the book. There is no more harsher critic than yourself. Simply wonderful and I hope to appreciate two volumes of her work as much as I enjoyed this one.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Allison

    I think many people pick this book up expecting concrete, step-by-step process explanations. And it doesn't have any. This is a book based in teaching theory--it's abstract and intangible. And completely life changing. After reading this, I've already started to adjust how I think about my job and my students. I feel excited and more energized than I have in years. I would seriously suggest this to anyone who needs a pep talk (or just a reminder) about what it means to teach.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

    I found this book to be very inspiring - one that feels like it can truly impact my teaching. I was excited to read it - I actually couldn't put it down - because the principles just make sense, while at the same time challenge what I believe about teaching. It's definitely a book every teacher should read, though I feel like it may be more useful if you have at least a couple years of experience under your belt.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Caroline Hooper

    I read this book in a teacher book group. The book is a great read if you are a teacher, and I highly recommend reading it with others. Usually, teacher books are full of tricks and gimmicks, but this book approaches the art and science of teaching from a more philosophical perspective in the sense of principles that are the foundation of effective teaching. If you are a teacher you should read this book.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Tagcaver

    The book goes over the seven principles of master teaching, and presents these in a logical manner. I did think the book was vague in many places, not giving enough concrete examples. I am going to put in lots of hard work to fill in where the lack of examples left gaps. There is some good stuff in the book, but I just didn't like the way it was written.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Paula Lyle

    I care a lot about my job and my students. I also work really hard. This book took those things as a given and gave suggestions, practices, and ideas that will, hopefully, help me to change the things that I do rather than increase the things that I do. It really did make me think about some things differently and look forward to the next school year.

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