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Jesus Among Other Gods: The Absolute Claims of the Christian Message

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In his most important work to date, apologetics scholar and popular speaker Ravi Zacharias shows how the blueprint for life and death itself is found in a true understanding of Jesus. With a simple yet penetrating style, Zacharias uses rich illustrations to celebrate the power of Jesus Christ to transform lives. Jesus Among Other Gods contrasts the truth of Jesus with founders In his most important work to date, apologetics scholar and popular speaker Ravi Zacharias shows how the blueprint for life and death itself is found in a true understanding of Jesus. With a simple yet penetrating style, Zacharias uses rich illustrations to celebrate the power of Jesus Christ to transform lives. Jesus Among Other Gods contrasts the truth of Jesus with founders of Islam, Hinduism, and Buddhism, strengthening believers and compelling them to share their faith with our post-modern world.


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In his most important work to date, apologetics scholar and popular speaker Ravi Zacharias shows how the blueprint for life and death itself is found in a true understanding of Jesus. With a simple yet penetrating style, Zacharias uses rich illustrations to celebrate the power of Jesus Christ to transform lives. Jesus Among Other Gods contrasts the truth of Jesus with founders In his most important work to date, apologetics scholar and popular speaker Ravi Zacharias shows how the blueprint for life and death itself is found in a true understanding of Jesus. With a simple yet penetrating style, Zacharias uses rich illustrations to celebrate the power of Jesus Christ to transform lives. Jesus Among Other Gods contrasts the truth of Jesus with founders of Islam, Hinduism, and Buddhism, strengthening believers and compelling them to share their faith with our post-modern world.

30 review for Jesus Among Other Gods: The Absolute Claims of the Christian Message

  1. 4 out of 5

    c.c. ladia

    Beautifully said: Napoleon expressed these thoughts while he was exiled on the rock of St. Helena. There, the conqueror of civilized Europe had time to reflect on the measure of his accomplishments. He called Count Montholon to his side and asked him, "Can you tell me who Jesus Christ was?" The count declined to respond. Napoleon countered: Well then, I will tell you. Alexander, Caesar, Charlemagne and I myself have founded great empires; but upon what did these creations of our Beautifully said: Napoleon expressed these thoughts while he was exiled on the rock of St. Helena. There, the conqueror of civilized Europe had time to reflect on the measure of his accomplishments. He called Count Montholon to his side and asked him, "Can you tell me who Jesus Christ was?" The count declined to respond. Napoleon countered: Well then, I will tell you. Alexander, Caesar, Charlemagne and I myself have founded great empires; but upon what did these creations of our genius depend? Upon force. Jesus alone founded His empire upon love, and to this very day millions will die for Him.... I think I understand something of human nature; and I tell you, all these were men, and I am a man: none else is like Him; Jesus Christ was more than man. . . . I have inspired multitudes with such an enthusiastic devotion that they would have died for me ... but to do this it was necessary that I should be visibly present with the electric influence of my looks, my words, of my voice. When I saw men and spoke to them, I lighted up the flame of self-devotion in their hearts.... Christ alone has succeeded in so raising the mind of man toward the unseen, that it becomes insensible to the barriers of time and space. Across a chasm of eighteen hundred years, Jesus Christ makes a demand which is beyond all others difficult to satisfy; He asks for that which a philosopher may often seek in vain at the hands of his friends, or a father of his children, or a bride of her spouse, or a man of his brother. He asks for the human heart; He will have it entirely to Himself He demands it unconditionally; and forthwith His demand is granted. Wonderful! In defiance of time and space, the soul of man, with all its powers and faculties, becomes an annexation to the empire of Christ. All who sincerely believe in Him, experience that remarkable, supernatural love toward Him. This phenomenon is unaccountable; it is altogether beyond the scope of man's creative powers. Time, the great destroyer, is powerless to extinguish this sacred flame; time can neither exhaust its strength nor put a limit to its range. This is it, which strikes me most; I have often thought of it. This it is which proves to me quite convincingly the Divinity of Jesus Christ. - Ravi Zacharias page 99

  2. 5 out of 5

    Alexis Neal

    This is a difficult book to summarize. Well-known Christian apologist Ravi Zacharias ostensibly wrote this book to distinguish the claims of Christianity from those of other major world religions. At least, that's what you would expect based on the title. But the title isn't really accurate. Other religions are mentioned, albeit in passing, but Zacharias' treatment of other religions is cursory and selective at best, and his normally incisive reasoning seems muddy. I've enjoyed hearing Zacharias This is a difficult book to summarize. Well-known Christian apologist Ravi Zacharias ostensibly wrote this book to distinguish the claims of Christianity from those of other major world religions. At least, that's what you would expect based on the title. But the title isn't really accurate. Other religions are mentioned, albeit in passing, but Zacharias' treatment of other religions is cursory and selective at best, and his normally incisive reasoning seems muddy. I've enjoyed hearing Zacharias speak, and have great respect for his intellect and his logical abilities. Unfortunately, for whatever reason, those abilities do not seem to be on display here. Zacharias seems to flit about up in the air without ever landing on any solid conclusions, and the conclusions he does reach don't seem to follow logically from the statements and arguments and observations that precede them--even the statements I agree with seem to hang out there unsupported. Indeed, if I didn't already agree with him, I doubt I would be persuaded. I often found myself suspecting that he had perfectly sound reasons for particular conclusions, but that he wasn't, well, 'showing his work' for lack of a better phrase. Maybe I'm not clever enough to follow his argument, but I suspect I am not the only one, and I think the book could have been much better if he'd spelled things out more clearly. I suppose this could be the result of differences between Eastern and Western thought processes and argument styles--I do find C.S. Lewis' down-to-earth clarity much more persuasive than Zacharias' untethered mental wandering--but the book seems to be written explicitly for Western readers, and I've never had any trouble following his reasoning in radio talks and lectures. Ultimately, I have no idea what this book is about--other than 'Christianity'--or what point Zacharias is ultimately trying to make. This is my first exposure to him as a writer (as opposed to a speaker), so I remain hopeful that this lackluster work is an aberration.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kris

    He talks about so many different things, that his thoughts can feel scattered. But he’s a smart man with valuable things to say, so it’s still worth reading. I think I enjoy listening to Zacharias’s speeches, more than I enjoy reading him. Just don’t go into this expecting a thorough treatment of one idea, or some sort of cohesive doctrine. When in the mood for more RZ, someday I want to pickup Can Man Live Without God. Quotes: “The purpose of this book is to lay out fo He talks about so many different things, that his thoughts can feel scattered. But he’s a smart man with valuable things to say, so it’s still worth reading. I think I enjoy listening to Zacharias’s speeches, more than I enjoy reading him. Just don’t go into this expecting a thorough treatment of one idea, or some sort of cohesive doctrine. When in the mood for more RZ, someday I want to pickup Can Man Live Without God. Quotes: “The purpose of this book is to lay out for you, the reader, why I firmly believe Jesus Christ to be who he claimed to be — the Son of the living God, the One who came to seek and to save a lost humanity. At a time in our cultural history when the West is looking more like the East and the East is covertly trying to emulate the West, this is much needed. Religions are making a revival, but often as a hybrid of western marketing technology and eastern technology — a devastating combination of seduction through media and mysticism. The first casualty in such a mix is truth, and, consequently, the person of God.” “Jesus reversed the process. He told us that he only way we could understand who we are is to cast our gaze not on the equation that binds it all together, but on the relationship toward which we move in the sum total of our being. It is the assemblage of an object that gives it its purpose, not the reduction of it.”

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jacob O'connor

    I've been a fan of Ravi Zacharias for years. He might be the most eloquent speaker I've ever heard. I didn't enjoy this book. The problem was, it reads exactly like Zacharias speaks. The very things that make him a compelling speaker make him a frustrating author. Every chapter I became impatient for him to make his point. His arguments get lost in his stories and anecdotes such that its hard to say exactly why he commends Jesus over against the other gods. I feel he's relying on the "ring of tr I've been a fan of Ravi Zacharias for years. He might be the most eloquent speaker I've ever heard. I didn't enjoy this book. The problem was, it reads exactly like Zacharias speaks. The very things that make him a compelling speaker make him a frustrating author. Every chapter I became impatient for him to make his point. His arguments get lost in his stories and anecdotes such that its hard to say exactly why he commends Jesus over against the other gods. I feel he's relying on the "ring of truth" in the Gospel. That's okay. I just wish he'd put a little finer edge. This book would be better read as a devotional than as an apologetic for comparative religion

  5. 4 out of 5

    Tylor Lovins

    Jesus Among Other Gods is a book about an author's intellectual journey to get the last word in every conversation. Philosophically, this book is a joke. If you want to read a conversation between a philosopher from the Dark Ages who encounters religions from other countries, then read this book. I won't ever spend this much time on a Zacharias book again.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ellen Maze

    5-Stars Ravi has such a way or conveying his ideas to you and this helps in a theology book. I agreed with his points, but more than that, he makes this book easy and even fun to read with his insight and poignant stories. I could read this over and over.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Rebekah Choat

    We live in a time in which tolerance is counted the highest virtue: one is free to believe and practice any philosophy or religion he chooses, so long as he does not claim that it is right or true or better than any other. Popular sentiment would have us accept all belief systems as equally valid. The problem, of course, is that this premise cannot be upheld logically. If the tenets of one religion stand in direct opposition to the tenets of another, as they so often do, they obviously are not e We live in a time in which tolerance is counted the highest virtue: one is free to believe and practice any philosophy or religion he chooses, so long as he does not claim that it is right or true or better than any other. Popular sentiment would have us accept all belief systems as equally valid. The problem, of course, is that this premise cannot be upheld logically. If the tenets of one religion stand in direct opposition to the tenets of another, as they so often do, they obviously are not equally correct. World-renowned apologist and author Ravi Zacharias examines this problem and addresses the question, "How does one communicate the message of Jesus Christ, in which truth and absoluteness are not only assumed, but also sustained?" Moreover, he does so with honor and respect toward all people, even while clearly contrasting the power of Jesus' words with the claims of other traditions. Zacharias does a masterful job of expounding upon Christ's answers to man's basic questions, showing how they supersede the explanations offered by other faiths. A vital facet of this work is a depth of understanding of just what those other faiths do, in fact, teach. I took away from the book a challenge to become better informed as well as a commission to speak the absolute truth of Jesus in clear expression of His love.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Brent McCulley

    A fantastic and refreshing read, that was as delightful as it was informative, Jesus Among Other Gods by Ravi Zacharias is a boldly apologetic work that is an excellent resource for the seeker and the Christian alike. With that being said, the cover and title is a bit misleading; for instance, one might expect to find a compare and contrast between world religions, or a systematic study of Jesus in light of other gods, etc. The reality is actually not so, as Ravi states, however, unequivo A fantastic and refreshing read, that was as delightful as it was informative, Jesus Among Other Gods by Ravi Zacharias is a boldly apologetic work that is an excellent resource for the seeker and the Christian alike. With that being said, the cover and title is a bit misleading; for instance, one might expect to find a compare and contrast between world religions, or a systematic study of Jesus in light of other gods, etc. The reality is actually not so, as Ravi states, however, unequivocally his intent with the book in the preface, the misleading title and cover notwithstanding. The book itself is totally apologetic, and is not systematic, or theological at all. This makes for Ravi's voice to truly shine. If anyone has ever heard Ravi speak, either in person or online, they know his style of oratory and delivery, and the tone of this book is written in true Zacharias diction. Included in his famous rhetoric are numerous references to delightful philosophers, theologians, and authors, such as Dostoevsky, Plantiga, Flew, Wesley, Hume, and more. Ravi is extremely well-read, and his intellect truly shines through his numerous pointed references, to capture the reader's emotion at just the right time. The book itself is styled into seven different sections, the first one being Ravi's testimony. The latter three dealing with the problem of pain and suffering. Ravi deals with Jesus Christ, and the questions that revolve around Him; namely, who is He; where is He from; and more. Although the book certainly seemed a bit scattered and could have been more cohesive in theme, Ravi does a good job at threading his numerous thoughts together with a friendly pathos tone. In short, this was a great book that I would certainly recommend to seekers and Christians, who want to get a feel for who Jesus is in light of our culture today. Brent McCulley

  9. 4 out of 5

    Robin Patchen

    Have you ever heard it said that all religions are the same? Ravi Zacharias takes on that lie on and disproves it in this amazing book. Raised in India among Hindus, Zacharias has a unique perspective on the "other gods," which he pits against Jesus, the only Savior. You might not walk away from this book a Christian (though it's likely you might), but you'll definitely walk away knowing Jesus is unique among all the "other gods."

  10. 4 out of 5

    Lollita

    Seemed like alot of rambling and very little to no insightful compare and contrast to other religions

  11. 5 out of 5

    Tim Baumgartner

    The subtitle of "Jesus Among Other Gods" is "The Absolute Truth of the Christian Message." I have read the "regular" version (as opposed to this youth edition) and this was MUCH simpler to read. Maybe this is because I read this youth edition AFTER seminary and the regular one BEFORE. Hmmmm. Anyways, Ravi's approach to discerning absolute truth is to address the often-told rumor that all religions are basically saying the same thing. In each of the 7 chapters of this book, the author compares th The subtitle of "Jesus Among Other Gods" is "The Absolute Truth of the Christian Message." I have read the "regular" version (as opposed to this youth edition) and this was MUCH simpler to read. Maybe this is because I read this youth edition AFTER seminary and the regular one BEFORE. Hmmmm. Anyways, Ravi's approach to discerning absolute truth is to address the often-told rumor that all religions are basically saying the same thing. In each of the 7 chapters of this book, the author compares the founders, scriptures, teachings, history, etc. of the Top 4 most populous religions of our world (Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, and Buddhism). Zacharias writes with a savvy style that is both respectful and yet truthful. If you would like a great introductory book on the comparison of religions, look no further than this one! There are some truly extraordinary nuggets of truth throughout the book that can be used in instigating dialogue with those representing the religions previously mentioned.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Nick Kinsella

    I hate this word, but it's perfect for how I felt about this book: "Meh" Zacharias promises lofty theses he never delivers on in this book. I expected a comprehensive book that would take the time to examine the major religions point by point compared to Christianity, as Zacharias says he'll do in the first chapter. He never delivers. Instead, he seems to go off track a lot, and his arguments are pretty weak and appeal to emotion rather than logic. Zacharias is better than this. He al I hate this word, but it's perfect for how I felt about this book: "Meh" Zacharias promises lofty theses he never delivers on in this book. I expected a comprehensive book that would take the time to examine the major religions point by point compared to Christianity, as Zacharias says he'll do in the first chapter. He never delivers. Instead, he seems to go off track a lot, and his arguments are pretty weak and appeal to emotion rather than logic. Zacharias is better than this. He also has a lot of purple prose throughout the book. Zacharias is an excellent public speaker, but he seems to like to use flowery prose and bizarre word choice in his writing. He does shine when expressing the uniqueness of Christ's claims, and for that I gave the book 3 stars. I would have liked him to go much more in-depth with the details of each major religion. I think the book is a good starting point, and Zacharias quotes many authors and theologians that I'll now seek out.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Joshua

    If you're a believer, this will probably strengthen your belief. If you'd like to believe, this will probably cement your belief. If you don't believe, this probably won't move you to belief. Zacharias creates a world made of generalizations and East/West dualism and then shuts his eyes tight and runs around stepping on straw people. He's sincere, that's obvious, but he's too excited about his purpose and ends up writing a tiring and sporadic book. I've never really understood the pur If you're a believer, this will probably strengthen your belief. If you'd like to believe, this will probably cement your belief. If you don't believe, this probably won't move you to belief. Zacharias creates a world made of generalizations and East/West dualism and then shuts his eyes tight and runs around stepping on straw people. He's sincere, that's obvious, but he's too excited about his purpose and ends up writing a tiring and sporadic book. I've never really understood the purpose of apologetics and the idea that a religion needs to be defended by a cadre of debaters seems repugnant and cheapens the appeal of any belief system...but that's just my own view. Much of the book reminds me of student essays I've read where a student writes, "Studies show..." and then just creates a world which fits his or her intention.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Neil R. Coulter

    Jesus Among Other Gods proposes an intriguing concept. Each chapter of the book focuses on one question that Jesus was asked, examining how the answer Jesus gave distinguishes him (and Christianity) from other religious leaders and religions. In leading a Bible study group through John’s gospel over the past year, I’ve been fascinated by the many times that people came to Jesus with the intent of putting him on “trial” in some manner, but Jesus quickly and incisively turns the tables so that the Jesus Among Other Gods proposes an intriguing concept. Each chapter of the book focuses on one question that Jesus was asked, examining how the answer Jesus gave distinguishes him (and Christianity) from other religious leaders and religions. In leading a Bible study group through John’s gospel over the past year, I’ve been fascinated by the many times that people came to Jesus with the intent of putting him on “trial” in some manner, but Jesus quickly and incisively turns the tables so that the questioners become the questioned—and the way the questioners respond makes all the difference to how they leave the conversation. Jesus’s answers confounded and surprised even some of the Jewish leaders of the time, who ought to have known the “right” questions to ask; and contemplating his answers is still a deeply satisfying and interesting endeavor today. So I like this idea of looking at Jesus through the questions put to him, and then using that to compare and contrast with other major religions of the world. There’s great promise. Unfortunately, the way Ravi Zacharias has written this book is frustrating. The chapters ramble, the prose is frequently hyperbolic (telling us how brilliant this or that genius was or how magnificent such-and-such a book or argument is, rather than simply presenting the facts and trusting the reader to put it all together correctly; this over-the-top style gives his writing a sense of desperation), the writing style is cluttered and unnecessarily complicated. Big-picture critiques: Given that this book intends to present one question from the gospels in each chapter, it’s strange how difficult it can be to figure out just what the question is for each chapter; in some chapters, I can only guess what main theme Zacharias was starting from. Also, Zacharias assumes a pretty solid knowledge of the Bible, because he quickly references sections from the gospels and elsewhere, but without giving the full text or explaining in much detail. Someone who wasn’t very familiar with the Bible would likely be lost in a lot of sections of this book, which seems to miss an important goal. The other flaw with the book, related to its stated purpose, is that there is very little direct comparison/contrast between Jesus and other religious figures and religions. I didn’t feel that Zacharias demonstrated a sufficiently comprehensive understanding of the other major religions to be able to analyze them in a comparative way. Sometimes he seems to stray from the “Among Other Gods” mandate altogether, critiquing humanism, naturalism, and atheism rather than major religions. There are some good moments in the book, but overall the project doesn’t come together for me. The concept is good, and I’m sure another author could build it into an excellent book. I do very much believe that there are things that set Jesus apart from anyone else in history, but that is a discussion that probably needs more than a quick, 188-page overview. If you know of a similar book that is really good, let me know in the comments—thanks!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Joon Ho

    As a Buddhist, I was intrigued to read a book that claims to compare Christianity with Buddhism, Hinduism and Islam. The book, from the outset, is an apologia and makes no apologies for it. Even so it’s disappointing in several ways. My overall impression is that Mr Zacharias talks a lot without saying very much at all. There are liberal uses of hyperboles which impresses upon the reader on the futility of non-Christian arguments. There are anecdotes of the writer’s encounters with pe As a Buddhist, I was intrigued to read a book that claims to compare Christianity with Buddhism, Hinduism and Islam. The book, from the outset, is an apologia and makes no apologies for it. Even so it’s disappointing in several ways. My overall impression is that Mr Zacharias talks a lot without saying very much at all. There are liberal uses of hyperboles which impresses upon the reader on the futility of non-Christian arguments. There are anecdotes of the writer’s encounters with people of other faiths and skeptics; of course these encounters end favourably for the writer. However the writer’s claims themselves can be easily rebutted or countered; of course you won’t read contrary opinions in an apologia. I’ll try to cover the overall themes of the book. The writer began the book with a personal story of how he found Christ through despair. Fair enough, it his personal experience. In a later anecdote he puzzles at how a desperate pair of parents has turned to a faith healer to treat their cancer-stricken child. I puzzle at how he fail to see parallels between himself and the parents; turning to something and someone in their darkest times. I was disappointed in the writer’s chapter discussing the perennial problem of “evil” in the presence of an all-powerful and loving God. Instead of answering the question, the writer reasons that since “evil” exists, its counterpart “good” must exist. Since “good” exists, a source of “good”, i.e. a God must exist. This reasoning raises some questions. By extending the writers logic, should there not be a supernatural entity as a source of “evil”? If the Devil, or a source of “evil” exists, why is it permitted so by God? The writer does not address these questions. Dichotomizing “good” and “evil” oversimplifies things. For a start one has to define “good” and “evil”. To me evil is volitional; like genocide and torture. Illness, infirmity, loss; these things cause suffering but they can hardly be regarded as evil. Not everything is good or evil, there is a lot in between and there is a lot that are neither. Even excluding a lot of that is not strictly “evil”, the writer still does not address why evil exists. In this respect, I feel the Buddhist thought on suffering and unsatisfactoriness, “dukkha” to be more sophisticated and all encompassing. One of the writers claims is that Jesus was unique in claiming to be the way to salvation. Since his claim is unique his claim must then be true. Uniqueness is not sufficient grounds for truth. Say I were to create a religion where God is a Flying Spaghetti Monster living in a Teapot orbiting the Sun between Earth and Mercury, who sends prophets in the form on Invisible Pink Unicorns; my claims will be very unique but that does not make it true! And if, as the writer implies, that uniqueness equals truth, then Buddhism has a greater claim to the truth since it’s an atheistic religion! For a book with images of the Buddha and Hindu deities on the cover, it touches only very briefly on comparative religious studies. I know little of Hinduism, but I’m not sure if Deepak Chopra is the most appropriate Hindu source to quote. Back to the question of evil or more appropriate suffering; the writer states that the Buddhist view is that suffering arises from “kamma” or actions that generates outcomes, triggers further karma and enters a self-perpetuating cycle. The writer then asks; if every action arises from a previous action, then what was the first action which started the whole thing? Surely this would be an “infinite regress”, or as the writer quotes another apologist, trying to jump out of an infinitely deep hole? Fair question but I feel the writer misunderstands the Buddhist view on the origin of “dukkha”. “Dukkha” arises due to dependent origination; the chief prerequisite of ignorance (avijja) on the ultimate reality; this leads to the entire morass of existence and dukkha. Ignorant of the ultimate reality we cling and crave the impermenant (anicca) Kamma, wholesome or unwholesome, then affects outcomes that we receive for example our rebirth. Funny the writer should bring up “infinite regress”; this is equally applicable to the age-old question of creation. If everything, as a theist maintains, needs to be created by a Creator then who created the Creators Creator, and the Creators Creators Creator ad infinitum? Other little bits for me to pick on; the writer describes the Hindu festival of Thaipusam (where devotees pierce their skins with hooks) as a “strange belief”. One can say the same about some traditions in Christianity for example reenactments of the Crucifixion or veneration of saintly relics. The writer quotes an example of Christmas in the trenches of the WWI, were British and German soldiers laid arms the night and sang carols and marvels that “..even the thought of God's presence could stop the killing on that night” but fails to consider how the thought of God’s presence did not prevent the war at the first place, or countless other wars before, or some wars fought in Gods name. Overall it’s more apologia than academia. The target audience I suspect are those who want to dip their toes in other religions, but feel to safe doing so to have their faith affirmed. It does not satisfy the slightly more critical and inquisitive reader, Christian or not.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sharon sumanti

    "He is not dead, He is ALIVE in the best sense of term. The celebration has b e g u n....." when Jesus speaks and says, " I am The Truth and The LIfe," He claims what no other did. when He says, " My sheep listen to My voice,I know them and they follow Me. I give them ternal life, and they shall never perish, no one can snatch them out of My hand," He speaks as no other does. Jesus did not only teach or expound His message, He was identical with His m "He is not dead, He is ALIVE in the best sense of term. The celebration has b e g u n....." when Jesus speaks and says, " I am The Truth and The LIfe," He claims what no other did. when He says, " My sheep listen to My voice,I know them and they follow Me. I give them ternal life, and they shall never perish, no one can snatch them out of My hand," He speaks as no other does. Jesus did not only teach or expound His message, He was identical with His message He did not just proclaim the truth. He said , " I Am The Truth " He did not just show a way. He said, " I Am The Way " He did not just open up vistas. He said , " I Am the door " I Am the Good Shepherd I Am The Ressurection and The Life. I Am The I AM.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Yari

    I have a lot of respect for Ravi Zacharias and his ministry. I've only listened to him speak and was eager to read one of his books. It didn't disappoint. I must point out, however, that the reader needs a bit of patience as Ravi lays out the foundation for his arguments. Context and viewpoints are key. At the book's onset Ravi tells us his purpose: to lay out why he firmly believes as he does- that Jesus Christ is the Son of the living God. It was extremely encouraging and I've learned so I have a lot of respect for Ravi Zacharias and his ministry. I've only listened to him speak and was eager to read one of his books. It didn't disappoint. I must point out, however, that the reader needs a bit of patience as Ravi lays out the foundation for his arguments. Context and viewpoints are key. At the book's onset Ravi tells us his purpose: to lay out why he firmly believes as he does- that Jesus Christ is the Son of the living God. It was extremely encouraging and I've learned so much. Ravi Zachariah, my heartfelt appreciation goes out to you.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy

    First RZ book I've read. I heard him speak at Clemson on March 8, 2012, so I wanted to have read one of his books by then. I think I expected more apologetics (which it did include), but there was also a lot of exposition of what Jesus said. However, the apologetics sections were brilliant.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Shawn Paterson

    Although I probably did not understand much of Ravi's points in this book at the time - this is the book that shattered my atheistic worldview.

  20. 4 out of 5

    John

    Zacharias is one of the most well known of Christian apologists for good reason. With that in mind, I read this hoping it would be a good resource to give to my own children at some point. There may be better ones out there, but this is very good. Zacharias is humble, assertive, and understands what is at stake in apologetic encounters. This book puts all of this on display and presents it for young readers. This book is geared toward teenagers, so it isn't as comprehensive as an adul Zacharias is one of the most well known of Christian apologists for good reason. With that in mind, I read this hoping it would be a good resource to give to my own children at some point. There may be better ones out there, but this is very good. Zacharias is humble, assertive, and understands what is at stake in apologetic encounters. This book puts all of this on display and presents it for young readers. This book is geared toward teenagers, so it isn't as comprehensive as an adult would desire, but it will engage younger readers at their own level while teaching the sufficiency and uniqueness of Christ.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Denis Ispan

    Great book to know some basic but deep ideas about the truth of Jesus in comparison to other gods. I think it's a good choice to give to your friends who doesn't believe in Jesus.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ann

    Ravi Zacharias is one of the most respected of Christian apologists and this book is an example of why. In this book Ravi explains in thought provoking style the key areas of Christianity that stand in stark contrast to three of the other major world religions, Islam, Hinduism, and Buddhism. Having been born and raised in India, he has a unique perspective on all three of these religions that can be found thriving in his home country. In his dealing with the divinity of Jesus, I found myself be Ravi Zacharias is one of the most respected of Christian apologists and this book is an example of why. In this book Ravi explains in thought provoking style the key areas of Christianity that stand in stark contrast to three of the other major world religions, Islam, Hinduism, and Buddhism. Having been born and raised in India, he has a unique perspective on all three of these religions that can be found thriving in his home country. In his dealing with the divinity of Jesus, I found myself being reminded of G.K. Chesterton's book, The Everlasting Man. Indeed, in quoting Chesterton throughout his book, Ravi stands in good company with this great Christian apologist. I particularly loved the section where he deals with he divinity of Jesus and the fact that He chose to show us God from the perspective of our humanity ... taking on Himself a real, physical body. He puts it this way,"... in His incarnation He exalts the body, first by being conceived in the womb of a virgin, then by taking on human form and giving it the glorious expression of God in the flesh. ... Jesus sent us a message loud and clear. WE are His temple. ... The Christian does not go to the temple to worship God.The Christian takes the temple with him or her. Jesus lifts us beyond the building and pays pays the human body the highest compliment by making it His dwelling place. ... the place where He meets with us."

  23. 4 out of 5

    Rod

    My second time reading this masterpiece. I got much more out of it this time around. Ravi is just about my favorite Christian thinker and Doer on this planet. Between Him and John MacArthur pretty much all of my questions have been answered. MacArthur does the Theology and scripture/And Ravi does the world religions and philosophy - It's all there! I'm not sure any non-spirit filled Christian (?) or non-believer could get much out of this book - it's incredibly deep and requires a lov My second time reading this masterpiece. I got much more out of it this time around. Ravi is just about my favorite Christian thinker and Doer on this planet. Between Him and John MacArthur pretty much all of my questions have been answered. MacArthur does the Theology and scripture/And Ravi does the world religions and philosophy - It's all there! I'm not sure any non-spirit filled Christian (?) or non-believer could get much out of this book - it's incredibly deep and requires a love of truth for comprehension. But I boldly dare anyone to try. So what does it mean: Jesus Among Other Gods? As Ravi points out; just look at the difference. Every other claim of deity fails on numerous points. We humans need a personal God who speaks and interacts with us fully. Only Jesus does that (with the help of the Holy Spirit as well). Name me another world religion: and I'll show you a god who isn't there, who hasn't suffered, who doesn't relate or love, who hasn't really impacted our world. That is why JESUS among other gods - proves they are not gods at all. (Satan is here telling lies for a reason).

  24. 4 out of 5

    Geoff

    I had heard a lot about Ravi & watched some great presentations on YouTube so I came to this book with high expectations. I found the content excellent & there are plenty of original insights that come from Ravi's unique & broad experience. The opening chapter was a powerful account of his own spiritual journey. My disappointment came from the lack of clear structure to the book - the progression through the themes didn't have a clear intuitive reason behind them that I co I had heard a lot about Ravi & watched some great presentations on YouTube so I came to this book with high expectations. I found the content excellent & there are plenty of original insights that come from Ravi's unique & broad experience. The opening chapter was a powerful account of his own spiritual journey. My disappointment came from the lack of clear structure to the book - the progression through the themes didn't have a clear intuitive reason behind them that I could detect. Within the chapters I often struggled to perceive the logical flow of the content too. The individual points were valid & often directed my thinking to fuller explanations or arguments provided by other authors (who had more space!) but I was regularly looking for a "secondly" after a "firstly" but never found the next point. Still, for anyone with exposure to multiple religious (& atheistic) viewpoints, I recommend this book as a helpful introduction from one of the worlds most experienced & integrous speakers to the issues around following Jesus.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jardinier

    This is a classic "don't judge the book by the cover" type of read. This was in no way a comparison of different religions, although he does point out various aspects of Hindu and Buddhism. Instead, Ravi Zacharias sets forth his reason and logic for why there is a God, and how that God came to earth and took on the form of Jesus. Similar paths of thought can be found in Timothy Kellers book "Reason for God" as well as most of C.S. Lewis works. The most interesting points of the book I This is a classic "don't judge the book by the cover" type of read. This was in no way a comparison of different religions, although he does point out various aspects of Hindu and Buddhism. Instead, Ravi Zacharias sets forth his reason and logic for why there is a God, and how that God came to earth and took on the form of Jesus. Similar paths of thought can be found in Timothy Kellers book "Reason for God" as well as most of C.S. Lewis works. The most interesting points of the book I found were tied up in his knowledge of other eastern religions. Although my understanding of these religions is extremely small, I will say that the perception of them among the average commoner in America is quite wrong. In the same way, many people have an inaccurate perception of Christianity. This mis-perception is I believe to be what Ravi sets out to explain and evaluate in this book.

  26. 5 out of 5

    R.G. Phelps

    Proof that Jesus Christ is the Son of God Not only did Ravi Zacharias prove that Jesus is the Christ, but that he is the one true God. Read about the importance of Christ's answers at his trial, but indeed how important were his non-answers. I enjoyed the additional sharing by Ravi of his beliefs, all over the world. And, the different ways he found to share these beliefs. If you had the slightest doubts buried away in your self-consciousness this book will open your eyes toward a more comp Proof that Jesus Christ is the Son of God Not only did Ravi Zacharias prove that Jesus is the Christ, but that he is the one true God. Read about the importance of Christ's answers at his trial, but indeed how important were his non-answers. I enjoyed the additional sharing by Ravi of his beliefs, all over the world. And, the different ways he found to share these beliefs. If you had the slightest doubts buried away in your self-consciousness this book will open your eyes toward a more complete understanding. One other thing that I enjoyed so much was his worldview on other religions that are becoming so much more a part of our daily awareness. Keep an open mind and enjoy this reading experience...

  27. 5 out of 5

    Tintinrulz

    "Jesus Among Other Gods: The Absolute Claims of the Christian Message" by Ravi Zacharias is an underwhelming read. Maybe I expected something more from Dr. Zacharias (his talks are generally very good), maybe I was looking for something different, maybe I've just recently read too much on comparative religions to be able to see anything of note. That's not to say there weren't a few good points made, there were. But overall, I found this book to be rather dull and samey. Some of the English was "Jesus Among Other Gods: The Absolute Claims of the Christian Message" by Ravi Zacharias is an underwhelming read. Maybe I expected something more from Dr. Zacharias (his talks are generally very good), maybe I was looking for something different, maybe I've just recently read too much on comparative religions to be able to see anything of note. That's not to say there weren't a few good points made, there were. But overall, I found this book to be rather dull and samey. Some of the English was awkward and incorrect and the old-fashioned poems Dr. Zacharias references throughout, while meaningful to him, didn't speak to me. Some people may be able to enjoy this book, but I can't recommend it. Very average. Instead, I recommend that you watch or listen to his talks on YouTube etc. 6/10

  28. 4 out of 5

    Bevan

    Not what I was expecting, but still very good. My assumption was that this book would be a series of comparisons between these major religions -- but it was more a plea against naturalism and atheism, while using Jesus as a litmus test (and 'proving' that no other religious figure could wear that mantle). It is an effective book, and endeared me to Ravi Zacharias, who uses rationality and logic in spectacular fashion. Would recommend.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Bledar

    When I was a student I visited the home of a missionary and saw Zacharias's book "Can a man live without God?". Because of that, when I read a poster about a lecture with Zacharias, I didn't hesitate to go and listen to him. I have loved him as the author since then. Using the Gospel of John as a background, Zacharias writes in this book an expose of key issues and how Jesus is distinguished from other gods/ faiths. An excellent read.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sandi

    Foremost, the content was not anything like what I expected from the title. Second, there are many profound insights contained within, but by the time the point was made, I forgot the topic at hand. Probably the best nugget I gleaned from this book was the value of silence. Worth the read--a slow, careful read, because you will probably have to re-read half of it.

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